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EUSPA welcomes excited delegates of the SME Assembly 2022

5.12.2022 16:16  
Published: 
06 December 2022

Taking place in Prague, from 28 to 30 November 2022, the 2022 SME Assembly is the most significant event for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in Europe. The conference is held once a year during the European SME Week. Together with the network of SME envoys, the assembly creates the governance structure of the Small Business Act.

This year’s SME Assembly included discussions and workshops about how the EU Space Programme enables companies to improve their operations, level-up and increase their return on investment.

The delegates of the Assembly enjoyed an exciting visit to our EUSPA headquarters where they were welcomed by the Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa. Market Development and Innovation professionals familiarised themselves with the funding opportunities that the agency offers.

"The true impact of space data and services is felt with downstream, and SMEs and start-ups are at the heart of the EU economy. At EUSPA, our role is to provide to non-traditionally space companies the means to innovate by using Galileo/EGNOS, Copernicus and in the future satellite communications’’ says Fiammetta Diani, Head of MDI at EUSPA.

EUSPA’s support of the European SMES’ ecosystem goes beyond funding to include GNSS and Earth Observation market intelligence, mentoring and knowledge sharing through the CASSINI activities for instance and other platforms like the EUSPA Space Academy.

With the promotion of Copernicus on board since 2021, the agency’s efforts also focus on engaging with new commercial and private bodies, research, and education organisations charities. SMEs are central part of this new strategy for Earth Observation which is why over the past EUSPA launched a call for new Copernicus demonstrators for Mobility, Emergency and Infrastructures, among others.

SMEs to clean up the ocean using space!

Of the 300 million tonnes of plastic produced every year, an estimated 26 million eventually ends up in the ocean. As a result, some estimates suggest there are now 5.25 trillion pieces of plastic in our oceans and seas.

The Maritime CASSINI Prize for Digital Space Apps is looking for innovative commercial solutions that leverage the EU Space Programme to detect, monitor and remove plastics, microplastics and other litter from our oceans and waterways. With a total prize purse of EUR 2.85 million, the top three proposals are eligible to win EUR 0.95 million each, which can be used to help further develop and commercialise your solution.  

Because the contest aims to create a new ecosystem of entrepreneurs, applications are only open to SMEs. All proposed solutions must be close-to-market and be able to prove their effectiveness in a real-world demonstration.

The prize is foreseen as part of the Horizon Europe Work Programme.

More information can be found here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

SMEs are central in the development of new and innovative EU Space downstream services. EUSPA makes sure to tap on their potential by providing the necessary tools.

EUSPA welcomes excited delegates of the SME Assembly 2022

5.12.2022 16:16  
Published: 
06 December 2022

Taking place in Prague, from 28 to 30 November 2022, the 2022 SME Assembly is the most significant event for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in Europe. The conference is held once a year during the European SME Week. Together with the network of SME envoys, the assembly creates the governance structure of the Small Business Act.

This year’s SME Assembly included discussions and workshops about how the EU Space Programme enables companies to improve their operations, level-up and increase their return on investment.

The delegates of the Assembly enjoyed an exciting visit to our EUSPA headquarters where they were welcomed by the Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa. Market Development and Innovation professionals familiarised themselves with the funding opportunities that the agency offers.

"The true impact of space data and services is felt with downstream, and SMEs and start-ups are at the heart of the EU economy. At EUSPA, our role is to provide to non-traditionally space companies the means to innovate by using Galileo/EGNOS, Copernicus and in the future satellite communications’’ says Fiammetta Diani, Head of MDI at EUSPA.

EUSPA’s support of the European SMES’ ecosystem goes beyond funding to include GNSS and Earth Observation market intelligence, mentoring and knowledge sharing through the CASSINI activities for instance and other platforms like the EUSPA Space Academy.

With the promotion of Copernicus on board since 2021, the agency’s efforts also focus on engaging with new commercial and private bodies, research, and education organisations charities. SMEs are central part of this new strategy for Earth Observation which is why over the past EUSPA launched a call for new Copernicus demonstrators for Mobility, Emergency and Infrastructures, among others.

SMEs to clean up the ocean using space!

Of the 300 million tonnes of plastic produced every year, an estimated 26 million eventually ends up in the ocean. As a result, some estimates suggest there are now 5.25 trillion pieces of plastic in our oceans and seas.

The Maritime CASSINI Prize for Digital Space Apps is looking for innovative commercial solutions that leverage the EU Space Programme to detect, monitor and remove plastics, microplastics and other litter from our oceans and waterways. With a total prize purse of EUR 2.85 million, the top three proposals are eligible to win EUR 0.95 million each, which can be used to help further develop and commercialise your solution.  

Because the contest aims to create a new ecosystem of entrepreneurs, applications are only open to SMEs. All proposed solutions must be close-to-market and be able to prove their effectiveness in a real-world demonstration.

The prize is foreseen as part of the Horizon Europe Work Programme.

More information can be found here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

SMEs are central in the development of new and innovative EU Space downstream services. EUSPA males sure to tap on their potential by providing the necessary tools.

Our doors are open on 9-10 December, so visit us and explore the EU Space Programme!

5.12.2022 15:07  
Published: 
05 December 2022

The days are getting shorter, the temperatures colder – making it the perfect time to come inside and learn about the EU Space Programme. So, on 9 – 10 December, take one of Prague’s Galileo-enabled trams and make your way over to EUSPA Headquarters for our annual Open Days! 

“After two years of virtual and outdoor events, we are thrilled to be able to once again open our doors to the public,” says EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. “A highlight on our agenda, the Open Days event is a unique opportunity for EU citizens to explore the Agency, learn about our mission and discover the many benefits of the EU Space Programme.”

With the theme ‘See, Navigate, Communicate’, this year’s edition shines the spotlight on how Galileo, EGNOS, Copernicus, GOVSATCOM and Space Situational Awareness all bring added value to our everyday lives. “Put these programmes together as one EU Space Programme and you unleash an array of synergies and possibilities, all of which have a powerful impact on society and the planet,” adds da Costa. 

Coming on the heels of the United Nations Climate Change Conference, Open Days will have a particular focus on how EU Space contributes to fighting climate change and achieving such European goals as the Green Deal. During the event visitors can learn how EGNSS and Earth Observation support everything from selecting the best location for building renewable energy infrastructure, implementing the most fuel-efficient flight paths, monitoring CO2 emissions, designing efficient and autonomous transportation networks and increasing agricultural yields to sustainably feed a growing population.

Immersive experiences and virtual reality games

As EUSPA works to reduce its own footprint by limiting paper use and waste, the event will present information largely through digital exhibits. Our immersive Copernicus experience invites visitors to walk through a collage of colourful Earth Observation images taken from around the world. 

The two-day event will also feature fun learning opportunities, exciting seminars, a hands-on space workshop and special activities for children, along with a number of competitions and prizes. And did we mention space simulators and virtual reality games? 

“Whether it be determining how to achieve the world’s climate goals, respond to natural disasters, or build the smart cities and mobility systems of tomorrow, as these exhibits and presentations make clear, the answer can often be found in space,” says da Costa.

For those interested in learning about a possible career in space or about EUSPA’s various funding and support initiatives for entrepreneurs and businesses, be sure mark your calendar for 9-10 December. EUSPA experts will be giving talks and be available to answer your questions throughout the day.  

A lot to celebrate! 

This year’s event coincides with the Czech Presidency of the Council of the European Union and the 10th anniversary of EUSPA headquarters calling Prague home. In the decade since its move to Prague, EUSPA has provided significant funding to start-ups, SMEs, enterprises and research projects, many of which are making substantial contributions to the EU’s robust space economy.

Open Days 2022 will take place Friday and Saturday, 9 – 10 December, from 09:00 to 18:00 at EUSPA Headquarters, located at Janovského 438/2, 170 00 Praha 7-Holešovice. 

Schools and universities interested in organising class visits on 9 December can still reserve a timeslot here

Learn more at: https://www.euspa.europa.eu/euspa-open-days-2022 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

This year we invite our guests to see, navigate and communicate with the help of the EU Space Programme.

La Réunion EU MEOLUT, a cornerstone new infrastructure for SAR Galileo delivery in the Indian Ocean

5.12.2022 12:30  
Published: 
05 December 2022

From 1982 to 2022, 40 years of lives saved by Cospas-Sarsat

Amidst the celebration of the 40th anniversary of the first use of satellite technologies by Search and Rescue (SAR) forces earmarked on 10 September 1982 as well as the 40th anniversary of uninterrupted SAR operations of the French Mission Control Center (FMCC), the SAR/Galileo is enlarging its contribution to the Cospas-Sarsat (C/S) system of international SAR efforts cooperation with a fourth MEOLUT (Medium Earth Orbit Local User Terminals) facility deployed in the Indian ocean La Reunion island.

SAR/Galileo Services were designed to support the Cospas-Sarsat (C/S) in the context of the MEOSAR system (Medium Earth Orbit Search And Rescue) providing uninterrupted Search and Rescue services globally which account for more than 2,000 lives saved a year. 

Galileo is already the largest ground (in terms of MEOLUTs) and space segment (L-band SAR payloads) provider within C/S in addition to being the only offering exclusively the Return Link Service (RLS).

Galileo SAR MEOLUTs Key Components of the SAR Ground Segment 

La Reunion/ EU MEOLUT facility has been installed in an Orange Site at Rivière-Des-Pluies in the French La Reunion island in close vicinity of a combined Uplink Station (ULS) and Ground Sensor Station (GSS) existing Galileo remote site. The new MEOLUT successfully passed the required C/s commissioning tests and started providing operational alert data to the French Mission Control Center (FMCC) in a coverage area equivalent to a circle of a radius of 2,500 km for the first-generation C/S beacons and ELT(DT) detection coverage area of a radius of 6,000 km.

Further to the commissioning activities already performed, the MEOLUT is soon to undergo a dedicated SAR/Galileo service validation phase before fully being an integral part of the SAR/Galileo Ground Segment and becoming the fourth EU MEOLUT joining the three already operational located in Larnaca (Cyprus), Maspalomas (Spain) and Spitsbergen (Norway).

Galileo instrumental to achieve Cospas-Sarsat global Coverage including ELT(DT) beacon detection and distribution. 

The Galileo SAR Programme continue to strive in providing world-class Search and Rescue services, the addition of the fourth MEOLUT facility in the Indian Ocean will underpin the efforts to achieve the Cospas-Sarsat MEOSAR global coverage but also ensure that C/S meets the ICAO deadline for the provision of a Global Aviation Distress and Safety System (GADSS) Automatic Distress Tracking capabilities in aircraft through ELT(DT) beacons.

The following figure illustrates the contribution of the SAR/Galileo la Réunion MEOLUT, represented in a yellow dot while the blue colour represents detection compliance status.

La Réunion EU MEOLUT Service Coverage Area
La Réunion EU MEOLUT Service Coverage Area

The case in point: First Return Link Distress Alert under the Coverage of the new SAR Galileo MEOLUT

As we commemorate the anniversaries of C/S, FMCC and the new SAR/Galileo MEOLUT, the 1st Return Link Service distress alert was recorded by Galileo coincidentally within the area of coverage of the newly inaugurated SAR/Galileo MEOLUT.

On 18 November, the Asteria, an 11m sailing boat captained by Helsinki life-long skipper Tapio Lehtinen, competing in the Golden Globerace noticed a strong unidentified water intake from astern. Tapio had only time to put on his survival suit, grab the grab-bag and jump into open seas with the liferaft, where at 8h 44min 44sec activated his SAR/Galileo Return Link PLB and saluted the Asteria for the last time as she was sinking.

The Asteria sunk in a little less than 5 minutes somewhere around 37°24'14.4" S, 44°11'50.4"E roughly 2000km South-West of La Rénion MEOLUT Service Coverage. The first detection was received by C/S a minute after activation (8h45min34s) where the first confirmed location occurred at 8h 48min 34sec (4 min after), the latter triggered the Return Link Message request to the Galileo Return Link Service Provider (RLSP) which in turn delivered the automatic acknowledgement back to Tapio’s PLB back to the originating beacon through the Galileo constellation Signal in Space (I/NAV E1) with a lightning fast response of just 14 seconds and a confirmed reception time 8h 48min 49s.
The Galileo Return Link Service is a free-of-charge global service available through Cospas-Sarsat RLS-compatible beacons fully operational since January 2020 and is designed to increase survival rates by giving an important psychological boost to people in distress such as Tapio’s case.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

New SAR Galileo MEOLUT Facility in Réunion island

La Réunion EU MEOLUT, a cornerstone new infrastructure for SAR Galileo delivery in the Indian Ocean

5.12.2022 12:30  
Published: 
05 December 2022

From 1982 to 2022, 40 years of lives saved by Cospas-Sarsat

Amidst the celebration of the 40th anniversary of the first use of satellite technologies by Search and Rescue (SAR) forces earmarked on 10 September 1982 as well as the 40th anniversary of uninterrupted SAR operations of the French Mission Control Center (FMCC), the SAR/Galileo is enlarging its contribution to the Cospas-Sarsat (C/S) system of international SAR efforts cooperation with a fourth MEOLUT (Medium Earth Orbit Local User Terminals) facility deployed in the Indian ocean La Reunion island.

SAR/Galileo Services were designed to support the Cospas-Sarsat (C/S) in the context of the MEOSAR system (Medium Earth Orbit Search And Rescue) providing uninterrupted Search and Rescue services globally which account for more than 2,000 lives saved a year. 

Galileo is already the largest ground (in terms of MEOLUTs) and space segment (L-band SAR payloads) provider within C/S in addition to being the only offering exclusively the Return Link Service (RLS).

Galileo SAR MEOLUTs Key Components of the SAR Ground Segment 

La Reunion/ EU MEOLUT facility has been installed in an Orange Site at Rivière-Des-Pluies in the French La Reunion island in close vicinity of a combined Uplink Station (ULS) and Ground Sensor Station (GSS) existing Galileo remote site. The new MEOLUT successfully passed the required C/s commissioning tests and started providing operational alert data to the French Mission Control Center (FMCC) in a coverage area equivalent to a circle of a radius of 2,500 km for the first-generation C/S beacons and ELT(DT) detection coverage area of a radius of 6,000 km.

Further to the commissioning activities already performed, the MEOLUT is soon to undergo a dedicated SAR/Galileo service validation phase before fully being an integral part of the SAR/Galileo Ground Segment and becoming the fourth EU MEOLUT joining the three already operational located in Larnaca (Cyprus), Maspalomas (Spain) and Spitsbergen (Norway).

Galileo instrumental to achieve Cospas-Sarsat global Coverage including ELT(DT) beacon detection and distribution. 

The Galileo SAR Programme continue to strive in providing world-class Search and Rescue services, the addition of the fourth MEOLUT facility in the Indian Ocean will underpin the efforts to achieve the Cospas-Sarsat MEOSAR global coverage but also ensure that C/S meets the ICAO deadline for the provision of a Global Aviation Distress and Safety System (GADSS) Automatic Distress Tracking capabilities in aircraft through ELT(DT) beacons.

The following figure illustrates the contribution of the SAR/Galileo la Réunion MEOLUT, represented in a yellow dot while the blue colour represents detection compliance status.

La Réunion EU MEOLUT Service Coverage Area
La Réunion EU MEOLUT Service Coverage Area

The case in point: First Return Link Distress Alert under the Coverage of the new SAR Galileo MEOLUT

As we commemorate the anniversaries of C/S, FMCC and the new SAR/Galileo MEOLUT, the 1st Return Link Service distress alert was recorded by Galileo coincidentally within the area of coverage of the newly inaugurated SAR/Galileo MEOLUT.

On 18 November, the Asteria, an 11m sailing boat captained by Helsinki life-long skipper Tapio Lehtinen, competing in the Golden Globerace noticed a strong unidentified water intake from astern. Tapio had only time to put on his survival suit, grab the grab-bag and jump into open seas with the liferaft, where at 8h 44min 44sec activated his SAR/Galileo Return Link PLB and saluted the Asteria for the last time as she was sinking.

The Asteria sunk in a little less than 5 minutes somewhere around 37°24'14.4" S, 44°11'50.4"E roughly 2000km South-West of La Rénion MEOLUT Service Coverage. The first detection was received by C/S a minute after activation (8h45min34s) where the first confirmed location occurred at 8h 48min 34sec (4 min after), the latter triggered the Return Link Message request to the Galileo Return Link Service Provider (RLSP) which in turn delivered the automatic acknowledgement back to Tapio’s PLB back to the originating beacon through the Galileo constellation Signal in Space (I/NAV E1) with a lightning fast response of just 14 seconds and a confirmed reception time 8h 48min 49s.
The Galileo Return Link Service is a free-of-charge global service available through Cospas-Sarsat RLS-compatible beacons fully operational since January 2020 and is designed to increase survival rates by giving an important psychological boost to people in distress such as Tapio’s case.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

New SAR Galileo MEOLUT Facility in Réunion island

The new IRISS Constellation will be beneficial to EU citizens in several ways, find out 5 of them!

29.11.2022 16:17  
Published: 
29 November 2022

Acknowledging the changing nature of the space ecosystem, the European Commission tabled a proposal for a Regulation of the European Parliament and the Council establishing the Union Secure Connectivity Programme for the period 2023-2027. On Thursday the 17th after nine months of negotiations–a record time in EU policy-making history–the co-legislators reached an agreement on this new critical infrastructure for the EU.

This multi-orbital constellation will combine the benefits offered by Low Earth (LEO), Geostationary (GEO), and Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) satellites. It is set to provide secure communication services to the EU and its Member States as well as broadband connectivity for European citizens, private companies and governmental authorities. This new component of the EU Space Programme will put an end to dead zones in Europe as well as the whole of Africa using the constellation's North-South orbits through a resilient and ultra-secure space and ground-based system. It may include the development and launch of up to 170 LEO satellites between 2025 and 2027.

Here's what we can expect from this new flagship programme:

1. Cutting-edge EU communications services: By developing and operating a multi-orbital connectivity infrastructure the Union will be able to continuously adapt to the evolving user needs and develop new tailor-made applications and services. Fusing MEO and LEO satellite capabilities allows for solutions that vary in coverage, throughput and latency. 

2. Resilience against cyberthreats: IRIS2 will integrate the space and related ground segment of the European Quantum Communication Infrastructure to enable secure transmission of cryptographic keys.

3. Synergies with other EU Space Programme components: Complementing Copernicus, Galileo and EGNOS the system will also open more opportunities for synergies between already existing components of the EU Space Programme. For instance, the synergies between Earth Observation, SatNav and SatCom can be useful among others for addressing maritime emergencies and supporting natural disasters management.

4. New disruptive technologies: Our continent is gifted with a satellite communications industry that has the capacity to make the necessary technological leap and bring Europe to the forefront. New Space actors are able to think outside the box and create new services that can benefit users. 

5. High-speed broadband everywhere: With the addition of the Secure Connectivity Programme, the European Union is ramping up digitisation of European society and its economy while looking to make space data more accessible and scalable to all interested entities. The combination of MEO and LEO capabilities will enable the provision seamless internet connectivity throughout the Union, removing communication dead zones and increasing cohesion across Member State territories. 

The EU Agency for the Space Programme is already actively involved in building secure satellite communication infrastructure for Europe through the coordination of the first phase of GOVSATCOM on which IRIS2 will be based.

And EUSPA will continue to contribute to the Programme. Certain tasks linked to the operational management of the governmental infrastructure of the Programme, provision of governmental services, through the GOVSATCOM hub and the coordination of user-related aspects of these services will therefore be entrusted to the Agency. The Security Accreditation Board established within the Agency, where Members States take accreditation decisions, shall become the IRIS2 security accreditation authority. It will enlarge SAB areas of responsibilities currently covering today all components of the EU space programme, providing security assurance to the users with regards to IRIS2 service and infrastructure.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

IRISS, the new satellite constellation based on GOVSATCOM, will provide secure satellite communication for Europe.

6 ways your financial well-being starts with space

28.11.2022 12:41  
Published: 
28 November 2022

Whether it be paying the bills, making investments or insuring our cars and homes, the vast majority of our financial transactions are now carried out digitally.  But what does this have to do with space?

Don’t worry, making a deposit or filing an insurance claim won’t require any rocket ships or intergalactic travel (at least any time soon). But they do require satellites – including those of the EU Space Programme.

In fact, GNSS and Earth Observation already play a critical role in the financial and insurance sectors. For example, the timing and positioning information provided by Galileo is used in banking to time-stamp financial transactions, while Copernicus data is used for everything from conducting risk assessments to computing indices, assessing damage and managing claims.

And that’s just the tip of the iceberg! From helping financial institutions make more sustainable investment decisions to evaluating insurance claims, EU Space is set to have a big impact on the Insurance and Finance market segment

Here are six ways that this is already happening:

1. Claims Assessment

When an insurance company receives a claim, it must compare the loss listed in the claim with the actual damages that occurred. Based on this information, called the event footprint, they can determine the amount of compensation that should be paid out.  

Claims examiners can use Earth Observation (EO) data to evaluate damage remotely, especially when the damage is caused by a natural disaster like floods or fires. Examiners can also use EO data to better plan for in-field assessments and manage resources, making the process both more efficient and safer. Some are even using GNSS-enabled drones for pre and post-event analysis and data gathering.  

2. Index-based Insurance

This is an innovative and quite new way of delivering insurance – mainly for the agriculture sector - which links claims to “indices” representing observable and quantifiable phenomena. Insurance companies utilise Earth Observation images to measure such parameters, such as soil moisture and vegetation growth and compute relevant indices. When a natural disaster causes damage, they use these indexes to make a pre-specified pay-out.  

3. Risk Modelling

Insurance companies have historically relied on risk modelling for everything from developing products to determining premiums. But this practice is becoming increasingly difficult due to the unpredictability brought about by climate change. To help, some companies are turning to Earth Observation.

EO can contribute to many aspects of risk modelling by including historical data providing imagery of natural events and damages hitting certain geographical areas in the past and supporting the creation of risk maps. These time series of imagery and data on parameters influencing future risks provide insurers with foresight on the future trends – and risks – created by climate change.  

4. Commodities Trading

To make better and quicker decisions and to have an advantage over their competition, commodity traders must have transparency and knowledge about current and future availability versus current and future demand. With EO, commodity traders can observe the filling status of storage tanks, check the level of oil extraction activity happening at a production site, monitor the loading and transport of goods, predict crop yields and even measure pollution and other factors that could impact a particular commodity.  

5. Financial Risk Assessment

In finance, risk assessment is the process of analysing potential events that may result in the loss of value of an asset, loan or investment. For instance, before the start of a new infrastructure project, such as building a wind farm or bridge, investors will assess risks like location, environmental threats and regulatory issues.  

While investors have long used Earth Observation data to assess immediate physical risks to a financial asset, they are now using this data to also better understand future risks related to climate change and sustainability-related issues. 

6. Timing and Synchronisation 

Financial services like banks and stock exchanges rely on powerful IT systems and networks that require a high level of availability, security and reliability. As such, the availability of accurate and secure timing information is very important – which is where GNSS comes in. 

Today, banks use GNSS equipment for time stamping functions and to log events in a chronological manner, and individual stock exchange servers apply time stamps to the trades they execute and to the quotes they establish.

Want to discover more ways the EU Space Programme supports the insurance and finance sectors? Be sure to check out the dedicated chapter in the latest edition of our EO and GNSS Market Report and get in touch with EUSPA at market@euspa.europa.eu.  

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Storm Diomides brought heavy snowfall and heavy rain over Greece, caused severe disruption and at least two casualties. The data captured by the Copernicus satellites are particularly valuable for monitoring flooded areas during extreme weather events.

6 ways your financial well-being starts with space

28.11.2022 12:41  
Published: 
28 November 2022

Whether it be paying the bills, making investments or insuring our cars and homes, the vast majority of our financial transactions are now carried out digitally.  But what does this have to do with space?

Don’t worry, making a deposit or filing an insurance claim won’t require any rocket ships or intergalactic travel (at least any time soon). But they do require satellites – including those of the EU Space Programme.

In fact, GNSS and Earth Observation already play a critical role in the financial and insurance sectors. For example, the timing and positioning information provided by Galileo is used in banking to time-stamp financial transactions, while Copernicus data is used for everything from conducting risk assessments to computing indices, assessing damage and managing claims.

And that’s just the tip of the iceberg! From helping financial institutions make more sustainable investment decisions to evaluating insurance claims, EU Space is set to have a big impact on the Insurance and Finance market segment

Here are six ways that this is already happening:

1. Claims Assessment

When an insurance company receives a claim, it must compare the loss listed in the claim with the actual damages that occurred. Based on this information, called the event footprint, they can determine the amount of compensation that should be paid out.  

Claims examiners can use Earth Observation (EO) data to evaluate damage remotely, especially when the damage is caused by a natural disaster like floods or fires. Examiners can also use EO data to better plan for in-field assessments and manage resources, making the process both more efficient and safer. Some are even using GNSS-enabled drones for pre and post-event analysis and data gathering.  

2. Index-based Insurance

This is an innovative and quite new way of delivering insurance – mainly for the agriculture sector - which links claims to “indices” representing observable and quantifiable phenomena. Insurance companies utilise Earth Observation images to measure such parameters, such as soil moisture and vegetation growth and compute relevant indices. When a natural disaster causes damage, they use these indexes to make a pre-specified pay-out.  

3. Risk Modelling

Insurance companies have historically relied on risk modelling for everything from developing products to determining premiums. But this practice is becoming increasingly difficult due to the unpredictability brought about by climate change. To help, some companies are turning to Earth Observation.

EO can contribute to many aspects of risk modelling by including historical data providing imagery of natural events and damages hitting certain geographical areas in the past and supporting the creation of risk maps. These time series of imagery and data on parameters influencing future risks provide insurers with foresight on the future trends – and risks – created by climate change.  

4. Commodities Trading

To make better and quicker decisions and to have an advantage over their competition, commodity traders must have transparency and knowledge about current and future availability versus current and future demand. With EO, commodity traders can observe the filling status of storage tanks, check the level of oil extraction activity happening at a production site, monitor the loading and transport of goods, predict crop yields and even measure pollution and other factors that could impact a particular commodity.  

5. Financial Risk Assessment

In finance, risk assessment is the process of analysing potential events that may result in the loss of value of an asset, loan or investment. For instance, before the start of a new infrastructure project, such as building a wind farm or bridge, investors will assess risks like location, environmental threats and regulatory issues.  

While investors have long used Earth Observation data to assess immediate physical risks to a financial asset, they are now using this data to also better understand future risks related to climate change and sustainability-related issues. 

6. Timing and Synchronisation 

Financial services like banks and stock exchanges rely on powerful IT systems and networks that require a high level of availability, security and reliability. As such, the availability of accurate and secure timing information is very important – which is where GNSS comes in. 

Today, banks use GNSS equipment for time stamping functions and to log events in a chronological manner, and individual stock exchange servers apply time stamps to the trades they execute and to the quotes they establish.

Want to discover more ways the EU Space Programme supports the insurance and finance sectors? Be sure to check out the dedicated chapter in the latest edition of our EO and GNSS Market Report and get in touch with EUSPA at market@euspa.europa.eu.  

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

From helping financial institutions make more sustainable investment decisions to evaluating claims from the sky, EU Space is set to have a big impact on the Insurance and Finance sectors.

EGNOS upgrade getting ready to improve performance and elevate the user experience

21.11.2022 15:44  
EGNOS Satellite orbiting
Published: 
22 November 2022

On 7 October 2022 at 7:32 UTC, an Inmarsat 4F2 geostationary satellite orbiting some 35.000 km above Earth began broadcasting EGNOS V242B test messages that will ultimately improve EGNOS performance and elevate the user experience.

EGNOS, Europe’s regional satellite-based augmentation system (SBAS), is used to improve the accuracy and reliability of GNSS positioning information. It was originally designed to mainly benefit aviation, which continues to be one of the programme’s key market segments. 

EUSPA is responsible for the exploitation of EGNOS and for delivering safe, secure and uninterrupted satnav services via a contract with the EGNOS service provider.

Extended service area, advanced functionalities 

Since its launch in 2010, EGNOS has been constantly expanding and evolving, providing safety of life navigation services to not only aviation users, but also to maritime, rail and land-based users across the EU. The V242B system release is the latest upgrade to EGNOS and extends both its service area and availability. By extending the service area to the far reaches of northern Europe, even more, aviation users have safe and secure access to such critical services as LPV-200.    

LPV-200 (Localiser Performance with Vertical guidance) delivers accurate information on an aircraft's approach to a runway with the use of GNSS positioning technology. The result is lateral and angular vertical guidance without the need for visual contact with the ground until an aircraft is 200 feet above the runway.

The V242B upgrade also incorporates such advanced data processing functionalities as increased resilience to peak solar activity and ionosphere phenomena, the latter of which can interfere with the transmission of EGNOS signals and, thus, services. 

Read more: EGNOS makes flying sustainably ‘easy’

As Jean-Marc Piéplu, EGNOS Exploitation Programme Manager at EUSPA, explains, although signals from GNSS satellites typically make their way to Earth unhindered, sometimes they become refracted, or even diffracted, in the Earth’s atmosphere, causing delays and distortions. “As the name suggests, the ionosphere contains particles that have become charged, or ionised, as a result of interactions with high-energy particles from the sun,” he says. “However, when these ionised particles are smoothly or homogeneously distributed, GNSS receivers can use models to take into account the effect they have on the signals.”  

These advanced functionalities and extended service are the results of enhanced algorithmic data processing functionalities and the addition of a Ranging Integrity Monitoring Stations (RIMS) station in Kuusamo, Finland. RIMS are used to collect measurements from GPS satellites and transmit this raw data to the Mission Control Centres every second. 

Towards EGNOS dual-frequency and multi-constellation services

While the latest system upgrade helps improve the robustness of EGNOS Version 2, it also reinforces the EGNOS services before starting the exploitation of EGNOS Version 3 (V3). 

By delivering a second frequency and augmenting Galileo signals (enabling a multi-constellation capability), this next generation of EGNOS will introduce new services and will also offer enhanced security protection against cyberattacks. “EGNOS V3 is designed to improve the accuracy and reliability of positioning, navigation and timing information for Safety-critical applications across Europe,” adds Piéplu.

Expected to be completed in 2027, the preparations for EGNOS V3 are underway and the first Critical Design Review, conducted by ESA, is ongoing. 

EUSPA is also currently working to update all the EGNOS ground segment site infrastructure (for instance, EUSPA has recently signed a contract to upgrade the site hosting capabilities of the EGNOS V3 RIMS in Athens, Greece). 

For what concerns the EGNOS Space Segment, most recently, the EGNOS GEO-4 payload was successfully launched via the  EUTELSAT HOTBIRD 13G satellite. 

“This launch marks an important milestone in EUSPA’s mission of delivering continuous, reliable and secure space-based services,” concludes Piéplu. “By delivering innovation and thus benefits, satellite navigation in general and EGNOS dual-frequency and multi-constellation services, in particular, will profoundly change how we manage the mobility, safety and security of people and goods in Europe and beyond.” 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EGNOS V242B upgrades and users benefit from an extended service area, increased availability and enhanced security.

Kicking-off the festive season with EUSPA Open Days 2022!

14.11.2022 14:28  
EUSPA Open Days is a two-day, walk-through, immersive experience that will introduce visitors to the EU Space Programme as well the agency's mission.
Published: 
15 November 2022

This year we invite our guests to see, navigate and communicate with the help of the EU Space Programme.

Can we reverse climate change by looking in on earth from space? Are autonomous driving cars fact or fiction? Would we still be able to communicate if ground networks become unavailable? Well thanks to Galileo, Copernicus and GOVSATCOM everything is possible!

This year’s event will also shine a light on the importance of keeping our precious satellite infrastructure safe and secure as they orbit in outer space thanks to the Space Situational Awareness component of the EU Space Programme.

‘’EUSPA Open Days give anyone wanting to visit our Headquarters in Prague, Czech Republic, a better chance to understand the crucial role of EUSPA and the added value of the EU’s investment in space but also the positive impact that EU Space technologies have in our daily lives’’ says EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa.

What's in it for me?

  • An immersive Copernicus exhibition which will make your social media feed blow up
  • Fun learning opportunities for youngsters or adults wanting to experience childlike playfulness 
  • Exciting seminars, space workshop, competitions, and prizes
  • Discussions with EUSPA experts about career or space entrepreneurship opportunities 

Registrations for schools and universities are open as of today and will remain open until all available slots are filed. 

Stay tuned for more information and keep an eye on our EUSPA Open Days 2022 page.

We are looking forward to welcoming you onboard!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EUSPA Open Days is a two-day, walk-through, immersive experience that will introduce visitors to the EU Space Programme as well the agency's mission.

Attention all GNSS signal simulator manufacturers

11.11.2022 12:52  
To bridge the gap between chipset and receiver manufacturers and GNSS simulator manufacturers, EUSPA is holding a dedicated GNSS Simulator Manufacturers Forum on 13 December.
Published: 
10 November 2022

Signal simulators play a critical role within the GNSS product pipeline. Chipset and receiver manufacturers depend on them to provide the relevant scenarios necessary to accurately test and certify their products. Laboratories also rely on GNSS simulators to run specific tests and to develop new standards.

The challenge, however, is that chipset and receiver manufacturers have rapidly evolving needs.  In order to keep up, GNSS signal simulators must be regularly updated. But to do this, simulator manufacturers must know what those needs are.

To bridge the gap between chipset and receiver manufacturers and GNSS simulator manufacturers, EUSPA, together with the European Commission and the Joint Research Centre (JRC), is organising a GNSS Signal Simulator Manufacturers Forum on 13 December 2022

Helping signal simulator manufacturers keep their products up to date

The online forum aims to help signal simulator manufacturers keep their products up to date by presenting the latest service interface control documents (ICDs), including those for the Galileo Open Service Navigation Message Authentication, the Galileo High Accuracy Service and for the I/NAV improvements

Manufacturers use ICDs to access information provided from a GNSS satellite’s Signal in Space (SiS) or from such terrestrial means as the internet. However, before a manufacturer can turn this information into a new product or service, they must first test it – which is where GNSS simulators come into play.

“Whether it be a personal navigation system or smart watch, before a device or application that relies on GNSS signals hits the market manufacturers first need to ensure it works,” explains Fiammetta Diani, Head of Market, Downstream and Innovation at EUSPA. “GNSS simulators allow manufacturers to test the accuracy of their receivers by simulating such real-world factors as vehicle and satellite motion, signal characteristics and atmospheric effects.” 

Addressing manufacturer needs

The forum will also serve as a channel for addressing GNSS signal simulator manufacturers’ needs, questions, and concerns. “As part of our mission to link space to user needs, EUSPA maintains close ties with the downstream industry and supports its development of new services, including Galileo-enabled chipsets and receivers,” says EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. 

In addition to being a source of market intelligence, EUSPA offers the downstream market a range of funding opportunities, including the Fundamental Elements scheme. Part of EUSPA’s market uptake strategy, Fundamental Elements is an EU R&D funding mechanism supporting the development of EGNSS-enabled chipsets, receivers and antennas. 

To register about the GNSS Signal Simulator Manufacturers Forum, contact us at market@euspa.europa.eu. The deadline for registering is 8 December.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

To bridge the gap between chipset and receiver manufacturers and GNSS simulator manufacturers, EUSPA is holding a dedicated GNSS Simulator Manufacturers Forum on 13 December.

Attention all GNSS signal simulator manufacturers

11.11.2022 12:52  
To bridge the gap between chipset and receiver manufacturers and GNSS simulator manufacturers, EUSPA is holding a dedicated GNSS Simulator Manufacturers Forum on 12 December.
Published: 
11 November 2022

Signal simulators play a critical role within the GNSS product pipeline. Chipset and receiver manufacturers depend on them to provide the relevant scenarios necessary to accurately test and certify their products. Laboratories also rely on GNSS simulators to run specific tests and to develop new standards.

The challenge, however, is that chipset and receiver manufacturers have rapidly evolving needs.  In order to keep up, GNSS signal simulators must be regularly updated. But to do this, simulator manufacturers must know what those needs are.

To bridge the gap between chipset and receiver manufacturers and GNSS simulator manufacturers, EUSPA, together with the European Commission and the Joint Research Centre (JRC), is organising a GNSS Signal Simulator Manufacturers Forum on 13 December 2022

Helping signal simulator manufacturers keep their products up to date

The online forum aims to help signal simulator manufacturers keep their products up to date by presenting the latest service interface control documents (ICDs), including those for the Galileo Open Service Navigation Message Authentication, the Galileo High Accuracy Service and for the I/NAV improvements

Manufacturers use ICDs to access information provided from a GNSS satellite’s Signal in Space (SiS) or from such terrestrial means as the internet. However, before a manufacturer can turn this information into a new product or service, they must first test it – which is where GNSS simulators come into play.

“Whether it be a personal navigation system or smart watch, before a device or application that relies on GNSS signals hits the market manufacturers first need to ensure it works,” explains Fiammetta Diani, Head of Market, Downstream and Innovation at EUSPA. “GNSS simulators allow manufacturers to test the accuracy of their receivers by simulating such real-world factors as vehicle and satellite motion, signal characteristics and atmospheric effects.” 

Addressing manufacturer needs

The forum will also serve as a channel for addressing GNSS signal simulator manufacturers’ needs, questions, and concerns. “As part of our mission to link space to user needs, EUSPA maintains close ties with the downstream industry and supports its development of new services, including Galileo-enabled chipsets and receivers,” says EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. 

In addition to being a source of market intelligence, EUSPA offers the downstream market a range of funding opportunities, including the Fundamental Elements scheme. Part of EUSPA’s market uptake strategy, Fundamental Elements is an EU R&D funding mechanism supporting the development of EGNSS-enabled chipsets, receivers and antennas. 

To register about the GNSS Signal Simulator Manufacturers Forum, contact us at market@euspa.europa.eu. The deadline for registering is 8 December.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

To bridge the gap between chipset and receiver manufacturers and GNSS simulator manufacturers, EUSPA is holding a dedicated GNSS Simulator Manufacturers Forum on 12 December.

Second Horizon Europe call seeks to develop innovative space downstream applications

9.11.2022 10:42  
The second Horizon Europe call is officially open for submissions! With an overall budget of EUR 48.1 million, the call looks to support the development of innovative downstream applications that leverage the data and services offered by the EU Space Programme.
Published: 
09 November 2022

The second Horizon Europe call is officially open for submissions. With an overall budget of EUR 48.1 million, the EUSPA-managed call aims to support the development of innovative downstream applications that leverage the data and services offered by the EU Space Programme

The deadline for applications is 2 March 2023.

This is the first Horizon Europe call to include GOVSATCOM, which provides secure, cost-efficient communication capabilities to security and safety-critical missions, operations and infrastructure. In addition to promoting the development of secure satellite use cases for GOVSATCOM, the call focuses on increasing the uptake of European GNSS within the smart mobility sector and boosting the European data economy with downstream applications based on both Copernicus data and Artificial Intelligence. The call also supports space-based solutions that can help modernise the EU public sector.

“The second Horizon Europe call is a unique opportunity for the European space downstream industry, including SMEs, along with academia and public actors, to develop space-based applications that can deliver real benefits to EU citizens, industry and society,” says EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. 

Horizon Europe is the EU’s key funding mechanism that facilitates collaboration and strengthens the impact of research and innovation in developing, supporting and implementing EU policies while also tackling global challenges. “Linking space to user needs starts with research and innovation,” adds da Costa. “By facilitating research that leverages the EU Space Programme, Horizon Europe supports the development of game-changing solutions to some of today’s most pressing challenges.”

More information about the second Horizon Europe call, including instructions for applying and details on available topics, can be found here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The 2nd Horizon Europe call is officially open for submissions! With an overall budget of EUR 48.1 million, the call looks to support the development of innovative downstream applications that leverage the data and services from the EU Space Programme

ENTRUSTED consortium representatives discuss the next GOVSATCOM phase in Prague

4.11.2022 16:21  
ENTRUSTED is a research project in the area of secure satellite communications (SatCom) for EU governmental actors.
Published: 
04 November 2022

Secure and robust satellite communications that can be rapidly deployed are key for governmental actors, especially when terrestrial network is compromised, there is lack of service coverage (e.g. in open-seas or Arctic regions) as well as to support humanitarian missions in hostile territories. To address this kind of challenges and shield its space autonomy, the European Union is ramping up preparations for the GOVSATCOM component. It is set to provide authorised governmental users with secure and cost-efficient communications capabilities.

‘’GOVSATCOM is a crucial pillar of the EU Space Programme. While Copernicus and EGNSS provide the necessary data, services and products, growing security threats require means of communication that is robustly protected against interference, interception, intrusion, and other risks,’’ adds EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa. ‘’With GOVSATCOM the European Union will make another step into securing its strategic autonomy in space’’ he concludes.

In late 2020, the H2020-funded ENTRUSTED project was established to provide, inter alia, a concrete set of governmental user requirements for the upcoming GOVSATCOM services. With over 25 participating entities including EU Member States and agencies, the consortium's partners joined forces to also assess the currently available state-of-the-art for SatCom technologies, analyse the future trends and identify key technological gaps and opportunities, including aspects such as standardisation and interoperability. Given its vast expertise in user-related aspects and market intelligence, EUSPA acts as the project coordinator of ENTRUSTED.

Check this out: GOVSATCOM adds secure governmental communications to the EU Space Programme

‘’EU Member State representatives and agencies met at the EUSPA headquarters for the first time after the pandemic to reflect on the progress made since the establishment of ENTRUSTED and to plan the steps necessary to conclude this strategic undertaking. As the project is slowly reaching the end of its lifecycle, I can say with confidence that we have successfully reached our main goal which is to define a solid user perspective baseline to be now translated into actual services’’ highlights Flavio Sbardellati, project manager for ENTRUSTED at EUSPA.

Throughout its lifetime, ENTRUSTED yielded excellent results. It is currently being used by DG DEFIS and EUSPA to shape the mission and the services offered by the fourth component of the EU Space Programme, GOVSATCOM. The outcomes generated helped EUSPA qualify and quantify the forecasted capacity demand by governmental users. Areas of great interest where secure communications capabilities will be key include critical infrastructures, land border and maritime surveillance as well as crisis management operations, including within the Common Security and Defence Policy.  

A live demonstration is scheduled for the first quarter of 2023, which will take place in the Italian Space Agency (ASI) premises. The demonstration will consist of a live event complemented by a set of recorded scenarios produced by several ENTRUSTED partners. It will serve to showcase the benefit of accessing secure telecommunication services in remote areas and in crisis situations as well as the functioning of the pooling and sharing service provision model for a number of use cases.

Are you an EU public actor interested in secure communications? 

The second Horizon Europe Call includes a specific topic looking to deliver SatCom use cases linked to the forthcoming GOVSATCOM system. This call is a unique opportunity for the European space downstream industry including SMEs and academia, but also public actors (e.g. regional and/or local authorities, infrastructure providers, civil protection organizations, etc.) to develop new EU space-based innovative applications, delivering commercial and social benefits.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

ENTRUSTED is a research project in the area of secure satellite communications (SatCom) for EU governmental actors.

Protecting coastal regions starts with space

3.11.2022 14:07  
This image, acquired by one of the Copernicus Sentinel-2 satellites on 17 April 2022, shows the Hamburg Wadden Sea National Park, particularly the islands of Neuwerk, Scharhörn and Nigehörn within its perimeter.
Published: 
03 November 2022

While biodiversity loss is happening across all ecosystems, it is particularly pronounced in coastal regions. Not only are these areas some of the most biodiverse on Earth, they also host large human populations (40% of the population globally lives within 100km from the coastline) and substantial economic activity. But, as the human factor increases, these unique ecosystems are experiencing rapid habitat loss, overexploitation of natural resources, pollution and climate change – all of which contribute to biodiversity loss.       

According to a recent online workshop entitled ‘Copernicus Biodiversity in Coastal Ecosystems’, the answer to maintaining a healthy balance between environmental protection and economic activity could be found in space. 

“Long used to monitor land and marine ecosystems, Earth Observation is well-positioned to be a key tool in the fight against the biodiversity loss happening in Europe’s coastal regions,” said Directorate-General for Defence Industry and Space (DG DEFIS), European Commission representative. 

The workshop, under the Copernicus programme umbrella, was jointly organised by DG DEFIS and EUSPA.

Copernicus data to monitor – and protect – coastal biodiversity

Copernicus, the European Earth Observation programme, offers numerous products and services for protecting, even restoring, coastal plant and animal life:

During the workshop, various organisations and end users shared how they use Copernicus services and data to address biodiversity loss in coastal areas. For example, in Finland, researchers are using Earth Observation to monitor coastal algae blooms and the impact these blooms have on the Finnish economy, while in the Galapagos Islands it is being used to track whale shark migration.    

Another company is using satellite-based monitoring tools to help predict jellyfish swarms. “Jellyfish can have a huge impact on the Blue Economy, causing fisheries to collapse and clogging hydropower plants,” said Federica Colombo, a marine scientist at ColomboSky, a company that specialises in innovative satellite-based solutions for improving water quality monitoring and ensuring a sustainable use of marine resources.

Mitigating the effects of climate change

Marine scientists and policymakers also use Earth Observation to fight the effects of climate change – one of the major drivers of biodiversity loss. Take for example extreme weather events, a consequence of climate change that can have a big impact on coastal biodiversity. The European Marine Board shared how it uses Copernicus data to help researchers understand how these events impact coastal habitats and marine species. This same data is also used by policymakers to forecast extreme weather events and increase resilience in coastal areas accordingly.  

Another consequence of climate change is the warming of the world’s oceans, a warming that can cause coral bleaching. Researchers from the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) in South Africa, use Copernicus data to monitor sea surface temperatures in the western Indian Ocean. “Having accurate data allows us to better predict bleaching events and how such events could impact food security and ecosystem stability,” said CSIR Senior Researcher Marie Smith.  

Harmonising policy with data

While all this work is beneficial, the problem is that it tends to happen in silos. “The vast majority of biodiversity monitoring programmes take place at the national or even subnational level,” said Joana Soares, Executive Secretary at the Marine Biodiversity and Observation Network.  

To have a true impact, these individual projects need to be connected – and that requires harmonised policy. “Harmonisation starts with Earth Observation, as access to accurate data can help tie the many different projects, goals, and policies targeting biodiversity loss together,” said DG MARE representative. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

This image, acquired by one of the Copernicus Sentinel-2 satellites on 17 April 2022, shows the Hamburg Wadden Sea National Park, particularly the islands of Neuwerk, Scharhörn and Nigehörn within its perimeter.

Faster and more robust: three I/NAV improvements to upgrade the Galileo Open Service

27.10.2022 11:51  
I/NAV improvements are part of EUSPA’s continuous improvement of the Galileo Open Service
Published: 
27 October 2022

The Galileo Open Service (OS) is being upgraded with three new features being added to the I/NAV message, which is one of four message types broadcast by Galileo satellites. Collectively referred to simply as I/NAV improvements, these features will be available free of charge to all Open Service users. 

“EUSPA is committed to continuously improving the Galileo Open Service,” says Guerric Pont, Galileo Exploitation Programme Manager. “With I/NAV improvements, users can considerably boost their experience when using Galileo OS, thanks, for example, to the improved performance in terms of time to first fix.”

Whilst ensuring full backward compatibility with existing Galileo receivers, the three new features will also improve the robustness of Galileo OS when receiving navigation data, particularly in challenging environments. 

Faster positioning 

The features will enhance the Open Service’s ability to resolve user clock uncertainty, which will reduce the time it takes to receive Clock and Ephemeris Data (CED). For example, by improving time-to-CED, the Reduced Clock Ephemeris Data (RedCED) and Reed-Solomon Outer Forward Error Correction (RS FEC2) features will reduce the overall Time to First Fix (TTFF). 

“In many conditions, the time it takes to receive clock corrections and ephemeris data has a major impact on TTFF,” adds Guerric Pont. “By reducing this time, these features will benefit all applications that require reception of this data from the navigation signals.” 

Benefiting applications working in GNSS-assisted mode

The improvements will also benefit applications working in GNSS-assisted mode. In this mode, when navigation data is received from non-GNSS channels and the receiver’s knowledge of the Galileo System Time is affected by a relatively large error, typically in the order of a few seconds, the clock uncertainty must be resolved quickly and stably. 

With the I/NAV improvements, receivers will be able to do this via the new Secondary Synchronisation Patterns (SSP) feature.

Deployment plan on going

I/NAV improvements are being gradually implemented into the existing Galileo constellation through satellite software upgrades, which allow individual satellites to be successively upgraded with the new features. After a satellite has been upgraded, the improvements will be openly accessible through the I/NAV message carried by the E1-B signal.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

I/NAV improvements are part of EUSPA’s continuous improvement of the Galileo Open Service

We want to hear from end users like you: the EGNOS and Galileo Survey is now open

21.10.2022 17:26  
Galileo and EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey is now open! This is your chance to tell us what you think about these programmes and share your thoughts on how we can make the services they provide even better.
Published: 
24 October 2022

Our mission is to link space to user needs, but to do that, we need to hear from you. The EUSPA Galileo and EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey is your chance to tell us what you think about the two programmes and share your thoughts on how to make the services they provide even better.   

“The survey collects a range of valuable information from users like you,” says EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. “From your perception of and expectations for Galileo and EGNOS to suggestions for improvements, this is a unique opportunity to share your thoughts and ideas.”

Addressing specific market segments 

The survey is for the first time combining EGNOS and Galileo with harmonised structures for users who want to assess both services.

It addresses a specific market segment, including aviation and drones, maritime and inland waterways, rail, road and automotive, consumer solutions, agriculture, infrastructure – and more. Start by selecting the segment (or segments) most important to you or your company, then answer a few simple questions – that’s all there is to it.

The EGNOS part of the survey also covers all EGNOS services, including the Open Service, Safety of Life Service and EGNOS Data Access Service (EDAS). While the Galileo User part of the survey includes questions about improving the services provided by the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC), the EGNOS part asks about the EGNOS service provider’s management of user's interfaces.  

Ready to get started? You can take the User Satisfaction Survey here.

Make a BIG difference in a short time

Although the survey will only take a few minutes of your time, your input will make a big difference in the evolution of the EU Space Programme. “EUSPA looks forward to receiving your feedback, which we will use to improve Galileo and EGNOS to better meet your evolving needs,” adds da Costa.   

The survey results will be compiled into reports and made available to the public next year. The results of last year’s surveys can be found in the 2021 Galileo User Satisfaction Survey Report and  EGNOS User Satisfaction Report.  

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Galileo and EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey is now open! This is your chance to tell us what you think about these programmes and share your thoughts on how we can make the services they provide even better.

EU Space to play a pivotal role in the European Critical Raw Materials Act

17.10.2022 12:23  
EU Space is set to play a bigger role in the raw materials sector, becoming a key enabler in achieving the rare earth independence envisioned by the new European Critical Raw Materials Act.
Published: 
17 October 2022

If oil and gas were once considered the ‘new gold’, then lithium and rare-earth elements (REE) are the new oil and gas. 

Whereas oil and gas boomed thanks to the development of the automobile, global trade and the plastics industry, lithium and REE are key to a wide array of high-tech and climate applications, including solar and wind energy, mobile phones, computers and electric vehicles. “We are experiencing a global race for the supply and recycling of critical raw materials,” confirmed Commissioner Breton.

Furthermore, like oil and gas, if the EU does not take strategic steps to shore up its reserves of lithium and REE today , it risks becoming dependent on supply from other countries – a dependency that could impact the green transition .  

“Without secure and sustainable access to the necessary raw materials, our ambition to become the first climate neutral continent is at risk… we will not lead the digital decade and we will not be able to develop our defence capabilities,” said European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen during her state of the European Union address.

In an effort to mitigate the EU’s dependence on the extraction, processing and recycling of critical raw materials, a European Critical Raw Materials Act has been announced. The Act aims to build up reserves where supply is at risk by identifying potential strategic projects along the entire supply chain.  The strategic raw materials are essential for the EU economic interest. 

As said by the European Commission President “Let's make sure the future of industry is made in Europe.”

Not only made in Europe but also supported by European projects and technology – including the EU Space Programme

The mining sector was an early adopter of augmented GNSS solutions, using it for everything from surveying mining sites to accessing remote areas and enabling the safe operation of heavy machinery. Now, with many mining activities becoming increasingly automated, GNSS has become a key enabler for the management of mining operations. 

The raw materials sector also depends on Earth Observation (EO). For example, companies can use hyperspectral imagery at the exploration stage to assess the abundancy of certain metals and minerals. When the mine site is up and running, high-resolution EO data is used to monitor many aspects of   operations, including pit slopes and ground motion effects. Even when a mining site closes, Earth Observation plays an important role in environmental monitoring, rehabilitation and waste management. 

The synergistic use of EO and GNSS is a golden opportunity for the raw materials sector

While GNSS and Earth Observation are powerful tools in their own right, the raw materials sector stands to benefit the most when these solutions are used in synergy. That’s why the European Commission is supporting such initiatives as the GOLDENEYE project.

The innovative platform proposed by GOLDENEYE, combines remote sensing and positioning technologies to take advantage of Earth Observation and GNSS data, together with data fusion and processing powered by data analytics and machine learning algorithms. The result is an increase in mine productivity and in a company’s ability to monitor and control an operation’s environmental impact.

With the raw materials sector already leveraging the benefits of GNSS and Earth Observation for it is whole life-cycle from exploration to, operations and closure thus boosting efficiency, automation, safety and environmental management of mining operations, EU Space is well-placed to play a pivotal role in ensuring the battery metals independence envisioned by the European Critical Raw Materials Act. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EU Space is set to play a bigger role in the raw materials sector, becoming a key enabler in achieving the rare earth independence envisioned by the new European Critical Raw Materials Act.

EUSPA launches the #myEUspace competition 2022

14.10.2022 14:48  
EUSPA is looking to support the development of innovative commercial applications that leverage data coming from the EU Space Programme.
Published: 
14 October 2022

Have an idea for a commercial application that leverages the power of the EU Space Programme? Looking for support to turn that idea into a prototype or to take it to market? Then check out the #myEUspace 2022 competition! 

The annual competition, which is organised by the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) as part of the European Commission’s CASSINI – Space Entrepreneurship Initiative, challenges innovators and entrepreneurs to create game-changing commercial solutions that use data coming from Galileo, Copernicus or both. 

“Space data is at the heart of the technological revolution currently sweeping Europe, and this competition is another example of how EUSPA supports innovative entrepreneurs, start-ups and SMEs from across the EU who are leveraging Copernicus and Galileo data, information and services, during the different steps of their evolution cycle,” says EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa.

While ideas can range from mobile applications to hardware-based solutions, all must be tied to one of three targeted innovation areas:

Space My Life: Consumer solutions like mobile applications, wearables (smart watches, smart glasses, fitness trackers, etc.), drones or robotics that address major societal challenges in focus areas such as health, citizen safety and security, gaming and entertainment, sports and fitness, and tourism.

Our Green Planet: Innovative solutions addressing environmental challenges and sustainable life and that contribute to the implementation of the European Green Deal, as well as solutions that aid the green transformation of corporations. The proposed solutions must address major societal challenges in focus areas such as the conservation of ecosystems, green mobility, sustainable agriculture and the management of energy and resources.

Dive in Deep Tech: Innovative solutions that combine EU Space data with deep technologies like artificial intelligence (AI), quantum (quantum computing, sensing, simulation, encryption, etc.), blockchain, the metaverse and extended reality (augmented reality [AR], mixed reality [MR], virtual reality [VR]). The proposed solutions must address major societal challenges in focus areas such as biotech, medtech and fintech.

Ready, set, disrupt!

The #myEUspace competition is open to teams from all EU Member States plus Switzerland, Norway and Iceland and has a total prize purse of nearly EUR 1 million. In addition to the cash prize, the competition provides support to entrepreneurs during the entire innovation cycle, from early-stage start-ups to scale-ups.  

“Start-ups and entrepreneurs are particularly enthusiastic about embracing the potential offered by the EU Space Programme and translating it into the innovative solutions that are sure to disrupt a wide range of sectors,” says EUSPA Head of Market, Downstream and Innovation Fiammetta Diani. “The #myEUspace competition can help you turn that enthusiasm into action – and success.”

Depending on the maturity of the solution at the time of submission, entrepreneurs can compete and win in three different prize tracks:

Best Ideas: for promising theoretical ideas that leverage EU space data and have a high market potential. The best 15 ideas will receive a cash prize of EUR 10K each.

Best Prototypes: for tested prototypes or beta versions that you want to bring to market. The 10 best prototypes will receive a cash prize of EUR 30K each.

Best Products: for existing commercial products that are looking to scale-up. The 5 best products will receive a cash prize of EUR 100K each.

Teams who win in one category can take the same award-winning idea or prototype and apply again in another track to compete and win additional prizes!

The details

All applications will be assessed based on their innovativeness, market potential, feasibility, relevance to the EU Space Programme and operational capacity. Awarded teams will be invited to showcase their solutions to the public and investors during the Contest Finals, part of next June’s Entrepreneurship Day.

You can find more information about the contest and how to apply here

The application platform is now open for all three tracks and the application process is very easy! 

The deadline for the Best Ideas track is 30 November 2022, 10 February 2023 for the Best Prototype track, and 23 April 2023 for the Best Products track.

To learn more, join us on 25 October for a webinar where EUSPA experts will provide an overview of the competition and answer all your questions. Register here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EUSPA is looking to support the development of innovative commercial applications that leverage data coming from the EU Space Programme.

10 Highlights from an eventful EU Space Week

7.10.2022 15:16  
Dinka Dinkova introducing the Welcome Address panel at EU Space Week 2022
Published: 
07 October 2022

EU Space Week 2022 welcomed over 3000 visitors (with more than 1100 on-site in Prague) and 150 presenters, who joined either in person in Prague or virtually from home in 35  sessions. Needless to say, it was a busy week, with far too much happening to summarise in a single article. So, instead, here are 10 highlights that we took away from four days of informative sessions, insightful keynote speeches and interesting demos from space-based companies.

1. Space is the foundation from which to build Europe’s resilience 

Key stakeholders and policymakers shared what they considered to be the most pressing topics facing the EU Space sector. At the top of the list: secured communications, sustainability and resilience. “All the components of the EU Space Programme concur to building Europe’s resilience and leadership in the global space ecosystem,” said European Commissioner for the Internal Market Thierry Breton. 

2. Funding and support are critical

During the CASSINI Overview session, one company noted how the funding and support they received from EUSPA was critical to their early-stage success. “We appreciated talking to someone that knew about the market and the technologies,” they said. 

3. EU Space keeps citizens safe

Industry representative reminded that Copernicus and Galileo play a central role in keeping people safe during natural and climate-related disasters, including extreme heatwaves. “By sending timely alerts, hospitals, healthcare providers and emergency first responders can reduce response times and be better prepared to quickly treat victims – all of which helps save lives,” he said.

4. EU Space supports European policies

It has been reminded to all that Copernicus supports key policies like the EU Green Deal and the Digital Transformation. Earth Observation is a key enabler to developing the new digital capacities needed to address a range of societal challenges, including climate change. 

5. Making space for the next generation

To evolve, EU Space needs to ensure the next generation of space personnel have the skills they need to succeed – and lead. This starts by bridging the gap between what students learn at university and the needs of the EU Space industry. 

6. Diversity matters

Having a diverse workforce is a key factor for a thriving and successful business, and space is no exception. A speaker reminded that innovation comes when there’s diversity.

7. Numbers are stunning

Galileo is a success! During the Galileo Status session, participants were reminded how much Galileo has already achieved – including the fact that there are now over 3.5 billion Galileo-enabled devices have been sold around the world. 

8. Users want more

With over 300 EU Space users represented at this year’s User Consultation Platform, EUSPA received a lot of valuable feedback, including the need for more resilience and security, more sustainability, more growth, and even more user engagement. 

9. Europe is powered by EU Space

EUSW showcased an array of demos and applications powered by EU Space, including robots for precision agriculture and drones for urban planning. You can see some of the many European companies that exhibited their solutions in the video below.

10. Inclusion matters, and space can help

The EU Space Programme plays an important role in building a more inclusive society. For example, the upcoming Galileo High Accuracy service will be able to improve urban navigation and wayfinding for people with disabilities. It has been recalled that one out of every five people has a disability, so not a niche market and it means that everyone must play a role in making space more inclusive.

Want to see more highlights from EUSW22? Be sure to check out our Twitter feed and send your feedback.

See you next year at EU Space Week 2023!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Dinka Dinkova introducing the Welcome Address panel at EU Space Week 2022

Hellenic Aviation Service Provider to host EGNOS V3 ground station in Athens, Greece

5.10.2022 14:14  
EUSPA and the Hellenic Aviation Service Provider agree on a joint statement on the upgrade and hosting of an EGNOS Ranging and Integrity Monitoring Stations (RIMS)
Published: 
05 October 2022

EGNOS, Europe’s regional satellite-based augmentation system (SBAS), is undergoing a transformation. 

Used to improve the accuracy and reliability of GNSS positioning information, EGNOS is designed to provide safety of life navigation services to aviation, maritime and land-based users across the EU. Part of the transition from the current version to Version 3 involves updating the EGNOS ground segment, an infrastructure that includes, amongst other components, 44 Ranging Integrity Monitoring Stations (RIMS). 

“EGNOS counts on a long history of providing safety of life navigation services to aviation, maritime and land-based users over Europe. Together with our partners at the European Space Agency and industry, we are working on the next generation of EGNOS, called Version 3, that will also augment Galileo signals,” said EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. 

The main function of the RIMS is to collect measurements from GPS satellites and transmit this raw data to the Mission Control Centres every second. The upgrade will ensure that these RIMS can also collect and transmit measurements from Galileo satellites

‘’Greece is making concrete steps toward developing its space policy. The joint statement between EUSPA and HCAA for the hosting of the new EGNOS RIMS in Athens shows our country's commitment to digital transformation and its contribution to the EU Space Programme,’’ says Athanasios Staveris-Polykalas, Secretary General of Telecommunications & Posts.

The Hellenic Aviation Service Provider (HASP) has hosted an EGNOS RIMS in Athens, Greece since 2010. EUSPA, who is responsible for the exploitation of EGNOS, and HASP renewed their cooperation for a future generation of the RIMS ground infrastructure. 

“HASP (former HCAA) is a major contributor to the successful services and performance achieved by the current EGNOS system, which has been delivering safety of life services for aviation since 2011, and will continue to provide high level services to the new EGNOS systems”, said HASP Governor Georgios Dritsakos.

Building on this successful experience, HASP was selected to host a new, EGNOS Version 3 ground station in Athens. “HASP is an important part of why EGNOS is the success it is today, and I am happy that they will be a part of this exciting new chapter,” added da Costa. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EUSPA and the Hellenic Aviation Service Provider agree on a joint statement on the upgrade and hosting of an EGNOS Ranging and Integrity Monitoring Stations (RIMS)

EU Space is the key to robust, sustainable growth

29.9.2022 15:32  
EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa at the Prague House event in Brussels
Published: 
29 September 2022

On 27 September in Brussels, an event organised under the Czech Presidency of the Council of the European Union in the Prague House brought together thought leaders, decision makers and industry representatives from both the EU and the Czech Republic to discuss and debate issues relating to the EU Space Programme

The topic up for discussion this year was EU Space’s contribution to sustainability and growth.

Galileo and EGNOS enable the determination of a precise position anywhere, while Copernicus provides information on the Earth’s surface, atmosphere and oceans,” added EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. “When you put these programmes together, you unleash an array of synergies that not only have a significant commercial potential, but also the potential to have a powerful impact on society and the planet.”

EU Space means greener transport for Europe

A panel discussion entitled ‘Greener Transport for Europe’ highlighted how the EU Space Programme is already making public transportation more efficient. A representative from the Czech Ministry of Transport noted that the addition of multi-frequency satellite receivers is allowing Prague’s trams to benefit from more precise localisation – opening the door to optimised journeys.    

European GNSS is also playing a crucial role in helping the aviation sector reduce its carbon footprint. Having EGNOS-enabled approaches in all airports gives more choices for alternative airports, which means the distance to be flown could be shorter, resulting in less fuel burned and less emissions released. Furthermore, because EGNOS can help pilots better evaluate visibility conditions, they can avoid circling or diverting – two manoeuvres that burn a lot of fuel.  

Galileo’s highly accurate positioning and timing information is even being used to position e-bike sharing programmes as a game changer in urban mobility. A bike sharing programme in the Barcelona metropolitan area has equipped 2,600 electric bikes with a Galileo-enabled GNSS receiver. Not only does this feature help cyclists navigate their way from docking station to destination in an environmentally-friendly manner, it also ensures the bikes are evenly distributed and readily available in high-use areas – showing how space technology can play a key role in building smart and sustainable urban transport networks.

Prague House Panel
Prague House Panel

Innovation and entrepreneurship in the space sector

A second panel discussion focused on ‘Innovation and Entrepreneurship in the Space Sector’, with a specific look at opportunities within the downstream sector. 

According to EUSPA research, the global GNSS downstream market is forecasted to see revenues reach EUR 220 billion by the end of this year and up to EUR 510 billion by 2032. It also forecasts that the Earth Observation sector will double its revenues, from approximately EUR 2.8 billion to over EUR 5.5 billion within the next decade. This represents a clear opportunity for European businesses– an opportunity that both EUSPA and the European Commission are keen to help companies of all shapes and sizes leverage. 

“Smaller European economies like the Czech Republic would find it difficult to invest in space research and space-based companies on their own,” said Member of the European Parliament Mikuláš Peksa. “By providing support across all Member States, EUSPA is a great example of the benefits that European integration and development bring.”

“Encourage capacity building across the Member States, through supporting space innovation activities that foster private and public demand and reinforce the European supply chains across the Union is indeed essential” confirmed Member of the European Parliament Carlos Zorrinho.

Václav Kobera at Prague House event
Václav Kobera at Prague House event

EU Space keeps European citizens and interests safe and secure

The Prague House event was jointly organised by EUSPA, whose headquarters are in Prague; the Permanent Representation of the Czech Republic to the European Union; the Czech Ministry of Transport; and the Prague House. 

This year’s edition was particularly unique in that it was held during the Czech Presidency of the Council of the European Union. “EUSPA is especially close to my heart, and I am very proud to see the tremendous work it has been doing,” said Jaroslav ZAJÍČEK, Deputy Head of the Czech Permanent Representation to the EU and Permanent Representative to COREPER I. “I am equally excited about where my country has come over the past decade when it comes to space activities and the benefits space technologies and data bring to the European economy and our daily lives.”

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa at the Prague House event in Brussels

EU Space Week 2022 preview is here

27.9.2022 18:08  
EU Space Week is happening 3 – 6 October and will be held as a hybrid event, with options to join either online or physically in Prague, the heart of the EU Space Programme.
Published: 
28 September 2022

EU Space Week 2022 (EUSW22) is set to put the spotlight on Europe’s dynamic – and rapidly growing – space sector. “As the hallmark event for the European space sector, EU Space Week is a unique opportunity to get an up close look at how European businesses – and society in general –benefit from the EU Space Programme,” says EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. “It is particularly exciting to be able to host this year’s edition in Prague, the home of EUSPA’s headquarters.

Expected to bring together over 1,500 representatives from across the European space industry, EUSW22 features a packed agenda that spans the entire spectrum of the EU Space Programme. The four-day event kicks off on 3 October with the annual User Consultation Platform (UCP). The UCP is an opportunity for business and industry leaders, entrepreneurs, service providers, innovators and space user communities to express their needs, share best practices and present case studies. 

Leveraging the central role users play in shaping space applications, the outcomes of this year’s UCP will help ensure that EU Space works for everyone.

Keynotes, insights and lively discussions 

EUSW22 swings into high gear on Tuesday, 4 October with a speaker list  of leaders from across and beyond the EU space ecosystem.

The day also features insights and lively discussions on such topics as strengthening the EU Space Programme through increased cooperation and how EU space is enabling secure communications

As Space is a strategic domain that is undergoing a massive transformation, thus panel discussion such as  ‘Space for EU Resilience and Autonomy’ with several entrepreneurs is to listen . It will be the opportunity to discuss how to stay at the forefront of this transformation and how the EU needs to consolidate existing assets while also developing to face upcoming challenges.

Programme updates and funding opportunities 

The EUSW22 agenda includes an array of sessions, plenaries, events and demonstrations covering everything from current and future trends to market forecasts, business opportunities, space-application demonstrations and updates on the EGNOS, Galileo, Copernicus and GOVSATCOM programmes. 

Galileo and EGNOS enable the determination of a precise position anywhere, while Copernicus provides information on the Earth’s surface, atmosphere and oceans. When you put these programmes together, you unleash an array of synergies that not only have a significant commercial potential, but can also have a powerful impact on society and the planet. The status session and the EU Space Programme Conclusionary session on 5 October will give you an update of its capabilities.

Also happening on 5 October are several sessions focused on investment and funding opportunities such as the CASSINI facility and the Horizon Europe programme. 

Both the CASSINI and Horizon sessions are a chance for participants to learn more about these important initiatives and receive practical advice from previously funded projects. EUSW22 also features a CASSINI Matchmaking event and a session dedicated to upcoming Horizon Europe opportunities

From women in space to the metaverse 

Last but not least, the week includes sessions that hit on a number of hot topics. For instance, the Women in Space session aims to identify the obstacles women face when entering space-related careers and what steps can be taken to end gender disparities. A session on Space for Equality will look at how applications are leveraging EU Space to create a more inclusive and welcoming society for everyone.  

Other sessions will focus on fostering essential skills for the next generation of space professionals and engaging with public authorities for better market uptake

The full agenda, along with additional information and registration, can be found at:  https://www.euspaceweek.eu/.

Taking place 3 – 6 October 2022 in Prague and online, EU Space Week 2022 is jointly organised by the European Commission and EUSPA and is being held under the auspices of the Czech Presidency of the Council of the EU and the City of Prague.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EU Space Week is happening 3 – 6 October and will be held as a hybrid event, with options to join either online or physically in Prague, the heart of the EU Space Programme.

ITT: EGNSS Additional Dissemination means

22.9.2022 9:17  
New ITT published to assess how the future evolution of European GNSS (EGNOS and Galileo) could be provided via additional dissemination means
Published: 
22 September 2022

Galileo is the European global satellite navigation system, under civil control, which provides satellite positioning and timing services worldwide. The European Commission is currently specifying the long-term evolution of the European Global Navigation Satellite System  (EGNSS) Programme, including new services for Galileo and European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service (EGNOS). Amongst these new services, Galileo High Accuracy Service (HAS) will provide real-time high accuracy improved user positioning (positioning error below two decimetres in nominal conditions according to the Galileo HAS Info Note) free of charge through the Galileo signal (E6-B) and   via the Internet. With regards to EGNOS, the next generation will augment Galileo and Global Positioning System (GPS) in the L1 and L5 frequency bands and will extend the service area to the entire landmasses of EU member states. The dissemination over Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) and Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) satellites limits operational availability of the signal for end-users in high-latitudes. The contractor shall analyse cost-effective potential data delivery means alternative to the current EGNOS and Galileo ones. 

A webinar to explain the framework and objectives of the procurement and its different tasks will be held on 4 October 2022 at 16:30 CEST. Please register for the webinar.

More information about the Invitation to Tender (ITT) and the contract notice publication can be found here.

Tailored premiums

Users are at the heart of the EU Space Programme. The annual User Consultation Platform is a chance for this group to share their needs and provide feedback.

Read more on this here: User Consultation Platform helps set the course for the EU Space Programme

The Galileo System became operational in December of 2016 with the provision of initial services for the Open Service, Search and Rescue Service and Public Regulated Service. In the Full Operational Capability (FOC) phase the constellation will consist of 30 satellites, including in orbit spares, in Medium Earth Orbit. As part of its main services, Galileo shall broadcast authentication data through its Navigation Message Authentication (OS NMA), which provides information about the received signal’s authenticity and protects the users against certain attacks. Also, Galileo shall provide a High-Accuracy Service (HAS), through correction data disseminated via signal in space and terrestrial means

EGNOS currently provides augmentation to the GPS Standard Positioning Service (SPS). EGNOS augments GPS using the L1 (1,575.42 MHz) Coarse/Acquisition (C/A) civilian signal function by broadcasting correction data and integrity information for positioning and navigation applications over Europe. Around 2028, the next generation of EGNOS, EGNOS V3, will augment Galileo and GPS OS constellations in the L1 and L5 bands and will extend the service area across the EU.  New EGNOS services could be implemented in further releases of EGNOS beyond 2028. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

New ITT published to assess how the future evolution of European GNSS (EGNOS and Galileo) could be provided via additional dissemination means

Galileo-enabled receivers installed in Prague tramways

21.9.2022 11:16  
Trams in Prague will be provided with more precise localisation thanks to Galileo
Published: 
21 September 2022

Multi-frequency satellite receivers using Galileo amongst other satellite navigation systems are helping to refine the position of Prague trams, ensuring high accuracy even in the dense development of the centre of Prague, showing deviations of no more than 2.5 metres. The Prague Public Transport Company (DPP) is gradually installing new receivers in all trams. It should be completed by the end of next year.

The precise localisation of trams will improve the overview of the current traffic situation for dispatchers and passengers. It will also open up opportunities for further savings in vehicle and infrastructure operations such as optimising the journey.   

"Thanks to the cooperation with scientists and experts from the Faculty of Electrical Engineering of the Czech Technical University, the European Union Agency for the Space Programme and the Ministry of Transport, we have a solution for determining the exact location of Prague trams. As part of the pilot project, we have tested different types of multi-frequency receivers with DPP, with each of them we have completed dozens of tests run in normal operation.  We managed to find the most suitable type of satellite receiver and determine its configuration. During the test runs, it showed only minimal position deviations, up to a maximum of 2 metres," said Adam Scheinherr, Deputy Mayor of the Capital City of Prague and chairman of the Supervisory Board of DPP.

"We have been using outdated satellite receivers in trams to determine the exact position of the vehicles for about 20 years, they work only on the GPS system. However, in the dense development in the centre of Prague, these devices very often showed and still show significant deviations from the actual position of tens to hundreds of metres. Therefore, in 2019, in cooperation with the City of Prague, experts from the Faculty of Electrical Engineering of the Czech Technical University and EUSPA, we launched a pilot project with the aim not only to modernize the existing receivers, but also to find a type and configuration that would withstand the operation of trams in the specific conditions of the Prague city centre," said Milan Slunečko, head of the Tram Vehicle Management Unit of the DPP. Currently one third of the DPP fleet is equipped. 

"The European Union Agency for the Space Programme has long supported the deployment of the Galileo and EGNOS satellite navigation systems in transport. In addition to their common use by passengers in various transport applications on mobile phones, our navigation services are used, for example, for the instrumented approach of aircraft on landing or for precise vehicle location in traffic accidents in the eCall system, where they can help ensure the timely arrival of the integrated rescue system. We are pleased that Galileo will also help to improve localization in Prague tram transport and open up space for further innovation and streamlining of daily operations," concluded Daniel Lopour from EUSPA.

Other cities in Europe such as Madrid are also using GNSS-based intelligent transport solutions to improve the user experience for their public transport. 

Galileo is enabling intelligent transport solutions and thus supporting cities in their efforts to become smarter and more sustainable. It is another contribution to the EU priority for a greener and more digital Europe.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Trams in Prague will be provided with more precise localisation thanks to Galileo

New version of the EDAS Service Definition Document released

13.9.2022 9:18  
The new version of EDAS SDD reflects the latest service's updates
Published: 
13 September 2022

The new version of the Service Definition Document (SDD) for the EGNOS Data Access Service (EDAS) has been just released. In this latest version, the SDD has been updated to reflect the service’s latest changes, including the inclusion of Iceland as an EGNOS participant member. Additionally, the SDD captures the GSA’s transition to the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) and provides up-to-date information on the EDAS performances.

10 years of EDAS

EDAS is one of three services provided by the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service (EGNOS). It is aimed at users who require access to specific GNSS data streams for the provision of added-value services, professional applications, commercial products, R&D and more.

EDAS provides ground-based access to EGNOS data, through a collection of services, which are accessible to registered users through the Internet and are oriented to users in different domains of application such as Location Based Services (LBS), a broad range of services in professional GNSS markets, Assisted-GNSS (A-GNSS) concepts, and related R&D activities.

2022 marks 10 years since EDAS’s service declaration in 2012.Throughout this decade of data provision, the collection of services has grown and evolved, and have oriented towards different domain applications.

EDAS has facilitated many success stories since its inception, such as the retransmission of differential global positioning system (DGPS) corrections in the maritime sector based on the EDAS (IALA beacons) and supporting surveying and mapping activities in Agriculture.

You can access the new SDD version either online or download it in PDF format. For any questions about EDAS or the new SDD, you can contact the EGNOS Helpdesk.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The new version of EDAS SDD reflects the latest service's updates

Register for the Copernicus Biodiversity in Coastal Ecosystems Workshop

12.9.2022 16:52  
The Copernicus Biodiversity in Coastal Ecosystems Workshop will illustrate what Copernicus can offer in relation to biodiversity and coastal ecosystems, and their protection.
Published: 
12 September 2022

While the loss of biodiversity is occurring across all ecosystems, it is particularly pronounced in coastal regions. Not only are these areas some of the most biodiverse on Earth, but they also host large human populations and substantial economic activity. As the human factor increases, these unique ecosystems are subjected to rapid habitat loss, overexploitation of natural resources, pollution, and climate change – all of which contribute to biodiversity loss.       

Long used to monitor land and marine environments, Earth Observation is an opportunity to develop best practices to reach a healthy balance between environmental protection and economic development and reduce biodiversity loss in coastal regions.

Copernicus, the European Earth Observation programme, offers numerous products and services for protecting, even restoring, biodiversity and coastal ecosystems. This includes forecasting the impact that climate change – the main driver of biodiversity loss – will have on these essential ecosystems, monitoring the good environmental status and EU policies implementation, developing sustainable living resources management.

To learn more about Earth Observation’s role in protecting biodiversity, the European Commission and EUSPA invite you to register for its Copernicus Biodiversity in Coastal Ecosystems Workshop. The online event, scheduled for 11 – 12 October, consists of four sessions:

  • Biodiversity and Coastal Resources – Setting the Scene
  • Biodiversity Versus Economic Development
  • Biodiversity Conservation in the Context of Climate Change
  • A Future Green Copernicus for Coastal Ecosystems

During each session, experts will talk about the role Copernicus’ land, marine, climate change services play in addressing biodiversity loss in coastal areas. The sessions will be a chance to share best practices and case studies, highlight opportunities for coupling digital technologies with science and research, and discuss how industry and businesses can leverage space technologies to help achieve such EU policy goals as the Biodiversity Strategy and Green Deal.

The Copernicus Biodiversity in Coastal Ecosystems Workshop is jointly organised by EUSPA and the European Commission’s Directorate-General for Defence Industry and Space (DG DEFIS). More information can be found here.

Participation is free.

Please keep in mind the registrations will close on 6th October at 18:00

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The Copernicus Biodiversity in Coastal Ecosystems Workshop will illustrate what Copernicus can offer in relation to biodiversity and coastal ecosystems, and their protection.

Register for the Copernicus Biodiversity in Coastal Ecosystems Workshop

12.9.2022 16:52  
The Copernicus Biodiversity in Coastal Ecosystems Workshop will illustrate what Copernicus can offer in relation to biodiversity and coastal ecosystems, and their protection.
Published: 
12 September 2022

While the loss of biodiversity is occurring across all ecosystems, it is particularly pronounced in coastal regions. Not only are these areas some of the most biodiverse on Earth, but they also host large human populations and substantial economic activity. As the human factor increases, these unique ecosystems are subjected to rapid habitat loss, overexploitation of natural resources, pollution, and climate change – all of which contribute to biodiversity loss.       

Long used to monitor land and marine environments, Earth Observation is an opportunity to develop best practices to reach a healthy balance between environmental protection and economic development and reduce biodiversity loss in coastal regions.

Copernicus, the European Earth Observation programme, offers numerous products and services for protecting, even restoring, biodiversity and coastal ecosystems. This includes forecasting the impact that climate change – the main driver of biodiversity loss – will have on these essential ecosystems, monitoring the good environmental status and EU policies implementation, developing sustainable living resources management.

To learn more about Earth Observation’s role in protecting biodiversity, the European Commission and EUSPA invite you to register for its Copernicus Biodiversity in Coastal Ecosystems Workshop. The online event, scheduled for 11 – 12 October, consists of four sessions:

  • Biodiversity and Coastal Resources – Setting the Scene
  • Biodiversity Versus Economic Development
  • Biodiversity Conservation in the Context of Climate Change
  • A Future Green Copernicus for Coastal Ecosystems

During each session, experts will talk about the role Copernicus’ land, marine, climate change services play in addressing biodiversity loss in coastal areas. The sessions will be a chance to share best practices and case studies, highlight opportunities for coupling digital technologies with science and research, and discuss how industry and businesses can leverage space technologies to help achieve such EU policy goals as the Biodiversity Strategy and Green Deal.

The Copernicus Biodiversity in Coastal Ecosystems Workshop is jointly organised by EUSPA and the European Commission’s Directorate-General for Defence Industry and Space (DG DEFIS). Participation is free, but registration is required. More information can be found here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The Copernicus Biodiversity in Coastal Ecosystems Workshop will illustrate what Copernicus can offer in relation to biodiversity and coastal ecosystems, and their protection.

Register for the Copernicus Biodiversity in Coastal Ecosystems Workshop

12.9.2022 16:52  
The Copernicus Biodiversity in Coastal Ecosystems Workshop will illustrate what Copernicus can offer in relation to biodiversity and coastal ecosystems, and their protection.
Published: 
12 September 2022

While the loss of biodiversity is occurring across all ecosystems, it is particularly pronounced in coastal regions. Not only are these areas some of the most biodiverse on Earth, but they also host large human populations and substantial economic activity. As the human factor increases, these unique ecosystems are subjected to rapid habitat loss, overexploitation of natural resources, pollution, and climate change – all of which contribute to biodiversity loss.       

Long used to monitor land and marine environments, Earth Observation is an opportunity to develop best practices to reach a healthy balance between environmental protection and economic development and reduce biodiversity loss in coastal regions.

Copernicus, the European Earth Observation programme, offers numerous products and services for protecting, even restoring, biodiversity and coastal ecosystems. This includes forecasting the impact that climate change – the main driver of biodiversity loss – will have on these essential ecosystems, monitoring the good environmental status and EU policies implementation, developing sustainable living resources management.

To learn more about Earth Observation’s role in protecting biodiversity, the European Commission and EUSPA invite you to register for its Copernicus Biodiversity in Coastal Ecosystems Workshop. The online event, scheduled for 11 – 12 October, consists of four sessions:

  • Biodiversity and Coastal Resources – Setting the Scene
  • Biodiversity Versus Economic Development
  • Biodiversity Conservation in the Context of Climate Change
  • A Future Green Copernicus for Coastal Ecosystems

During each session, experts will talk about the role Copernicus’ land, marine, climate change services play in addressing biodiversity loss in coastal areas. The sessions will be a chance to share best practices and case studies, highlight opportunities for coupling digital technologies with science and research, and discuss how industry and businesses can leverage space technologies to help achieve such EU policy goals as the Biodiversity Strategy and Green Deal.

The Copernicus Biodiversity in Coastal Ecosystems Workshop is jointly organised by EUSPA and the European Commission’s Directorate-General for Defence Industry and Space (DG DEFIS). More information can be found here.

Participation is free.

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The Copernicus Biodiversity in Coastal Ecosystems Workshop will illustrate what Copernicus can offer in relation to biodiversity and coastal ecosystems, and their protection.

Register for the Copernicus Biodiversity in Coastal Ecosystems Workshop

12.9.2022 16:52  
The Copernicus Biodiversity in Coastal Ecosystems Workshop will illustrate what Copernicus can offer in relation to biodiversity and coastal ecosystems, and their protection.
Published: 
12 September 2022

While the loss of biodiversity is occurring across all ecosystems, it is particularly pronounced in coastal regions. Not only are these areas some of the most biodiverse on Earth, but they also host large human populations and substantial economic activity. As the human factor increases, these unique ecosystems are subjected to rapid habitat loss, overexploitation of natural resources, pollution, and climate change – all of which contribute to biodiversity loss.       

Long used to monitor land and marine environments, Earth Observation is an opportunity to develop best practices to reach a healthy balance between environmental protection and economic development and reduce biodiversity loss in coastal regions.

Copernicus, the European Earth Observation programme, offers numerous products and services for protecting, even restoring, biodiversity and coastal ecosystems. This includes forecasting the impact that climate change – the main driver of biodiversity loss – will have on these essential ecosystems, monitoring the good environmental status and EU policies implementation, developing sustainable living resources management.

To learn more about Earth Observation’s role in protecting biodiversity, the European Commission and EUSPA invite you to register for its Copernicus Biodiversity in Coastal Ecosystems Workshop. The online event, scheduled for 11 – 12 October, consists of four sessions:

  • Biodiversity and Coastal Resources – Setting the Scene
  • Biodiversity Versus Economic Development
  • Biodiversity Conservation in the Context of Climate Change
  • A Future Green Copernicus for Coastal Ecosystems

During each session, experts will talk about the role Copernicus’ land, marine, climate change services play in addressing biodiversity loss in coastal areas. The sessions will be a chance to share best practices and case studies, highlight opportunities for coupling digital technologies with science and research, and discuss how industry and businesses can leverage space technologies to help achieve such EU policy goals as the Biodiversity Strategy and Green Deal.

The Copernicus Biodiversity in Coastal Ecosystems Workshop is jointly organised by EUSPA and the European Commission’s Directorate-General for Defence Industry and Space (DG DEFIS). More information can be found here.

Participation is free.

Registrations are open

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The Copernicus Biodiversity in Coastal Ecosystems Workshop will illustrate what Copernicus can offer in relation to biodiversity and coastal ecosystems, and their protection.

Wanted: space-based solutions for solving the oceans’ plastic problem

9.9.2022 9:56  
CASSINI Maritime Maritime Prize is the new contest under the CASSINI competition initiative
Published: 
08 September 2022

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is supporting a new prize contest. The competition is looking for solutions that leverage Earth Observation and GNSS to detect, monitor and remove plastic in oceans and waterways. Read on to learn more about the global issue spurring the need for these types of solutions and the CASSINI competition initiative. 

The growing problem of plastic in oceans and waterways

Of the 300 million tons of plastic produced every year, an estimated 26 million eventually ends up in the ocean. As a result, some estimates suggest there are now 5.25 trillion pieces of plastic in our oceans and seas. Even more concerning is the fact that this number is expected to increase, with National Geographic predicting that the annual amount of plastic flowing into the oceans will triple by 2040. 

As the International Union for Conservation of Nature explains, in addition to causing climate change and impacting the coastal tourism industry, plastic litter also threatens marine ecosystems. That’s because when plastic litter is exposed to sunlight, wind and currents, it breakdowns to become microplastics. These microplastics can be easily ingested by marine life, resulting in severe injuries, health problems and even death – all of which could impact our own food security and safety.  

Space’s plastic removal potential 

Solving the ocean’s plastic problem starts with taking the litter out of the water. But this requires first knowing where the plastic is, which is where Earth Observation and GNSS come into play.

Earth Observation has the potential to help detect and monitor plastic pollution across the oceans. According to an Observer article, by using data on ocean currents collected by the Copernicus Marine Service, in combination with other information, one can monitor how and where plastics enter the ocean and determine how long they have been there.  

GNSS can also play a role in cleaning up our oceans. In 2019, a California-based cargo ship used GNSS positioning to track and collect a mass of plastic floating in the Pacific Ocean that is thought to be three times the size of France. The initiative had mariners place reusable GNSS trackers on the discarded fishing nets that tend to accumulate plastics. The cargo ship then tracked these devices to collect both the nets and plastic waste. In total, 40 tonnes of plastic were removed.   

But these examples only scratch the surface of what Earth Observation, GNSS and their synergistic use are capable of. To fully leverage these technologies and their plastic removal potential, EUSPA is supporting a new prize contest.

A chance to win funding for your commercial solution 

The CASSINI Prize for Digital Space Apps is looking for innovative commercial solutions that leverage the EU Space Programme to detect, monitor and remove plastics, microplastics and other litter from our oceans and waterways. With a total prize purse of EUR 2.85 million, the top three proposals are eligible to win EUR 0.95 million each, which can be used to help further develop and commercialise your solution.  

CASSINI is the European Commission’s initiative to support entrepreneurs, start-ups and SMEs developing innovative applications and services that leverage the EU Space Programme. Dedicated to promoting the commercialisation of Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus data and services, EUSPA is actively involved in the initiative.

Because the contest aims to create a new ecosystem of entrepreneurs, applications are only open to SMEs. All proposed solutions must be close-to-market and be able to prove their effectiveness in a real-world demonstration. 

The prize is foreseen as part of the Horizon Europe Work Programme.

More information can be found here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

CASSINI Maritime Maritime Prize is the new contest under the CASSINI competition initiative

EUSPA taps ESSP for EGNOS service provider role

7.9.2022 9:26  
EUSPA signs new EGNOS service provider contract with ESSP
Published: 
07 September 2022

The European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service (EGNOS) is Europe’s regional satellite-based augmentation system (SBAS). Used to improve the accuracy and reliability of GNSS positioning information, EGNOS is designed to provide safety of life navigation services to aviation, maritime and land-based users across the EU.

While the exploitation of EGNOS is the responsibility of the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), its services are delivered by the EGNOS service provider under a contract with EUSPA. Today, EUSPA formally announced that it has signed  its new EGNOS service provider contract with European Satellite Services Provider (ESSP), a company specialising in the operations and provision of satellite-based services for  critical missions such as for aviation and whose shareholders include seven leading European Air Navigation Service Providers (ANSPs).   

“EGNOS is a very successful part of the EU Space Programme. ESSP has been a strong partner to achieve this result and I look forward to another decade of success,” said EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. 

“As Europe’s first venture into satellite navigation, EGNOS set the precedent for what a successful space programme looks like,” added ESSP CEO Charlotte Neyret. “With this new contract, we look to raise the bar even higher.”

The new 10 years contract sees ESSP continuing its role as the EGNOS service provider for the Open Service and Safety of Life Service (SoL) while EUSPA is in the process of taking over the responsibility of EGNOS Data Access Service (EDAS) service provision. During this time, ESSP will be responsible for EGNOS service provision (including EGNOS operations and part of its maintenance). 

Expanding and evolving

With EGNOS constantly expanding and evolving, the new contract will see ESSP performing some new tasks as well. For example, in addition to bolstering EGNOS’ use in the aviation sector, the company will look to further develop the service for the maritime, rail and drone sectors. It will also help improve the security of EGNOS V2 through the addition of new functions and by upgrading the system.

Then there’s EGNOS V3, the next generation of EGNOS that will augment Galileo signals. With ESSP set to play a major role in this transition, the company has brought on new partners, including Airbus Defence and Space currently in charge of the development of EGNOS V3.    

Under the new contract, ESSP will work to further expand the EGNOS services in European Neighbourhood Policy South countries (ENP-South) and Ukraine. The company is in the process of setting up new RIMS in Nigeria and Chad, the operation of which will be subcontracted to the Agency for Aerial Navigation Safety in Africa and Madagascar (ASECNA). 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EUSPA signs new EGNOS service provider contract with ESSP

EUSPA taps ESSP for EGNOS service provider role

7.9.2022 9:26  
EUSPA signs new EGNOS service provider contract with ESSP
Published: 
06 September 2022

The European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service (EGNOS) is Europe’s regional satellite-based augmentation system (SBAS). Used to improve the accuracy and reliability of GNSS positioning information, EGNOS is designed to provide safety of life navigation services to aviation, maritime and land-based users across the EU.

While the exploitation of EGNOS is the responsibility of the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), its services are delivered by the EGNOS service provider under a contract with EUSPA. Today, EUSPA formally announced that it has signed  its new EGNOS service provider contract with European Satellite Services Provider (ESSP), a company specialising in the operations and provision of satellite-based services for  critical missions such as for aviation and whose shareholders include seven leading European Air Navigation Service Providers (ANSPs).   

“EGNOS is a very successful part of the EU Space Programme. ESSP has been a strong partner to achieve this result and I look forward to another decade of success,” said EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. 

“As Europe’s first venture into satellite navigation, EGNOS set the precedent for what a successful space programme looks like,” added ESSP CEO Charlotte Neyret. “With this new contract, we look to raise the bar even higher.”

The new 10 years contract sees ESSP continuing its role as the EGNOS service provider for the Open Service and Safety of Life Service (SoL) while EUSPA is in the process of taking over the responsibility of EGNOS Data Access Service (EDAS) service provision. During this time, ESSP will be responsible for EGNOS service provision (including EGNOS operations and part of its maintenance). 

Expanding and evolving

With EGNOS constantly expanding and evolving, the new contract will see ESSP performing some new tasks as well. For example, in addition to bolstering EGNOS’ use in the aviation sector, the company will look to further develop the service for the maritime, rail and drone sectors. It will also help improve the security of EGNOS V2 through the addition of new functions and by upgrading the system.

Then there’s EGNOS V3, the next generation of EGNOS that will augment Galileo signals. With ESSP set to play a major role in this transition, the company has brought on new partners, including Airbus Defence and Space currently in charge of the development of EGNOS V3 under a contract with EUSPA.    

Under the new contract, ESSP will work to further expand the EGNOS services in European Neighbourhood Policy South countries (ENP-South) and Ukraine. The company is in the process of setting up new RIMS in Nigeria and Chad, the operation of which will be subcontracted to the Agency for Aerial Navigation Safety in Africa and Madagascar (ASECNA). 

The event took place at the occasion of AEOLUS working group meeting where EUSPA is gathering the European ANSPs (Air Navigation Service Providers), EUROCONTROL, EASA and ESA.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EUSPA signs new EGNOS service provider contract with ESSP

EUSPA Headquarters celebrates 10 years in Prague

6.9.2022 15:51  
Published: 
06 September 2022

Today, the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) headquarters celebrates 10 years of calling Prague, Czech Republic home. The Agency, then called the European GNSS Agency (GSA), moved to the ‘Golden City’ in 2012, following an open call held by the European Commission in which the Czech Republic won.  

"Prague offers a high quality of living, access to a skilled talent pool and great connections to the rest of Europe, making it a truly European city fit to host an EU agency", says EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. 

Understanding the importance of hosting an EU agency, EUSPA maintains close ties with its host countries, which, in addition to the Czech Republic, include Spain, where the GNSS Service Centre (GSC) is based; France, which co-host the Galileo Security Monitoring Centre (GSMC) with Spain; the Netherlands, home of the Galileo Reference Centre (GRC); Belgium, where the Galileo Integrated Logistic Support (ILS) Centre is located; and Germany and Italy, each of which host a Galileo Control Centre (GCC). 

"We are an EU agency dedicated to serving the space needs of citizens, businesses and other stakeholders from all Member States," adds da Costa. "By engaging with the entire EU Space community, we contribute to achieving such European goals as the Green Deal and digital transformation – all while reinforcing the EU’s autonomy and resilience."

A decade of growth and development

In the decade since the move, both the EU Space Programme and the Czech Republic’s space sector have enjoyed continuous growth and development. Through various grants, Horizon calls and other funding mechanisms, EUSPA has provided significant funding to start-ups, SMEs, enterprises and research across all EU Member States – including EUR 2.2 million to Czech-based initiatives, many of which are making substantial contributions to the EU’s robust space economy. 

EUSPA has also seen its mandate expand since it first landed in Prague. Not only is the Agency now responsible for overseeing the security, services and market uptake of Galileo and EGNOS, but also Copernicus, Europe’s Earth Observation (EO) service. 

This list of responsibilities is by no means stagnant. As part of its expanded mandate, EUSPA has been entrusted with additional responsibilities relating to GOVSATCOM, a user-centric programme designed to meet the unique requirements of governmental applications, including those used for crisis management, surveillance and the management of key infrastructures. In 2023, EUSPA will take responsibility for the Space Surveillance and Tracking (SST) Front Desk operations service, part of the Space Situational Awareness (SSA) component of the EU Space Programme. 

A future in Prague 

Earlier this year, EUSPA signed an amended host agreement with the Czech Republic, cementing Prague’s place at the heart of the EU Space Programme for years to come. 

“I look forward to continuing to call this vibrant city home and, together with our Czech partners, further grow the EU Space Programme and develop the European space economy, ” notes da Costa.

In October, the city is set to welcome EU Space Week 2022, Europe’s premiere space event. We are organising this event jointly with the European Commission, the city of Prague under the auspices of the Czech Presidency of the Council of the EU.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

User Consultation Platform helps set the course for the EU Space Programme

2.9.2022 15:02  
A highlight on the EU Space Week agenda, the UCP invites users from a range of market segments to present their needs and requirements
Published: 
02 September 2022

Just as EU Space Week is back, so too is the annual User Consultation Platform. A highlight on the EU Space Week agenda, the User Consultation Platform (UCP) invites users from a range of market segments to present their needs and requirements. 

“The UCP is an exciting opportunity for business and industry leaders, entrepreneurs, service providers, innovators and space user communities to express their needs, share best practices and present case studies,” says Fiammetta Diani, Head of Market, Downstream and Innovation at the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA). “By creating an engaged network of innovators, the User Consultation Platform plays a key role in shaping the evolution of the EU Space Programme and its services.”

The UCP consists of breakout sessions and a summary plenary and covers not only Galileo and EGNOS, but also Copernicus and GOVSATCOM. “The Platform’s unique format allows all space stakeholders to share their experiences and expertise and learn from each other, helping them grow stronger and become more innovative and competitive,” adds Diani.   

Extensive exchanges and in-depth discussions

This year’s UCP kicks off 3 October with a full day of extensive exchanges happening during eight parallel sessions, each of which focuses on a specific market segment:

  • Infrastructure: the role of EU Space in infrastructure development, with a focus on key user requirements, trends and representative use cases.
  • Renewable Energy: how Earth Observation (EO) and GNSS-based solutions can support the rapid transition towards renewable energies.
  • EO-Platforms and Consumer Applications: a discussion on both improving access to space data and how to leverage that data for use in consumer, tourism and health applications.
  • Aviation and Drones: how GNSS and EO can enable emerging operational concepts in the air, increase business opportunities and identify priorities for R&D and innovation.
  • Maritime and Fisheries: discuss the needs of applications relying on GNSS and EO, which will be instrumental in defining potential new space data-based services.
  • Emergency Management and Humanitarian Aid: applications for monitoring geohazards, post-crisis damage assessment and building inspection, with a special focus on supporting Ukraine.
  • Insurance and Finance: an in-depth discussion on how to leverage the full potential of space data in fintech.
  • Raw Materials: why EO and GNSS data and services are key for raw material resource exploration, operations and post-closure environmental management.

In addition to in-depth discussions on user needs, each session will also provide updates on testing campaigns, market trends, the evolution of the various programmes and new opportunities in R&D. “These sessions are a one-of-a-kind networking opportunity that gives the entire space ecosystem a chance to explore new synergies and keep abreast of the latest developments in this fast-paced sector,” says Diani.

The results of the individual sessions will be presented to the entire EU Space community during a dedicated plenary session on 4 October.

“As the EU Space Programme evolves, so too do the needs of its users,” notes Diani. “Leveraging the central role users play in shaping EU Space applications, the outcomes of this year’s UCP will help define the service provision and ensure that EU Space works for everyone.” 

The User Consultation Platform will take place 3 – 4 October. More information and registration can be found here.

EU Space Week, Europe’s premiere space event, is happening 3 – 6 October. As a hybrid event, you can join either online or physically in Prague, the heart of the EU Space Programme.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

A highlight on the EU Space Week agenda, the UCP invites users from a range of market segments to present their needs and requirements

User Consultation Platform helps set the course for the EU Space Programme

2.9.2022 15:02  
A highlight on the EU Space Week agenda, the UCP invites users from a range of market segments to present their needs and requirements
Published: 
02 September 2022

Just as EU Space Week is back, so too is the annual User Consultation Platform. A highlight on the EU Space Week agenda, the User Consultation Platform (UCP) invites users from a range of market segments to present their needs and requirements. 

“The UCP is an exciting opportunity for business and industry leaders, entrepreneurs, service providers, innovators and space user communities to express their needs, share best practices and present case studies,” says Fiammetta Diani, Head of Market, Downstream and Innovation at the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA). “By creating an engaged network of innovators, the User Consultation Platform plays a key role in shaping the evolution of the EU Space Programme and its services.”

The UCP consists of breakout sessions and a summary plenary and covers not only Galileo and EGNOS, but also Copernicus and GOVSATCOM. “The Platform’s unique format allows all space stakeholders to share their experiences and expertise and learn from each other, helping them grow stronger and become more innovative and competitive,” adds Diani.   

Extensive exchanges and in-depth discussions

This year’s UCP kicks off 3 October with a full day of extensive exchanges happening during eight parallel sessions, each of which focuses on a specific market segment:

  • Infrastructure: the role of EU Space in infrastructure development, with a focus on key user requirements, trends and representative use cases.
  • Renewable Energy: how Earth Observation (EO) and GNSS-based solutions can support the rapid transition towards renewable energies.
  • EO-Platforms and Consumer Applications: a discussion on both improving access to space data and how to leverage that data for use in consumer, tourism and health applications.
  • Aviation and Drones: how GNSS and EO can enable emerging operational concepts in the air, increase business opportunities and identify priorities for R&D and innovation.
  • Maritime and Fisheries: discuss the needs of applications relying on GNSS and EO, which will be instrumental in defining potential new space data-based services.
  • Emergency Management and Humanitarian Aid: applications for monitoring geohazards, post-crisis damage assessment and building inspection, with a special focus on supporting Ukraine.
  • Insurance and Finance: an in-depth discussion on how to leverage the full potential of space data in fintech.
  • Raw Materials: why EO and GNSS data and services are key for raw material resource exploration, operations and post-closure environmental management.

In addition to in-depth discussions on user needs, each session will also provide updates on testing campaigns, market trends, the evolution of the various programmes and new opportunities in R&D. “These sessions are a one-of-a-kind networking opportunity that gives the entire space ecosystem a chance to explore new synergies and keep abreast of the latest developments in this fast-paced sector,” says Diani.

“As the EU Space Programme evolves, so too do the needs of its users,” notes Diani. “Leveraging the central role users play in shaping EU Space applications, the outcomes of this year’s UCP will help define the service provision and ensure that EU Space works for everyone.” 

The User Consultation Platform will take place 3 – 4 October. More information and registration can be found here.

EU Space Week, Europe’s premiere space event, is happening 3 – 6 October. As a hybrid event, you can join either online or physically in Prague, the heart of the EU Space Programme.

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

A highlight on the EU Space Week agenda, the UCP invites users from a range of market segments to present their needs and requirements

EUSPA welcomes Shriya satellite to the Galileo family!

29.8.2022 10:45  
The Galileo satellite GSAT0224 entered into service on 29 August
Published: 
29 August 2022

The Galileo satellite GSAT0224 entered into service on 29 August. The satellite is named ‘Shriya’, after a Norwegian grade school student who won the Galileo drawing competition organised by the European Commission and the Norwegian Space Agency. 

The news comes after extended In-Orbit Testing that took place in January-March, followed by participation in the In-Orbit Validation (IOV) for EUSPA/ESA’s finalized testing campaign for I/NAV improvements in July and August 2022.

Having passed the initial tests, the satellite was deemed healthy and ready to join the Galileo family, and after IOV participation, it is now also ready for faster convergence improvements!

Continue to serve Galileo users around the world

The previous Galileo satellite GSAT0223 entered into service in May 2022. While the two satellites may be orbiting some 23,000 kilometres above us, their service impact will be felt right here on Earth.

In a very practical sense, these additional satellites mean that whether using a navigation device in a car or on a mobile phone, you’ll now know your exact position with even greater precision and faster positioning than before. The new satellites also mean enhanced capabilities for the wide range of applications that depend on Galileo’s accuracy, including search and rescue missions, the eCall emergency response system and precision farming methods, to name only a few.  

“The addition of these satellites to the world’s most precise positioning system is part of our continuous improvement logic for our more than 3 billion users worldwide,” says EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. “Not only do more satellites mean more availability, more robust navigation and a better user experience, it also means more market opportunities for European businesses, SMEs and entrepreneurs.”

Milestones reached and milestones ahead 

GSAT0223 and GSAT0224 were part of Galileo launch L11 on 5 December 2021. The pair is the first of a third batch of Galileo first generation satellites to reach space, with GSAT0223 filling the last empty slot in Galileo’s orbital plane B and GSAT0224 flying in an auxiliary slot B15 as defined by the Open Service SDD.   

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The Galileo satellite GSAT0224 entered into service on 29 August

Using Copernicus data to climate-proof cities

26.8.2022 16:28  
Copernicus data is essential for measuring the urban heat vulnerability
Published: 
26 August 2022

Over half of the world’s 8 billion people live in cities, a number that is expected to increase by over 70% in the coming decades. This is concerning because, just as the world’s urban population continues to increase, so too does the world’s average temperature – setting the stage for a potential catastrophe.

That’s because with this increase in temperature comes more frequent and extreme heat events which, due to the urban heat island phenomena, make cities particularly vulnerable to the impact of climate change. It also puts urban populations at a greater risk for suffering the sweltering and potentially deadly effects of heatwaves – a fact has been abundantly clear this summer. According to the Copernicus Climate Change Service’s (C3S) July Climate Bulletin, many parts of Europe, including Spain, Portugal, France and the UK, experienced intense heat, if not record-breaking high temperatures, during the month of July.  

All of this means city planners are facing a sense of urgency for finding new ways to keep cities cool. As discussed in a recent article, one potential solution is to use the data generated by C3S to reconsider the layout of cities in an effort to mitigate heat-related risks.  

One company doing exactly that is ECOTEN urban comfort.

Mapping high vulnerability areas 

The Prague-based company is taking a data-driven approach to designing greener, cooler and healthier cities. “By integrating science, data and technology into urban planning, we help make cities more resilient against the impact of climate change,” says ECOTEN co-founder and CEO Jiri Tencar. 

Much of ECOTEN’s data comes from Earth Observation, including the Copernicus Programme. “Copernicus data is essential for measuring the urban heat vulnerability of a city as it provides high resolution information that can be uniformly obtained for any city in the world,” explains ECOTEN co-founder and CTO Sagnik Bhattacharjee.

By combining this Earth Observation data with available socio-demographic data, the company creates Urban Heat Vulnerability Maps. “These high-resolution maps provide city planners and other authorities with a real-time analysis of extreme heat vulnerability in a given urban area,” remarks Tencar. “Having ready-access to this information allows city officials to take immediate steps to protect citizens and infrastructure from a forecasted heatwave.” 

Vienna maps a cooler future    

In addition to helping city planners react to immediate heat threats, ECOTEN’s innovative heat mapping is also being used to mitigate future risks. For example, the company partnered with the city of Vienna to map the vulnerability of each of the city’s electoral districts. 

What these maps revealed was that several heavily populated areas have an urban heat vulnerability index (UHVI) value of 0.9 on a scale where 1.0 implies a high vulnerability to an extreme heat event. The map also identified 10 ‘hot spots’, including areas with little to no green space or areas with a large concentration of young children and/or older adults, both of whom are at risk populations. 

“For the first time, we have a map that shows us where cooling is urgent and allows us to take specific measures,” said Birgit Hebein, the former deputy mayor of Vienna.

City planners can now use this map, which was made possible thanks to Copernicus data, to adapt their urban planning to the realities of a warmer climate. In fact, the ECOTEN map is behind the city’s Cool Street project, an initiative that aims to turn down the heat at street level by, for example, planting more trees and reducing traffic.    

Prague cools down its transport hotspots    

Following the success in Austria, ECOTEN was soon contacted by the Environmental Protection Department of the City of Prague, who wanted to map the urban heat vulnerability of the city’s public transport stops. To create such a map, the company once again turned to Copernicus data, this time combining it with data on passenger wait times.

“This combination allowed us to create a tool that Prague can use to easily identify the specific areas that need attention and take steps to make these stops more comfortable for passengers,” says Bhattacharjee.  

Using the ECOTEN provided heat map, the city has taken numerous steps to cool down hotspots. For example, a green lawn was planted on the roof of a tram stop, while draught-resistant plants, grasses and rock gardens have been placed across Prague. The city also installed misting devices and drinking fountains.

“The Urban Heat Vulnerability Map has already proved to be an important tool for making Prague and Vienna more resilient to climate change, and we look forward to adding more cities to this list soon,” concludes Tencar.

Other European cities confirmed this approach as being useful and efficient as ECOTEN urban comfort is now working on developing an Urban Heat Vulnerability Map of Helsinki, Finland.

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Copernicus data is essential for measuring the urban heat vulnerability

EU Space Week 2022 – registration now open!

8.8.2022 14:06  
Join the EU Space Week 3 – 6 October 2022 in Prague, Czech Republic
Published: 
08 August 2022

Following two years of online only editions, EU Space Week – Europe’s premiere space event – is back. Happening 3 – 6 October, the 2022 edition will be held as a hybrid event, meaning you can join either online or physically in Prague, the heart of the EU Space Programme. 

This not-to-be-missed event is set to bring together the entire EU space community, from policy makers, industry, start-ups, public authorities, investors and end users. The packed agenda will span the entire spectrum of the EU Space Programme. 

“As the hallmark event for the European space sector, EU Space Week is a unique opportunity to see first-hand how European businesses – and society in general – are benefiting from the EU Space Programme,” says EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. “It’s particularly exciting to be able to host this year’s edition in Prague, the home of EUSPA headquarters.”

A ‘New Space’ for space

With the theme of ‘New Space’, sessions, plenaries, events and demonstrations will cover everything from current and future trends, market forecasts, business opportunities, space-application demonstrations and updates on the EGNOS, Galileo, Copernicus and GOVSATCOM programmes. 

The event will also host the annual User Consultation Platform, where users from a range of market segments present their needs and requirements and help shape the evolution of the EU Space Programme and its services. Other highlights include the Copernicus Networks General Assembly, a CASSINI matchmaking event and sessions on Space for EU Resilience and Autonomy, EU Space for Secure Communications, Horizon Europe and Space 4 Equality – to name only a few.

As always, there will be ample opportunities for networking and knowledge sharing. 

Register today!

Ready to join over 1,200 representatives from Europe’s dynamic space sector? Then don’t delay, reserve you spot at EU Space Week 2022 by registering today at https://www.euspaceweek.eu/.

EU Space Week 2022 is jointly organised by the European Commission and EUSPA and is being held under the auspices of the Czech Presidency of the Council of the EU and the City of Prague. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Join the EU Space Week 3 – 6 October 2022 in Prague, Czech Republic

As the mercury rises, Copernicus helps keep you cool

3.8.2022 16:08  
Surface air temperature anomaly for June 2022 relative to the June average for the period 1991-2020. Data source: ERA5. Credit: Copernicus Climate Change Service/ECMWF.
Published: 
03 August 2022

It’s the dog days of summer, and things are hot – and getting hotter. 

For much of Europe, and especially southern Europe, temperatures have been steadily increasing year after year. Not only was 2021 one of the warmest years on record, Sicily recorded what could very well be Europe’s hottest temperature ever, seeing the mercury hit a scorching 48.8°C.

This summer it’s more of the same. The European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) recently reported that the global average temperature for June was about 0.31ºC higher than the 1991-2020 average, making it the third warmest June on record. Furthermore, Europe as a whole had its second warmest June on record, at about 1.6ºC above average.

This isn’t a fluke or some kind of anomaly. According to an article published in Horizon, the EU’s research and innovation magazine, temperatures have been steadily on the rise for years, the result of increasing – and largely unchecked – climate change. The annual European State of the Climate (ESOTC) report, which provides a timely, transparent and detailed description of the evolving climate, backs this claim. This year’s edition shows that, despite year-to-year variability, global temperatures have increased since the pre-industrial era, by 1.1 – 1.2°C.

How do we know all this? 

Copernicus – the European Earth Observation programme.

Introducing C3S

Copernicus, or more specifically the Copernicus Climate Change Service (C3S), supports society, climate researchers and decision makers by providing authoritative information about the past, present and future climate in Europe and the rest of the world. As with other Copernicus services, CS3 processes and analyses a wealth of satellite and in situ data, transforming it into value-added information. 

Datasets dating back years, even decades, can be compared and searched to monitor changes, while patterns can be examined and used to build, for example, better forecasting models. Maps are created from Copernicus imagery, from which features and anomalies can be identified and statistical information extracted.

While all this information is essential to helping users meet their climate goals, it is particularly useful to the EU’s climate adaptation and mitigation policies – including those pertaining to extreme heatwaves. 

Heatwaves are already responsible for a considerable number of deaths, a trend that is unfortunately expected to increase as temperatures continue to go up. “As average temperatures warm, extreme temperatures will also become warmer, leading to more frequent and warmer heatwaves,” Rachel White, an assistant professor at the University of British Columbia, told Horizon. “This is particularly concerning in regions that already experience high temperatures, such as southern Europe.”

According to White, the key to saving lives is the use of accurate and reliable weather prediction models that go well beyond standard weekly forecasts. 

Here too, C3S can help. 

Preparing for a hotter tomorrow 

C3S provides users with quality-controlled data about the impact climate change will have on heatwave frequency and severity in the decades to come. “When the past is no longer a good predictor for the climate risks we face, having data about the future is key to preparing for the conditions that lie ahead, whether that future be days, months or even years ahead,” says C3S Director Carlo Buontempo.

As Buontempo explains, because C3S data focuses on climate, as opposed to weather, it is particularly useful for helping local authorities be more proactive – and less reactive – to climate-related risks. For example, today, national and local authorities depend on C3S’s heat stress predictions to implement heat-related action plans. 

“Since the shocking death toll of the 2003 heatwave in southern Europe, many European countries have developed action plans that can be triggered when specific heat stress conditions are forecasted,” notes Buontempo. 

These action plans can include things as simple as limiting outside activities and drinking plenty of fluids to actively monitoring at-risk populations. In the near future, city planners could use this same C3S data to reconsider the layout of cities and buildings and design green spaces that help mitigate heat-related risks to make cities more pleasant to live in – even in a hotter world.

“Not only does C3S data provide us with a better understanding of what the summer of the future may look like, it also gives us the opportunity to start preparing for that future today,” concludes Buontempo.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Surface air temperature anomaly for June 2022 relative to the June average for the period 1991-2020. Data source: ERA5. Credit: Copernicus Climate Change Service/ECMWF.

Galileo OSNMA workshop highlights preliminary test results

22.7.2022 12:06  
Stakeholders got a first look at some initial results during a dedicated workshop.
Published: 
22 July 2022

On 28 June 2022, the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) held an online workshop about the ongoing testing of the Galileo Open Service – Navigation Message Authentication (OSNMA). The event was an opportunity to both learn about the status of the testing phase and discuss preliminary results. As to the latter, highlights included:

  • All OSNMA-enabled receivers tested according to the expected performance. Testing demonstrated that the use of OSNMA does not degrade the quality of the Position, Velocity and Time (PVT). Furthermore, tested receivers had an availability of at least 95% and a Time to First Fix (TTFF) in line with the testing service performance.   
  • Septentrio receivers, which are geared towards those sectors requiring the highest level of security (e.g., maritime, mining, rail, defence, aerospace, drones, advanced driver-assistance systems, telecom, etc.), are OSNMA ready. OSNMA is implemented within the Septentrio receiver using the proprietary Advanced Interference Mitigation (AIM+) tool. 
  • An OSNMA-enabled GNSS receiver designed specifically for boat security called NaviSoC® was successfully tested, performing optically while using OSNMA. Although initially designed for the maritime sector, engineers are confident that the GNSS receiver will be able to address all major market segments. The team is currently looking in to the cross-authentication capability, to be ready when/if it will be included in the service baseline. 
  • An STM Teseo V chip with firmware co-developed by STM and FDC contains algorithms to protect the integrity of OSNMA assets against jamming, spoofing and other security concerns, with applications in the area of smart tachographs and potentially beyond.  

The initial results show that, although the Galileo OSNMA Public Observation Test Phase continues, it has already successfully provided important feedback that EUSPA can use to enhance the service’s functionality. 

Testing remains ongoing – and you can still participate 

The Galileo OSNMA is a data authentication function that will be freely accessible worldwide. The pioneering service will pave the way towards robust PVT for users of the Galileo Open Service.

In preparation for its service declaration, GNSS receiver manufacturers, integrators and application developers are encouraged to continue testing the Galileo OSNMA. This testing is done via a Signal in Space (SiS) and is meant to assess the service’s performance across a range of scenarios and use cases. 

Relevant interested parties can still register for the Public Observation Test Phase by accessing the OSNMA Public Observation webpage

The final workshop is foreseen to take place at the end of 2022.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Stakeholders got a first look at some initial results during a dedicated workshop

EU Space enables safer maritime operations

18.7.2022 11:43  
The exercise involved the activation of a Galileo-enabled EPIRB equipped with the innovative Return Link Service on board a leisure boat.
Published: 
17 July 2022

 

It’s the middle of the summer holiday season and an earthquake strikes Greece, rendering all ground-based communication services worthless. At this exact moment, a leisure boat sailing several kilometres off the coast of Athens experiences an on-board fire. Luckily, they have a Galileo-enabled Emergency Position-Indicating Radio Beacon (EPIRB) to send a distress signal with, meaning they don’t have to rely on now inoperable ground-based services. 

The coastguard picks up the yacht’s distress signal and establishes its location. Due to the lack of viable ground-based communication networks, the coastguard and other emergency services communicate using the GOVSATCOM system to coordinate all search and rescue (SAR) operations. To facilitate the search and rescue itself, authorities rely on optical and in-situ data generated by Copernicus regarding, for example, current strength, wave height and water temperature. 

The end result? Disaster is averted and lives are saved, thanks in large part to the EU Space Programme.

Prioritising safety at sea

This is but one example of how safety at sea has long been one of the European maritime sector’s top priorities. Today, the European Commission is building on this tradition by investing in digital technologies that help further ensure the safety of passengers and crew, while also minimising the sector’s environmental impact. Many of these new technologies rely on the data and services generated by the EU Space Programme. 

Take for example the ground-breaking Galileo Return Link Service (RLS), part of the Galileo SAR service. Thanks to the RLS, sailors in distress, when equipped with the appropriate beacon, will see a light verifying that their distress signal has been received by emergency first responders and that their location has been established. 

Galileo is the only GNSS constellation to offer such a service to its end-users. The RLS is proven to increase survival rates by giving an important psychological boost to people in distress. Experts of Cospas-Sarsat estimated that the international SAR system, with the contribution of the Galileo SAR service, saves more than 2,000 lives a year. 

 

    EU Space in Action

    On the occasion of the Pytheas Space Maritime Forum, EUSPA, in collaboration with the Greek authorities, organised a demonstration that showcases the importance of space technologies in Search and Rescue (SAR) Operations. The exercise involved the activation of a Galileo-enabled EPIRB equipped with the innovative Return Link Service on board a leisure boat. 

    Note: this was a test exercise for the purposes of promoting the SAR service. Both Cospas-Sarsat and the Greek coastguard had previously been notified.

    • The yacht departed Floisvos Marina, Athens at 13:15 EEST and sailed towards the Saronic gulf.
    • When the boat was around 3 nautical miles off the Athens coast, EUSPA staff activate the Galileo-enabled beacon.
    • The signal was picked up almost immediately by the Greek Mission Control Center, taking only 1’08 ‘’ - a record time for the Galileo SAR service.
    • Upon acknowledgment of the location, the Galileo Return Link Service was activated. 
    • Onboard the boat, demo participants saw a blinking light on the beacon, confirming that their distress signal had been picked up. 

    Director for Outreach and Innovation at DG DEFIS, European Commission Catherine Kavvada and EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa, watched the exercise live from the Operations Room of the Hellenic Coastguard. The demonstration showcased the capabilities of the Galileo SAR service, and highlighted the added vbalue of the return link to people in distress.  

Visualise with Copernicus

Accidents often occur in poor weather conditions, where it is difficult or dangerous to deploy manned assets like helicopters. When an accident happens in a remote area, there may not be the option to send vessels or aircraft to verify the situation. In both contexts, the Copernicus Maritime Surveillance (CMS) service can provide valuable additional data to help detect, track and potentially identify the vessels in distress. By doing so, the CMS helps support SAR efforts. 

Specifically, Copernicus utilises synthetic aperture radar images, which can be used to help search for vessels over large areas, during the night and even in poor weather conditions. This capability is especially useful when a vessel loses communication and goes adrift (e.g., following a fire or tracking storm damage). Identifying the location of a vessel helps optimise the use of search and rescue assets and allows authorities to direct resources to where they are of most use. Optical images can also provide a wealth of additional information, including positively identifying the vessel, characterising the damage caused and detecting any deployed lifeboats in the water. 

Communicate with GOVSATCOM

While Galileo and Copernicus provide the necessary data and positioning, some security incidents also require a means of communication that is robustly protected against interference, interception, intrusion and other risks. GOVSATCOM bridges this gap between the need for assured and secure communication and the capabilities already offered by Copernicus, Galileo and EGNOS.

Once active, GOVSATCOM will provide secure, cost-efficient communication capabilities to security and safety-critical missions, operations and infrastructure. EUSPA has been entrusted with the procurement of the secure operational ground segment (GOVSATCOM Hubs), its operations and the coordination of the user-related aspects of GOVSATCOM, all in close collaboration with the Member States and other involved entities.

Putting it all together 

Thanks to the EU Space Programme, authorities and maritime operators can rely on three different types of satellite data and signals that allow them to see, navigate and communicate. First, Copernicus provides the near real-time data needed to evaluate the state of the sea, currents and temperature. Galileo, on the other hand, makes navigation easier and more reliable, thanks to its accurate signals. Completing the maritime safety trifecta is GOVSATCOM, which ensures uninterrupted communications, even on the open seas. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The exercise involved the activation of a Galileo-enabled EPIRB equipped with the innovative Return Link Service on board a leisure boat.

EU Space enables safer maritime operations

18.7.2022 11:43  
The exercise involved the activation of a Galileo-enabled EPIRB equipped with the innovative Return Link Service on board a leisure boat.
Published: 
18 July 2022

 

It’s the middle of the summer holiday season and an earthquake strikes Greece, rendering all ground-based communication services worthless. At this exact moment, a leisure boat sailing several kilometres off the coast of Athens experiences an on-board fire. Luckily, they have a Galileo-enabled Emergency Position-Indicating Radio Beacon (EPIRB) to send a distress signal with, meaning they don’t have to rely on now inoperable ground-based services. 

The coastguard picks up the yacht’s distress signal and establishes its location. Due to the lack of viable ground-based communication networks, the coastguard and other emergency services communicate using the GOVSATCOM system to coordinate all search and rescue (SAR) operations. To facilitate the search and rescue itself, authorities rely on optical and in-situ data generated by Copernicus regarding, for example, current strength, wave height and water temperature. 

The end result? Disaster is averted and lives are saved, thanks in large part to the EU Space Programme.

Prioritising safety at sea

This is but one example of how safety at sea has long been one of the European maritime sector’s top priorities. Today, the European Commission is building on this tradition by investing in digital technologies that help further ensure the safety of passengers and crew, while also minimising the sector’s environmental impact. Many of these new technologies rely on the data and services generated by the EU Space Programme. 

Take for example the ground-breaking Galileo Return Link Service (RLS), part of the Galileo SAR service. Thanks to the RLS, sailors in distress, when equipped with the appropriate beacon, will see a light verifying that their distress signal has been received by emergency first responders and that their location has been established. 

Galileo is the only GNSS constellation to offer such a service to its end-users. The RLS is proven to increase survival rates by giving an important psychological boost to people in distress. Experts of Cospas-Sarsat estimated that the international SAR system, with the contribution of the Galileo SAR service, saves more than 2,000 lives a year. 

 

    EU Space in Action

    On the occasion of the Pytheas Space Maritime Forum, EUSPA, in collaboration with the Greek authorities, organised a demonstration that showcases the importance of space technologies in Search and Rescue (SAR) Operations. The exercise involved the activation of a Galileo-enabled EPIRB equipped with the innovative Return Link Service on board a leisure boat. 

    Note: this was a test exercise for the purposes of promoting the SAR service. Both Cospas-Sarsat and the Greek coastguard had previously been notified.

    • The yacht departed Floisvos Marina, Athens at 13:15 EEST and sailed towards the Saronic gulf.
    • When the boar was around 3 nautical miles off the Athens coast, EUSPA staff activate the Galileo-enabled beacon.
    • The signal was picked up almost immediately by the Greek Mission Control Center, taking only 1’08 ‘’ - a record time for the Galileo SAR service.
    • Upon acknowledgment of the location, the Galileo Return Link Service was activated. 
    • Onboard the boat, demo participants saw a blinking light on the beacon, confirming that their distress signal had been picked up. 

    Director for Outreach and Innovation at DG DEFIS, European Commission Catherine Kavvada and EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa, watched the exercise live from the Operations Room of the Hellenic Coastguard. The demonstration showcased the capabilities of the Galileo SAR service, and highlighted the added vbalue of the return link to people in distress.  

Visualise with Copernicus

Accidents often occur in poor weather conditions, where it is difficult or dangerous to deploy manned assets like helicopters. When an accident happens in a remote area, there may not be the option to send vessels or aircraft to verify the situation. In both contexts, the Copernicus Maritime Surveillance (CMS) service can provide valuable additional data to help detect, track and potentially identify the vessels in distress. By doing so, the CMS helps support SAR efforts. 

Specifically, Copernicus utilises synthetic aperture radar images, which can be used to help search for vessels over large areas, during the night and even in poor weather conditions. This capability is especially useful when a vessel loses communication and goes adrift (e.g., following a fire or tracking storm damage). Identifying the location of a vessel helps optimise the use of search and rescue assets and allows authorities to direct resources to where they are of most use. Optical images can also provide a wealth of additional information, including positively identifying the vessel, characterising the damage caused and detecting any deployed lifeboats in the water. 

Communicate with GOVSATCOM

While Galileo and Copernicus provide the necessary data and positioning, some security incidents also require a means of communication that is robustly protected against interference, interception, intrusion and other risks. GOVSATCOM bridges this gap between the need for assured and secure communication and the capabilities already offered by Copernicus, Galileo and EGNOS.

Once active, GOVSATCOM will provide secure, cost-efficient communication capabilities to security and safety-critical missions, operations and infrastructure. EUSPA has been entrusted with the procurement of the secure operational ground segment (GOVSATCOM Hubs), its operations and the coordination of the user-related aspects of GOVSATCOM, all in close collaboration with the Member States and other involved entities.

Putting it all together 

Thanks to the EU Space Programme, authorities and maritime operators can rely on three different types of satellite data and signals that allow them to see, navigate and communicate. First, Copernicus provides the near real-time data needed to evaluate the state of the sea, currents and temperature. Galileo, on the other hand, makes navigation easier and more reliable, thanks to its accurate signals. Completing the maritime safety trifecta is GOVSATCOM, which ensures uninterrupted communications, even on the open seas. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The exercise involved the activation of a Galileo-enabled EPIRB equipped with the innovative Return Link Service on board a leisure boat.

Using Galileo to protect boats from criminals

11.7.2022 17:05  
New security solution uses Galileo to protect boats from criminal activity
Published: 
12 July 2022

From theft to hacking and un-anchoring, boats of all shapes and sizes are becoming an increasingly popular target for attacks, including cyberattacks. Protecting these critical and often expensive assets requires new, outside-the-box solutions. 

One of those solutions, powered by Galileo, is ARGOS.

Developed with the support of the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), through its Fundamental Elements funding initiative, ARGOS leverages the Galileo services and newest differentiatiors as a means of securing yachts and boats against criminal activity and making their mooring safer. 

The solution is unique; it not only provides the accurate position of a vessel (or related assets), it also uses the Galileo Open Service Navigation Message Authentication (OSNMA) to assure the user that the navigation message received is in fact from Galileo and has not been modified. 

By fusing this Galileo-provided positioning information with data from on-board sensors, ARGOS can:

Protect a vessel against theft, tampering, un-anchoring and interruptions to the power supply  

Provide real-time monitoring of a docked or anchored boat’s location

Accurately track a vessel’s location, monitoring that it remains in a pre-defined geo-fenced area

Defend navigation systems against cyberattacks, spoofing and other forms of manipulation

In addition to Galileo and sensors, the ARGOS solution comes equipped with artificial intelligence, 4G connectivity, WiFi, Bluetooth, CAN-BUS, an anti-tampering system and a backup battery.

ARGOS ready for use

ARGOS is not just another technological concept. Following a successful demonstration, the ARGOS solution is now market-ready and it will well position in the market thanks to a strong and unique value proposition. To take advantage of its range of security services, all a user needs to do is install the device onboard the vessel and be ready to receive notifications in case an alert is triggered. 

From there, ARGOS communicates information on the boat’s location and monitor it within a pre-defined geo-fenced area through a proprietary ecosystem. This process starts with the control centre, which uses sophisticated algorithms to track and control the vessel’s position. The information collected, along with any alarms and notifications, is relayed to the user via an easy-to-use mobile app and/or web portal.  

ARGOS was developed by a consortium of companies, including Modis, Permare, GEA Space, ChipCraft and Aria United. The group is currently exploring the option of expanding the technology to other transport sectors, such as bikes, scooters and shared mobility services.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

New security solution uses Galileo to protect boats from criminal activity

Czech EU Presidency puts space at the centre of its security priority

1.7.2022 11:56  
In the face of growing global instability, the Czech EU Presidency has made security a key priority – and one that will be supported by the EU Space Programme.
Published: 
01 July 2022

July 1st marks the start of the Czech Presidency of the Council of the European Union. As the host country of the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), it’s safe to say that space will play a key role in achieving some of the presidency’s top priorities.  

The Council presidency rotates among the EU Member States every six months. During this time, it chairs meetings at every level in the Council, helping ensure the continuity of the EU's work in the Council. 

With the Czech Presidency starting in the midst of growing global instability, it will use the next half year to focus on strengthening Europe’s defence capabilities and cybersecurity. As to the former, the presidency aims to pay particular attention to reducing the EU’s technological dependence on third-party countries and enhancing the EU’s own capacity for building disruptive technologies. As to the latter, the Czech Presidency plans to reinforce the Union’s cybersecurity infrastructure.

At the centre of both is the EU Space Programme.

EU Space for European autonomy 

At the heart of the EU Space Programme is European autonomy. Before Galileo, GNSS users depended on other countries’ satellite signals. With Galileo, Europeans now have a reliable alternative that remains under civil control. 

This is important as satellite positioning has become an essential service that is often taken for granted. Just think what would happen if GNSS signals were suddenly switched off. Truck and taxi drivers, ship and aircraft crews and millions of people around the world would suddenly be lost. Furthermore, financial and communication activities, public utilities, security and humanitarian operations and emergency services would all come to a standstill. 

Galileo helps minimise the risk of any of this happening.

EUSPA answers the cybersecurity challenge 

While the EU Space Programme has given the European Union a new level of autonomy and independence, by no means does this make it immune to cyberattacks. As the number of critical services and everyday devices that depend on satellite-based data continues to increase, so too does the cybersecurity risk.

Ensuring the confidentiality, integrity and availability of space data against cyber threats is a challenge that EUSPA takes very seriously. In addition to its service provision, EUSPA also serves as the security gatekeeper of the EU Space Programme – a role that includes, amongst other things, keeping Europe’s GNSS signals secure. 

Building an even more robust EU Space Programme

Because security is such a critical issue, and one that space is playing an increasingly bigger role in, the EU is developing several new security-oriented, space-related initiatives. One of those is GOVSATCOM

As the fourth pillar of the EU Space Programme, GOVSATCOM bridges the gap between the need for assured and secure communication and the capabilities already offered by Copernicus, Galileo and EGNOS. A user-centric programme, GOVSATCOM is designed to meet the unique requirements of governmental applications, including those used for crisis management, surveillance and the management of key infrastructures. The programme will provide a means of communication that is robustly protected against interference, interception, intrusion and other risks.

EUSPA has been entrusted with procuring the secure operational ground segment, its operations and the coordination of the user-related aspects of GOVSATCOM, all in close collaboration with Member States and other involved entities.

Complementing GOVSATCOM and the rest of the EU Space Programme is the EU’s Secure Connectivity Initiative. This new asset is set to provide secure communication services to the EU and its Member States, as well as offer a new level of connectivity for European citizens, private companies and governmental authorities. The initiative will build a resilient, ultra-secure space- and ground-based system that will put an end to dead zones and offer high-speed broadband to everyone in Europe and even some areas of Africa.

With the addition of the Secure Connectivity Initiative and GOVSATCOM, the EU and the Czech Presidency continue to ramp up Europe’s own space resources and infrastructure, strengthening its sovereignty and security. 

EUSPA looks forward to working with the Czech Presidency. Together, we can leverage the many benefits of the EU Space Programme to keep European citizens and interests safe and secure.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

In the face of growing global instability, the Czech EU Presidency has made security a key priority – and one that will be supported by the EU Space Programme.

EUSPA takes on the Space Surveillance and Tracking helpdesk as of 2023

27.6.2022 10:53  
As part of its expanded role in the #EUSpace Programme, EUSPA will take responsibility for the Programme’s Space Surveillance and Tracking (SST) Front Desk service.
Published: 
27 June 2022

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) will take responsibility for the Programme’s Space Surveillance and Tracking (SST) Front Desk operations service, following a Commission’s Decision of 03 June 2022. 

The responsibility will be transferred from the European Satellite Centre (SatCen), who currently operates the service, to EUSPA’s Galileo Security Monitoring Centre (GSMC) in Madrid, which will now serve as the SST Front Desk. The Front Desk is the main interface for the delivery of SST information and services, including activities related to user coordination, service performance, engagement and promotion. 

The EU established the SST as a means of mitigating the increasing risk of collision between European operators’ space assets, such as Galileo satellites, and other spacecraft and debris. To do this, the system uses a network of nationally owned ground-based sensors and other infrastructure to survey and track artificial space objects orbiting Earth. 

The SST is part of the Space Situational Awareness (SSA) component of the EU Space Programme and plays a key role in ensuring the safety and security of the European economies, societies and citizens who rely on space-based applications. As such, transferring the system’s Front Desk to EUSPA aligns with the Agency’s mission of linking space to user needs and further strengthens the resiliency of the EU Space Programme.  

In preparation for the transfer, EUSPA is working closely with SatCen to design, procure, validate and implement the necessary IT infrastructure. The two organisations are also cooperating on the handover of the relevant operational information and related competencies. EUSPA is currently in the process of onboarding the necessary talent to manage the service. 

In addition to its SST Front Desk responsibilities, EUSPA is preparing the system’s security monitoring jointly with the European Commission and the EUSST Consortium, particularly as to establishing the security requirements needed to shape the SST network. The Agency will also operate the security monitoring of the network.  

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

As part of its expanded role in the #EUSpace Programme, EUSPA will take responsibility for the Programme’s Space Surveillance and Tracking (SST) Front Desk service.

EUSPA re-opens testing campaign for INAV improvements implementation

24.6.2022 10:35  
The present European GNSS (Galileo) Open Service Signal-In-Space Interface Control Document (OS SIS ICD) Issue 2.0 contains the publicly available information on the Galileo Signal-In-Space.
Published: 
24 June 2022

The European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is re-opening a testing campaign for INAV improvements implementation and hereby invites external stakeholders to express their interest in participating in such testing campaign. 

The testing will cover any of the three I/NAV improvements (SSP, FEC-2, RedCED), that will be tested in laboratory using simulated realistic scenarios, including open sky as well as impaired environments. The tests will allow the participants to have confirmation of the correct implementation of the OSSISICD 2.0. In case of specific interest, legacy receivers (e.g. not implementing I/NAV improvements) could be also tested, solely at the scope of confirming that they are not impacted anyhow by the introduction of the new I/NAV capabilities (backward compatibility is in any case guaranteed “by design” for any receiver that is fully compliant with the Galileo OS SIS ICD provisions, and referring in particular to section 4.1.2). 

The characteristics of the testing campaign are described here.

The interested participants may be invited to provide their product(s) before 1 August or 1 October to the premises indicated below according to the terms and conditions that will be communicated by the agency and be ready to provide any remote technical assistance needed during the testing as well as all the necessary interface documentation required for the testing. Any further detailed provision, including the possibility to provide the testing laboratories with ad-hoc receiver development platforms facilitating the testing activities, will be discussed with the interested participants.

The tests will be executed at the laboratories of the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy, and of the European Space Agency ESA/ESTEC in Noordwijk, The Netherlands. Each applicant will be assigned by EUSPA to any of the two laboratories depending on the specific conditions and availability.

Testing is currently foreseen to be done in three batches, starting on 1 August and 1 October 2022. The EUSPA reserves the right to change the scope, and timeline of the procedure.

Express your interest 

If you are interested in participating in the testing campaign above, please express your interest by sending an email before 15/07/2022, 17:00 (Prague local time) to the following email address: market@euspa.europa.eu. The subject of the email shall be “INAV improvements implementation testing campaign: 2nd call”.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The present European GNSS (Galileo) Open Service Signal-In-Space Interface Control Document (OS SIS ICD) Issue 2.0 contains the publicly available information on the Galileo Signal-In-Space.

EUSPA re-opens testing campaign for INAV improvements implementation

24.6.2022 10:35  
The present European GNSS (Galileo) Open Service Signal-In-Space Interface Control Document (OS SIS ICD) Issue 2.0 contains the publicly available information on the Galileo Signal-In-Space.
Published: 
24 June 2022

(The information has been updated as of 29 July 2022)

The European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is re-opening a testing campaign for INAV improvements implementation and hereby invites external stakeholders to express their interest in participating in such testing campaign. 

The testing will cover any of the three I/NAV improvements (SSP, FEC-2, RedCED), that will be tested in laboratory using simulated realistic scenarios, including open sky as well as impaired environments. The tests will allow the participants to have confirmation of the correct implementation of the OSSISICD 2.0. In case of specific interest, legacy receivers (e.g. not implementing I/NAV improvements) could be also tested, solely at the scope of confirming that they are not impacted anyhow by the introduction of the new I/NAV capabilities (backward compatibility is in any case guaranteed “by design” for any receiver that is fully compliant with the Galileo OS SIS ICD provisions, and referring in particular to section 4.1.2). 

The characteristics of the testing campaign are described here.

The interested participants may be invited to provide their product(s) before 1 October to the premises indicated below according to the terms and conditions that will be communicated by the agency and be ready to provide any remote technical assistance needed during the testing as well as all the necessary interface documentation required for the testing. Any further detailed provision, including the possibility to provide the testing laboratories with ad-hoc receiver development platforms facilitating the testing activities, will be discussed with the interested participants.

The tests will be executed at the laboratories of the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy, and of the European Space Agency ESA/ESTEC in Noordwijk, The Netherlands. Each applicant will be assigned by EUSPA to any of the two laboratories depending on the specific conditions and availability.

Testing is currently foreseen to start on 1 October 2022. The EUSPA reserves the right to change the scope, and timeline of the procedure.

Express your interest 

If you are interested in participating in the testing campaign above, please express your interest by sending an email before 15/09/2022, 17:00 (Prague local time) to the following email address: market@euspa.europa.eu. The subject of the email shall be “INAV improvements implementation testing campaign: 2nd call”.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The present European GNSS (Galileo) Open Service Signal-In-Space Interface Control Document (OS SIS ICD) Issue 2.0 contains the publicly available information on the Galileo Signal-In-Space.

The EUSPA Space Academy: Lift off to a successful space business!

20.6.2022 17:57  
EUSPA Space Academy offers free online training to space entrepreneurs
Published: 
21 June 2022

Tired of the nine-to-five grind? Spacing out at your desk while thinking of launching your own start-up? 

It’s time to stop dreaming, buckle up and get ready for lift off towards exciting opportunities in space!

The Space Academy, a new initiative by the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), is your ticket to creating ground-breaking new apps and disruptive business solutions using the power of the EU Space Programme.

This free online training is open to all individuals, start-ups, entrepreneurs and SMEs who want to learn the ins and outs of building a space application business. 

From innovative idea to successful space business 

Your training starts with a series of modules that can be followed using your own device and completed when and where you want. The modules are taught by top academics, industry leaders and EUSPA experts, all of whom bring real-world experience to your learning journey. 

By covering a specific topic or skill, these modules serve as building blocks for turning your innovative idea into a successful space business. Topics range from the technical details of the EU Space Programme and its various components to practical business skills such as:

Customer support and sales

Building a successful team

Resource allocation

Business plans and models

Access to funding

Intellectual Property, copyrights and data policy

And much, much more

Pick and choose which modules to follow and tailor your training to your own unique learning needs. Opportunities for Q&As, one-on-one sessions, additional workshops, personalised follow-ups and mentoring may also be available. Once you finish the training, you’ll receive an official certificate of completion from EUSPA.  

What are you waiting for? Subscribe to the EUSPA Space Academy today and then it’s 3, 2, 1 lift off to a successful space business! 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EUSPA Space Academy offers free online training to space entrepreneurs

Think you know EU Space?

15.6.2022 12:38  
Test your EU Space knowledge with our quiz
Published: 
17 June 2022

You read our news, follow us on Twitter and Instagram, watch our YouTube videos, download our publications, and subscribe to our weekly Watch This Space Newsletter. Maybe you’ve even attended an event or two. 

But does that make you ‘space smart’?

To find out, it’s time to put your EU Space knowledge to the test and take our online quiz!

There are 10 questions that cover everything from EGNOS, Galileo and Copernicus to market uptake and the forthcoming GOVSATCOM. Some might be a breeze, but others might leave you scratching your head. 

To help you out, we’ve created this cheat sheet, which you can use to go from being a space student to becoming a space ace. 

How many Galileo satellites are now in orbit?

There are currently 28 Galileo satellites in orbit. The most recent satellite to enter service is called Nikolina, named after one of the children who won the 2020 Galileo drawing competition. With satellites 29 and 30 set for launch later this year, Galileo will soon enter Full Operational Capability. 

What are EUSPA’s responsibilities?

Under our new mandate, which went into effect just over a year ago, EUSPA is responsible not only for implementing the EU Space Programme (and ensuring that EU citizens and companies benefit and make the best out of it) but also for the satellite service provision of Galileo and EGNOS and the security accreditation of the EU Space Programme. But even with our expanded mandate and new responsibilities, EUSPA’s mission remains the same: linking space to user needs.

How many airports across Europe use EGNOS today for safer, greener and less noisy landings?

EGNOS has revolutionised aviation – creating greater access to small and regional airports, increasing safety and facilitating more sustainable flight routes across Europe. Today, over 400 airports have implemented EGNOS-based approaches, including many small and regional airports that cannot afford the high cost of ground-based navigational systems. By increasing accessibility to regional airports, EGNOS-based procedures help decongest Europe’s busy airspace, especially around the major hub airports.

At what altitude do Galileo satellites orbit Earth?

While Galileo satellites may be orbiting 22,900 kilometres above us, their impact is felt right here on Earth. Whether you’re using a navigation device in your car or on your mobile phone, thanks to these satellites in space, you’ll always know your exact position. That same positioning and timing information is also used for everything from search and rescue missions to keeping the trains running on time.

What percentage of new tractors in Europe use EGNOS?

With EGNOS, European farmers can leverage the many benefits of precision agriculture, including cutting waste, saving time, reducing fatigue, optimising equipment and increasing crop yields. No wonder 97% of new tractors use EGNOS! 

Which facts and figures are true about EUSPA?

Just as the EU is diverse, so too is EUSPA. Today, we have 250 colleagues from 22 different nationalities. Our team is spread across 7 locations and 5 sites that stretch from our headquarters in Prague to our operational facilities in France, Spain, the Netherlands, Germany, Italy and Belgium. With plans to expand to around 300 staff by 2024, we’re always looking for new talent to join our team

What will GOVSATCOM offer?

As the fourth pillar of the EU Space Programme, GOVSATCOM will offer secure communication capabilities to security and safety critical missions managed by the EU and its Member States. EUSPA has been entrusted with the procurement of the secure operational ground segment, its operations and the coordination of the user-related aspects of GOVSATCOM, all in close collaboration with Member States and other involved entities.

Today, how many smartphones use Galileo worldwide?

Around the world, more than 3 billion smartphones rely on Galileo’s precise positioning information for a range of location-based services. This number will continue to grow, as all smartphones sold within the European single market are now required to be Galileo-enabled

Which component of the EU Space Programme allows us to monitor climate change?

From curbing CO2 emissions to fighting illegal logging and tracking biodiversity, Copernicus – Europe’s Earth Observation programme – is an essential tool for monitoring climate change and delivering on the Green Deal’s ambitious goals. 

According to the 2022 EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report, how much revenue did the GNSS and Earth Observation downstream market generate in 2021? 

Not only did the GNSS and EO downstream market generate over EUR 200 billion in revenue in 2021, but it’s set to reach almost half a trillion over the next decade. Add this up and what you have is a very lucrative investment opportunity.

A space ace

You now have all the information you need to ace our space quiz. Keep following our EUSPA channels to ensure your EU Space knowledge stays in top form! 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Test your EU Space knowledge with our quiz

New Fundamental Elements call kicks off with dedicated workshop

14.6.2022 10:31  
Attendees at the Fundamental Elements workshop will learn about the programme and hear about previous projects
Published: 
14 June 2022

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is set to launch a new Fundamental Elements call. To kick things off, they are hosting a dedicated online workshop on 30 June. The workshop is an opportunity to not only learn about the new call, but also hear from successful projects funded during the last call.

Fundamental Elements is an R&D funding mechanism designed to support the development of innovative chipset, antenna and receiver technologies that industry would not yet invest in on its own initiative. In doing so, the programme helps accelerate the integration of European GNSS (EGNSS) into market-ready devices and solutions.  

Projects funded by Fundamental Elements play a key role in EUSPA’s mission of driving the development and market uptake of Galileo-enabled receivers. For example, the GEARS project, which was funded during the initial call, developed a super accurate and highly robust Galileo-enabled receiver capable of providing both time and frequency data for critical infrastructure. 

GEARS, another project funded during the programme’s first call, developed an eCall and anti-theft system leveraging Galileo. The innovative device integrated the anti-theft and e-call Galileo based system into a small/medium-size scooter manageable by the user through a mobile application, battery duration, and the antenna performance in a stressed environment, due to the vibrations and potential accidents.

The new Fundamental Elements call builds on the success of projects like these by: 

Integrating Galileo’s key differentiators into receiver technologies, including OS-NMA, High Accuracy Frequency, triple frequency, Early Warning Service, CAS and ARAIM

Leveraging disruptive technologies such as machine learning and artificial intelligence

Exploring potential synergies with Copernicus and the forthcoming GovSatCom 

More details about these points and the call in general will be made available during EUSPA’s upcoming Fundamental Elements online Workshop via Webex. Scheduled for 30 June, the workshop will include in-depth information on the funding programme and the application process. The event will also feature a number of project teams funded during the first Fundamental Elements call, who will share their experiences, best practices and advice for putting together a successful project. See the agenda here.     

You can register for the workshop here

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Attendees at the Fundamental Elements workshop will learn about the programme and hear about previous projects

New Fundamental Elements call kicks off with dedicated workshop

14.6.2022 10:31  
Attendees at the Fundamental Elements workshop will learn about the programme and hear about previous projects
Published: 
14 June 2022

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is set to launch a new Fundamental Elements call. To kick things off, they are hosting a dedicated online workshop on 30 June. The workshop is an opportunity to not only learn about the new call, but also hear from successful projects funded during the last call.

Fundamental Elements is an R&D funding mechanism designed to support the development of innovative chipset, antenna and receiver technologies that industry would not yet invest in on its own initiative. In doing so, the programme helps accelerate the integration of European GNSS (EGNSS) into market-ready devices and solutions.  

Projects funded by Fundamental Elements play a key role in EUSPA’s mission of driving the development and market uptake of Galileo-enabled receivers. For example, the GEARS project, which was funded during the initial call, developed a super accurate and highly robust Galileo-enabled receiver capable of providing both time and frequency data for critical infrastructure. 

GEARS, another project funded during the programme’s first call, developed an eCall and anti-theft system leveraging Galileo. The innovative device integrated the anti-theft and e-call Galileo based system into a small/medium-size scooter manageable by the user through a mobile application, battery duration, and the antenna performance in a stressed environment, due to the vibrations and potential accidents.

The new Fundamental Elements call builds on the success of projects like these by: 

Integrating Galileo’s key differentiators into receiver technologies, including OS-NMA, High Accuracy Frequency, triple frequency, Early Warning Service, CAS and ARAIM

Leveraging disruptive technologies such as machine learning and artificial intelligence

Exploring potential synergies with Copernicus and the forthcoming GovSatCom 

More details about these points and the call in general will be made available during EUSPA’s upcoming Fundamental Elements online Workshop via Webex. Scheduled for 30 June, the workshop will include in-depth information on the funding programme and the application process. The event will also feature a number of project teams funded during the first Fundamental Elements call, who will share their experiences, best practices and advice for putting together a successful project. See the agenda here.     

You can register for the workshop here

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Attendees at the Fundamental Elements workshop will learn about the programme and hear about previous projects

New Fundamental Elements call kicks off with dedicated workshop

14.6.2022 10:31  
Attendees at the Fundamental Elements workshop will learn about the programme and hear about previous projects
Published: 
14 June 2022

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is set to launch a new Fundamental Elements call. To kick things off, they are hosting a dedicated online workshop on 30 June. The workshop is an opportunity to not only learn about the new call, but also hear from successful projects funded during the last call.

Fundamental Elements is an R&D funding mechanism designed to support the development of innovative chipset, antenna and receiver technologies that industry would not yet invest in on its own initiative. In doing so, the programme helps accelerate the integration of European GNSS (EGNSS) into market-ready devices and solutions.  

Projects funded by Fundamental Elements play a key role in EUSPA’s mission of driving the development and market uptake of Galileo-enabled receivers. For example, the GEARS project, which was funded during the initial call, developed a super accurate and highly robust Galileo-enabled receiver capable of providing both time and frequency data for critical infrastructure. 

GEARS, another project funded during the programme’s first call, developed an eCall and anti-theft system leveraging Galileo. The innovative device integrated the anti-theft and e-call Galileo based system into a small/medium-size scooter manageable by the user through a mobile application, battery duration, and the antenna performance in a stressed environment, due to the vibrations and potential accidents.

The new Fundamental Elements call builds on the success of projects like these by: 

Integrating Galileo’s key differentiators into receiver technologies, including OS-NMA, High Accuracy Frequency, triple frequency, Early Warning Service, CAS and ARAIM

Leveraging disruptive technologies such as machine learning and artificial intelligence

Exploring potential synergies with Copernicus and the forthcoming GovSatCom 

More details about these points and the call in general will be made available during EUSPA’s upcoming Fundamental Elements online Workshop via Webex. Scheduled for 30 June, the workshop will include in-depth information on the funding programme and the application process. The event will also feature a number of project teams funded during the first Fundamental Elements call, who will share their experiences, best practices and advice for putting together a successful project.     

You can register for the workshop here

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Attendees at the Fundamental Elements workshop will learn about the programme and hear about previous projects

EU Space to keep Europe’s railways on track

10.6.2022 9:30  
The European rail sector is one step closer to leveraging GNSS as a safe source of positioning.
Published: 
10 June 2022

When it comes to making European rail safer, cleaner and more efficient, the EU Space Programme is nothing short of a gamechanger. As a case in point, look no further than the European Railway Traffic Management System (ERTMS). 

ERTMS aims to make rail transport safer and more competitive by replacing Europe’s different national train control and command systems with a single, coordinated and highly digital solution. To do this, it’s using European GNSS.

Not only does GNSS provide precise positioning and localisation, when augmented by EGNOS and possibly fused with other sensors, it has the potential to replace the expensive physical balises used to monitor train speed and streamline rail operations. 

GNSS’ potential becomes even greater when its positioning is complemented by Earth Observation. For example, railway operators can use Earth Observation data to monitor and prevent vegetation encroachment, landsides, and other risks that could endanger the safe operation of trains. 

With the goal of further advancing the safe use of GNSS as a source of positioning for trains, the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) has funded several research and development projects. One of those projects is CLUG, an initiative dedicated to developing a cost-efficient train tracking solution using EU satellite technology in conjunction with other sensors and data. 

Developing future train technology today

The CLUG project brought together experienced rail operators and infrastructure managers to define a set of specifications and operational scenarios capable of meeting the sector’s strict safety needs. The main outcome of this work is an interoperable, failsafe Train Localisation on Board Unit (TLOBU). 

The TLOBU uses measurements from a GNSS receiver and an EGNOS-enabled integrity algorithm, together with other technologies, such as an IMU and a digital map notably, to provide train and railway operators with such critical information as positioning and velocity. 

"It is within EUSPA’s long term strategy to ensure that EGNSS can support fail-safe train localization within ERTMS. CLUG consortium composed by many important railway undertakings and system integrators is contributing to this objective by developing Train Localization onboard unit, combining EGNSS with additional sensors to achieve the required localization performance in difficult railway environment," says Daniel Lopour, Market Development Officer for Rail and Logistics at EUSPA.

Read this: EGNOS and Galileo on the ambitious Digital Rail agenda (europa.eu)

“The idea is to move away from trackside-based train detection systems to onboard safe navigation systems using multi sensor fusion with EGNSS” said CLUG Project Coordinator Valentin Barreau, who made his remarks during the project’s Final Event on 9 June. 

“The absolute safe train positioning solution is oriented towards the needs of the future railway system. It will foster concepts such as intelligent traffic management, automated train operation (GoA2 to GoA4), ERTMS/ETCS Level 3 and it will decrease the cost of the ERTSM signalling system” by reducing the ground equipment used for safe train localisation, including axel counters, track circuits and, to some extent, physical balises.

Although the project itself is now finished, the CLUG team plans to continue developing its solution with the aim to include the necessary elements within the future evolution of the ERTMS technical specifications for interoperability.  

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The European rail sector is one step closer to leveraging GNSS as a safe source of positioning.

Pytheas Space Maritime Forum: educating the next generation EU seafarers and young professionals with the power of #EUSpace

8.6.2022 15:37  
The first Pytheas Maritime Space Forum is a 3 day summer camp open to EU students, seafarers and young professional between the ages of 20 and 30 with an interest in the shipping and/or space industries.
Published: 
08 June 2022

University is out, the weather is warm and the days are long – all signs that summer is finally here. But instead of spending the entire summer on the beach, why not travel to Athens and learn how the EU Space Programme is making the maritime sector smarter, safer and more sustainable?  

The first Pytheas Maritime Space Forum is a three-day summer camp open to EU students, seafarers and young professional between the ages of 20 and 30 with an interest in the shipping and/or space industries. Happening 15 – 17 July 2022, this is a one-of-a-kind opportunity to get an up-close understanding of how Galileo, Copernicus and EGNOS are redefining the shipping industry. 

The details 

Named after the Greek navigator, geographer, astronomer and explorer, the Pytheas Maritime Space Forum is organised by Isalos.net, a training initiative dedicated to connecting the shipping industry with the next generation of maritime professionals. 

Held within the framework of the 2022 European Year of Youth, the forum will provide students and young professionals from across the European Union with a platform for sharing their vision about the blue economy and the future of the maritime industry. The European Year of the Youth, an initiative of the European Union and the Directorate-General for Education, Youth, Sport and Culture, aims to highlight the important role that young Europeans play in building a greener, digital and more inclusive future.  

The Pytheas Maritime Space Forum is open to all EU citizens between 20 and 30 years old who are either studying or employed in the EU blue economy. To apply, please submit a letter of recommendation, a current CV and two brief essays.  

Students will be evaluated based on academic criteria by professors of the University of Aegean and Piraeus. Selected participants can expect a full three days of networking activities, informational sessions, hands-on workshops and on-site visits. Participation is free. Some students will be offered travel and accommodations costs

This forum will be an excellent opportunity to connect with fellow young professionals and underscores the essential roles that space-based technology and EUSPA play in driving a safer and more sustainable maritime industry.

EUSPA is happy to be contributing its expertise and knowledge in the fields of satellite navigation and Earth Observation to the forum’s agenda, which includes such topics as: 

Transformation of Shipping: emerging technologies in navigation and telecommunication

Space and the Sea: towards greener maritime operations

Safety and Security at sea enabled by the EU Space Programme.  

You can learn more about the forum here, or click here to start the application process. The deadline for applying is 15 June 2022.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The first Pytheas Maritime Space Forum is a 3 day summer camp open to EU students, seafarers and young professional between the ages of 20 and 30 with an interest in the shipping and/or space industries.

Pytheas Space Maritime Forum: educating the next generation EU seafarers and young professionals with the power of #EUSpace

8.6.2022 15:37  
The first Pytheas Maritime Space Forum is a 3 day summer camp open to EU students, seafarers and young professional between the ages of 20 and 30 with an interest in the shipping and/or space industries.
Published: 
08 June 2022

University is out, the weather is warm and the days are long – all signs that summer is finally here. But instead of spending the entire summer on the beach, why not travel to Athens and learn how the EU Space Programme is making the maritime sector smarter, safer and more sustainable?  

The first Pytheas Maritime Space Forum is a three-day summer camp open to EU students, seafarers and young professionals between the ages of 20 and 30 with an interest in the shipping and/or space industries. Happening 15 – 17 July 2022, this is a one-of-a-kind opportunity to get an up-close understanding of how Galileo, Copernicus and EGNOS are redefining the shipping industry. 

The details 

Named after the Greek navigator, geographer, astronomer and explorer, the Pytheas Maritime Space Forum is organised by Isalos.net, a training initiative dedicated to connecting the shipping industry with the next generation of maritime professionals. 

Held within the framework of the 2022 European Year of Youth, the forum will provide students and young professionals from across the European Union with a platform for sharing their vision about the blue economy and the future of the maritime industry. The European Year of the Youth, an initiative of the European Union and the Directorate-General for Education, Youth, Sport and Culture, aims to highlight the important role that young Europeans play in building a greener, digital and more inclusive future.  

The Pytheas Maritime Space Forum is open to all EU citizens between 20 and 30 years old who are either studying or employed in the EU blue economy. To apply, please submit a letter of recommendation, a current CV and two brief essays.  

Students will be evaluated based on academic criteria by professors of the University of Aegean and Piraeus. Selected participants can expect a full three days of networking activities, informational sessions, hands-on workshops and on-site visits. Participation is free. Some students will be offered travel and accommodations costs

This forum will be an excellent opportunity to connect with fellow young professionals and underscores the essential roles that space-based technology and EUSPA play in driving a safer and more sustainable maritime industry.

EUSPA is happy to be contributing its expertise and knowledge in the fields of satellite navigation and Earth Observation to the forum’s agenda, which includes such topics as: 

Transformation of Shipping: emerging technologies in navigation and telecommunication

Space and the Sea: towards greener maritime operations

Safety and Security at sea enabled by the EU Space Programme.  

You can learn more about the forum here, or click here to start the application process. The deadline for applying is 24 June 2022.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The first Pytheas Maritime Space Forum is a 3 day summer camp open to EU students, seafarers and young professional between the ages of 20 and 30 with an interest in the shipping and/or space industries.

Galileo OSNMA Workshop: testing insights and upcoming opportunities

7.6.2022 11:05  
To contribute to the detection of certain types of data-level GNSS attacks, EUSPA and the European Commission are currently testing the Galileo Open Service – Navigation Message Authentication (OSNMA)
Published: 
07 June 2022

The Galileo OSNMA Public Observation Test Phase is ongoing and has successfully gathered GNSS manufacturers, integrators and application developers to test this new authentication mechanism. Participants have been able to test OSNMA via Signal in Space (SiS) with a free choice of scenarios depending on their target use cases and assess the service’s performance. EUSPA values the feedback of testers and will leverage the knowledge gained during this phase to enhance the functionality in preparation for its service declaration. 

As mentioned during the Galileo OSNMA Public Observation Webinar held on 2nd February 2022, opportunities are designed throughout the testing phase for participants to discuss their test results with EUSPA experts and gain visibility for their OSNMA tested solutions. In this context, the Agency is organising the first Galileo OSNMA Public Observation Workshop to take place online on the 28th June 2022. You can find the agenda here. EUSPA experts will present an overview of the status of the testing phase, selected participants will discuss preliminary test results and market stakeholders will introduce their perspective on OSNMA added value for specific use cases. 

Participants will also have the opportunity to learn more about additional activities involving OSNMA. The European Commission Joint Research Centre (JRC) will present more details on the testing of scenarios not accessible via SiS, while the Institute of Electric and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) will showcase the role of OSNMA in the development of standards for a resilient position, navigation and time (PNT).

To attend this Workshop, please register here.

The registration will be open until June 26th. 

Relevant interested parties can still register for the Public Observation Test Phase by accessing the OSNMA Public Observation Webpage.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

To contribute to the detection of certain types of data-level GNSS attacks, EUSPA and the European Commission are currently testing the Galileo Open Service – Navigation Message Authentication (OSNMA)

Galileo OSNMA Workshop: testing insights and upcoming opportunities

7.6.2022 11:05  
To contribute to the detection of certain types of data-level GNSS attacks, EUSPA and the European Commission are currently testing the Galileo Open Service – Navigation Message Authentication (OSNMA)
Published: 
07 June 2022

The Galileo OSNMA Public Observation Test Phase is ongoing and has successfully gathered GNSS manufacturers, integrators and application developers to test this new authentication mechanism. Participants have been able to test OSNMA via Signal in Space (SiS) with a free choice of scenarios depending on their target use cases and assess the service’s performance. EUSPA values the feedback of testers and will leverage the knowledge gained during this phase to enhance the functionality in preparation for its service declaration. 

As mentioned during the Galileo OSNMA Public Observation Webinar held on 2nd February 2022, opportunities are designed throughout the testing phase for participants to discuss their test results with EUSPA experts and gain visibility for their OSNMA tested solutions. In this context, the Agency is organising the first Galileo OSNMA Public Observation Workshop to take place online on the 28th June 2022. You can find the agenda here. EUSPA experts will present an overview of the status of the testing phase, selected participants will discuss preliminary test results and market stakeholders will introduce their perspective on OSNMA added value for specific use cases. 

Participants will also have the opportunity to learn more about additional activities involving OSNMA. The European Commission Joint Research Centre (JRC) will present more details on the testing of scenarios not accessible via SiS, while the Institute of Electric and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) will showcase the role of OSNMA in the development of standards for a resilient position, navigation and time (PNT).

To attend this Workshop, please register here.

The registration will be open until June 26th. 

Relevant interested parties can still register for the Public Observation Test Phase by accessing the OSNMA Public Observation Webpage.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

To contribute to the detection of certain types of data-level GNSS attacks, EUSPA and the European Commission are currently testing the Galileo Open Service – Navigation Message Authentication (OSNMA)

Galileo OSNMA Workshop: testing insights and upcoming opportunities

7.6.2022 11:05  
To contribute to the detection of certain types of data-level GNSS attacks, EUSPA and the European Commission are currently testing the Galileo Open Service – Navigation Message Authentication (OSNMA)
Published: 
07 June 2022

The Galileo OSNMA Public Observation Test Phase is ongoing and has successfully gathered GNSS manufacturers, integrators and application developers to test this new authentication mechanism. Participants have been able to test OSNMA via Signal in Space (SiS) with a free choice of scenarios depending on their target use cases and assess the service’s performance. EUSPA values the feedback of testers and will leverage the knowledge gained during this phase to enhance the functionality in preparation for its service declaration. 

As mentioned during the Galileo OSNMA Public Observation Webinar held on 2nd February 2022, opportunities are designed throughout the testing phase for participants to discuss their test results with EUSPA experts and gain visibility for their OSNMA tested solutions. In this context, the Agency is organising the first Galileo OSNMA Public Observation Workshop to take place online on the 28th June 2022. You can find the agenda here. EUSPA experts will present an overview of the status of the testing phase, selected participants will discuss preliminary test results and market stakeholders will introduce their perspective on OSNMA added value for specific use cases. 

Participants will also have the opportunity to learn more about additional activities involving OSNMA. The European Commission Joint Research Centre (JRC) will present more details on the testing of scenarios not accessible via SiS, while the Institute of Electric and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) will showcase the role of OSNMA in the development of standards for a resilient position, navigation and time (PNT).

To attend this Workshop, please register here.

The registration will be open until June 26th. 

Relevant interested parties can still register for the Public Observation Test Phase by accessing the OSNMA Public Observation Webpage.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

To contribute to the detection of certain types of data-level GNSS attacks, EUSPA and the European Commission are currently testing the Galileo Open Service – Navigation Message Authentication (OSNMA)

EGNOS makes flying sustainably ‘easy’

3.6.2022 14:32  
A320neo with Pratt and Whtney engines is certified
Published: 
03 June 2022

EGNOS, the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service, has revolutionised the way we fly: creating greater access to small and regional airports, increasing safety and facilitating more sustainable flight routes across Europe. 

“From the commercial, regional, general and business aviation sectors to original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), airports and the end user – everyone benefits from EGNOS,” says Jean-Marc Piéplu,  Head of EGNOS Services Department at the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA).

With news that Airbus has delivered the first EGNOS-enabled A320neo to the popular low-cost airline EasyJet, soon even more passengers will be flying with EGNOS. The A320neo is the world’s most popular aircraft family for short-haul flights, claiming the greatest number of aircraft sold and delivered. 

Accurate guidance for safer landings

As an alternative to ground-based Instrument Landing System (ILS) navigational aids, EGNOS-enabled approaches, often referred to as localiser performance with vertical guidance (LPV), utilise geostationary satellites and a network of ground stations to receive, analyse and augment GNSS signals. In doing so, it enables aircraft approaches that are operationally equivalent to ILS CAT I, providing lateral and vertical guidance without the need for visual contact with the ground until a decision height of only 200 feet above the runway as minimum. 

In addition to providing pilots with accurate guidance for safer landings (even in poor weather conditions), EGNOS is also more cost effective to install, maintain and operate than equivalent ground-based systems. This makes EGNOS particularly attractive to Europe’s many small and regional airports that simply cannot afford the high cost of ILS. 

“Having the ability to cost-effectively offer accurate vertical guidance makes these airports safer and more attractive to short-haul flights,” explains Piéplu “Moreover, EGNOS based procedures are mandatory in all instrument runways by 2024, and will be the main means for CAT-I by 2030 in EU.” 

Towards a more sustainable aviation sector 

Not only are these EGNOS-enabled approaches safer, they’re also more sustainable. “Having LPV in all airports give more choices for alternate airports, which means that the distance to be flown could be shorter, and results in less fuel being burned and more emissions being released,” adds Carmen Aguilera, Operational Market Development Officer at EUSPA. “EGNOS approaches, as enabler of PBN, allows shorter trajectories with respect to conventional approaches, which is more fuel efficient.”

Thanks to its lower decision height, EGNOS can help pilots better evaluate visibility conditions, which in many cases means avoiding the need to circle or divert – two manoeuvres that burn a lot of fuel. “Minimising diversions and aborted landings mean less fuel consumption, a win-win for both the environment and the airlines,” concludes Aguilera. 

EGNOS services are delivered by the EGNOS service provider (ESSP) under a contract with EUSPA.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

A320neo with Pratt and Whtney engines is certified

EGNOS makes flying sustainably ‘easy’

3.6.2022 14:32  
A320neo with Pratt and Whtney engines is certified
Published: 
03 June 2022

EGNOS, the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service, has revolutionised the way we fly: creating greater access to small and regional airports, increasing safety and facilitating more sustainable flight routes across Europe. 

“From the commercial, regional, general and business aviation sectors to original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), airports and the end user – everyone benefits from EGNOS,” says Jean-Marc Piéplu,  Head of EGNOS Services Department at the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA).

With news that Airbus has delivered the first EGNOS-enabled A320neo to the popular low-cost airline EasyJet, soon even more passengers will be flying with EGNOS. The A320neo is the world’s most popular aircraft family for short-haul flights, claiming the greatest number of aircraft sold and delivered. 

Accurate guidance for safer landings

As an alternative to ground-based Instrument Landing System (ILS) navigational aids, EGNOS-enabled approaches, often referred to as localiser performance with vertical guidance (LPV), utilise geostationary satellites and a network of ground stations to receive, analyse and augment GNSS signals. In doing so, it enables aircraft approaches that are operationally equivalent to ILS CAT I, providing lateral and vertical guidance without the need for visual contact with the ground until a decision height of only 200 feet above the runway as minimum. 

In addition to providing pilots with accurate guidance for safer landings (even in poor weather conditions), EGNOS is also more cost effective to install, maintain and operate than equivalent ground-based systems. This makes EGNOS particularly attractive to Europe’s many small and regional airports that simply cannot afford the high cost of ILS. 

“Having the ability to cost-effectively offer accurate vertical guidance makes these airports safer and more attractive to short-haul flights,” explains Piéplu “Moreover, EGNOS based procedures are mandatory in all instrument runways by 2024, and will be the main means for CAT-I by 2030 in EU.” 

Towards a more sustainable aviation sector 

Not only are these EGNOS-enabled approaches safer, they’re also more sustainable. “Having LPV in all airports give more choices for alternate airports, which means that the distance to be flown could be shorter, and results in less fuel being burned and more emissions being released,” adds Carmen Aguilera, Operational Market Development Officer at EUSPA. “EGNOS approaches, as enabler of PBN, allows shorter trajectories with respect to conventional approaches, which is more fuel efficient.”

Thanks to its lower decision height, EGNOS can help pilots better evaluate visibility conditions, which in many cases means avoiding the need to circle or divert – two manoeuvres that burn a lot of fuel. “Minimising diversions and aborted landings mean less fuel consumption, a win-win for both the environment and the airlines,” concludes Aguilera. 

EGNOS services are delivered by the EGNOS service provider (ESSP) under a contract with EUSPA.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

A320neo with Pratt and Whtney engines is certified

Watch out - exciting disruption is happening ahead! #myEUspace winners announced

2.6.2022 13:10  
#myEUspace competition winners on Entrepreneurship Day at EUSPA
Published: 
02 June 2022

Farming by smartphone. Creating artistic, personalised products using satellite imagery. Building a better back nine from space. And monitoring road safety issues without a human in sight. 

These aren’t clips from some sci-fi future. It’s all happening now – thanks to EU Space and 11 very innovative European start-ups.

The start-ups are the winners of the #myEUspace competition, a EUSPA initiative supporting the development of innovative commercial applications that leverage data coming from the EU Space Programme

Launched in September 2021 as part of the European Commission’s CASSINI Space Entrepreneurship Initiative and with over EUR 1 million in prize money on the line, #myEUspace is one of the biggest competitions ever organised by EUSPA. 

And the winners are…

Following an intense nine-week process of fine-tuning prototypes and products, refining business plans and making final pitches to a scrutinising panel of judges, the competition’s winners were announced at EUSPA’s Entrepreneurship Day. 

While the selected solutions cover such diverse sectors as location-based services, smart mobility, geomatics and precision agriculture, they all share a foundation in their use of data coming from Galileo, Copernicus or a synergistic combination of the two.

So, without further ado, let us introduce to you 11 of Europe’s hottest, most disruptive space-based start-ups:

Track 1:

SANGENE: integrated GNSS-based passive radar for the detection and first localisation of obstacles.

EO4ART: web application for artistic and personalised products based on satellite images acquired over a specific region of interest.

ALTIWAVE: satellite-derived regional wave heights for the marine energy sector.

Master Map: automatic road mapping status for maintenance optimisation.

VirtualCrop: application for sustainable precision farming that turns phones into data gathering and analysis tools.

RIGOROUS: efficient and effective development and deployment of solutions based on using Randomness-Intensive algorithms for near-real-time route optimisation.

Track 2:

C-ITS Platform: increased road safety, powered by Galileo and Copernicus.

E20.Green: intelligent platform powered by GNSS, AI, EO and IoT that enables golf courses and urban green spaces to effectively manage their assets, operations and land.

SPAI: solution to easily integrate satellite analytics into the work practices of expert and non-expert users, effortlessly extracting the value of EO using AI.

SOILSPECT: automatic monitoring of ground settlement happening at construction sites.  

Agricircle: dashboard for monitoring the outcome of regenerative agriculture initiatives.

Defining the future today 

While the competition may be over, for these 11 start-ups, the work is just beginning. Armed with up to EUR 50,000 in prize money and ready access to additional sources of financing, mentoring and incubation, the winners will now work to further develop their products and services and move them towards commercialisation.

"Space data and services are driving innovation and enabling disruptive technologies in a wide range of sectors", says EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa. "Start-ups have been particularly enthusiastic in embracing the potential offered by the EU Space Programme. I would like to congratulate the winners and also the participants for the effort they put."

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

#myEUspace competition winners on Entrepreneurship Day at EUSPA

Watch out - exciting disruption is happening ahead! #myEUspace winners announced

2.6.2022 13:10  
#myEUspace competition winners on Entrepreneurship Day at EUSPA
Published: 
02 June 2022

Farming by smartphone. Creating artistic, personalised products using satellite imagery. Building a better back nine from space. And monitoring road safety issues without a human in sight. 

These aren’t clips from some sci-fi future. It’s all happening now – thanks to EU Space and 11 very innovative European start-ups.

The start-ups are the winners of the #myEUspace competition, a EUSPA initiative supporting the development of innovative commercial applications that leverage data coming from the EU Space Programme

Launched in September 2021 as part of the European Commission’s CASSINI Space Entrepreneurship Initiative and with over EUR 1 million in prize money on the line, #myEUspace is one of the biggest competitions ever organised by EUSPA. 

And the winners are…

Following an intense nine-week process of fine-tuning prototypes and products, refining business plans and making final pitches to a scrutinising panel of judges, the competition’s winners were announced at EUSPA’s Entrepreneurship Day. 

While the selected solutions cover such diverse sectors as location-based services, smart mobility, geomatics and precision agriculture, they all share a foundation in their use of data coming from Galileo, Copernicus or a synergistic combination of the two.

So, without further ado, let us introduce to you 11 of Europe’s hottest, most disruptive space-based start-ups:

Track 1:

SANGENE: integrated GNSS-based passive radar for the detection and first localisation of obstacles.

EO4ART: web application for artistic and personalised products based on satellite images acquired over a specific region of interest.

ALTIWAVE: satellite-derived regional wave heights for the marine energy sector.

Master Map: automatic road mapping status for maintenance optimisation.

VirtualCrop: application for sustainable precision farming that turns phones into data gathering and analysis tools.

RIGOROUS: efficient and effective development and deployment of solutions based on using Randomness-Intensive algorithms for near-real-time route optimisation.

Track 2:

C-ITS Platform: increased road safety, powered by Galileo and Copernicus.

E20.Green: intelligent platform powered by GNSS, AI, EO and IoT that enables golf courses and urban green spaces to effectively manage their assets, operations and land.

SPAI: solution to easily integrate satellite analytics into the work practices of expert and non-expert users, effortlessly extracting the value of EO using AI.

SOILSPECT: automatic monitoring of ground settlement happening at construction sites.  

Agricircle: dashboard for monitoring the outcome of regenerative agriculture initiatives.

Defining the future today 

While the competition may be over, for these 11 start-ups, the work is just beginning. Armed with up to EUR 50,000 in prize money and ready access to additional sources of financing, mentoring and incubation, the winners will now work to further develop their products and services and move them towards commercialisation.

"Space data and services are driving innovation and enabling disruptive technologies in a wide range of sectors", says EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa. "Start-ups have been particularly enthusiastic in embracing the potential offered by the EU Space Programme. I would like to congratulate the winners and also the participants for the effort they put."

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

#myEUspace competition winners on Entrepreneurship Day at EUSPA

Help us improve the EUSPA user experience

30.5.2022 12:02  
Help us improve the EUSPA user experience
Published: 
30 May 2022

EUSPA is revamping its online presence – and we need your help! Take part in our study and let us know how we can build a better website user experience for you.

When the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) was launched in May 2021, it represented the start of a new era for EU Space. With an expanded mandate and new responsibilities, EUSPA has remained committed to helping the EU, its citizens and its businesses maximise the many social and economic benefits offered by the EU Space Programme.

Part of this commitment means making sure you can easily access the EU Space information you need when and where you need it – and that starts with our website. To build a better user experience, we have created a study in two parts to find out what you want to see and how you want to see it. Take our short online survey and participate in our tree testing study to provide us with your valuable insights. Read on to learn more.

An evolving space programme and organisation

Today, the EU Space Programme consists of:

Read more: GOVSATCOM adds secure governmental communications to the EU Space Programme

Together, these core components enable a wide range of critical services and everyday applications, making the EU Space Programme indispensable to the lives of Europeans.

The EU Space Programme also provides essential infrastructure that gives the European economy an important competitive edge and plays a key role in Europe’s digital transformation. Copernicus, as the number one world provider of space data and information, coupled with Galileo’s impressive 20 cm accuracy, means that EU space technology and data are a major enabler in the GNSS and Earth Observation downstream market. A market, that on a global scale, is expected to reach almost EUR 500 billion in revenue over the next decade.

With so much growth on the horizon, in addition to managing an increasing workload, promoting innovative downstream applications, scaling the market share of EGNSS and Copernicus and creating new synergies across the EU Space Programme requires that EUSPA, as an organisation, evolve. That is why we are currently in the process of establishing ourselves as a matrix organisation. By streamlining our operations and maximising efficiency, this change in structure will allow us to better meet our expanded mandate and growing responsibilities.

We need your help!

Even with its expanded mandate, new responsibilities and an updated organisational structure, EUSPA’s mission remains the same: linking space to user needs. To ensure we continue to meet that mission, we need your support.

You can help us improve our website to better serve your needs in two ways:

  1. By taking our short survey, you will ensure that we are providing the type of information and content you are looking for when you visit the EUSPA site. Your input will be used to tailor the type of online content we provide.
  2. Our tree testing study, which should take no more than 10 minutes of your time, will help us better understand how you navigate our site and how easily you can find the information you are looking for. We’ll use your input to design an enhanced user experience for our online presence.

Because we want to gather input from as many different users as possible, we also ask that you share our survey within your own network. Simply copy and paste this link (https://bit.ly/3sRBhlM) into your preferred social media channels, email and messaging apps.

Together, we can make the link between space and users even stronger!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Help us improve the EUSPA user experience

EU Space is the key to disaster risk management and response

27.5.2022 15:59  
EUSPA's Executive Director at Disaster Risk Management Workshop in Athens, Greece
Published: 
27 May 2022

When it comes to weather-related events, 2021 was a record-breaking year for Europe. The summer the hottest on record – with a part of Sicily setting a provisional heat record for Europe at 48.8 degrees Celsius in August – translating into a very dry Mediterranean region. This extreme heatwave ignited wildfires across countries like Greece and Italy. According to the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT), these fires overwhelmed firefighters, forced people to evacuate their homes and left at least 86 dead. By the end, 2021 was the second worst year ever for forest fires in the Mediterranean. But it wasn’t just southern Europe that suffered. Up north, parts of Germany, Belgium and some surrounding countries were inundated by record-breaking rains and deadly flooding. 

“Satellite technologies have proven invaluable in addressing emergencies, with an enormous potential to further contribute to effective response and adequate recovery” said Minister for Climate Crisis  and Protection in his opening remarks  at the Satellite-based Services for Disaster Risk Management Workshop organised in Athens, Greece. ‘’ EU programmes like Copernicus and Galileo help us build an efficient disaster risk management cycle - prevent and prepare, respond, and recover” he concluded.

EUSPA's Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa with Greece's Minister for the Climate Crisis and Civil Protection Christos Stylianides

“Last summer was a case study in the importance of having innovative tools and solutions for effective disaster risk management and response,” said Rodrigo da Costa, Executive Director of the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA). “The key to building these potentially life-saving tools and solutions is the EU Space Programme.”

According to da Costa, each component of the EU Space Programme brings added value to different phases of the disaster risk management and mitigation chain. For example, the Copernicus EMS service provides on-demand, detailed information for selected emergency situations, including fires and flooding. 

The service also offers continuous observations and forecasting for flood, drought and fire risks, providing decision makers with the critical geospatial information they need to, for example, issue an evacuation order or early warning alert. 

The power of synergy 

Although Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus each offer emergency responders with a unique tool set, EU Space offers even more benefits when used in synergy. 

“When the Greek central region of Thessaly has been affected by floods in 2020 trapping hundreds of people and rendered transportation and communication infrastructure useless, satellite communication, working in synergy with Copernicus (CEMS activation) and European GNSS (EGNSS), provided rescue teams with the spatial awareness, connectivity and highly accurate positioning and navigation they needed to save lives,” da Costa told the Hellenic Parliament in Greece. 

As part of his visit to Athens, da Costa addressed the Parliament’s Special Permanent Committee on Environmental Protection during a dedicated discussion on using the EU Space Programme to prevent and respond to natural disasters.

This synergy between GNSS and Earth Observation is particularly beneficial to drone operations, which emergency response teams use for everything from inspecting flooded areas to post-earthquake search and rescue operations and monitoring remote wildfires. 

As to the later, firefighting teams are replacing traditional ground-based systems supported by manned aircraft with more cost-effective drones. Equipped with a wide-range of sensors for capturing Earth Observation data and navigated using GNSS positioning, advanced drones can now provide firefighters with another layer of information – and protection.    

Secure satellite communications for security and safety-critical missions 

But what happens when a disaster occurs where there are no ground stations, either because they were destroyed, such as during an earthquake, or because they never existed in the first place? Or what if the end users require secure communication? 

For emergency situations like these, there’s GOVSATCOM.

As the fourth pillar of the EU Space Programme, GOVSATCOM will provide secure, cost-efficient communication capabilities to security and safety-critical missions, operations and infrastructure. Its users will include border and maritime authorities, law enforcement agencies, civil protection forces, search and rescue services, disaster relief and humanitarian missions, authorised infrastructure operators and military forces. 

 

By working in synergy with Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus, GOVSATCOM will further enhance the EU Space Programme’s ability to keep European citizens safe and secure.  While Copernicus and EGNSS provide the necessary data and positioning, some security incidents also require a means of communication that is robustly protected against interference, interception, intrusion and other risks. GOVSATCOM bridges this gap between the need for assured and secure communication and the capabilities already offered by Copernicus, Galileo and EGNOS.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EUSPA's Executive Director at Disaster Risk Management Workshop in Athens, Greece

Entrepreneurship Day a not-to-be-missed event for start-ups, scale-ups, innovators and investors

25.5.2022 11:43  
Entrepreneurship Day a not-to-be-missed event for start-ups, scale-ups, innovators and investors
Published: 
25 May 2022

If you’re a European start-up, scale-up, SME, entrepreneur, innovator or investor and aren’t taking advantage of the EU Space Programme then listen up: you’re missing out on a big opportunity.

Just how big are we talking?

According to research conducted by the experts at the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), the GNSS and Earth Observation downstream market generated over EUR 200 billion in revenue in 2021. What’s more, this market is expected to hit the half trillion mark over the next decade.

Now that we have your attention, it’s time to take out your calendar and circle 1 June. That’s the day EUSPA will provide all the information and insight you need to successfully integrate European space solutions into your business idea, start-up or innovation.

Taking place at EUSPA Headquarters in Prague, Entrepreneurship Day is a chance to learn about the EU Space Programme and how EUSPA supports those looking to innovate and invest using European GNSS and Earth Observation. It’s also an opportunity to get a first-hand look at how innovative space-based solutions are delivering cutting-edge, often industry-defining services across a range of application areas – many of which will be exhibiting during the event as part of the #myEUspace competition.

Bringing space-solutions onto the European market

Organised by EUSPA as part of the European Commission’s CASSINI - Space Entrepreneurship Initiative, the #myEUspace competition has committed EUR 1 million in prize money to bring disruptive, space-based solutions onto the European market. The accelerated start-ups developed a range of novel solutions, new technologies, mobile apps and hardware. While each solution covers a different sector, including location-based services, smart mobility, geomatics and smart agriculture, they all share a foundation in their use of data coming from Galileo and/or Copernicus

“Space data is at the heart of the technological revolution currently sweeping Europe, and this competition is another example of how EUSPA supports innovative entrepreneurs, start-ups and SMEs from across the EU who are leveraging Copernicus and Galileo data, information and services,” says Fiammetta Diani, EUSPA Head of Market, Downstream and Innovation. 

Nearly 40 EU start-ups will be on hand at Entrepreneurship Day to share how their space-based innovations support the EU’s strategic agenda. The start-ups will also provide live demonstrations as part of their final pitch to judges, who will announce the winners of the #myEUspace competition at the end of the day.    

Information for fund managers and investors too

Entrepreneurship Day will also host the latest edition of our Capacity Building for Fund Managers series

Organised by EUSPA, in collaboration with the European Commission, European Space Agency (ESA) and European Investment Fund (EIF), this series of five workshops is designed to provide venture capitalists, fund managers and other investors with the in-depth information they need to make smart, informed investment decisions. 

“If you want to become an active investor in this exciting field or simply want to gather more information before deciding to raise a new fund, then this capacity building programme is for you,” adds Diani.

The workshop will be held live during Entrepreneurship Day, as well as online. 

A focus on start-ups 

On top of the start-up showcase, the #myEUspace competition and the Capacity Building workshop, the Entrepreneurship Day agenda  will feature panel discussions on how to grow a start-up and best practices in start-up investment. 

“Because of their agility and unique ability to adjust to new business models and adapt to new technologies, start-ups are particularly well-positioned to leverage the potential offered by the EU Space Programme,” notes Diani. 

The day also includes dedicated time for business matchmaking and of course plenty of opportunities for networking.

Join us virtually for the afternoon sessions by tuning in here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Entrepreneurship Day happening June 1st at EUSPA headquarters in Prague

Entrepreneurship Day a not-to-be-missed event for start-ups, scale-ups, innovators and investors

25.5.2022 11:43  
Entrepreneurship Day a not-to-be-missed event for start-ups, scale-ups, innovators and investors
Published: 
25 May 2022

If you’re a European start-up, scale-up, SME, entrepreneur, innovator or investor and aren’t taking advantage of the EU Space Programme then listen up: you’re missing out on a big opportunity.

Just how big are we talking?

According to research conducted by the experts at the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), the GNSS and Earth Observation downstream market generated over EUR 200 billion in revenue in 2021. What’s more, this market is expected to hit the half trillion mark over the next decade.

Now that we have your attention, it’s time to take out your calendar and circle 1 June. That’s the day EUSPA will provide all the information and insight you need to successfully integrate European space solutions into your business idea, start-up or innovation.

Taking place at EUSPA Headquarters in Prague, Entrepreneurship Day is a chance to learn about the EU Space Programme and how EUSPA supports those looking to innovate and invest using European GNSS and Earth Observation. It’s also an opportunity to get a first-hand look at how innovative space-based solutions are delivering cutting-edge, often industry-defining services across a range of application areas – many of which will be exhibiting during the event as part of the #myEUspace competition.

Bringing space-solutions onto the European market

Organised by EUSPA as part of the European Commission’s CASSINI - Space Entrepreneurship Initiative, the #myEUspace competition has committed EUR 1 million in prize money to bring disruptive, space-based solutions onto the European market. The accelerated start-ups developed a range of novel solutions, new technologies, mobile apps and hardware. While each solution covers a different sector, including location-based services, smart mobility, geomatics and smart agriculture, they all share a foundation in their use of data coming from Galileo and/or Copernicus

“Space data is at the heart of the technological revolution currently sweeping Europe, and this competition is another example of how EUSPA supports innovative entrepreneurs, start-ups and SMEs from across the EU who are leveraging Copernicus and Galileo data, information and services,” says Fiammetta Diani, EUSPA Head of Market, Downstream and Innovation. 

Nearly 40 EU start-ups will be on hand at Entrepreneurship Day to share how their space-based innovations support the EU’s strategic agenda. The start-ups will also provide live demonstrations as part of their final pitch to judges, who will announce the winners of the #myEUspace competition at the end of the day.    

Information for fund managers and investors too

Entrepreneurship Day will also host the latest edition of our Capacity Building for Fund Managers series

Organised by EUSPA, in collaboration with the European Commission, European Space Agency (ESA) and European Investment Fund (EIF), this series of five workshops is designed to provide venture capitalists, fund managers and other investors with the in-depth information they need to make smart, informed investment decisions. 

“If you want to become an active investor in this exciting field or simply want to gather more information before deciding to raise a new fund, then this capacity building programme is for you,” adds Diani.

The workshop will be held live during Entrepreneurship Day, as well as online. 

A focus on start-ups 

On top of the start-up showcase, the #myEUspace competition and the Capacity Building workshop, the Entrepreneurship Day agenda  will feature panel discussions on how to grow a start-up and best practices in start-up investment. 

“Because of their agility and unique ability to adjust to new business models and adapt to new technologies, start-ups are particularly well-positioned to leverage the potential offered by the EU Space Programme,” notes Diani. 

The day also includes dedicated time for business matchmaking and of course plenty of opportunities for networking.

Join us virtually for the afternoon sessions by tuning in here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Entrepreneurship Day happening June 1st at EUSPA headquarters in Prague

Entrepreneurship Day a not-to-be-missed event for start-ups, scale-ups, innovators and investors

25.5.2022 11:43  
Entrepreneurship Day a not-to-be-missed event for start-ups, scale-ups, innovators and investors
Published: 
25 May 2022

If you’re a European start-up, scale-up, SME, entrepreneur, innovator or investor and aren’t taking advantage of the EU Space Programme then listen up: you’re missing out on a big opportunity.

Just how big are we talking?

According to research conducted by the experts at the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), the GNSS and Earth Observation downstream market generated over EUR 200 billion in revenue in 2021. What’s more, this market is expected to hit the half trillion mark over the next decade.

Now that we have your attention, it’s time to take out your calendar and circle 1 June. That’s the day EUSPA will provide all the information and insight you need to successfully integrate European space solutions into your business idea, start-up or innovation.

Taking place at EUSPA Headquarters in Prague, Entrepreneurship Day is a chance to learn about the EU Space Programme and how EUSPA supports those looking to innovate and invest using European GNSS and Earth Observation. It’s also an opportunity to get a first-hand look at how innovative space-based solutions are delivering cutting-edge, often industry-defining services across a range of application areas – many of which will be exhibiting during the event as part of the #myEUspace competition.

Bringing space-solutions onto the European market

Organised by EUSPA as part of the European Commission’s CASSINI - Space Entrepreneurship Initiative, the #myEUspace competition has committed EUR 1 million in prize money to bring disruptive, space-based solutions onto the European market. The accelerated start-ups developed a range of novel solutions, new technologies, mobile apps and hardware. While each solution covers a different sector, including location-based services, smart mobility, geomatics and smart agriculture, they all share a foundation in their use of data coming from Galileo and/or Copernicus

“Space data is at the heart of the technological revolution currently sweeping Europe, and this competition is another example of how EUSPA supports innovative entrepreneurs, start-ups and SMEs from across the EU who are leveraging Copernicus and Galileo data, information and services,” says Fiammetta Diani, EUSPA Head of Market, Downstream and Innovation. 

Nearly 40 EU start-ups will be on hand at Entrepreneurship Day to share how their space-based innovations support the EU’s strategic agenda. The start-ups will also provide live demonstrations as part of their final pitch to judges, who will announce the winners of the #myEUspace competition at the end of the day.    

Information for fund managers and investors too

Entrepreneurship Day will also host the latest edition of our Capacity Building for Fund Managers series

Organised by EUSPA, in collaboration with the European Commission, European Space Agency (ESA) and European Investment Fund (EIF), this series of five workshops is designed to provide venture capitalists, fund managers and other investors with the in-depth information they need to make smart, informed investment decisions. 

“If you want to become an active investor in this exciting field or simply want to gather more information before deciding to raise a new fund, then this capacity building programme is for you,” adds Diani.

The workshop will be held live during Entrepreneurship Day, as well as online. 

A focus on start-ups 

On top of the start-up showcase, the #myEUspace competition and the Capacity Building workshop, the Entrepreneurship Day agenda  will feature panel discussions on how to grow a start-up and best practices in start-up investment. 

“Because of their agility and unique ability to adjust to new business models and adapt to new technologies, start-ups are particularly well-positioned to leverage the potential offered by the EU Space Programme,” notes Diani. 

The day also includes dedicated time for business matchmaking and of course plenty of opportunities for networking.

Join us virtually for the afternoon sessions by tuning in here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Entrepreneurship Day happening June 1st at EUSPA headquarters in Prague

Copernicus to expand its user-base with new demonstrators

24.5.2022 10:26  
The European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is playing a key role in the downstream user uptake activities of Copernicus, the EU Earth Observation Programme
Published: 
24 May 2022

Copernicus has been monitoring the Earth’s environment from several years now, providing a unique combination of full, free and open data and services in six thematic areas: Land, Marine, Atmosphere, Climate Change, Emergency and Security. The Copernicus system consists of three main components: a space component, which delivers data from a fleet of dedicated observation satellites (the ‘Sentinels’) and from contributing missions; an in-situ component which collects data acquired by a multitude of sensors at air-, sea- and ground-level; and a service component which transforms the wealth of satellite and in-situ data into timely and actionable information products.

The European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is playing a key role in the downstream user uptake activities of Copernicus, the EU Earth Observation Programme. In its current role related to the Copernicus Programme, EUSPA is looking to demonstrate 6 innovative Proof of Concepts, starting from 10 areas, divided in two Lots:

  • Lot 1: Mobility, Emergency and Infrastructures
  • Lot 2: Consumer and Environment

For each Lot, 3 Proof of Concepts will be demonstrated, starting from 5 areas, prioritizing the most impactful and promising markets for current and potential Copernicus data use.

Read this: How the EU Space Programme helps address the new challenges of a changing Arctic

The objective is to demonstrate the utilization of Copernicus data and services in the user’s operational environment. Therefore, the technical demonstration should be concretely integrated in a controlled operational environment of the user.

EUSPA intends to promote the widest participation possible by economic operators, in particular start-ups, new entrants, and SMEs.

To do so, the agency is organizing an industry day on 06 June 2022 at 10:00 to present the details of the procurement for “Copernicus Demonstrators”. You can find the agenda here.

Potential participants will have the opportunity to learn more about the mission of the European Union Agency for the Space Programme and the procurement documentation and submission process.

For more information about the utility of Earth Observation data across various market segments you can consult the EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report.

To attend this industry day, please register here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is playing a key role in the downstream user uptake activities of Copernicus, the EU Earth Observation Programme

Copernicus to expand its user-base with new demonstrators (Webinar)

24.5.2022 10:26  
The European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is playing a key role in the downstream user uptake activities of Copernicus, the EU Earth Observation Programme
Published: 
24 May 2022

Copernicus has been monitoring the Earth’s environment from several years now, providing a unique combination of full, free and open data and services in six thematic areas: Land, Marine, Atmosphere, Climate Change, Emergency and Security. The Copernicus system consists of three main components: a space component, which delivers data from a fleet of dedicated observation satellites (the ‘Sentinels’) and from contributing missions; an in-situ component which collects data acquired by a multitude of sensors at air-, sea- and ground-level; and a service component which transforms the wealth of satellite and in-situ data into timely and actionable information products.

The European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is playing a key role in the downstream user uptake activities of Copernicus, the EU Earth Observation Programme. In its current role related to the Copernicus Programme, EUSPA is looking to demonstrate 6 innovative Proof of Concepts, starting from 10 areas, divided in two Lots:

  • Lot 1: Mobility, Emergency and Infrastructures
  • Lot 2: Consumer and Environment

For each Lot, 3 Proof of Concepts will be demonstrated, starting from 5 areas, prioritizing the most impactful and promising markets for current and potential Copernicus data use.

Read this: How the EU Space Programme helps address the new challenges of a changing Arctic

The objective is to demonstrate the utilization of Copernicus data and services in the user’s operational environment. Therefore, the technical demonstration should be concretely integrated in a controlled operational environment of the user.

EUSPA intends to promote the widest participation possible by economic operators, in particular start-ups, new entrants, and SMEs.

To do so, the agency is organizing an industry day -online- on 06 June 2022 at 10:00 to present the details of the procurement for “Copernicus Demonstrators”. You can find the agenda here.

Potential participants will have the opportunity to learn more about the mission of the European Union Agency for the Space Programme and the procurement documentation and submission process.

For more information about the utility of Earth Observation data across various market segments you can consult the EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report.

Join us for the webinar, register here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is playing a key role in the downstream user uptake activities of Copernicus, the EU Earth Observation Programme

Copernicus to expand its user-base with new demonstrators

24.5.2022 10:26  
The European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is playing a key role in the downstream user uptake activities of Copernicus, the EU Earth Observation Programme
Published: 
24 May 2022

Copernicus has been monitoring the Earth’s environment from several years now, providing a unique combination of full, free and open data and services in six thematic areas: Land, Marine, Atmosphere, Climate Change, Emergency and Security. The Copernicus system consists of three main components: a space component, which delivers data from a fleet of dedicated observation satellites (the ‘Sentinels’) and from contributing missions; an in-situ component which collects data acquired by a multitude of sensors at air-, sea- and ground-level; and a service component which transforms the wealth of satellite and in-situ data into timely and actionable information products.

The European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is playing a key role in the downstream user uptake activities of Copernicus, the EU Earth Observation Programme. In its current role related to the Copernicus Programme, EUSPA is looking to demonstrate 6 innovative Proof of Concepts, starting from 10 areas, divided in two Lots:

  • Lot 1: Mobility, Emergency and Infrastructures
  • Lot 2: Consumer and Environment

For each Lot, 3 Proof of Concepts will be demonstrated, starting from 5 areas, prioritizing the most impactful and promising markets for current and potential Copernicus data use.

Read this: How the EU Space Programme helps address the new challenges of a changing Arctic

The objective is to demonstrate the utilization of Copernicus data and services in the user’s operational environment. Therefore, the technical demonstration should be concretely integrated in a controlled operational environment of the user.

EUSPA intends to promote the widest participation possible by economic operators, in particular start-ups, new entrants, and SMEs.

To do so, the agency is organizing an industry day on 06 June 2022 at 10:00 to present the details of the procurement for “Copernicus Demonstrators”. You can find the agenda here.

Potential participants will have the opportunity to learn more about the mission of the European Union Agency for the Space Programme and the procurement documentation and submission process.

For more information about the utility of Earth Observation data across various market segments you can consult the EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report.

To attend this industry day, please register here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is playing a key role in the downstream user uptake activities of Copernicus, the EU Earth Observation Programme

New chair-elect for the Security Accreditation Board (SAB) of EUSPA

19.5.2022 9:55  
Philippe Bertrand, EUSPA SAB Chair, Rodrigo da Costa, EUSPA Executive Director, Bruno Vermeire, outgoing EUSPA SAB chair
Published: 
19 May 2022

During the 52nd meeting of EUSPA’s Security Accreditation Board, Mr Philippe Bertrand, European affairs DGA coordinator, was elected as its new chair by the Member States representatives.

Philippe Bertrand has a vast experience in space-related activities and more specifically in satellite navigation. He has held several managerial positions in the public sector, namely in the French Armed Forces, the office of the French Prime Minister and the European Commission.

"I am honoured to have been elected Chair of the EUSPA Security Accreditation Board and I would like to thank all the EU Member States representatives for putting their trust in me. In times of increased security cyber threats and attacks, maintaining the systems intact and guaranteeing the reliability of data to end-users is of utmost importance" stated Bertrand. "All together, we will keep the safety and security of our space assets in the forefront" he concluded.Bertrand thanked outgoing Chair, Bruno Vermeire for his leadership over the past four years.

"EUSPA is a cluster of experienced professionals and they are doing a fantastic job. I want to thank them for their patience and their incredible competence in security matters. I would also like to thank the other Member states for their permanent commitment to supporting me in achieving my mission and the European Commission for their collaboration" were Vermeire’s final remarks.

"The only way to ensure the security of each and every link, and thus of the entire EU Space Programme, is through the collaboration of all relevant actors from EUSPA’s security apparatus. The SAB is central to ensuring the security of our systems" says EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa. "I look forward to working closely with our new SAB Chair now that EUSPA accredits all the EU Space Programme components" concludes da Costa.

"I would like to congratulate Phillipe Bertrand on his election by the EU Member States.  I am sure the EUSPA SAB will benefit from his guidance and expertise in space security" said EUSPA AB Chair, Václav Kobera.

About the Security Accreditation Board 

EUSPA is the security gatekeeper of the EU Space Programme. The SAB is the security accreditation authority for all of the EU Space Programme’s components. It ensures that all systems comply with the relevant security requirements, including Cyber and Supply Chain, and provides statements of approval to operate the systems and services with the objective that the EU space based services and data can be used by the EU citizens in a trusted way.

An independent body within EUSPA, the SAB is composed of a representative from each Member State, the Commission, and the High Representative for the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy. The board independently makes its decisions, including in regard to the Commission and other bodies responsible for implementing the components and provision of service.

More information on the SAB way of working can be found in the SAB Rules of Procedure (RoP).

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Philippe Bertrand, EUSPA SAB Chair, Rodrigo da Costa, EUSPA Executive Director, Bruno Vermeire, outgoing EUSPA SAB chair

New chair-elect for the Security Accreditation Board (SAB) of EUSPA

19.5.2022 9:55  
Philippe Bertrand, EUSPA SAB Chair, Rodrigo da Costa, EUSPA Executive Director, Bruno Vermeire, outgoing EUSPA SAB chair
Published: 
18 May 2022

During the 52nd meeting of EUSPA’s Security Accreditation Board, Mr Philippe Bertrand, European affairs DGA coordinator, was elected as its new chair by the Member States representatives.

Philippe Bertrand has a vast experience in space-related activities and more specifically in satellite navigation. He has held several managerial positions in the public sector, namely in the French Armed Forces, the office of the French Prime Minister and the European Commission.

"I am honoured to have been elected Chair of the EUSPA Security Accreditation Board and I would like to thank all the EU Member States representatives for putting their trust in me. In times of increased security cyber threats and attacks, maintaining the systems intact and guaranteeing the reliability of data to end-users is of utmost importance" stated Bertrand. "All together, we will keep the safety and security of our space assets in the forefront" he concluded.Bertrand thanked outgoing Chair, Bruno Vermeire for his leadership over the past four years.

"EUSPA is a cluster of experienced professionals and they are doing a fantastic job. I want to thank them for their patience and their incredible competence in security matters. I would also like to thank the other Member states for their permanent commitment to supporting me in achieving my mission and the European Commission for their collaboration" were Vermeire’s final remarks.

"The only way to ensure the security of each and every link, and thus of the entire EU Space Programme, is through the collaboration of all relevant actors from EUSPA’s security apparatus. The SAB is central to ensuring the security of our systems" says EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa. "I look forward to working closely with our new SAB Chair now that EUSPA accredits all the EU Space Programme components" concludes da Costa.

"I would like to congratulate Phillippe Bertrand on his election by the EU Member States.  I am sure the EUSPA SAB will benefit from his guidance and expertise in space security" said EUSPA AB Chair, Václav Kobera.

About the Security Accreditation Board 

EUSPA is the security gatekeeper of the EU Space Programme. The SAB is the security accreditation authority for all of the EU Space Programme’s components. It ensures that all systems comply with the relevant security requirements, including Cyber and Supply Chain, and provides statements of approval to operate the systems and services with the objective that the EU space based services and data can be used by the EU citizens in a trusted way.

An independent body within EUSPA, the SAB is composed of a representative from each Member State, the Commission, and the High Representative for the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy. The board independently makes its decisions, including in regard to the Commission and other bodies responsible for implementing the components and provision of service.

More information on the SAB way of working can be found in the SAB Rules of Procedure (RoP).

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Philippe Bertrand, EUSPA SAB Chair, Rodrigo da Costa, EUSPA Executive Director, Bruno Vermeire, outgoing EUSPA SAB chair

Happy Birthday EUSPA!

12.5.2022 8:58  
Published: 
12 May 2022

The EU Agency for the Space Programme celebrates its first anniversary with new services, a new satellite and even more end users.

Time flies when you’re busy getting things done. And in the first year of its existence, the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) has gotten a lot of things done.

EUSPA’s launch one year ago today represented the start of a new era for the EU Space Programme,” says EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. “With an expanded mandate and new responsibilities, we are committed to helping the EU, its citizens and its businesses maximise the many social and economic benefits of space.”

“Today we celebrate EUSPA. It's also the opportunity to reflect and be proud of the milestones we achieved by working together. More users, more services, and satellites in space! Go Europe, go EUSPA!'' concludes EUSPA Administrative Board Chair, Václav Kobera.

Building on the legacy of the European GNSS Agency (GSA), EUSPA’s mandate includes not only overseeing the security, services and market uptake of Galileo and EGNOS, but also Copernicus, Europe’s Earth Observation (EO) service – an area with significant commercial potential.

According to the first ever EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report, published earlier this year, SMEs and start-ups account for more than 93% of European Earth Observation companies. With revenues set to double from approximately EUR 2.8 billion to over EUR 5.5 billion within the next decade, the EO market is full of opportunities for EU businesses and entrepreneurs.

To ensure companies take advantage of these opportunities, EUSPA has positioned itself as the go-to-source for all things related to Earth Observation. In addition to providing market intelligence, the Agency works directly with businesses to help them best leverage Copernicus data, information and services. EUSPA also launched several EO focused funding opportunities, including Horizon Calls and innovation competitions.

But Copernicus doesn’t exist in a vacuum. It also complements the other components of the EU Space Programme, which is why EUSPA is constantly promoting the benefits of using Copernicus, Galileo and EGNOS together.

“Galileo and EGNOS enable the determination of a precise position, anywhere and Copernicus provides information on the Earth’s surface, atmosphere and oceans,” adds da Costa. “When you put these programmes together, you unleash an array of synergies that can have a powerful impact on society and the planet.”

A new pillar for the EU Space Programme

This list of space programmes will soon add a new name. GOVSATCOM, the fourth pillar of the EU Space Programme, is a user-centric programme designed to meet the unique requirements of governmental applications, including those used for crisis management, surveillance and the management of key infrastructures.

“While Copernicus and EGNSS provide the necessary data and positioning, European governments and institutions need a means of communication that is robustly protected against interference, interception, intrusion and other risks” explains da Costa. “Once operational, GOVSATCOM will bridge this gap between the need for assured and secure communication and the capabilities offered by Copernicus, Galileo and EGNOS.”

As part of its expanded mandate, EUSPA has been entrusted with the procurement of the secure ground segment, its operations and the coordination of the user-related aspects of GOVSATCOM.

The mission remains the same

EUSPA’s first year also saw the development of new services and the launch of new satellites. As to the former, the Agency has been busy developing two new Galileo services: a High Accuracy Service (HAS) for high accuracy Precise Point Positioning (PPP) corrections and the Open Service Navigation Message Authentication (OSNMA), which will provide receivers with a first level of protection against falsifying and spoofing.

The entry into service of a new additional satellite, GSAT 2203, has brought enhanced accuracy and more precise positioning to the Galileo service provision.

But even with its expanded mandate and new responsibilities, EUSPA’s mission remains the same: linking space to user needs. “I am extremely proud of everything EUSPA has achieved in a year, which is the direct result of our dedicated professionals, all of whom embrace a service-oriented mindset and are passionate about making space technology accessible to EU citizens and businesses,” concludes da Costa.

“It is an honour to serve as Chair of the Security Accreditation Board, the independent authority that provides accreditation to all of the EU Space Programme’s components. Thanks to SAB, EUSPA is at the front lines of cybersecurity, providing end-users with the confidence of knowing that the space-derived data they depend on is safe and secure,” adds Bruno Vermeire.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Happy Birthday EUSPA!

12.5.2022 8:58  
Published: 
12 May 2022

The EU Agency for the Space Programme celebrates its first anniversary with new services, a new satellite and even more end users.

Time flies when you’re busy getting things done. And in the first year of its existence, the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) has gotten a lot of things done.

EUSPA’s launch one year ago today represented the start of a new era for the EU Space Programme,” says EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. “With an expanded mandate and new responsibilities, we are committed to helping the EU, its citizens and its businesses maximise the many social and economic benefits of space.”

“Today we celebrate EUSPA. It's also the opportunity to reflect and be proud of the milestones we achieved by working together. More users, more services, and satellites in space! Go Europe, go EUSPA!'' concludes EUSPA Administrative Board Chair, Václav Kobera.

Building on the legacy of the European GNSS Agency (GSA), EUSPA’s mandate includes not only overseeing the security, services and market uptake of Galileo and EGNOS, but also Copernicus, Europe’s Earth Observation (EO) service – an area with significant commercial potential.

According to the first ever EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report, published earlier this year, SMEs and start-ups account for more than 93% of European Earth Observation companies. With revenues set to double from approximately EUR 2.8 billion to over EUR 5.5 billion within the next decade, the EO market is full of opportunities for EU businesses and entrepreneurs.

To ensure companies take advantage of these opportunities, EUSPA has positioned itself as the go-to-source for all things related to Earth Observation. In addition to providing market intelligence, the Agency works directly with businesses to help them best leverage Copernicus data, information and services. EUSPA also launched several EO focused funding opportunities, including Horizon Calls and innovation competitions.

But Copernicus doesn’t exist in a vacuum. It also complements the other components of the EU Space Programme, which is why EUSPA is constantly promoting the benefits of using Copernicus, Galileo and EGNOS together.

“Galileo and EGNOS enable the determination of a precise position, anywhere and Copernicus provides information on the Earth’s surface, atmosphere and oceans,” adds da Costa. “When you put these programmes together, you unleash an array of synergies that can have a powerful impact on society and the planet.”

A new pillar for the EU Space Programme

This list of space programmes will soon add a new name. GOVSATCOM, the fourth pillar of the EU Space Programme, is a user-centric programme designed to meet the unique requirements of governmental applications, including those used for crisis management, surveillance and the management of key infrastructures.

“While Copernicus and EGNSS provide the necessary data and positioning, European governments and institutions need a means of communication that is robustly protected against interference, interception, intrusion and other risks” explains da Costa. “Once operational, GOVSATCOM will bridge this gap between the need for assured and secure communication and the capabilities offered by Copernicus, Galileo and EGNOS.”

As part of its expanded mandate, EUSPA has been entrusted with the procurement of the secure ground segment, its operations and the coordination of the user-related aspects of GOVSATCOM.

The mission remains the same

EUSPA’s first year also saw the development of new services and the launch of new satellites. As to the former, the Agency has been busy developing two new Galileo services: a High Accuracy Service (HAS) for high accuracy Precise Point Positioning (PPP) corrections and the Open Service Navigation Message Authentication (OSNMA), which will provide receivers with a first level of protection against falsifying and spoofing.

The entry into service of a new additional satellite, GSAT 2203, has brought enhanced accuracy and more precise positioning to the Galileo service provision.

But even with its expanded mandate and new responsibilities, EUSPA’s mission remains the same: linking space to user needs. “I am extremely proud of everything EUSPA has achieved in a year, which is the direct result of our dedicated professionals, all of whom embrace a service-oriented mindset and are passionate about making space technology accessible to EU citizens and businesses,” concludes da Costa.

“It is an honour to serve as Chair of the Security Accreditation Board, the independent authority that provides accreditation to all of the EU Space Programme’s components. Thanks to SAB, EUSPA is at the front lines of cybersecurity, providing end-users with the confidence of knowing that the space-derived data they depend on is safe and secure,” adds Bruno Vermeire.

Test your knowledge on all things EU Space here!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Happy Birthday EUSPA!

12.5.2022 8:58  
Published: 
12 May 2022

The EU Agency for the Space Programme celebrates its first anniversary with new services, a new satellite and even more end users.

Time flies when you’re busy getting things done. And in the first year of its existence, the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) has gotten a lot of things done.

EUSPA’s launch one year ago today represented the start of a new era for the EU Space Programme,” says EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. “With an expanded mandate and new responsibilities, we are committed to helping the EU, its citizens and its businesses maximise the many social and economic benefits of space.”

Building on the legacy of the European GNSS Agency (GSA), EUSPA’s mandate includes not only overseeing the security, services and market uptake of Galileo and EGNOS, but also Copernicus, Europe’s Earth Observation (EO) service – an area with significant commercial potential.

According to the first ever EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report, published earlier this year, SMEs and start-ups account for more than 93% of European Earth Observation companies. With revenues set to double from approximately EUR 2.8 billion to over EUR 5.5 billion within the next decade, the EO market is full of opportunities for EU businesses and entrepreneurs.

To ensure companies take advantage of these opportunities, EUSPA has positioned itself as the go-to-source for all things related to Earth Observation. In addition to providing market intelligence, the Agency works directly with businesses to help them best leverage Copernicus data, information and services. EUSPA also launched several EO focused funding opportunities, including Horizon Calls and innovation competitions.

But Copernicus doesn’t exist in a vacuum. It also complements the other components of the EU Space Programme, which is why EUSPA is constantly promoting the benefits of using Copernicus, Galileo and EGNOS together.

“Galileo and EGNOS enable the determination of a precise position, anywhere and Copernicus provides information on the Earth’s surface, atmosphere and oceans,” adds da Costa. “When you put these programmes together, you unleash an array of synergies that can have a powerful impact on society and the planet.”

A new pillar for the EU Space Programme

This list of space programmes will soon add a new name. GOVSATCOM, the fourth pillar of the EU Space Programme, is a user-centric programme designed to meet the unique requirements of governmental applications, including those used for crisis management, surveillance and the management of key infrastructures.

“While Copernicus and EGNSS provide the necessary data and positioning, European governments and institutions need a means of communication that is robustly protected against interference, interception, intrusion and other risks” explains da Costa. “Once operational, GOVSATCOM will bridge this gap between the need for assured and secure communication and the capabilities offered by Copernicus, Galileo and EGNOS.”

As part of its expanded mandate, EUSPA has been entrusted with the procurement of the secure ground segment, its operations and the coordination of the user-related aspects of GOVSATCOM.

The mission remains the same

EUSPA’s first year also saw the development of new services and the launch of new satellites. As to the former, the Agency has been busy developing two new Galileo services: a High Accuracy Service (HAS) for high accuracy Precise Point Positioning (PPP) corrections and the Open Service Navigation Message Authentication (OSNMA), which will provide receivers with a first level of protection against falsifying and spoofing.

The entry into service of a new additional satellite, GSAT 2203, has brought enhanced accuracy and more precise positioning to the Galileo service provision.

But even with its expanded mandate and new responsibilities, EUSPA’s mission remains the same: linking space to user needs. “I am extremely proud of everything EUSPA has achieved in a year, which is the direct result of our dedicated professionals, all of whom embrace a service-oriented mindset and are passionate about making space technology accessible to EU citizens and businesses,” concludes da Costa.

“It is an honour to serve as Chair of the Security Accreditation Board, the independent authority that provides accreditation to all of the EU Space Programme’s components. Thanks to SAB, EUSPA is at the front lines of cybersecurity, providing end-users with the confidence of knowing that the space-derived data they depend on is safe and secure,” adds Bruno Vermeire.

“Today we celebrate EUSPA. It's also the opportunity to reflect and be proud of the milestones we achieved by working together. More users, more services, and satellites in space! Go Europe, go EUSPA!'' concludes EUSPA Administrative Board Chair, Václav Kobera.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Galileo High Accuracy Service Signal in Space Interface Control Document officially published

11.5.2022 14:45  
The new Galileo High Accuracy Service Signal-In-Space Interference Control Document (HAS SIS ICD) is now published
Published: 
11 May 2022

Galileo High Accuracy Service gets one step closer to the launch of initial services. 

Galileo, Europe’s Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), is now one step closer to declaring the start of initial services for its High Accuracy Service (HAS). The news follows the publication by the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), together with the European Commission and the European Space Agency, of the first Galileo HAS Signal in Space (SiS) Interface Control Document (link).

By providing free-of-charge, high accuracy Precise Point Positioning (PPP) corrections through both the Galileo signal (E6-B) and via the internet, the HAS will offer users improved positioning performance with an accuracy of less than two decimetres. 

“Galileo will be the first GNSS constellation capable of providing a high accuracy service directly through the Signal in Space,” explains EUSPA Guerric Pont, Galileo Services, Programme Manager. “This is unique in that, typically, high accuracy services are based on accurate satellite and atmospheric data provided from a third party, but not directly from the GNSS”.

According to Pont, high accuracy services are experiencing a massive boost in interest, thanks in large part to new capabilities of GNSS receivers and the rapid emergence of new applications that require accurate location data. “Currently, high accuracy is primarily used in such professional applications as surveying, precision agriculture and civil engineering, amongst others,” he says. “However, new and emerging applications, including autonomous driving, unmanned vehicles, robotics and a range of location-based services will all welcome high accuracy.” 

Pont also notes that, when used in synergy with Copernicus, the Galileo HAS will open up new market possibilities and help design new services. 

The accumulation of an ongoing process

In 2021, EUSPA, in coordination with the European Commission and the European Space Agency (ESA), published an Information Note on the Galileo HAS. The note provided an overview of the service’s main characteristics, along with information on such key features as service levels, targeted performance and markets and a roadmap for implementation. 

This was followed by a call for Expression of Interest for High Accuracy Service Testing, which invited external stakeholders to participate in a testing campaign of the Galileo HAS Signal in Space broadcasting. The goal of the campaign was to collect relevant feedback, not only on the HAS SiS Interface Control Document structure and implementation at the receiver level, but also on service-related aspects and specifications. 

“The Galileo programme has been performing a long set of HAS testing activities since 2019, which cumulated in the first-ever HAS signal broadcast in May 2021,” adds Javier de Blas, EUSPA Commercial and HAS manager. “Based on the feedback gained during the joint efforts conducted by EUSPA, the European Commission and ESA, with the key support of European aerospace industry during the testing phase, we are now able to publish the first Galileo High Accuracy Service Signal in Space Interface Control Document.”  

Following the publication of this HAS SIS ICD, the Galileo Programme will continue the deployment and service validation of HAS over the next months, in view of an operational declaration of HAS initial service, or HAS Phase 1, by the end of 2022. This will enable the development of products in parallel to the gradual entry into full operational service in the next few years.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The new Galileo High Accuracy Service Signal-In-Space Interference Control Document (HAS SIS ICD) is now published

Galileo High Accuracy Service Signal in Space Interface Control Document officially published

11.5.2022 14:45  
The new Galileo High Accuracy Service Signal-In-Space Interference Control Document (HAS SIS ICD) is now published
Published: 
11 May 2022

Galileo High Accuracy Service gets one step closer to the launch of initial services. 

Galileo, Europe’s Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), is now one step closer to declaring the start of initial services for its High Accuracy Service (HAS). The news follows the publication by the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), together with the European Commission and the European Space Agency, of the first Galileo HAS Signal in Space (SiS) Interface Control Document (link).

By providing free-of-charge, high accuracy Precise Point Positioning (PPP) corrections through both the Galileo signal (E6-B) and via the internet, the HAS will offer users improved positioning performance with an accuracy of less than two decimetres. 

“Galileo will be the first GNSS constellation capable of providing a high accuracy service directly through the Signal in Space,” explains EUSPA Guerric Pont, Galileo Services, Programme Manager. “This is unique in that, typically, high accuracy services are based on accurate satellite and atmospheric data provided from a third party, but not directly from the GNSS”.

According to Pont, high accuracy services are experiencing a massive boost in interest, thanks in large part to new capabilities of GNSS receivers and the rapid emergence of new applications that require accurate location data. “Currently, high accuracy is primarily used in such professional applications as surveying, precision agriculture and civil engineering, amongst others,” he says. “However, new and emerging applications, including autonomous driving, unmanned vehicles, robotics and a range of location-based services will all welcome high accuracy.” 

Pont also notes that, when used in synergy with Copernicus, the Galileo HAS will open up new market possibilities and help design new services. 

The accumulation of an ongoing process

In 2021, EUSPA, in coordination with the European Commission and the European Space Agency (ESA), published an Information Note on the Galileo HAS. The note provided an overview of the service’s main characteristics, along with information on such key features as service levels, targeted performance and markets and a roadmap for implementation. 

This was followed by a call for Expression of Interest for High Accuracy Service Testing, which invited external stakeholders to participate in a testing campaign of the Galileo HAS Signal in Space broadcasting. The goal of the campaign was to collect relevant feedback, not only on the HAS SiS Interface Control Document structure and implementation at the receiver level, but also on service-related aspects and specifications. 

“The Galileo programme has been performing a long set of HAS testing activities since 2019, which cumulated in the first-ever HAS signal broadcast in May 2021,” adds Javier de Blas, EUSPA Commercial and HAS manager. “Based on the feedback gained during the joint efforts conducted by EUSPA, the European Commission and ESA, with the key support of European aerospace industry during the testing phase, we are now able to publish the first Galileo High Accuracy Service Signal in Space Interface Control Document.”  

Following the publication of this HAS SIS ICD, the Galileo Programme will continue the deployment and service validation of HAS over the next months, in view of an operational declaration of HAS initial service, or HAS Phase 1, by the end of 2022. This will enable the development of products in parallel to the gradual entry into full operational service in the next few years.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The new Galileo High Accuracy Service Signal-In-Space Interference Control Document (HAS SIS ICD) is now published

Celebrating Europe’s biggest achievements – including the EU Space Programme

9.5.2022 12:02  
Europe Day held on 9 May every year celebrates peace and unity in Europe.
Published: 
09 May 2022

EUSPA celebrates Europe Day – a chance to highlight European integration and values and how the EU Space Programme is helping build an even better EU for tomorrow. 

Today, the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) joins citizens across the EU in celebrating Europe. 

Known as Europe Day, the 9th of May marks the signing of the Schuman Declaration, an historic agreement that laid the foundation for a united Europe and planted the seeds to what would eventually grow into the European Union.

As the Declaration states, “Europe will not be made all at once… it will be built through concrete achievements.” Europe Day is an opportunity to reflect on those many achievements – including the achievement that is the EU Space Programme.

Over the past 20 years, the EU has been committed to creating a space programme and infrastructure that is competitive, innovative and capable of delivering real benefits to citizens and businesses alike. The programme has made great leaps forward in recent years, delivering unique services in satellite navigation, Earth Observation and telecommunications, along with strengthening both the upstream and downstream sectors.

The essential link

Positioned as the link between space and user needs, EUSPA plays a central role in the EU Space Programme’s success. “By engaging with the entire EU space community, EUSPA drives innovation-based growth in the European economy and contributes to the safety of EU citizens and the security of the Union and its Member States, while at the same time reinforcing the EU’s strategic autonomy,” says EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa.

As a result of this work, space technology, data and services not only support the interest of the EU, they’re also indispensable to the daily lives of Europeans. Over 3 billion people are currently using Galileo, the world’s most precise positioning system, while many governments, national agencies, institutions, researchers and businesses are all leveraging the data and information coming from Copernicus, the world’s best Earth Observation system. 

Even with the many benefits that the EU Space Programme is already delivering, we’re just scratching the surface of what’s possible. “Businesses and society will increasingly look to space for solutions to some of the world’s most pressing challenges,” adds da Costa. “EUSPA is preparing for this space-based future today.” 

Join us in Prague 

What our space-based future may look like will be on full display on 9 May during Prague’s annual Europe Day celebration. Held on the city’s Střelecký Island starting at 13:00 CET, the event is a showcase of EU integration and values. 

EUSPA will be there to show how you already benefit from space, along with highlighting how Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus are building a better future for all Europeans. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Europe Day held on 9 May every year celebrates peace and unity in Europe.

Celebrating Europe’s biggest achievements – including the EU Space Programme

9.5.2022 12:02  
Europe Day held on 9 May every year celebrates peace and unity in Europe.
Published: 
09 May 2022

EUSPA celebrates Europe Day – a chance to highlight European integration and values and how the EU Space Programme is helping build an even better EU for tomorrow. 

Today, the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) joins citizens across the EU in celebrating Europe. 

Known as Europe Day, the 9th of May marks the signing of the Schuman Declaration, an historic agreement that laid the foundation for a united Europe and planted the seeds to what would eventually grow into the European Union.

As the Declaration states, “Europe will not be made all at once… it will be built through concrete achievements.” Europe Day is an opportunity to reflect on those many achievements – including the achievement that is the EU Space Programme.

Over the past 20 years, the EU has been committed to creating a space programme and infrastructure that is competitive, innovative and capable of delivering real benefits to citizens and businesses alike. The programme has made great leaps forward in recent years, delivering unique services in satellite navigation, Earth Observation and telecommunications, along with strengthening both the upstream and downstream sectors.

The essential link

Positioned as the link between space and user needs, EUSPA plays a central role in the EU Space Programme’s success. “By engaging with the entire EU space community, EUSPA drives innovation-based growth in the European economy and contributes to the safety of EU citizens and the security of the Union and its Member States, while at the same time reinforcing the EU’s strategic autonomy,” says EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa.

As a result of this work, space technology, data and services not only support the interest of the EU, they’re also indispensable to the daily lives of Europeans. Over 3 billion people are currently using Galileo, the world’s most precise positioning system, while many governments, national agencies, institutions, researchers and businesses are all leveraging the data and information coming from Copernicus, the world’s best Earth Observation system. 

Even with the many benefits that the EU Space Programme is already delivering, we’re just scratching the surface of what’s possible. “Businesses and society will increasingly look to space for solutions to some of the world’s most pressing challenges,” adds da Costa. “EUSPA is preparing for this space-based future today.” 

Join us in Prague 

What our space-based future may look like will be on full display on 9 May during Prague’s annual Europe Day celebration. Held on the city’s Střelecký Island starting at 13:00 CET, the event is a showcase of EU integration and values. 

EUSPA will be there to show how you already benefit from space, along with highlighting how Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus are building a better future for all Europeans. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Europe Day held on 9 May every year celebrates peace and unity in Europe.

EUSPA is looking for Galileo Engineering Support

6.5.2022 9:49  
EUSPA is organizing an industry day on 13 May 2022 at 16.00 to present the details of the procurement for “Engineering Services”.
Published: 
06 May 2022

EUSPA published a procurement on “Engineering Services” for the Galileo Programme. To encourage the widest participation possible, the agency is organizing an industry day to present all the procurement details on 13 May 2022 at 16:00.

The European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is playing a key role in the Galileo Programme, the EU Global Navigation Satellite System. In its current and future roles related to the Galileo Programme EUSPA is validating the Services, accepting new system upgrades, managing the operations, maintaining and evolving the infrastructure and promoting the use and benefits of Galileo. To perform these tasks effectively and efficiently, EUSPA will continue to rely on industrial support. 

The procurement of this support covers several engineering domains, allowing EUSPA to ensure continuity and maintenance of the Galileo  operational capabilities, implement the planned evolutions and fulfill its new role as Galileo System Prime for the system in operation. The support is requested in separate lots each focused on different activities and expertise. EUSPA is committed to promoting the widest participation possible by economic operators, in particular start-ups, new entrants, and SMEs. 

The agency is thus organizing an industry day on 13 May 2022 at 16.00 to present the details of the procurement for “Engineering Services”. You can find the agenda here.

Potential participants will have the opportunity to learn more about the mission of the European Union Agency for the Space Programme and the procurement documentation and submission process.

To attend this industry day, please register here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EUSPA is organizing an industry day on 13 May 2022 at 16.00 to present the details of the procurement for “Engineering Services”.

EUSPA is looking for Galileo Engineering Support

6.5.2022 9:49  
EUSPA is organizing an industry day on 13 May 2022 at 16.00 to present the details of the procurement for “Engineering Services”.
Published: 
06 May 2022

EUSPA published a procurement on “Engineering Services” for the Galileo Programme. To encourage the widest participation possible, the agency is organizing an industry day to present all the procurement details on 13 May 2022 at 16:00.

The European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is playing a key role in the Galileo Programme, the EU Global Navigation Satellite System. In its current and future roles related to the Galileo Programme EUSPA is validating the Services, accepting new system upgrades, managing the operations, maintaining and evolving the infrastructure and promoting the use and benefits of Galileo. To perform these tasks effectively and efficiently, EUSPA will continue to rely on industrial support. 

The procurement of this support covers several engineering domains, allowing EUSPA to ensure continuity and maintenance of the Galileo  operational capabilities, implement the planned evolutions and fulfill its new role as Galileo System Prime for the system in operation. The support is requested in separate lots each focused on different activities and expertise. EUSPA is committed to promoting the widest participation possible by economic operators, in particular start-ups, new entrants, and SMEs. 

The agency is thus organizing an industry day on 13 May 2022 at 16.00 to present the details of the procurement for “Engineering Services”. You can find the agenda here.

Potential participants will have the opportunity to learn more about the mission of the European Union Agency for the Space Programme and the procurement documentation and submission process.

To attend this industry day, please register here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EUSPA is organizing an industry day on 13 May 2022 at 16.00 to present the details of the procurement for “Engineering Services”.

Another step for EU’s positioning system: Nikolina joins the Galileo family!

5.5.2022 12:32  
Nikolina joins the Galileo family
Published: 
05 May 2022

After a challenging Launch and Early Orbit Phase (LEOP) and Testing campaign during the pandemic times, Galileo satellite “Nikolina” (GSAT0223) is entering service provision as of today. The satellite will reinforce the performance and robustness of the EU’s satellite-based positioning system.

GSAT0223 was brought into space on 05/12/2021 with Galileo launch L11 after the usual design, acceptance, validation, launch and early orbit preparation and operations phases.

This was the first Early Orbit Operations phase conducted directly from the operational centre in Germany, under the responsibility of EUSPA. Thanks to the efforts of all parties involved, “Nikolina” is now a happy member of the Galileo family!

GSAT0223 and its launch-companion GSAT0224 (Shriya) are the first pair of the third batch of Galileo First Generation satellites to reach space. GSAT0223 will fill the last empty slot in Galileo’s orbital plane B. Shriya is soon completing its in-orbit validation and will then join the operational constellation. Furthermore, ten additional satellites of the same batch are continuing assembly, acceptance and launch preparations.

New horizons for the EU Space Programme and its Galileo component are opening up.

Stay tuned for more updates on I/NAV and the next entries into service!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Nikolina joins the Galileo family

Partnering to promote sustainable fisheries and aquafarms

4.5.2022 9:31  
Rodrigo da Costa, EUSPA Executive Director, Susan Steele, Executive Director of EFCA
Published: 
04 May 2022

A new Memorandum of Understanding aims to better leverage Galileo and Copernicus to further the goals of the Common Fisheries Policy and the EU’s Green Deal.

Today, the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) and the European Fisheries Control Agency (EFCA), the EU agency responsible for coordinating national operational activities in fisheries and assisting Member States in applying the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP), have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU). The cooperation agreement reflects the two agencies shared commitment to creating sustainable fisheries and aquaculture – both of which are key components to the European Union’s Green Deal.

“Through the MoU, EUSPA will help EFCA better leverage the EU Space Programme, particularly Galileo, the European Global Satellite Navigation System (EGNSS) and Copernicus, the European Earth Observation programme. This agreement allows EFCA to gain new tools for enforcing the Common Fisheries Policy and EUSPA will also be able to benefit from EFCA’s expertise, allowing us to better meet the needs of the fisheries control community,” says EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa.

Cracking down on illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing

Both Copernicus and Galileo are already being used to assess the location of fish stocks and to track the location of vessels in an effort to prevent illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing, an important aspect of the CFP. The key to doing so is to increase transparency and provide precise information to policy makers and regulators like the EFCA. To this end, Earth Observation services, including the Maritime Surveillance component of the Copernicus Security Service, along with GNSS-based solutions utilising Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) and Vessel Monitoring Systems (VMS), are important tools in the fight against IUU fishing – a practice that not only costs the global economy between EUR 9 and 21 billion annually, but also threatens our oceans’ fragile biodiversity.

Galileo and Copernicus will improve EFCA capacity to detect, identify and categorise suspected non-compliant fishing activities and will result in safer, more sustainable and efficient maritime operations.

According to Dr Steele, EFCA is already using the EU Space Programme. Back in 2017, EFCA requested the support of Copernicus Maritime Surveillance (CMS) to monitor a vessel seen towing a cage of bluefin tuna – a strictly regulated species. By providing an optical image of a precise location, the agency was able to confirm that the targeted vessel was compliant with all relevant EU regulations.

Another good example of how Galileo and Copernicus are being used to curtail IUU fishing can be found in Norway, where the Norwegian Coastal Authority, in collaboration with Mercator Ocean, are combining GNSS and Earth Observation data with artificial intelligence to identify vessels with suspicious route patterns. The tool is contributing to a more efficient identification and monitoring of vessels that are possibly conducting illicit activities or are engaged in IUU fishing.

Supporting Europe’s growing aquaculture sector

Copernicus and Galileo are also being used to support Europe’s growing aquaculture sector. By providing information and data on environmental conditions (salinity, currents, temperature, etc.) and long-term weather forecasts, EO-based applications play a key role selecting ideal locations to establish aquafarms.

Once the aquafarm is up and running, much of the work is done by fully automated vessels that rely on the accurate positioning and navigation provided by Galileo.

Several projects set to benefit

To kick-off the MoU, EUSPA and EFCA have identified several EU-funded projects that could benefit from the agencies’ cooperation. These include Bluebox Porbeagle, which is developing a transceiver to report the position of vessels computed using Galileo and authenticated with Galileo Open Service Navigation Message Authentication, and GAMBAS, a project building a search and rescue beacon that can be remotely activated by rescue coordination centres. The MoU can be amended to expand the cooperation to include other projects and initiatives.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Rodrigo da Costa, EUSPA Executive Director, Susan Steele, Executive Director of EFCA

EU Space Week 2022: Addressing user needs through #EUSpace

3.5.2022 10:55  
EU Space Week, the go-to event of for Europe’s space community, is happening 3 – 6 October 2022 in Prague, Czech Republic.
Published: 
03 May 2022

EU Space Week, the go-to event of for Europe’s space community, is happening 3 – 6 October 2022 in Prague, Czech Republic.

After two years of online-only editions, EU Space Week 2022 is set to bring together the entire European Union space community. From policymakers to industry, start-ups, public authorities, investors and users, EU Space Week is the place to be for anyone interested in current – and future – trends of the EU Space Programme.

The event is jointly organised by the European Commission and the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) and held under the auspices of the Czech Presidency and the City of Prague.

What to expect

Plunge into the world of EU Space with several days full of exciting sessions, events, demonstrations and business opportunities.

With the aim of giving a ‘New Space’ angle to EU Space, this year’s edition will be about entrepreneurship and innovation in space-related businesses across the EU. We will also be showcasing the critical role the EU Space programme plays in igniting positive societal changes.

It's time to see each other again!

Let’s meet and reconnect in Prague at EU Space Week 2022!

Registration will be open soon, but you can already mark your calendars for 3 – 6 October.

And be sure to follow DG DEFIS (@DEFIS_eu) and EUSPA (@EU4Space) on Twitter for updates.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EU Space Week, the go-to event of for Europe’s space community, is happening 3 – 6 October 2022 in Prague, Czech Republic.

EU Space Week 2022: Addressing user needs through #EUSpace

3.5.2022 10:55  
EU Space Week, the go-to event of for Europe’s space community, is happening 3 – 6 October 2022 in Prague, Czech Republic.
Published: 
03 May 2022

EU Space Week, the go-to event of for Europe’s space community, is happening 3 – 6 October 2022 in Prague, Czech Republic.

After two years of online-only editions, EU Space Week 2022 is set to bring together the entire European Union space community. From policymakers to industry, start-ups, public authorities, investors and users, EU Space Week is the place to be for anyone interested in current – and future – trends of the EU Space Programme.

The event is jointly organised by the European Commission and the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) and held under the auspices of the Czech Presidency and the City of Prague.

What to expect

Plunge into the world of EU Space with several days full of exciting sessions, events, demonstrations and business opportunities.

With the aim of giving a ‘New Space’ angle to EU Space, this year’s edition will be about entrepreneurship and innovation in space-related businesses across the EU. We will also be showcasing the critical role the EU Space programme plays in igniting positive societal changes.

It's time to see each other again!

Let’s meet and reconnect in Prague at EU Space Week 2022!

Registration will be open soon, but you can already mark your calendars for 3 – 6 October.

And be sure to follow DG DEFIS (@DEFIS_eu) and EUSPA (@EU4Space) on Twitter for updates.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EU Space Week, the go-to event of for Europe’s space community, is happening 3 – 6 October 2022 in Prague, Czech Republic.

Galileo helps map out safer cycling routes in the Netherlands

28.4.2022 15:49  
Surveying with integrated equipment
Published: 
28 April 2022

An initiative in the Netherlands leverages Galileo’s enhanced accuracy and positioning to conduct a comprehensive safety assessment of local bicycle paths.

The Dutch love their bikes. In fact, according to a European Commission report on quality transportation, 36% of Dutch people say biking is their preferred method for getting around.

Bolstered by a robust cycling infrastructure, including dedicated paths, protected lanes, and plenty of bicycle parking, 27% of all travel in the Netherlands is done by bike. In cities like Amsterdam and Zwolle, this percentage is even higher.

But, as impressive as these figures may be, one biking-related statistic cannot be ignored: the number of cycling accidents. According to SafetyNL, nearly 50,000 cyclists were seriously injured in 2019. With cycling continuing to grow in popularity, this number will only increase – which is why the Dutch province of Noord-Brabant decided to conduct a trial for comprehensive safety assessment of its bicycle infrastructure.

Carried out in cooperation with Royal HaskoningDHV, BAM Infra Nederland and the Prisma Groep, the initiative used Galileo alongside other technologies to create detailed and comprehensive maps of the area’s bike paths. After assessing their status and analysing traffic safety, each path was given a unique safety score.

A more accurate picture

The inventory was created by equipping bikes and riders with sensors, accelerometers, LiDAR and cameras – and of course, Galileo-enabled GNSS receivers.

 Prisma Groep first trial for rider assistance

 Backup sensors counts with GNSS, IMU, two velodyne scanners and five cameras

“Using Galileo means more visible satellites and thus increased signal continuity and availability,” says Erik van Duffelen, a project coordinator at the Prisma Groep. “This capability is particularly important in areas with limited line of sight, like bike paths that traverse through urban canyons or under dense tree canopies.”

As the cyclist rides around, the equipment scans the environment, capturing measurements and recording location. During post-processing, the captured data is analysed using artificial intelligence models and algorithms. The result forms the basis of a “digital twin” of the bicycle paths, which not only helps to update older maps, but also includes information about obstacles and other safety hazards. This can be used to improve cyclist safety and to inform future infrastructure development.

 Surveying with integrated equipments

“Galileo gave us a more accurate picture of the bicycle paths and a more precise inventory of the cycling infrastructure,” adds van Duffelen. “Thanks to this level of accuracy and precision, cyclists and authorities alike have the information they need to improve safety.”

 Sketch of the bicycles paths after processing data

Following a successful pilot programme, the initiative has launched a comprehensive commercial service. Called BikePathfinder (FietsPadvinder; article in Dutch), the service is available to road authorities and other entities working to improve cycling infrastructure and safety.

 FietsPadvinder logo

To learn more about Galileo, its services and differentiators, please register at the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) or contact the GSC Helpdesk at www.gsc-europa.eu/helpdesk.

The authors would like to thank the Prisma Groep for their help in preparing this article.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Surveying with integrated equipment

Galileo helps map out safer cycling routes in the Netherlands

28.4.2022 15:49  
Surveying with integrated equipment
Published: 
28 April 2022

An initiative in the Netherlands leverages Galileo’s enhanced accuracy and positioning to conduct a comprehensive safety assessment of local bicycle paths.

The Dutch love their bikes. In fact, according to a European Commission report on quality transportation, 36% of Dutch people say biking is their preferred method for getting around.

Bolstered by a robust cycling infrastructure, including dedicated paths, protected lanes, and plenty of bicycle parking, 27% of all travel in the Netherlands is done by bike. In cities like Amsterdam and Zwolle, this percentage is even higher.

But, as impressive as these figures may be, one biking-related statistic cannot be ignored: the number of cycling accidents. According to SafetyNL, nearly 50,000 cyclists were seriously injured in 2019. With cycling continuing to grow in popularity, this number will only increase – which is why the Dutch province of Noord-Brabant decided to conduct a trial for comprehensive safety assessment of its bicycle infrastructure.

Carried out in cooperation with Royal HaskoningDHV, BAM Infra Nederland and the Prisma Groep, the initiative used Galileo alongside other technologies to create detailed and comprehensive maps of the area’s bike paths. After assessing their status and analysing traffic safety, each path was given a unique safety score.

A more accurate picture

The inventory was created by equipping bikes and riders with sensors, accelerometers, LiDAR and cameras – and of course, Galileo-enabled GNSS receivers.

 Prisma Groep first trial for rider assistance

Prisma Groep first trial for rider assistance

 Backup sensors counts with GNSS, IMU, two velodyne scanners and five cameras

Backup sensors counts with GNSS, IMU, two velodyne scanners and five cameras

“Using Galileo means more visible satellites and thus increased signal continuity and availability,” says Erik van Duffelen, a project coordinator at the Prisma Groep. “This capability is particularly important in areas with limited line of sight, like bike paths that traverse through urban canyons or under dense tree canopies.”

As the cyclist rides around, the equipment scans the environment, capturing measurements and recording location. During post-processing, the captured data is analysed using artificial intelligence models and algorithms. The result forms the basis of a “digital twin” of the bicycle paths, which not only helps to update older maps, but also includes information about obstacles and other safety hazards. This can be used to improve cyclist safety and to inform future infrastructure development.

 Surveying with integrated equipments

Surveying with integrated equipments

“Galileo gave us a more accurate picture of the bicycle paths and a more precise inventory of the cycling infrastructure,” adds van Duffelen. “Thanks to this level of accuracy and precision, cyclists and authorities alike have the information they need to improve safety.”

 Sketch of the bicycles paths after processing data

Sketch of the bicycles paths after processing data

Following a successful pilot programme, the initiative has launched a comprehensive commercial service. Called BikePathfinder (FietsPadvinder; article in Dutch), the service is available to road authorities and other entities working to improve cycling infrastructure and safety.

FietsPadvinder logo

FietsPadvinder logo

To learn more about Galileo, its services and differentiators, please register at the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) or contact the GSC Helpdesk at www.gsc-europa.eu/helpdesk.

The authors would like to thank the Prisma Groep for their help in preparing this article.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Surveying with integrated equipment

PIN: European GNSS Service Demonstrator

26.4.2022 11:21  
EGNSS Service Demonstrator as the centralised platform for EGNSS demonstration capabilities
Published: 
26 April 2022

The European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) has issued a Prior Information Notice (PIN) for a planned call to develop the European GNSS Service Demonstrator (ESD) providing a centralised platform for the demonstration of new and enhanced end-to-end European Global Navigation Satellite System (EGNSS) services

The European Commission is currently specifying the long-term evolution of the EGNSS programme, including new services for Galileo and EGNOS. The European GNSS Service Demonstrator (ESD) will support Galileo and EGNOS evolution by providing a centralised platform for the demonstration of new and enhanced end-to-end EGNSS services.

The ESD shall deliver preoperational EGNSS signals and data that can be easily and openly accessed by users with the appropriate equipment to test the new/enhanced services in realistic conditions, validate the correct implementation of receiver interfaces and standards and anticipate and support the development of new applications.

The ESD will receive data from various sources (e.g. GNSS sensor station data) and rebroadcast data from various sources(e.g. SBAS DFMC data, high accuracy data); compute EGNSS data and corrections by providing a pre-operational DFMC SBAS open service signal (for non-safety of life usage) over Europe primarily, and potentially over a part of Africa; disseminate EGNSS data via various broadcast means (e.g. SiS through EGNOS GEOs, internet). The contractor may be requested to carry out additional activities such as developing additional kernels or integrating or interfacing with external kernels (e.g. high accuracy kernel, authentication kernel, emergency warning service kernel, internet of things kernel, OS-NMA evolution kernel, etc.). The scope of the procurement will also cover the provision of engineering support services.

More information about the Prior Information Notice (PIN) can be found here.

Read this: Space-based solutions set to address some of today’s most pressing challenges

Galileo is Europe’s Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) providing an accurate, guaranteed global positioning service under civilian control. Galileo is operational since the Initial Service declaration at the end of 2016. Beyond the classical positioning and timing services provided by all the existing GNSS providers, Galileo will provide new, advance services, such as the High Accuracy Service (HAS, an open access service based on the provision of precise corrections) and the Commercial Authentication Service (CAS, a controlled access service based on the encrypted spreading codes).

EGNOS is the European SBAS and augments GPS L1 C/A civilian signal by providing corrections and integrity information for positioning and navigation applications over Europe. EGNOS version 3, will in the near future augment both GPS and Galileo constellations in the L1 and L5 bands and will extend the service area to the entire landmasses of EU Member States. New EGNOS services could be implemented in further EGNOS releases.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EGNSS Service Demonstrator as the centralised platform for EGNSS demonstration capabilities

EUSPA: the gatekeeper to a secure EU Space Programme

21.4.2022 11:15  
EUSPA: the gatekeeper to a secure EU Space Programme
Published: 
21 April 2022

Speaking at CYSAT, EUSPA highlighted how its security apparatus helps protect the space-based data we depend on against malicious cyberattacks.

The number of critical services and everyday devices that depend on satellite-based data continues to increase. But with this increase comes new challenges – including cybersecurity.

Satellites have historically been designed to be reliable - but not necessarily secure. This, in combination with recent trends towards software-defined satellites, in-orbit reconfigurations, and quantum technologies, means space assets and data are now more vulnerable to cyberattacks than ever before.

“Ensuring the confidentiality, integrity and availability of space data against cyber threats is a new challenge that we simply cannot afford to ignore,” said Philippe Rosius, Head of Galileo Security Monitoring centre (GSMC) at the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA).

According to Rosius, who made his remarks at CYSAT (the European event dedicated to cybersecurity for the space industry) EUSPA is uniquely positioned to serve as the security gatekeeper of the EU Space Programme. “In addition to its service provision, EUSPA is responsible for ensuring that Europe’s GNSS signals are secure,” he said. “It also provides security expertise and support for the Space Programme’s other components, including GOVSATCOM, as well as to various European Commission initiatives.”

Specifically, the EUSPA security organisation provides the cybersecurity and engineering competence for all programme components. “Our security engineering and cybersecurity work defines and implements the security requirements related to the services, the systems, and their operations,” explained Rosius.

The Security Authority also oversees the operational security of European GNSS (Galileo and EGNOS). “Here our work focuses on ensuring that the systems in operation comply with the general security requirements established using a threat and risk analysis,” added Rosius.

An integral part of the Galileo infrastructure

Security monitoring is done by the Galileo Security Monitoring Centre (GSMC).

“The GSMC is an integral part of the Galileo infrastructure and has the competence to be extended to other Space Programme’s components,” said Rosius.

From its sites in France and Spain, the GSMC monitors and, when necessary, takes action regarding security threats, security alerts and the operational status of Galileo’s various components. It is also responsible for managing access to the Public Regulated Service (PRS) and ensures that sensitive information relating to its use is properly managed and protected.

“In the event of a security threat to the security of systems and services deployed, operated and used under the Union Space Programme which may affect the security of the Union, the European Council issues specific instructions to EUSPA, which the GSMC is responsible for implementing,” explained Rosius.

The EU Space Programme’s security accreditation authority

If the Security authority and GSMC make EUSPA the security gatekeeper of the EU Space Programme, then security assurance is finally ensured by the Security Accreditation Board (SAB). “The SAB is the security accreditation authority for all of the EU Space Programme’s components,” said SAB Chair Bruno Vermeire, who also spoke during CYSAT. “In this role, it ensures that all systems comply with the relevant security requirements, including Cyber and Supply Chain, and provides statements of approval to operate for the systems and services.”

An independent body within EUSPA, the SAB is composed of a representative from each Member State, the Commission and from the High Representative for the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy. The Board is charged with:

  • Defining and approving security accreditation strategies
  • Approving satellite launches
  • Authorising the operation of systems in different configurations and for various services
  • Authorising the operation of ground stations
  • Authorising bodies to develop or manufacture sensitive PRS technologies, receivers and security modules
  • Endorsing the selection of approved products
  • Approving interconnections between systems

The SAB makes its decisions in an independent manner, including in regard to the Commission and other bodies responsible for implementing the components and provision of service.

“Thanks to this robust security apparatus, EUSPA is at the front lines of cybersecurity, providing end users with the confidence of knowing that the space-derived data they depend on is safe and secure,” concluded Vermeire. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EUSPA: the gatekeeper to a secure EU Space Programme

GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Meeting: Registration now open!

13.4.2022 16:42  
The GNSS Task Force Meeting brings stakeholders together to discuss experience around raw measurement use.
Published: 
13 April 2022

Registration is now open for the fifth GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force meeting, which will take place on 17 May 2022. Participants in the event, which will be held online, will gain access to Task Force members’ experience and learn about progress around the use of raw measurements in Android devices. Interested? Register here.

The aim of the EUSPA’s Raw Measurements Task Force is to bridge the knowledge gap between raw measurement users. The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force meetings are a key element in this effort, providing a forum for stakeholders to share experience and knowledge around raw measurements use.

A full agenda

Starting in the afternoon, following a welcome address from the EUSPA’s Head of Market, Downstream and Innovation (MADI) Department Fiammetta Diani, the opening session of the meeting will include a keynote presentation from Google`s Frank Van Diggelen and Mohammed Khider. Then, update on EGNSS opportunities and other useful information coming from the Galileo programme given by the members of the MADI team will follow.

After the break, the agenda will be fully dedicated to presentations from Task Force members, targeting their innovative work using raw measurements. Finally, during the last session, the presentations focusing on latest testing results and implementation of EGNSS differentiators will follow. For the full draft agenda, click here.

Join the Task Force

The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force is dedicated to promoting a better and wider use of GNSS raw measurements.

Since its launch in 2017, the Task Force has expanded from a handful of experts to a community of over 100 agencies, universities, research institutes and companies. Membership is open to anybody interested in GNSS raw measurements. To join the Task Force contact: market@euspa.europa.eu.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The GNSS Task Force Meeting brings stakeholders together to discuss experience around raw measurement use.

GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Meeting: Registration now open!

13.4.2022 16:42  
The GNSS Task Force Meeting brings stakeholders together to discuss experience around raw measurement use.
Published: 
13 April 2022

Registration is now open for the fifth GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force meeting, which will take place on 17 May 2022. Participants in the event, which will be held online, will gain access to Task Force members’ experience and learn about progress around the use of raw measurements in Android devices. Interested? Register here.

The aim of the EUSPA’s Raw Measurements Task Force is to bridge the knowledge gap between raw measurement users. The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force meetings are a key element in this effort, providing a forum for stakeholders to share experience and knowledge around raw measurements use.

A full agenda

Starting in the afternoon, following a welcome address from the EUSPA’s Head of Market, Downstream and Innovation (MADI) Department Fiammetta Diani, the opening session of the meeting will include a keynote presentation from Google`s Frank Van Diggelen and Mohammed Khider. Then, update on EGNSS opportunities and other useful information coming from the Galileo programme given by the members of the MADI team will follow.

After the break, the agenda will be fully dedicated to presentations from Task Force members, targeting their innovative work using raw measurements. Finally, during the last session, the presentations focusing on latest testing results and implementation of EGNSS differentiators will follow. For the full draft agenda, click here.

Join the Task Force

The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force is dedicated to promoting a better and wider use of GNSS raw measurements.

Since its launch in 2017, the Task Force has expanded from a handful of experts to a community of over 100 agencies, universities, research institutes and companies. Membership is open to anybody interested in GNSS raw measurements. To join the Task Force contact: market@euspa.europa.eu.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The GNSS Task Force Meeting brings stakeholders together to discuss experience around raw measurement use.

GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Meeting: Registration now open!

13.4.2022 16:42  
The GNSS Task Force Workshop brings stakeholders together to discuss experience around raw measurement use.
Published: 
13 April 2022

Registration is now open for the fifth GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force meeting, which will take place on 17 May 2022. Participants in the event, which will be held online, will gain access to Task Force members’ experience and learn about progress around the use of raw measurements in Android devices. Interested? Register here.

The aim of the GSA’s Raw Measurements Task Force is to bridge the knowledge gap between raw measurement users. The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force meetings are a key element in this effort, providing a forum for stakeholders to share experience and knowledge around raw measurements use.

A full agenda

Starting in the afternoon, following a welcome address from the EUSPA’s Head of Market, Downstream and Innovation (MADI) Department Fiammetta Diani, the opening session of the workshop will include a keynote presentation from Google`s Frank Van Diggelen and Mohammed Khider. Then, update on EGNSS opportunities and other useful information coming from the Galileo programme given by the members of the MADI team will follow.

After the break, the agenda will be fully dedicated to presentations from Task Force members, targeting their innovative work using raw measurements. Finally, during the last session, the presentations focusing on latest testing results and implementation of EGNSS differentiators will follow. For the full draft agenda, click here.

Join the Task Force

The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force is dedicated to promoting a better and wider use of GNSS raw measurements.

Since its launch in 2017, the Task Force has expanded from a handful of experts to a community of over 100 agencies, universities, research institutes and companies. Membership is open to anybody interested in GNSS raw measurements. To join the Task Force contact: market@euspa.europa.eu.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The GNSS Task Force Workshop brings stakeholders together to discuss experience around raw measurement use.

GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Meeting: Registration now open!

13.4.2022 16:42  
The GNSS Task Force Workshop brings stakeholders together to discuss experience around raw measurement use.
Published: 
13 April 2022

Registration is now open for the fifth GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force meeting, which will take place on 17 May 2022. Participants in the event, which will be held online, will gain access to Task Force members’ experience and learn about progress around the use of raw measurements in Android devices. Interested? Register here.

The aim of the EUSPA’s Raw Measurements Task Force is to bridge the knowledge gap between raw measurement users. The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force meetings are a key element in this effort, providing a forum for stakeholders to share experience and knowledge around raw measurements use.

A full agenda

Starting in the afternoon, following a welcome address from the EUSPA’s Head of Market, Downstream and Innovation (MADI) Department Fiammetta Diani, the opening session of the workshop will include a keynote presentation from Google`s Frank Van Diggelen and Mohammed Khider. Then, update on EGNSS opportunities and other useful information coming from the Galileo programme given by the members of the MADI team will follow.

After the break, the agenda will be fully dedicated to presentations from Task Force members, targeting their innovative work using raw measurements. Finally, during the last session, the presentations focusing on latest testing results and implementation of EGNSS differentiators will follow. For the full draft agenda, click here.

Join the Task Force

The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force is dedicated to promoting a better and wider use of GNSS raw measurements.

Since its launch in 2017, the Task Force has expanded from a handful of experts to a community of over 100 agencies, universities, research institutes and companies. Membership is open to anybody interested in GNSS raw measurements. To join the Task Force contact: market@euspa.europa.eu.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The GNSS Task Force Workshop brings stakeholders together to discuss experience around raw measurement use.

Galileo positions e-bike sharing programme as a game changer in urban mobility

12.4.2022 12:54  
Each AMBici bike will be equipped with a Galileo-enabled GNSS receiver.
Published: 
12 April 2022

A new electric bike sharing programme in the Barcelona metropolitan area will use Galileo’s highly accurate positioning and timing information.

In Barcelona, bike sharing is set to go electric as the metropolitan area prepares to rollout a fleet of state-of-the-art electric bicycles – making it even easier for the public to travel in a sustainable, healthy and economical way.

Called AMBici, the electric bikes will complement existing bike sharing programmes, such as Barcelona’s Bicing system, and further integrate the metro area’s public transportation network. Led by the Àrea Metropolitana de Barcelona (AMB) and managed by Transports Metropolitana de Barcelona (TMB), the programme will consist of 2,600 electric bikes and 236 docking stations located across 15 area municipalities.

To ensure that the bicycles are evenly distributed and readily available in high-use areas, each bike will be equipped with a Galileo-enabled GNSS receiver. The highly accurate positioning that Galileo provides will also support cyclists as they navigate their way from docking station to destination.

“Because using Galileo means greater precision regarding positioning and timing information, it has the potential to exponentially enhance the quality of urban mobility services,” explains Josep Laborda, ARIADNA project coordinator.

ARIADNA is a Horizon 2020 project funded by the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) dedicated to supporting the adoption of European GNSS (EGNSS) for mobility services. The project focuses on educating urban mobility stakeholders about how EGNSS can be used to enable integrated transportation networks.

“The AMBici initiative is a perfect example of how cutting-edge technologies like EGNSS are key to boosting multimodality, encouraging active transportation and building smart and sustainable urban transport networks,” adds Laborda.

The AMBici programme will be implemented, operated, maintained and managed by a private service provider selected via an open public tender with a budget of EUR 60.8 million. The contract is expected to be awarded in June of this year.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Each AMBici bike will be equipped with a Galileo-enabled GNSS receiver.

Galileo positions e-bike sharing programme as a game changer in urban mobility

12.4.2022 12:54  
Each AMBici bike will be equipped with a Galileo-enabled GNSS receiver.
Published: 
12 April 2022

A new electric bike sharing programme in the Barcelona metropolitan area will use Galileo’s highly accurate positioning and timing information.

In Barcelona, bike sharing is set to go electric as the metropolitan area prepares to rollout a fleet of state-of-the-art electric bicycles – making it even easier for the public to travel in a sustainable, healthy and economical way.

Called AMBici, the electric bikes will complement existing bike sharing programmes, such as Barcelona’s Bicing system, and further integrate the metro area’s public transportation network. Led by the Àrea Metropolitana de Barcelona (AMB) and managed by Transports Metropolitana de Barcelona (TMB), the programme will consist of 2,600 electric bikes and 236 docking stations located across 15 area municipalities.

To ensure that the bicycles are evenly distributed and readily available in high-use areas, each bike will be equipped with a Galileo-enabled GNSS receiver. The highly accurate positioning that Galileo provides will also support cyclists as they navigate their way from docking station to destination.

“Because using Galileo means greater precision regarding positioning and timing information, it has the potential to exponentially enhance the quality of urban mobility services,” explains Josep Laborda, ARIADNA project coordinator.

ARIADNA is a Horizon 2020 project funded by the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) dedicated to supporting the adoption of European GNSS (EGNSS) for mobility services. The project focuses on educating urban mobility stakeholders about how EGNSS can be used to enable integrated transportation networks.

“The AMBici initiative is a perfect example of how cutting-edge technologies like EGNSS are key to boosting multimodality, encouraging active transportation and building smart and sustainable urban transport networks,” adds Laborda.

The AMBici programme will be implemented, operated, maintained and managed by a private service provider selected via an open public tender with a budget of EUR 60.8 million. The contract is expected to be awarded in June of this year.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Each AMBici bike will be equipped with a Galileo-enabled GNSS receiver.

Galileo positions e-bike sharing programme as a game changer in urban mobility

12.4.2022 12:54  
Each AMBici bike will be equipped with a Galileo-enabled GNSS receiver.
Published: 
12 April 2022

A new electric bike sharing programme in the Barcelona metropolitan area will use Galileo’s highly accurate positioning and timing information.

In Barcelona, bike sharing is set to go electric as the metropolitan area prepares to rollout a fleet of state-of-the-art electric bicycles – making it even easier for the public to travel in a sustainable, healthy and economical way.

Called AMBici, the electric bikes will complement existing bike sharing programmes, such as Barcelona’s Bicing system, and further integrate the metro area’s public transportation network. Led by the Àrea Metropolitana de Barcelona (AMB) and managed by Transports Metropolitana de Barcelona (TMB), the programme will consist of 2,600 electric bikes and 236 docking stations located across 15 area municipalities.

To ensure that the bicycles are evenly distributed and readily available in high-use areas, each bike will be equipped with a Galileo-enabled GNSS receiver. The highly accurate positioning that Galileo provides will also support cyclists as they navigate their way from docking station to destination.

“Because using Galileo means greater precision regarding positioning and timing information, it has the potential to exponentially enhance the quality of urban mobility services,” explains Josep Laborda, ARIADNA project coordinator.

ARIADNA is a Horizon 2020 project funded by the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) dedicated to supporting the adoption of European GNSS (EGNSS) for mobility services. The project focuses on educating urban mobility stakeholders about how EGNSS can be used to enable integrated transportation networks.

“The AMBici initiative is a perfect example of how cutting-edge technologies like EGNSS are key to boosting multimodality, encouraging active transportation and building smart and sustainable urban transport networks,” adds Laborda.

The AMBici programme will be implemented, operated, maintained and managed by a private service provider selected via an open public tender with a budget of EUR 60.8 million. The contract is expected to be awarded in June of this year.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Each AMBici bike will be equipped with a Galileo-enabled GNSS receiver.

How the EU Space Programme helps address the new challenges of a changing Arctic

8.4.2022 12:51  
The smallest of the earth’s five major oceans, the Arctic is almost twice the size of Australia, covering 14 million square kilometers
Published: 
08 April 2022

Polar regions are faced with emerging challenges. Climate change is affecting the entire globe, but it is especially pronounced at the poles. With an integrated EU Space Programme in place, Europe has the capacity to better understand the challenges the Arctic Circle is confronted with, shape new mitigating policies and develop the necessary tools to fight climate change.

With nearly half the country sitting north of the Arctic Circle, Norway has a front row seat to the unprecedented changes taking place in this polar region. Climate change is causing temperatures in the Arctic Circle to rise twice as fast as anywhere else on the planet. As the ice melts, the Arctic Ocean is opening and shipping companies are moving in. According to the Arctic Council, ship traffic in the area grew by 25% between 2013 and 2019.

It was also in this context that EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa, delivered a keynote speech at the Oslo Position Conference 2022. His visit to the Norwegian capital was a great opportunity to confer with Jan Christian Vestre Minister of Trade, Industry and Fisheries, on the huge potential of EU Space across 17 markets. Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) & Earth Observation (EO) revenues are expected to reach 500 billion by 2031. Besides, Norway has been supporting European innovation with several H2020 funded projects such as Prepare Ships. Da Costa also met with Norwegian Space Agency leadership and members of the Norwegian Parliament’s Standing Committee on Business and Industry to give an overview of how the Arctic stands to benefit from the EU Space Programme.

Increased maritime traffic in this remote polar region, in combination with more unpredictable and extreme weather events, raises many new challenges”, said EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. “In the event of a ship running aground or a collision, search and rescue crews have to navigate rough seas, freezing temperatures and vast spaces in order to evacuate the vessel and provide emergency services.

This is where Galileo comes into play.

Galileo supports search and rescue operations Galileo, Europe’s GNSS, provides improved positioning and timing information to a range of users – including search and rescue (SAR) teams.

Galileo’s SAR service contributes to life-saving efforts by swiftly relaying radio beacon distress signals to the relevant SAR crews by means of dedicated payloads onboard Galileo satellites, supported by three ground stations strategically deployed across Europe. But what really sets the Galileo SAR service apart is its unique Return Link Service (RLS) – a feature that allows people in distress to receive an automatic acknowledgement that their signal has been picked up by emergency first responders.

The Galileo SAR service is fully integrated into the Cospas-Sarsat system, a non-profit satellite-based search and rescue distress alert detection and information distribution system. The SAR transponder on the Galileo satellites picks up signals emitted from distress beacons in the 406 – 406.1 MHz band. It then broadcasts this information to dedicated ground stations called MEOLUTS, which use the signals to generate an independent location of the beacon. This location is then relayed to first responders through dedicated Cospas-Sarsat Mission Control Centres.

In Case You Missed It: EUSPA celebrates ‘406Day’.

Because it offers greater coverage in higher latitudes and thus a more robust performance, Galileo brings particularly important added value to Arctic SAR operations – value which was on full display during a large-scale rescue exercise that took place in the Artic Circle last year. Following the activation of the onboard distress signal, the Galileo SAR service was able to track the ship’s location in just 2 minutes and 20 seconds and with an accuracy of under one kilometre.

Safe navigation, environmental protection and mitigating climate change

But Galileo isn’t the only EU Space Programme benefiting the Arctic. The Copernicus Earth Observation programme’s Marine service provides ship captains and search and rescue teams with essential data on wave height and direction and the presence of sea ice, for example. And ships of all sizes rely on the accurate positioning provided by Galileo to safely navigate across these remote waters.

Furthermore, as the Arctic sees more ship traffic, the risk of environmental catastrophes, such as oil spills, increases. Here, Copernicus satellites can provide optical and synthetic aperture radar images which, combined with accurate positioning from Galileo, allow authorities to quickly reach the spill site, understand the extent of the risk, and implement necessary actions.

The EU Space Programme also plays an important role in mitigating how climate change impacts the Nordic environment. On the one hand, the accurate navigation offered by Galileo and EGNOS can optimise shipping routes to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and fuel consumption. On the other hand, the Copernicus Marine and Climate Change Services monitor a number of key climate indicators, such as sea level, temperature, currents and salinity. This data can then be used to drive global climate policy decisions.

Read More: The world has a water problem, and space may have a solution

All the benefits that the EU Space Programme brings to the Arctic region are highlighted in a short film produced by EUSPA, which was premiered for the Norwegian Space Agency. “Protecting the Arctic and its many ecosystems are an important component of the EU Green Deal,” said da Costa while introducing the film. “Through an integrated EU Space Programme and by working closely with our partners in the Arctic like NOSA, we are better-positioned to understand the challenges, find solutions and implement change.

 

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The smallest of the earth’s five major oceans, the Arctic is almost twice the size of Australia, covering 14 million square kilometers

How the EU Space Programme helps address the new challenges of a changing Arctic

8.4.2022 12:51  
Published: 
08 April 2022

 

 

 

Polar regions are faced with emerging challenges. Climate change is affecting the entire globe, but it is especially pronounced at the poles. With an integrated EU Space Programme in place, Europe has the capacity to better understand the challenges the Arctic Circle is confronted with, shape new mitigating policies and develop the necessary tools to fight climate change.

With nearly half the country sitting north of the Arctic Circle, Norway has a front row seat to the unprecedented changes taking place in this polar region. Climate change is causing temperatures in the Arctic Circle to rise twice as fast as anywhere else on the planet. As the ice melts, the Arctic Ocean is opening and shipping companies are moving in. According to the Arctic Council, ship traffic in the area grew by 25% between 2013 and 2019.

It was also in this context that EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa, delivered a keynote speech at the Oslo Position Conference 2022. His visit to the Norwegian capital was a great opportunity to confer with Jan Christian Vestre Minister of Trade, Industry and Fisheries, on the huge potential of EU Space across 17 markets. Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) & Earth Observation (EO) revenues are expected to reach 500 billion by 2031. Besides, Norway has been supporting European innovation with several H2020 funded projects such as Prepare Ships. Da Costa also met with Norwegian Space Agency leadership and members of the Norwegian Parliament’s Standing Committee on Business and Industry to give an overview of how the Arctic stands to benefit from the EU Space Programme.

Increased maritime traffic in this remote polar region, in combination with more unpredictable and extreme weather events, raises many new challenges”, said EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. “In the event of a ship running aground or a collision, search and rescue crews have to navigate rough seas, freezing temperatures and vast spaces in order to evacuate the vessel and provide emergency services.

This is where Galileo comes into play.

Galileo supports search and rescue operations Galileo, Europe’s GNSS, provides improved positioning and timing information to a range of users – including search and rescue (SAR) teams.

Galileo’s SAR service contributes to life-saving efforts by swiftly relaying radio beacon distress signals to the relevant SAR crews by means of dedicated payloads onboard Galileo satellites, supported by three ground stations strategically deployed across Europe. But what really sets the Galileo SAR service apart is its unique Return Link Service (RLS) – a feature that allows people in distress to receive an automatic acknowledgement that their signal has been picked up by emergency first responders.

The Galileo SAR service is fully integrated into the Cospas-Sarsat system, a non-profit satellite-based search and rescue distress alert detection and information distribution system. The SAR transponder on the Galileo satellites picks up signals emitted from distress beacons in the 406 – 406.1 MHz band. It then broadcasts this information to dedicated ground stations called MEOLUTS, which use the signals to generate an independent location of the beacon. This location is then relayed to first responders through dedicated Cospas-Sarsat Mission Control Centres.

In Case You Missed It: EUSPA celebrates ‘406Day’.

Because it offers greater coverage in higher latitudes and thus a more robust performance, Galileo brings particularly important added value to Arctic SAR operations – value which was on full display during a large-scale rescue exercise that took place in the Artic Circle last year. Following the activation of the onboard distress signal, the Galileo SAR service was able to track the ship’s location in just 2 minutes and 20 seconds and with an accuracy of under one kilometre.

Safe navigation, environmental protection and mitigating climate change

But Galileo isn’t the only EU Space Programme benefiting the Arctic. The Copernicus Earth Observation programme’s Marine service provides ship captains and search and rescue teams with essential data on wave height and direction and the presence of sea ice, for example. And ships of all sizes rely on the accurate positioning provided by Galileo to safely navigate across these remote waters.

Furthermore, as the Arctic sees more ship traffic, the risk of environmental catastrophes, such as oil spills, increases. Here, Copernicus satellites can provide optical and synthetic aperture radar images which, combined with accurate positioning from Galileo, allow authorities to quickly reach the spill site, understand the extent of the risk, and implement necessary actions.

The EU Space Programme also plays an important role in mitigating how climate change impacts the Nordic environment. On the one hand, the accurate navigation offered by Galileo and EGNOS can optimise shipping routes to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and fuel consumption. On the other hand, the Copernicus Marine and Climate Change Services monitor a number of key climate indicators, such as sea level, temperature, currents and salinity. This data can then be used to drive global climate policy decisions.

Read More: The world has a water problem, and space may have a solution

All the benefits that the EU Space Programme brings to the Arctic region are highlighted in a short film produced by EUSPA, which was premiered for the Norwegian Space Agency. “Protecting the Arctic and its many ecosystems are an important component of the EU Green Deal,” said da Costa while introducing the film. “Through an integrated EU Space Programme and by working closely with our partners in the Arctic like NOSA, we are better-positioned to understand the challenges, find solutions and implement change.” Insertion of video for now

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

How the EU Space Programme helps address the new challenges of a changing Arctic

8.4.2022 12:51  
Published: 
08 April 2022

Polar regions are faced with emerging challenges. Climate change is affecting the entire globe, but it is especially pronounced at the poles. With an integrated EU Space Programme in place, Europe has the capacity to better understand the challenges the Arctic Circle is confronted with, shape new mitigating policies and develop the necessary tools to fight climate change.

With nearly half the country sitting north of the Arctic Circle, Norway has a front row seat to the unprecedented changes taking place in this polar region. Climate change is causing temperatures in the Arctic Circle to rise twice as fast as anywhere else on the planet. As the ice melts, the Arctic Ocean is opening and shipping companies are moving in. According to the Arctic Council, ship traffic in the area grew by 25% between 2013 and 2019.

It was also in this context that EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa, delivered a keynote speech at the Oslo Position Conference 2022. His visit to the Norwegian capital was a great opportunity to confer with Jan Christian Vestre Minister of Trade, Industry and Fisheries, on the huge potential of EU Space across 17 markets. Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) & Earth Observation (EO) revenues are expected to reach 500 billion by 2031. Besides, Norway has been supporting European innovation with several H2020 funded projects such as Prepare Ships. Da Costa also met with Norwegian Space Agency leadership and members of the Norwegian Parliament’s Standing Committee on Business and Industry to give an overview of how the Arctic stands to benefit from the EU Space Programme.

Increased maritime traffic in this remote polar region, in combination with more unpredictable and extreme weather events, raises many new challenges”, said EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. “In the event of a ship running aground or a collision, search and rescue crews have to navigate rough seas, freezing temperatures and vast spaces in order to evacuate the vessel and provide emergency services.

This is where Galileo comes into play.

Galileo supports search and rescue operations Galileo, Europe’s GNSS, provides improved positioning and timing information to a range of users – including search and rescue (SAR) teams.

Galileo’s SAR service contributes to life-saving efforts by swiftly relaying radio beacon distress signals to the relevant SAR crews by means of dedicated payloads onboard Galileo satellites, supported by three ground stations strategically deployed across Europe. But what really sets the Galileo SAR service apart is its unique Return Link Service (RLS) – a feature that allows people in distress to receive an automatic acknowledgement that their signal has been picked up by emergency first responders.

The Galileo SAR service is fully integrated into the Cospas-Sarsat system, a non-profit satellite-based search and rescue distress alert detection and information distribution system. The SAR transponder on the Galileo satellites picks up signals emitted from distress beacons in the 406 – 406.1 MHz band. It then broadcasts this information to dedicated ground stations called MEOLUTS, which use the signals to generate an independent location of the beacon. This location is then relayed to first responders through dedicated Cospas-Sarsat Mission Control Centres.

In Case You Missed It: EUSPA celebrates ‘406Day’.

Because it offers greater coverage in higher latitudes and thus a more robust performance, Galileo brings particularly important added value to Arctic SAR operations – value which was on full display during a large-scale rescue exercise that took place in the Artic Circle last year. Following the activation of the onboard distress signal, the Galileo SAR service was able to track the ship’s location in just 2 minutes and 20 seconds and with an accuracy of under one kilometre.

Safe navigation, environmental protection and mitigating climate change

But Galileo isn’t the only EU Space Programme benefiting the Arctic. The Copernicus Earth Observation programme’s Marine service provides ship captains and search and rescue teams with essential data on wave height and direction and the presence of sea ice, for example. And ships of all sizes rely on the accurate positioning provided by Galileo to safely navigate across these remote waters.

Furthermore, as the Arctic sees more ship traffic, the risk of environmental catastrophes, such as oil spills, increases. Here, Copernicus satellites can provide optical and synthetic aperture radar images which, combined with accurate positioning from Galileo, allow authorities to quickly reach the spill site, understand the extent of the risk, and implement necessary actions.

The EU Space Programme also plays an important role in mitigating how climate change impacts the Nordic environment. On the one hand, the accurate navigation offered by Galileo and EGNOS can optimise shipping routes to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and fuel consumption. On the other hand, the Copernicus Marine and Climate Change Services monitor a number of key climate indicators, such as sea level, temperature, currents and salinity. This data can then be used to drive global climate policy decisions.

Read More: The world has a water problem, and space may have a solution

All the benefits that the EU Space Programme brings to the Arctic region are highlighted in a short film produced by EUSPA, which was premiered for the Norwegian Space Agency. “Protecting the Arctic and its many ecosystems are an important component of the EU Green Deal,” said da Costa while introducing the film. “Through an integrated EU Space Programme and by working closely with our partners in the Arctic like NOSA, we are better-positioned to understand the challenges, find solutions and implement change.” Insertion of video for now

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

How the EU Space Programme helps address the new challenges of a changing Arctic

8.4.2022 12:51  
Published: 
08 April 2022

 

 

Polar regions are faced with emerging challenges. Climate change is affecting the entire globe, but it is especially pronounced at the poles. With an integrated EU Space Programme in place, Europe has the capacity to better understand the challenges the Arctic Circle is confronted with, shape new mitigating policies and develop the necessary tools to fight climate change.

With nearly half the country sitting north of the Arctic Circle, Norway has a front row seat to the unprecedented changes taking place in this polar region. Climate change is causing temperatures in the Arctic Circle to rise twice as fast as anywhere else on the planet. As the ice melts, the Arctic Ocean is opening and shipping companies are moving in. According to the Arctic Council, ship traffic in the area grew by 25% between 2013 and 2019.

It was also in this context that EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa, delivered a keynote speech at the Oslo Position Conference 2022. His visit to the Norwegian capital was a great opportunity to confer with Jan Christian Vestre Minister of Trade, Industry and Fisheries, on the huge potential of EU Space across 17 markets. Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) & Earth Observation (EO) revenues are expected to reach 500 billion by 2031. Besides, Norway has been supporting European innovation with several H2020 funded projects such as Prepare Ships. Da Costa also met with Norwegian Space Agency leadership and members of the Norwegian Parliament’s Standing Committee on Business and Industry to give an overview of how the Arctic stands to benefit from the EU Space Programme.

Increased maritime traffic in this remote polar region, in combination with more unpredictable and extreme weather events, raises many new challenges”, said EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. “In the event of a ship running aground or a collision, search and rescue crews have to navigate rough seas, freezing temperatures and vast spaces in order to evacuate the vessel and provide emergency services.

This is where Galileo comes into play.

Galileo supports search and rescue operations Galileo, Europe’s GNSS, provides improved positioning and timing information to a range of users – including search and rescue (SAR) teams.

Galileo’s SAR service contributes to life-saving efforts by swiftly relaying radio beacon distress signals to the relevant SAR crews by means of dedicated payloads onboard Galileo satellites, supported by three ground stations strategically deployed across Europe. But what really sets the Galileo SAR service apart is its unique Return Link Service (RLS) – a feature that allows people in distress to receive an automatic acknowledgement that their signal has been picked up by emergency first responders.

The Galileo SAR service is fully integrated into the Cospas-Sarsat system, a non-profit satellite-based search and rescue distress alert detection and information distribution system. The SAR transponder on the Galileo satellites picks up signals emitted from distress beacons in the 406 – 406.1 MHz band. It then broadcasts this information to dedicated ground stations called MEOLUTS, which use the signals to generate an independent location of the beacon. This location is then relayed to first responders through dedicated Cospas-Sarsat Mission Control Centres.

In Case You Missed It: EUSPA celebrates ‘406Day’.

Because it offers greater coverage in higher latitudes and thus a more robust performance, Galileo brings particularly important added value to Arctic SAR operations – value which was on full display during a large-scale rescue exercise that took place in the Artic Circle last year. Following the activation of the onboard distress signal, the Galileo SAR service was able to track the ship’s location in just 2 minutes and 20 seconds and with an accuracy of under one kilometre.

Safe navigation, environmental protection and mitigating climate change

But Galileo isn’t the only EU Space Programme benefiting the Arctic. The Copernicus Earth Observation programme’s Marine service provides ship captains and search and rescue teams with essential data on wave height and direction and the presence of sea ice, for example. And ships of all sizes rely on the accurate positioning provided by Galileo to safely navigate across these remote waters.

Furthermore, as the Arctic sees more ship traffic, the risk of environmental catastrophes, such as oil spills, increases. Here, Copernicus satellites can provide optical and synthetic aperture radar images which, combined with accurate positioning from Galileo, allow authorities to quickly reach the spill site, understand the extent of the risk, and implement necessary actions.

The EU Space Programme also plays an important role in mitigating how climate change impacts the Nordic environment. On the one hand, the accurate navigation offered by Galileo and EGNOS can optimise shipping routes to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and fuel consumption. On the other hand, the Copernicus Marine and Climate Change Services monitor a number of key climate indicators, such as sea level, temperature, currents and salinity. This data can then be used to drive global climate policy decisions.

Read More: The world has a water problem, and space may have a solution

All the benefits that the EU Space Programme brings to the Arctic region are highlighted in a short film produced by EUSPA, which was premiered for the Norwegian Space Agency. “Protecting the Arctic and its many ecosystems are an important component of the EU Green Deal,” said da Costa while introducing the film. “Through an integrated EU Space Programme and by working closely with our partners in the Arctic like NOSA, we are better-positioned to understand the challenges, find solutions and implement change.” Insertion of video for now

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

How the EU Space Programme helps address the new challenges of a changing Arctic

8.4.2022 12:51  
The smallest of the earth’s five major oceans, the Arctic is almost twice the size of Australia, covering 14 million square kilometers
Published: 
08 April 2022

Polar regions are faced with emerging challenges. Climate change is affecting the entire globe, but it is especially pronounced at the poles. With an integrated EU Space Programme in place, Europe has the capacity to better understand the challenges the Arctic Circle is confronted with, shape new mitigating policies and develop the necessary tools to fight climate change.

With nearly half the country sitting north of the Arctic Circle, Norway has a front row seat to the unprecedented changes taking place in this polar region. Climate change is causing temperatures in the Arctic Circle to rise twice as fast as anywhere else on the planet. As the ice melts, the Arctic Ocean is opening and shipping companies are moving in. According to the Arctic Council, ship traffic in the area grew by 25% between 2013 and 2019.

It was also in this context that EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa, delivered a keynote speech at the Oslo Position Conference 2022. His visit to the Norwegian capital was a great opportunity to confer with Jan Christian Vestre Minister of Trade, Industry and Fisheries, on the huge potential of EU Space across 17 markets. Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) & Earth Observation (EO) revenues are expected to reach 500 billion by 2031. Besides, Norway has been supporting European innovation with several H2020 funded projects such as Prepare Ships. Da Costa also met with Norwegian Space Agency leadership and members of the Norwegian Parliament’s Standing Committee on Business and Industry to give an overview of how the Arctic stands to benefit from the EU Space Programme.

Increased maritime traffic in this remote polar region, in combination with more unpredictable and extreme weather events, raises many new challenges”, said EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. “In the event of a ship running aground or a collision, search and rescue crews have to navigate rough seas, freezing temperatures and vast spaces in order to evacuate the vessel and provide emergency services.

This is where Galileo comes into play.

Galileo supports search and rescue operations Galileo, Europe’s GNSS, provides improved positioning and timing information to a range of users – including search and rescue (SAR) teams.

Galileo’s SAR service contributes to life-saving efforts by swiftly relaying radio beacon distress signals to the relevant SAR crews by means of dedicated payloads onboard Galileo satellites, supported by three ground stations strategically deployed across Europe. But what really sets the Galileo SAR service apart is its unique Return Link Service (RLS) – a feature that allows people in distress to receive an automatic acknowledgement that their signal has been picked up by emergency first responders.

The Galileo SAR service is fully integrated into the Cospas-Sarsat system, a non-profit satellite-based search and rescue distress alert detection and information distribution system. The SAR transponder on the Galileo satellites picks up signals emitted from distress beacons in the 406 – 406.1 MHz band. It then broadcasts this information to dedicated ground stations called MEOLUTS, which use the signals to generate an independent location of the beacon. This location is then relayed to first responders through dedicated Cospas-Sarsat Mission Control Centres.

In Case You Missed It: EUSPA celebrates ‘406Day’.

Because it offers greater coverage in higher latitudes and thus a more robust performance, Galileo brings particularly important added value to Arctic SAR operations – value which was on full display during a large-scale rescue exercise that took place in the Artic Circle last year. Following the activation of the onboard distress signal, the Galileo SAR service was able to track the ship’s location in just 2 minutes and 20 seconds and with an accuracy of under one kilometre.

Safe navigation, environmental protection and mitigating climate change

But Galileo isn’t the only EU Space Programme benefiting the Arctic. The Copernicus Earth Observation programme’s Marine service provides ship captains and search and rescue teams with essential data on wave height and direction and the presence of sea ice, for example. And ships of all sizes rely on the accurate positioning provided by Galileo to safely navigate across these remote waters.

Furthermore, as the Arctic sees more ship traffic, the risk of environmental catastrophes, such as oil spills, increases. Here, Copernicus satellites can provide optical and synthetic aperture radar images which, combined with accurate positioning from Galileo, allow authorities to quickly reach the spill site, understand the extent of the risk, and implement necessary actions.

The EU Space Programme also plays an important role in mitigating how climate change impacts the Nordic environment. On the one hand, the accurate navigation offered by Galileo and EGNOS can optimise shipping routes to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and fuel consumption. On the other hand, the Copernicus Marine and Climate Change Services monitor a number of key climate indicators, such as sea level, temperature, currents and salinity. This data can then be used to drive global climate policy decisions.

Read More: The world has a water problem, and space may have a solution

All the benefits that the EU Space Programme brings to the Arctic region are highlighted in a short film produced by EUSPA, which was premiered for the Norwegian Space Agency. “Protecting the Arctic and its many ecosystems are an important component of the EU Green Deal,” said da Costa while introducing the film. “Through an integrated EU Space Programme and by working closely with our partners in the Arctic like NOSA, we are better-positioned to understand the challenges, find solutions and implement change.

 

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The smallest of the earth’s five major oceans, the Arctic is almost twice the size of Australia, covering 14 million square kilometers

EUSPA celebrates “406Day”, the International Search and Rescue Beacon Day by lifting the veil on new life-saving features.

6.4.2022 12:40  
The Galileo SAR reached new heights with a record-breaking location accuracy performance of 98.12% below 2km. The EU constellation is the biggest contributor to the Cospas-Sarsat MEOSAR system.
Published: 
06 April 2022

Beacon Awareness Day (#406Day) is an opportunity to celebrate the amazing work carried out by Search and Rescue teams across the globe that risk their lives daily to save people in distress. It also aims to remind the owners of Search and Rescue beacons of the need to register their beacons and test them regularly.

On #406Day2021, we celebrate Search and Rescue teams all around the world. But why 406? Well, 406 Day, as April 6th is written in the US where the initiative emerged, is a reference to the 406 MHz frequency of the Search and Rescue beacons used by the international rescue organisation Cospas-Sarsat. These beacons help save an average of seven lives every day around the world.

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), the European Commission, and their partners, the European Space Agency (ESA), is proud to celebrate Galileo’s contribution to this international effort.

The Search and Rescue (SAR) transponders installed onboard the Galileo satellites decrease the detection and location time of a distress beacon dramatically, speeding up the rescue response and augmenting the chances of survival. Galileo/SAR is the only system delivering the Return Link Service (RLS). This feature provides the user in distress with an acknowledgment indication on the beacon that the distress signal was received and its position located.

Today, Galileo provides more than 90% of the approved L-band satellite-based search and rescue capabilities with 24/7 worldwide coverage. On top, Galileo is also the largest search and rescue ground segment provider with a committed performance of over 20% of the Earth's surface.

It is a great European achievement, which shows that Europe is not only a major space power but also an actor continuously working on people's well-being. The 406 Day is also the perfect occasion to pay tribute to all the members of the Rescue teams around the world.

As announced last year, and based on the feedback received from more than 250 operational Search and Rescue units, Galileo is designing new features to answer their operational needs as closely as possible, to save even more lives. The Remote Beacon Activation Service (e.g. in the case of the disappearance of a plane or a vessel) and the Two-Way communication functionality (that allows rescue coordinators to send pre-programmed questions and instructions to the person in distress) is due to enter into preliminary testing shortly.

Click here for more info.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The Galileo SAR reached new heights with a record-breaking location accuracy performance of 98.12% below 2km. The EU constellation is the biggest contributor to the Cospas-Sarsat MEOSAR system.

EUSPA celebrates “406Day”, the International Search and Rescue Beacon Day by lifting the veil on new life-saving features.

6.4.2022 12:40  
The Galileo SAR reached new heights with a record-breaking location accuracy performance of 98.12% below 2km. The EU constellation is the biggest contributor to the Cospas-Sarsat MEOSAR system.
Published: 
06 April 2022

Beacon Awareness Day (#406Day) is an opportunity to celebrate the amazing work carried out by Search and Rescue teams across the globe that risk their lives daily to save people in distress. It also aims to remind the owners of Search and Rescue beacons of the need to register their beacons and test them regularly.

On #406Day2021, we celebrate Search and Rescue teams all around the world. But why 406? Well, 406 Day, as April 6th is written in the US where the initiative emerged, is a reference to the 406 MHz frequency of the Search and Rescue beacons used by the international rescue organisation Cospas-Sarsat. These beacons help save an average of seven lives every day around the world.

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), the European Commission, and their partners, the European Space Agency (ESA), is proud to celebrate Galileo’s contribution to this international effort.

The Search and Rescue (SAR) transponders installed onboard the Galileo satellites decrease the detection and location time of a distress beacon dramatically, speeding up the rescue response and augmenting the chances of survival. Galileo/SAR is the only system delivering the Return Link Service (RLS). This feature provides the user in distress with an acknowledgment indication on the beacon that the distress signal was received and its position located.

Today, Galileo provides more than 90% of the approved L-band satellite-based search and rescue capabilities with 24/7 worldwide coverage. On top, Galileo is also the largest search and rescue ground segment provider with a committed performance of over 20% of the Earth's surface.

It is a great European achievement, which shows that Europe is not only a major space power but also an actor continuously working on people's well-being. The 406 Day is also the perfect occasion to pay tribute to all the members of the Rescue teams around the world.

As announced last year, and based on the feedback received from more than 250 operational Search and Rescue units, Galileo is designing new features to answer their operational needs as closely as possible, to save even more lives. The Remote Beacon Activation Service (e.g. in the case of the disappearance of a plane or a vessel) and the Two-Way communication functionality (that allows rescue coordinators to send pre-programmed questions and instructions to the person in distress) is due to enter into preliminary testing shortly.

Click here for more info.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The Galileo SAR reached new heights with a record-breaking location accuracy performance of 98.12% below 2km. The EU constellation is the biggest contributor to the Cospas-Sarsat MEOSAR system.

EUSPA celebrates “406Day”, the International Search and Rescue Beacon Day by lifting the veil on new life-saving features.

6.4.2022 12:40  
The Galileo SAR reached new heights with a record-breaking location accuracy performance of 98.12% below 2km. The EU constellation is the biggest contributor to the Cospas-Sarsat MEOSAR system.
Published: 
06 April 2022

Beacon Awareness Day (#406Day) is an opportunity to celebrate the amazing work carried out by Search and Rescue teams across the globe that risk their lives daily to save people in distress. It also aims to remind the owners of Search and Rescue beacons of the need to register their beacons and test them regularly.

On #406Day2021, we celebrate Search and Rescue teams all around the world. But why 406? Well, 406 Day, as April 6th is written in the US where the initiative emerged, is a reference to the 406 MHz frequency of the Search and Rescue beacons used by the international rescue organisation Cospas-Sarsat. These beacons help save an average of seven lives every day around the world.

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), the European Commission, and their partners, the European Space Agency (ESA), is proud to celebrate Galileo’s contribution to this international effort.

The Search and Rescue (SAR) transponders installed onboard the Galileo satellites decrease the detection and location time of a distress beacon dramatically, speeding up the rescue response and augmenting the chances of survival. Galileo/SAR is the only system delivering the Return Link Service (RLS). This feature provides the user in distress with an acknowledgment indication on the beacon that the distress signal was received and its position located.

Today, Galileo provides more than 90% of the approved L-band satellite-based search and rescue capabilities with 24/7 worldwide coverage. On top, Galileo is also the largest search and rescue ground segment provider with a committed performance of over 20% of the Earth's surface.

It is a great European achievement, which shows that Europe is not only a major space power but also an actor continuously working on people's well-being. The 406 Day is also the perfect occasion to pay tribute to all the members of the Rescue teams around the world.

As announced last year, and based on the feedback received from more than 250 operational Search and Rescue units, Galileo is designing new features to answer their operational needs as closely as possible, to save even more lives. The Remote Beacon Activation Service (e.g. in the case of the disappearance of a plane or a vessel) and the Two-Way communication functionality (that allows rescue coordinators to send pre-programmed questions and instructions to the person in distress) is due to enter into preliminary testing shortly.

Click here for more info.

See how EU Space mitigates risks and saves lives in the Arctic region. 

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The Galileo SAR reached new heights with a record-breaking location accuracy performance of 98.12% below 2km. The EU constellation is the biggest contributor to the Cospas-Sarsat MEOSAR system.

EUSPA celebrates “406Day”, the International Search and Rescue Beacon Day by lifting the veil on new life-saving features.

6.4.2022 12:40  
The Galileo SAR reached new heights with a record-breaking location accuracy performance of 98.12% below 2km. The EU constellation is the biggest contributor to the Cospas-Sarsat MEOSAR system.
Published: 
06 April 2022

Beacon Awareness Day (#406Day) is an opportunity to celebrate the amazing work carried out by Search and Rescue teams across the globe that risk their lives daily to save people in distress. It also aims to remind the owners of Search and Rescue beacons of the need to register their beacons and test them regularly.

On #406Day2021, we celebrate Search and Rescue teams all around the world. But why 406? Well, 406 Day, as April 6th is written in the US where the initiative emerged, is a reference to the 406 MHz frequency of the Search and Rescue beacons used by the international rescue organisation Cospas-Sarsat. These beacons help save an average of seven lives every day around the world.

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), the European Commission, and their partners, the European Space Agency (ESA), is proud to celebrate Galileo’s contribution to this international effort.

The Search and Rescue (SAR) transponders installed onboard the Galileo satellites decrease the detection and location time of a distress beacon dramatically, speeding up the rescue response and augmenting the chances of survival. Galileo/SAR is the only system delivering the Return Link Service (RLS). This feature provides the user in distress with an acknowledgment indication on the beacon that the distress signal was received and its position located.

Today, Galileo provides more than 90% of the approved L-band satellite-based search and rescue capabilities with 24/7 worldwide coverage. On top, Galileo is also the largest search and rescue ground segment provider with a committed performance of over 20% of the Earth's surface.

It is a great European achievement, which shows that Europe is not only a major space power but also an actor continuously working on people's well-being. The 406 Day is also the perfect occasion to pay tribute to all the members of the Rescue teams around the world.

As announced last year, and based on the feedback received from more than 250 operational Search and Rescue units, Galileo is designing new features to answer their operational needs as closely as possible, to save even more lives. The Remote Beacon Activation Service (e.g. in the case of the disappearance of a plane or a vessel) and the Two-Way communication functionality (that allows rescue coordinators to send pre-programmed questions and instructions to the person in distress) is due to enter into preliminary testing shortly.

Click here for more info.

Watch our first ever short documentary to see how Galileo-enabled Emergency Position-Indicating Radiobeacon (EPIRB) is used to save lives in the Arctic Circle, and what benefits the EU Space Programme brings to better understand and fight the challenges climate change is causing, from affecting communities and ecosystems to disrupting maritime operations in the Arctic Circle. 

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The Galileo SAR reached new heights with a record-breaking location accuracy performance of 98.12% below 2km. The EU constellation is the biggest contributor to the Cospas-Sarsat MEOSAR system.

EUSPA celebrates “406Day”, the International Search and Rescue Beacon Day by lifting the veil on new life-saving features.

6.4.2022 12:40  
The Galileo SAR reached new heights with a record-breaking location accuracy performance of 98.12% below 2km. The EU constellation is the biggest contributor to the Cospas-Sarsat MEOSAR system.
Published: 
06 April 2022

Beacon Awareness Day (#406Day) is an opportunity to celebrate the amazing work carried out by Search and Rescue teams across the globe that risk their lives daily to save people in distress. It also aims to remind the owners of Search and Rescue beacons of the need to register their beacons and test them regularly.

On #406Day2021, we celebrate Search and Rescue teams all around the world. But why 406? Well, 406 Day, as April 6th is written in the US where the initiative emerged, is a reference to the 406 MHz frequency of the Search and Rescue beacons used by the international rescue organisation Cospas-Sarsat. These beacons help save an average of seven lives every day around the world.

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), the European Commission, and their partners, the European Space Agency (ESA), is proud to celebrate Galileo’s contribution to this international effort.

The Search and Rescue (SAR) transponders installed onboard the Galileo satellites decrease the detection and location time of a distress beacon dramatically, speeding up the rescue response and augmenting the chances of survival. Galileo/SAR is the only system delivering the Return Link Service (RLS). This feature provides the user in distress with an acknowledgment indication on the beacon that the distress signal was received and its position located.

Today, Galileo provides more than 90% of the approved L-band satellite-based search and rescue capabilities with 24/7 worldwide coverage. On top, Galileo is also the largest search and rescue ground segment provider with a committed performance of over 20% of the Earth's surface.

It is a great European achievement, which shows that Europe is not only a major space power but also an actor continuously working on people's well-being. The 406 Day is also the perfect occasion to pay tribute to all the members of the Rescue teams around the world.

As announced last year, and based on the feedback received from more than 250 operational Search and Rescue units, Galileo is designing new features to answer their operational needs as closely as possible, to save even more lives. The Remote Beacon Activation Service (e.g. in the case of the disappearance of a plane or a vessel) and the Two-Way communication functionality (that allows rescue coordinators to send pre-programmed questions and instructions to the person in distress) is due to enter into preliminary testing shortly.

Click here for more info.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The Galileo SAR reached new heights with a record-breaking location accuracy performance of 98.12% below 2km. The EU constellation is the biggest contributor to the Cospas-Sarsat MEOSAR system.

Space-based solutions set to address some of today’s most pressing challenges

4.4.2022 11:45  
EUSPA launched earlier in 2020 this Horizon Europe call to transform the digital economy, increase the Union’s resilience and support the Green Deal.
Published: 
04 April 2022

Having received 50 proposals, the first Horizon Europe call is set to turn space technologies like Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus into innovative applications and solutions.

The results of the first Horizon Europe call are in, with the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), who manages the call, receiving 50 proposals.

While the proposals come from across Europe, each shares the common goal of developing innovative downstream solutions that leverage data and information from the EU Space Programme, including Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus.

“Linking space to user needs starts with research and innovation,” says EUSPA Head of Market Development Innovation department, Fiammetta Diani. “By facilitating research that leverages the EU Space Programme, Horizon Europe supports the development of space-based solutions to some of today’s most pressing challenges.”

Those challenges are transforming the digital economy, improving safety and security services and mitigating the risk of climate change – and the proposals received for this first call address all three.

For instance, for the Digital Age, EUSPA received 10 innovative applications proposals focusing on this particular topic. Taking advantage of European GNSS’ (EGNSS) superb multipath resistance and authentication, these proposals look to address a range of societal challenges, including health and wellbeing, smart mobility and the sharing economy.

EUSPA also received 12 proposals for using Earth Observation and EGNSS to better protect European citizens from natural disasters and other emergencies. Many of these proposals, highlight the important of timing and synchronisation services offered by Galileo. “In the unfortunate event of wildfires, floods or earthquakes, having ready access to precise location and up-to-date geospatial information are vital to conducting an effective emergency response,” says Diani. “The synergies between Copernicus, Galileo and EGNOS have the potential to offer just that, and these proposals aim to turn that potential into practical solutions.”

As to mitigating the risk of climate change, the first call received 28 proposals for using EGNSS and Earth Observation data to support the objectives of the EU’s Green Deal. “From curbing CO2 emissions to fighting illegal logging, monitoring biodiversity and tracking oil spills, Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus are essential tools for delivering on the Green Deal’s ambitious environmental goals,” adds Diani.

The total indicative budget allocated for these first call proposals is EUR 32.6 million.

The second Horizon Europe call is planned to be opened for submissions in October 2022. With an overall budget of EUR 48.1 million, this second call will focus on supporting the development of innovative space-based downstream applications.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EUSPA launched earlier in 2020 this Horizon Europe call to transform the digital economy, increase the Union’s resilience and support the Green Deal.

Save the date: EUSpace4Ukraine humanitarian help webinar on 12 April

31.3.2022 12:58  
Data from the EU Space Programme are provided freely to users around the globe.

The European Union, its Member States, and Europeans across the continent have joined efforts to support Ukrainians fleeing the devastating war. EUSPA is mobilizing the EU Space innovation community who can provide solutions to enhance humanitarian support for Ukraine people. We are creating a platform to match the innovators with the NGOs and other helpers.

If you are a start-up, an innovator, an NGO or a helper providing humanitarian support for Ukraine, save the date for our webinar on 12 April - 10:00 am - 11:00 am, to discover how you can be part of the platform and the upcoming opportunities!

Register here.

Meanwhile, EUSPA, being a user-oriented agency is currently setting up a first version of the platform grouping applications and solutions that leverage freely accessible data of Galileo and Copernicus to enhance humanitarian support for Ukraine people. In the webinar you will discover how to contribute to growing this first platform.

The applications/solutions will cover a wide range of uses, from supporting NGOs delivering medical goods via drones to practical solutions to support the integration in EU countries of people fleeing the war.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Data from the EU Space Programme are provided freely to users around the globe.

Save the date: EUSpace4Ukraine humanitarian help webinar on 12 April

31.3.2022 12:58  
Published: 
31 March 2022

The European Union, its Member States, and Europeans across the continent have joined efforts to support Ukrainians fleeing the devastating war. EUSPA is mobilizing the EU Space innovation community who can provide solutions to enhance humanitarian support for Ukraine people. We are creating a platform to match the innovators with the NGOs and other helpers.

If you are a start-up, an innovator, an NGO or a helper providing humanitarian support for Ukraine, save the date for our webinar on 12 April - 10:00 am - 11:00 am, to discover how you can be part of the platform and the upcoming opportunities!

Register here.

Meanwhile, EUSPA, being a user-oriented agency is currently setting up a first version of the platform grouping applications and solutions that leverage freely accessible data of Galileo and Copernicus to enhance humanitarian support for Ukraine people. In the webinar you will discover how to contribute to growing this first platform.

The applications/solutions will cover a wide range of uses, from supporting NGOs delivering medical goods via drones to practical solutions to support the integration in EU countries of people fleeing the war.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Data from the EU Space Programme are provided freely to users around the globe.

Save the date: EUSpace4Ukraine humanitarian help webinar on 12 April

31.3.2022 12:58  
Data from the EU Space Programme are provided freely to users around the globe.
Published: 
30 March 2022

EUSPA to mobilise the EU Space innovation community and provide solutions to enhance humanitarian support to those fleeing the war.

The European Union, its Member States, and Europeans across the continent have joined efforts to support people fleeing the devastating war. EUSPA is mobilizing the EU Space innovation community who can provide solutions to enhance humanitarian support. We are creating a platform to match the innovators with the NGOs and other helpers.

If you are a start-up, an innovator, an NGO or a helper providing humanitarian support for Ukraine, save the date for our webinar on 12 April - 10:00 am - 11:00 am, to discover how you can be part of the platform and the upcoming opportunities!

Register here.

Meanwhile, EUSPA, being a user-oriented agency is currently setting up a first version of the platform grouping applications and solutions that leverage freely accessible data of Galileo and Copernicus to enhance humanitarian support for Ukraine people. In the webinar you will discover how to contribute to growing this first platform.

The applications/solutions will cover a wide range of uses, from supporting NGOs delivering medical goods via drones to practical solutions to support the integration in EU countries of people fleeing the war.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Data from the EU Space Programme are provided freely to users around the globe.

Save the date: EUSpace4Ukraine humanitarian help webinar on 12 April

31.3.2022 12:58  
Data from the EU Space Programme are provided freely to users around the globe.
Published: 
31 March 2022

EUSPA to mobilise the EU Space innovation community and provide solutions to enhance humanitarian support for the Ukrainian people.

The European Union, its Member States, and Europeans across the continent have joined efforts to support Ukrainians fleeing the devastating war. EUSPA is mobilizing the EU Space innovation community who can provide solutions to enhance humanitarian support for Ukraine people. We are creating a platform to match the innovators with the NGOs and other helpers.

If you are a start-up, an innovator, an NGO or a helper providing humanitarian support for Ukraine, save the date for our webinar on 12 April - 10:00 am - 11:00 am, to discover how you can be part of the platform and the upcoming opportunities!

Register here.

Meanwhile, EUSPA, being a user-oriented agency is currently setting up a first version of the platform grouping applications and solutions that leverage freely accessible data of Galileo and Copernicus to enhance humanitarian support for Ukraine people. In the webinar you will discover how to contribute to growing this first platform.

The applications/solutions will cover a wide range of uses, from supporting NGOs delivering medical goods via drones to practical solutions to support the integration in EU countries of people fleeing the war.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Data from the EU Space Programme are provided freely to users around the globe.

Save the date: EUSpace4Ukraine humanitarian help webinar on 12 April

31.3.2022 12:58  
Data from the EU Space Programme are provided freely to users around the globe.
Published: 
31 March 2022

EUSPA to mobilise the EU Space innovation community and provide solutions to enhance humanitarian support for the Ukrainian people.

The European Union, its Member States, and Europeans across the continent have joined efforts to support Ukrainians fleeing the devastating war. EUSPA is mobilizing the EU Space innovation community who can provide solutions to enhance humanitarian support for Ukraine people. We are creating a platform to match the innovators with the NGOs and other helpers.

If you are a start-up, an innovator, an NGO or a helper providing humanitarian support for Ukraine, save the date for our webinar on 12 April - 10:00 am - 11:00 am, to discover how you can be part of the platform and the upcoming opportunities!

Register here.

Meanwhile, EUSPA, being a user-oriented agency is currently setting up a first version of the platform grouping applications and solutions that leverage freely accessible data of Galileo and Copernicus to enhance humanitarian support for Ukraine people. In the webinar you will discover how to contribute to growing this first platform.

The applications/solutions will cover a wide range of uses, from supporting NGOs delivering medical goods via drones to practical solutions to support the integration in EU countries of people fleeing the war.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Data from the EU Space Programme are provided freely to users around the globe.

Save the date: EUSpace4Ukraine humanitarian help webinar on 12 April

31.3.2022 12:58  
Data from the EU Space Programme are provided freely to users around the globe.
Published: 
31 March 2022

EUSPA to mobilise the EU Space innovation community and provide solutions to enhance humanitarian support for the Ukrainian people.

The European Union, its Member States, and Europeans across the continent have joined efforts to support Ukrainians fleeing the devastating war. EUSPA is mobilizing the EU Space innovation community who can provide solutions to enhance humanitarian support for Ukrainian people. We are creating a platform to match the innovators with the NGOs and other helpers.

If you are a start-up, an innovator, an NGO or a helper providing humanitarian support for Ukraine, save the date for our webinar on 12 April - 10:00 am - 11:00 am, to discover how you can be part of the platform and the upcoming opportunities!

Register here.

Meanwhile, EUSPA, being a user-oriented agency is currently setting up a first version of the platform grouping applications and solutions that leverage freely accessible data of Galileo and Copernicus to enhance humanitarian support for Ukraine people. In the webinar you will discover how to contribute to growing this first platform.

The applications/solutions will cover a wide range of uses, from supporting NGOs delivering medical goods via drones to practical solutions to support the integration in EU countries of people fleeing the war.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Data from the EU Space Programme are provided freely to users around the globe.

Save the date: EUSpace4Ukraine humanitarian help webinar on 12 April

31.3.2022 12:58  
Data from the EU Space Programme are provided freely to users around the globe.
Published: 
31 March 2022

EUSPA to mobilise the EU Space innovation community and provide solutions to enhance humanitarian support to those fleeing the war.

The European Union, its Member States, and Europeans across the continent have joined efforts to support people fleeing the devastating war. EUSPA is mobilizing the EU Space innovation community who can provide solutions to enhance humanitarian support. We are creating a platform to match the innovators with the NGOs and other helpers.

If you are a start-up, an innovator, an NGO or a helper providing humanitarian support for Ukraine, save the date for our webinar on 12 April - 10:00 am - 11:00 am, to discover how you can be part of the platform and the upcoming opportunities!

Register here.

Meanwhile, EUSPA, being a user-oriented agency is currently setting up a first version of the platform grouping applications and solutions that leverage freely accessible data of Galileo and Copernicus to enhance humanitarian support for Ukraine people. In the webinar you will discover how to contribute to growing this first platform.

The applications/solutions will cover a wide range of uses, from supporting NGOs delivering medical goods via drones to practical solutions to support the integration in EU countries of people fleeing the war.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Data from the EU Space Programme are provided freely to users around the globe.

Deadline for Galileo Reference Centre procurement approaching

23.3.2022 12:02  
The deadline for the procurement on “GRC Infrastructure evolution, nominal operations support, and maintenance’’ is on April 11 23:59 CET.
Published: 
23 March 2022

Located in Noordwijk, the Netherlands, the Galileo Reference Centre (GRC) is a cornerstone of the Galileo service provision. From Initial Services to full operational capability and beyond, it provides EUSPA with an independent service facility to evaluate the quality of the signals in space and the overall performance of the different Galileo services. In doing so, it helps the EUSPA ensure the delivery of world-class navigation services so users can better rely on and benefit from Galileo. EUSPA is responsible for the management of the GRC, including its development and operations. The GRC helps ensure that Galileo users are provided with very high-quality signals for use by an array of the new navigation applications, but it also monitors, where feasible, other GNSSs.

Read this: The Galileo Reference Centre evolves to support the constellation’s growing needs (europa.eu)

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) published a procurement on the “GRC Nominal Operations Support, Infrastructure Development, Evolution, and Maintenance”. To encourage large participation, EUSPA held a workshop to present the details of the call on 10 March 2022. Presentations delivered during this workshop are available here.

Q&A followed the presentation during this successful workshop. The questions and our answers can be found here.

With this procurement, EUSPA is looking for partners to provide services and supplies to support the agency in shaping the future versions of the GRC infrastructure to support the evolutions of several GNSS services.

Application deadline is on April 11 2022 at 23:59 CET.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The deadline for the procurement on “GRC Infrastructure evolution, nominal operations support, and maintenance’’ is on April 11 23:59 CET.

The world has a water problem, and space may have a solution

22.3.2022 13:50  
Both Copernicus, for EO, and Galileo, for GNSS, are also being used to support Europe’s growing aquaculture sector.
Published: 
22 March 2022

The world has a water problem. At present, according to the World Health Organisation (WHO) there are 785 million people who lack access to clean water – that’s one in every 10 people on the planet. But the problem goes well beyond the water we drink; it also affects the food we eat. For example, water scarcity, due in part to the increase in droughts caused by climate change, means farmers have less water to grow their crops with.

In parallel, people are increasingly looking to our oceans, lakes and rivers for food – a shift that causes another problem: overfishing. According to some estimates, nearly 30% of all commercially fished species are now considered to be overfished. In the Mediterranean and Black seas, that number is closer to 88%.

With climate change set to exacerbate the water crisis, there’s an urgent need for new solutions.

Two of those solutions are Earth Observation (EO) and Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS).

Go fish

According to the latest edition of the EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report, Earth Observation is already being used to assess the location of fish stocks, while GNSS is used to track the location of vessels in an effort to prevent illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing – an important component of the EU’s Common Fisheries Policy (CFP). 

Both Copernicus, for EO, and Galileo, for GNSS, are also being used to support Europe’s growing aquaculture sector. For instance, by providing information and data on environmental conditions and long-term weather forecasts, EO-based applications play a key role in selecting ideal locations to establish aquafarms. Once the aquafarm is up and running, Copernicus, together with Galileo, is used to optimise operations and provide aquafarmers with a wide range of insight and information.

Keeping an eye on our oceans’ health

While sustainable fisheries and aquaculture are important to securing food production, and are key components to the European Union’s Green Deal, they both depend on having healthy oceans. Here too, GNSS and especially EO play an important role.

Oceans, which account for about 71% of the Earth’s surface, are at the centre of climate change. That’s because oceans act as a natural carbon sink, essentially absorbing much of the carbon being emitted into the atmosphere. As the oceans absorb more carbon, their temperatures go up, which can lead to a whole host of problems, including rising sea levels, changes in fish migration, the killing of coral reefs and alterations to the world’s climate patterns.

To mitigate these issues, the Copernicus Marine and Climate Change Services monitor a number of key climate indicators, such as sea level, temperature, currents and salinity. This data can then be used to drive global climate policy decisions.

 Phytoplankton are microscopic plants that grow in the sunlit surface waters of the ocean. When their concentration reaches a certain level, the bloom becomes visible from space.

Phytoplankton are microscopic plants that grow in the sunlit surface waters of the ocean. When their concentration reaches a certain level, the bloom becomes visible from space.

For freshwater too

EO’s usefulness doesn’t stop with salt water, it’s being used to monitor the quality of freshwater sources too. Today, scientists and policymakers regularly use data coming from Copernicus satellites to, for example, measure water surface temperature, which can tell us a lot about a lake or river’s overall health.

This same data can be used to track how rising global temperatures and more extreme weather events increase a body of water’s acidity, cause a build-up of pathogens, and change its nutrient concentration. And because quality freshwater is essential to drinking water, this same data can play a key role in achieving the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal of ensuring access to water and sanitation for all

So on this World Water Day, as you’re enjoying a fresh glass of H2O, be sure to look up and remember how space-based solutions are working to ensure the healthy climate, healthy oceans, and healthy freshwater systems that make our water sustainable, safe and sanitary.

--

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (https://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Both Copernicus, for EO, and Galileo, for GNSS, are also being used to support Europe’s growing aquaculture sector.

The world has a water problem, and space may have a solution

22.3.2022 13:50  
Both Copernicus, for EO, and Galileo, for GNSS, are also being used to support Europe’s growing aquaculture sector.
Published: 
22 March 2022

The world has a water problem. At present, according to the World Health Organisation (WHO) there are 785 million people who lack access to clean water – that’s one in every 10 people on the planet. But the problem goes well beyond the water we drink; it also affects the food we eat. For example, water scarcity, due in part to the increase in droughts caused by climate change, means farmers have less water to grow their crops with.

In parallel, people are increasingly looking to our oceans, lakes and rivers for food – a shift that causes another problem: overfishing. According to some estimates, nearly 30% of all commercially fished species are now considered to be overfished. In the Mediterranean and Black seas, that number is closer to 88%.

With climate change set to exacerbate the water crisis, there’s an urgent need for new solutions.

Two of those solutions are Earth Observation (EO) and Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS).

Go fish

According to the latest edition of the EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report, Earth Observation is already being used to assess the location of fish stocks and to track the location of vessels in an effort to prevent illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing – an important component of the EU’s Common Fisheries Policy (CFP). 

Both Copernicus, for EO, and Galileo, for GNSS, are also being used to support Europe’s growing aquaculture sector. For instance, by providing information and data on environmental conditions and long-term weather forecasts, EO-based applications play a key role in selecting ideal locations to establish aquafarms. Once the aquafarm is up and running, Copernicus, together with Galileo, is used to optimise operations and provide aquafarmers with a wide range of insight and information.

Keeping an eye on our oceans’ health

While sustainable fisheries and aquaculture are important to securing food production, and are key components to the European Union’s Green Deal, they both depend on having healthy oceans. Here too, GNSS and especially EO play an important role.

Oceans, which account for about 71% of the Earth’s surface, are at the centre of climate change. That’s because oceans act as a natural carbon sink, essentially absorbing much of the carbon being emitted into the atmosphere. As the oceans absorb more carbon, their temperatures go up, which can lead to a whole host of problems, including rising sea levels, changes in fish migration, the killing of coral reefs and alterations to the world’s climate patterns.

To mitigate these issues, the Copernicus Marine and Climate Change Services monitor a number of key climate indicators, such as sea level, temperature, currents and salinity. This data can then be used to drive global climate policy decisions.

 Phytoplankton are microscopic plants that grow in the sunlit surface waters of the ocean. When their concentration reaches a certain level, the bloom becomes visible from space.

Phytoplankton are microscopic plants that grow in the sunlit surface waters of the ocean. When their concentration reaches a certain level, the bloom becomes visible from space.

For freshwater too

EO’s usefulness doesn’t stop with salt water, it’s being used to monitor the quality of freshwater sources too. Today, scientists and policymakers regularly use data coming from Copernicus satellites to, for example, measure water surface temperature, which can tell us a lot about a lake or river’s overall health.

This same data can be used to track how rising global temperatures and more extreme weather events increase a body of water’s acidity, cause a build-up of pathogens, and change its nutrient concentration. And because quality freshwater is essential to drinking water, this same data can play a key role in achieving the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal of ensuring access to water and sanitation for all

So on this World Water Day, as you’re enjoying a fresh glass of H2O, be sure to look up and remember how space-based solutions are working to ensure the healthy climate, healthy oceans, and healthy freshwater systems that make our water sustainable, safe and sanitary.

--

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (https://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Both Copernicus, for EO, and Galileo, for GNSS, are also being used to support Europe’s growing aquaculture sector.

The best time to invest in space – EUSPA launches info session for fund managers

18.3.2022 16:21  
The event will be held live at EUSPA’s headquarters in Prague, as well as online. Attendance is free, but registration is required.
Published: 
18 March 2022

The best time to invest in space – EUSPA launches info session for fund managers.

According to the latest edition of the EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report, in 2021, the GNSS and Earth Observation downstream market generated over EUR 200 billion in revenue.

What’s more, this market is expected to reach nearly half a trillion euros within the next decade. Add this up and what you have is a very lucrative investment opportunity.

But to take advantage of this opportunity, you need the right information and the right market intelligence – which is exactly what the Space Investments Capacity Building Programme is set to provide.

Organised by the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), in collaboration with the European Commission, European Space Agency (ESA) and European Investment Fund (EIF), this series of five workshops is designed to provide venture capitalists, fund managers and other investors with in-depth information on the space sector, including:

  • Results from the latest European space market and investment studies
  • Advice from the EIF on fund setup, investment strategy and building an investment team
  • A platform to discuss business models and best practices
  • Opportunities to network with other fund managers
  • Details on the European Commission’s EUR 1 billion CASSINI Facility, an InvestEU initiative offering capital for establishing space-focused investment funds

The first workshop, scheduled for 28 March 2022 from 14:00 – 17:00 CET, will focus on how EU space technology – including Galileo and Copernicus – can be used to support the construction sector, optimise the green transformation and maintain critical infrastructure.

If you want to become an active investor in this exciting field or simply want to gather more information before deciding to raise a new fund, then this capacity building programme is for you”, says Fiammetta Diani, EUSPA Head of Market Downstream and Innovation.

The event will be held live at EUSPA’s headquarters in Prague, as well as online. Attendance is free, but registration is required. For participants able to attend physically in Prague, please send an email to market@euspa.europa.eu to secure your place in the venue. Questions related to the workshop series or requests for additional information can be directed to this email address as well.

Mark Your Calendars: Space Investments Capacity Building Programme 2022

  • Episode 1: Infrastructure lifecycle support from space, EUSPA, Prague, Monday 28 March 2022
  • Episode 2: Security and defence (in and from space), COM, Brussels, Monday 2 May 2022
  • Episode 3: Consumer space solutions: well-being, education and entertainment, EUSPA, Prague, Monday 23 May 2022
  • Episode 4: Access to space (launchers, ground systems, modular technology, etc), ESA, Paris, Tuesday 7 June 2022
  • Episode 5: Fund setup, investment strategy, investment team, exit strategy, EIF, Luxemburg, Monday 27 June 2022

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The event will be held live at EUSPA’s headquarters in Prague, as well as online. Attendance is free, but registration is required.

The best time to invest in space – EUSPA launches info session for fund managers

18.3.2022 16:21  
The event will be held live at EUSPA’s headquarters in Prague, as well as online. Attendance is free, but registration is required.
Published: 
18 March 2022

The best time to invest in space – EUSPA launches info session for fund managers.

According to the latest edition of the EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report, in 2021, the GNSS and Earth Observation downstream market generated over EUR 200 billion in revenue.

What’s more, this market is expected to reach nearly half a trillion euros within the next decade. Add this up and what you have is a very lucrative investment opportunity.

But to take advantage of this opportunity, you need the right information and the right market intelligence – which is exactly what the Space Investments Capacity Building Programme is set to provide.

Organised by the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), in collaboration with the European Commission, European Space Agency (ESA) and European Investment Fund (EIF), this series of five workshops is designed to provide venture capitalists, fund managers and other investors with in-depth information on the space sector, including:

  • Results from the latest European space market and investment studies
  • Advice from the EIF on fund setup, investment strategy and building an investment team
  • A platform to discuss business models and best practices
  • Opportunities to network with other fund managers
  • Details on the European Commission’s EUR 1 billion CASSINI Facility, an InvestEU initiative offering capital for establishing space-focused investment funds

The first workshop, scheduled for 28 March 2022 from 14:00 – 17:00 CET, will focus on how EU space technology – including Galileo and Copernicus – can be used to support the construction sector, optimise the green transformation and maintain critical infrastructure.

If you want to become an active investor in this exciting field or simply want to gather more information before deciding to raise a new fund, then this capacity building programme is for you”, says Fiammetta Diani, EUSPA Head of Market Downstream and Innovation.

The event will be held live at EUSPA’s headquarters in Prague, as well as online. Attendance is free, but registration is required. For participants able to attend physically in Prague, please send an email to market@euspa.europa.eu to secure your place in the venue. Questions related to the workshop series or requests for additional information can be directed to this email address as well.

Mark Your Calendars: Space Investments Capacity Building Programme 2022

  • Episode 1: Infrastructure lifecycle support from space, EUSPA, Prague, Monday 28 March 2022
  • Episode 2: Security and defence (in and from space), COM, Brussels, Monday 2 May 2022
  • Episode 3: Consumer space solutions: well-being, education and entertainment, EUSPA, Prague, Monday 23 May 2022
  • Episode 4: Access to space (launchers, ground systems, modular technology, etc), ESA, Paris, Tuesday 7 June 2022
  • Episode 5: Fund setup, investment strategy, investment team, exit strategy, EIF, Luxemburg, Monday 27 June 2022

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The event will be held live at EUSPA’s headquarters in Prague, as well as online. Attendance is free, but registration is required.
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