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Test your Android device’s satellite navigation performance

21.8.2018 11:33  
Android users can download the GPSTest application that will check to see if your phone is currently using Galileo satellites to determine its position.
Published: 
21 August 2018

Use the GPSTest app (or similar) to find out whether your smartphone is benefiting from the increased positioning accuracy that Galileo provides.

As Galileo is a native feature of the smartphone hardware itself, the only way to have Galileo capability on your phone is to purchase one that comes with a chip that tracks Galileo. The good news is that most of the chips found in phones are multi-Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), meaning they use data from more than one GNSS constellation. The question is, which constellations is your phone using?

Android users can choose from several applications, most of them available free of charge, that will check if your phone is currently using Galileo, GPS or Glonass satellites to determine its position. For example, to test whether your phone uses Galileo,  you can download the GPSTest application from the Google Play store or F-Droid. This open source app, developed by Dr. Sean Barbeau, who is the Principal Mobile Software Architect for R&D at the Centre for Urban Transportation Research at the University of South Florida, displays real-time information for satellites in view of your device.

Once you have it installed, simply launch the app. “In just a matter of seconds, you should be able to see the available satellites providing positioning data to your device,” says Dr. Barbeau. The application shows four global constellations: GPS (American flag), Galileo (EU flag), GLONASS (Russian flag) and Beidou (Chinese flag). It also shows regional satellite-based augmentation systems (SBAS), including QZSS (Japanese flag), GAGAN (Indian flag), ANIK F1 flag (Canadian flag), Galaxy 15 (American flag), Inmarsat 3-F2 and 4-F3 (UK flag), SES-5 (Luxembourg flag), and Astra 5B (Luxembourg flag).

“You will likely see that you phone is using several GNSS for positioning, and if one of those is Galileo, you should be able to see the blue Galileo flag on the app,” notes Dr. Barbeau.

“On the status screen, if the Galileo satellite has a ‘U’ next to it, that satellite is being used by your device to calculate your position at that very moment.”

However, Dr. Barbeau notes that those currently using their smartphones in the US will not see the Galileo flag, even if their phone hardware supports Galileo signals. This is because the US Federal Communication Commission (FCC) must first approve Galileo before any devices can use its signals on US soil. The European Commission’s application is under review by the FCC, and this regional limitation will hopefully be removed soon.

Other information provided by the app includes:

  • Latitude and longitude of device
  • Geographic altitude
  • Total number of satellites in view
  • Strength of current satellite configuration and its impact on accuracy
  • Current local time read from GNSS
  • Time To First Fix (TTFF)
  • Speed of device
  • Satellite identifiers
  • Carrier frequency of the signal (L1, L5, E1, E5) on supported devices
  • Carrier-to-noise density
  • Satellite’s elevation and azimuth
  • If the device has acquired information (almanac, ephemeris) about each satellite’s current position
  • Estimated horizontal and vertical accuracy of location
  • Estimate speed and bearing accuracy

To learn more about all of GPSTest’s many features, please read this.

In addition to GPSTest, users can choose from many similar applications. To see how Galileo is improving the accuracy of GPS, users can download GNSS Compare. The winner of the Galileo App Competition, which was jointly organised by ESA and the GSA, this app not only shows the device’s “use” status, but also compares the positioning accuracy in real time.

So what’s the big deal?

When your phone is calculating its position using GNSS, having access to more satellite signals means better location accuracy and a faster fix.  Therefore, the advantage of having a Galileo-enabled phone is that the location can be calculated using the 17 currently available Galileo satellites, on top of GPS and other GNSS constellations. This is particularly helpful in urban environments where narrow streets and tall buildings block satellite signals and limit the usefulness of many mobile services.  

“Galileo-enabled devices definitely have an advantage - the more satellites, the better when calculating your position,” says Dr. Barbeau.  “You will definitely benefit from the more accurate and reliable positioning that Galileo helps provide, especially as more devices begin to emerge that support dual-frequency GNSS for both GPS and Galileo.”

Broadcom, Qualcomm, Intel and Mediatek all have included Galileo into their chips, many of which are used by leading smartphone manufacturers. For an up-to-date list of Galileo-enabled devices, please visit www.useGalileo.eu

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Android users can download the GPSTest application that will check to see if your phone is currently using Galileo satellites to determine its position.

Test your Android device’s satellite navigation performance

21.8.2018 11:33  
Android users can download the GPSTest application that will check to see if your phone is currently using Galileo satellites to determine its position.
Published: 
21 August 2018

Use the GPSTest app (or similar) to find out whether your smartphone is benefiting from the increased positioning accuracy that Galileo provides.

As Galileo is a native feature of the smartphone hardware itself, the only way to have Galileo capability on your phone is to purchase one that comes with a chip that tracks Galileo. The good news is that most of the chips found in phones are multi-Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), meaning they use data from more than one GNSS constellation. The question is, which constellations is your phone using?

Android users can choose from several applications, most of them available free of charge, that will check if your phone is currently using Galileo, GPS or Glonass satellites to determine its position. For example, to test whether your phone uses Galileo,  you can download the GPSTest application from the Google Play store or F-Droid. This open source app, developed by Dr. Sean Barbeau, who is the Principal Mobile Software Architect for R&D at the Centre for Urban Transportation Research at the University of South Florida, displays real-time information for satellites in view of your device.

Once you have it installed, simply launch the app. “In just a matter of seconds, you should be able to see the available satellites providing positioning data to your device,” says Dr. Barbeau. The application shows four global constellations: GPS (American flag), Galileo (EU flag), GLONASS (Russian flag) and Beidou (Chinese flag). It also shows regional satellite-based augmentation systems (SBAS), including QZSS (Japanese flag), GAGAN (Indian flag), ANIK F1 flag (Canadian flag), Galaxy 15 (American flag), Inmarsat 3-F2 and 4-F3 (UK flag), SES-5 (Luxembourg flag), and Astra 5B (Luxembourg flag).

“You will likely see that your phone is using several GNSS for positioning, and if one of those is Galileo, you should be able to see the blue Galileo flag on the app,” notes Dr. Barbeau.

“On the status screen, if the Galileo satellite has a ‘U’ next to it, that satellite is being used by your device to calculate your position at that very moment.”

However, Dr. Barbeau notes that those currently using their smartphones in the US will not see the Galileo flag, even if their phone hardware supports Galileo signals. This is because the US Federal Communication Commission (FCC) must first approve Galileo before any devices can use its signals on US soil. The European Commission’s application is under review by the FCC, and this regional limitation will hopefully be removed soon.

Other information provided by the app includes:

  • Latitude and longitude of device
  • Geographic altitude
  • Total number of satellites in view
  • Strength of current satellite configuration and its impact on accuracy
  • Current local time read from GNSS
  • Time To First Fix (TTFF)
  • Speed of device
  • Satellite identifiers
  • Carrier frequency of the signal (L1, L5, E1, E5) on supported devices
  • Carrier-to-noise density
  • Satellite’s elevation and azimuth
  • If the device has acquired information (almanac, ephemeris) about each satellite’s current position
  • Estimated horizontal and vertical accuracy of location
  • Estimate speed and bearing accuracy

To learn more about all of GPSTest’s many features, please read this.

In addition to GPSTest, users can choose from many similar applications. To see how Galileo is improving the accuracy of GPS, users can download GNSS Compare. The winner of the Galileo App Competition, which was jointly organised by ESA and the GSA, this app not only shows the device’s “use” status, but also compares the positioning accuracy in real time.

So what’s the big deal?

When your phone is calculating its position using GNSS, having access to more satellite signals means better location accuracy and a faster fix.  Therefore, the advantage of having a Galileo-enabled phone is that the location can be calculated using the 17 currently available Galileo satellites, on top of GPS and other GNSS constellations. This is particularly helpful in urban environments where narrow streets and tall buildings block satellite signals and limit the usefulness of many mobile services.  

“Galileo-enabled devices definitely have an advantage - the more satellites, the better when calculating your position,” says Dr. Barbeau.  “You will definitely benefit from the more accurate and reliable positioning that Galileo helps provide, especially as more devices begin to emerge that support dual-frequency GNSS for both GPS and Galileo.”

Broadcom, Qualcomm, Intel and Mediatek all have included Galileo into their chips, many of which are used by leading smartphone manufacturers. For an up-to-date list of Galileo-enabled devices, please visit www.useGalileo.eu

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Android users can download the GPSTest application that will check to see if your phone is currently using Galileo satellites to determine its position.

IMPACT Connected Car second call now open

16.8.2018 9:02  
The winning start-ups selected in a previous IMPACT Open Call
Published: 
16 August 2018

The IMPACT Accelerator is offering up to €2.1 million plus acceleration services to the best companies and start-ups in the connected vehicle industry in the second and final open call of its IMPACT Connected Car programme.

IMPACT Connected Car was designed by the INNOSUP Initiative under the Horizon 2020 Programme to give a boost to all parts of the connected car value chain, including industry start-ups. With this aim in mind, it is offering start-ups a six-month acceleration programme and will distribute up to €2.1 million equity free, with selected start-ups receiving up to €60,000.

Top start-ups will also have the opportunity to receive private funding of up to €200,000 from participating venture capital funds. What’s more, all participants will be offered a special place in the Connected Car Open Space, a new platform that brings together the connected car community.

Projects selected for the programme will have the opportunity to “smartize” their start-ups while learning from experts in the areas of business, technology, and funding. They will also be able to learn from four pioneer SMEs that are already disrupting the automotive industry and have been integrated into the consortium to inspire other potential disruptors.

GSA as Ambassador

In combination with other automotive sensors and technologies, GNSS has an important role to play in the €141-billion connected car industry. In recognition of this, the GSA is supporting the initiative as an “Ambassador”, fostering communication with start-ups, entrepreneurs and young experts working in the field of satellite navigation. The aim is to attract them to the potential market opportunities offered by connected vehicles and other automotive applications.

The Challenges

IMPACT Connected Car is looking for SMEs and start-ups working on applications that address one or more of the following main challenges:

  • SAFETY & SECURITY - functions that warn drivers of external hazards, and vehicle responses to hazards;
  • DRIVER ASSISTANCE - functions involving partially or fully automatic driving;
  • WELLBEING - functions involving driver comfort and ability and fitness to drive;
  • MOBILITY MANAGEMENT - functions that allow the driver to reach a destination quickly, safely and in a cost-efficient manner;
  • VEHICLE MANAGEMENT - functions that help the driver/car owner reduce operating costs and improve ease of use;
  • INFOTAINMENT - functions involving entertainment of driver and passengers.

However, the scope is not restricted to these six topics. Solutions for other mobility modes/topics are also welcome, so long as they are applicable or transferable to car systems.

More than 500 start-ups applied during the first open call and the programme is now accepting applications for its second and final open call. The deadline for applications is 17:00 CET on 18 October. For more information and to apply, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The winning start-ups selected in a previous IMPACT Open Call

Accurate, affordable geo-location for drones

14.8.2018 9:45  
To use the system, all one has to do is mount the ARGONAUT multi-constellation receiver onto the drone
Published: 
14 August 2018

The GSA-sponsored ARGONAUT project is making low-cost, high-precision GNSS receivers a viable option for all drone operators.

Perhaps nobody understands the need for post-process geolocation accuracy better than drone operators. But being able to satisfy this need is a different story. This is because most of the accurate systems currently on the market capable of offering results within decimetres – such as GNSS receivers – cost thousands of dollars. As this figure is often well-beyond what many drone operators can afford, most have had to settle for less accuracy.

Luckily, things are beginning to change. “We are witnessing exciting times, as low-cost, high-precision GNSS receivers are coming onto the market and challenging the dominance of the older, expensive and overly complex models,” says Xavier Banqué-Casanovas, CEO of Rokubun, the company behind the development of the GSA-sponsored ARGONAUT project.

ARGONAUT is a fully integrated GNSS receiver designed to meet the need for high-precision geo-location data. It achieves better than 30 cm horizontal accuracy when post-processing is done using JASON Positioning as a Service (PaaS), an adaptable cloud post-processing service developed and regularly updated by Rokubun’s GNSS team.

For high-precision solutions

According to Xavier, the development of ARGONAUT was driven by the need for affordable high-precision geo-location solutions. The result is an innovative combination of GNSS receivers and PaaS perfectly suited to meet the UAV community’s needs with the market’s best cost-accuracy ratio. “Regardless of the task being performed, an accurate GNSS receiver is a must for all UAV models,” says Xavier. “An unmanned system without a proper geolocation solution simply cannot be employed for drone applications for which the final outcome needs to be precisely orthorectified.”

ARGONAUT is equipped to track all global navigation systems, including Galileo, along with such regional systems as EGNOS. According to Xavier, ARGONAUT’s multi-constellation capability increases exposure to more satellites in view, thus greatly enhancing its robustness in reduced sky visibility conditions, such as urban canyons. “For us, the use of Galileo basically translates into being able to provide a better service in harsh environments” he explains.

Using the system

To use the system, all one has to do is mount the ARGONAUT multi-constellation receiver onto the drone. Since it is light and small, it works on all UAV models and serves both as the main GNSS receiver and the synchronising GNSS payload. During flight, the receiver tracks its position, logging it onto the embedded SD card. When you’ve gathered enough data, simply land the drone, remove the SD card from the receiver and upload its data to your computer.

Before post-processing, the measured position typically differs from the actual one, with an error of around two meters. Although this level of accuracy is suitable for navigation, it isn’t enough for high-precision tasks. So, to enhance the geo-location, simply go to the Rokubun JASON cloud service and drag and drop the raw data file to process it. From here, the PaaS uses advanced processing techniques to bring down the level of error to less than half a meter. You then receive instant, ready-to-use accurate positioning and geo-tagged events (such as camera shots). 

Most recently, the company has updated the device’s firmware so it is plug-and-play compatible with Pixhawk2, the most popular professional drone controller. But perhaps the best news is that this level of accuracy is now available for just $350.00 – up to 10 times cheaper than other professional navigation systems. “Used alone or together with our Positioning-as-a-service, ARGONAUT stands out from the competition for combining accuracy and affordability into one state-of-the-art, easy to use solution,” concludes Xavier.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

To use the system, all one has to do is mount the ARGONAUT multi-constellation receiver onto the drone

Accurate, affordable geo-location for drones

14.8.2018 9:45  
To use the system, all one has to do is mount the ARGONAUT multi-constellation receiver onto the drone
Published: 
14 August 2018

The ARGONAUT project is making low-cost, high-precision GNSS receivers a viable option for all drone operators.

Perhaps nobody understands the need for post-process geolocation accuracy better than drone operators. But being able to satisfy this need is a different story. This is because most of the accurate systems currently on the market capable of offering results within decimetres – such as GNSS receivers – cost thousands of dollars. As this figure is often well-beyond what many drone operators can afford, most have had to settle for less accuracy.

Luckily, things are beginning to change. “We are witnessing exciting times, as low-cost, high-precision GNSS receivers are coming onto the market and challenging the dominance of the older, expensive and overly complex models,” says Xavier Banqué-Casanovas, CEO of Rokubun, the company behind the development of the ARGONAUT project.

ARGONAUT is a fully integrated GNSS receiver designed to meet the need for high-precision geo-location data. It achieves better than 30 cm horizontal accuracy when post-processing is done using JASON Positioning as a Service (PaaS), an adaptable cloud post-processing service developed and regularly updated by Rokubun’s GNSS team.

For high-precision solutions

According to Xavier, the development of ARGONAUT was driven by the need for affordable high-precision geo-location solutions. The result is an innovative combination of GNSS receivers and PaaS perfectly suited to meet the UAV community’s needs with the market’s best cost-accuracy ratio. “Regardless of the task being performed, an accurate GNSS receiver is a must for all UAV models,” says Xavier. “An unmanned system without a proper geolocation solution simply cannot be employed for drone applications for which the final outcome needs to be precisely orthorectified.”

ARGONAUT is equipped to track all global navigation systems, including Galileo, along with such regional systems as EGNOS. According to Xavier, ARGONAUT’s multi-constellation capability increases exposure to more satellites in view, thus greatly enhancing its robustness in reduced sky visibility conditions, such as urban canyons. “For us, the use of Galileo basically translates into being able to provide a better service in harsh environments” he explains.

Using the system

To use the system, all one has to do is mount the ARGONAUT multi-constellation receiver onto the drone. Since it is light and small, it works on all UAV models and serves both as the main GNSS receiver and the synchronising GNSS payload. During flight, the receiver tracks its position, logging it onto the embedded SD card. When you’ve gathered enough data, simply land the drone, remove the SD card from the receiver and upload its data to your computer.

Before post-processing, the measured position typically differs from the actual one, with an error of around two meters. Although this level of accuracy is suitable for navigation, it isn’t enough for high-precision tasks. So, to enhance the geo-location, simply go to the Rokubun JASON cloud service and drag and drop the raw data file to process it. From here, the PaaS uses advanced processing techniques to bring down the level of error to less than half a meter. You then receive instant, ready-to-use accurate positioning and geo-tagged events (such as camera shots). 

Most recently, the company has updated the device’s firmware so it is plug-and-play compatible with Pixhawk2, the most popular professional drone controller. But perhaps the best news is that this level of accuracy is now available for just $350.00 – up to 10 times cheaper than other professional navigation systems. “Used alone or together with our Positioning-as-a-service, ARGONAUT stands out from the competition for combining accuracy and affordability into one state-of-the-art, easy to use solution,” concludes Xavier.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

To use the system, all one has to do is mount the ARGONAUT multi-constellation receiver onto the drone

EU citizens and businesses already benefiting from Galileo

9.8.2018 8:49  
Published: 
09 August 2018

Following last week’s successful launch of four new Galileo satellites from the European spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana, representatives of leading industry that have adopted Galileo held a special press briefing for journalists from across the Continent.

With four new satellites having been successfully launched on-board a Ariane 5 launcher, the Galileo constellation took another big step towards full operational capability. “This launch and the Galileo services that these satellites will help provide is testament to the European Union’s ambition to position itself as one of the world’s preeminent space powers,” said Matthias Petschke, European Commission Director of EU Satellite Navigation Programmes.    

Driving this ambition is the European GNSS Agency (GSA), which is responsible for ensuring that the EU’s commitment to Galileo is translated into a return on investment for European citizens and businesses. “The GSA plays a unique role in linking space to user needs,” said GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. “Whether it be through user consultations, funding research and development or monitoring the latest developments in GNSS applications and technology, the GSA is closing the gap between satellites like those launched today and the many services and applications they provide.”   

Much of Galileo’s early success is the result of intense cooperation between the GSA and private GNSS chip and receiver manufacturers and service providers. After all, without Galileo-enabled chipsets and receivers, no one would be able to benefit from Galileo. “The partnerships that the GSA has built over the years with leading chipset and receiver manufacturers is a key asset, not only for the Agency, but for the entire European space programme,” added des Dorides. “Because of these relationships, Galileo has been quickly incorporated into phones, wearables, cars, computing and IoT devices, allowing both citizens and businesses to enjoy the benefits that European GNSS provides.”

Voices from the frontline

Representatives from several of these early adopters and innovative businesses were invited to share their experiences with using Galileo. Among them was global chipset manufacturer Qualcomm, a long-term partner of the GSA that is active in Location Based Services for smartphones, wearables, computing, IoT and the automotive market segments.

In 2016, the company made headlines when it launched the Galileo-enabled Snapdragon smartphone chipset, which was used in the BQ Aquaris X5 – the market’s first Galileo smartphone. This year, Qualcomm also introduced a number of European GNSS (Galileo, EGNOS) capable automotive chipsets for Europe’s eCall system, the emergency response location initiative now mandatory in all new vehicle types sold in Europe.

Read this: eCall satellite navigation certified for first European customers

With all of its models capable of receiving and using Galileo signals, Qualcomm sits as the world’s largest chipset manufacturer of Galileo-enabled receivers. “We sell approximately 800 million models with integrated GNSS every year and, since the end of 2016, all of our GNSS products are capable of receiving the Galileo signal,” said Francesco Grilli, Vice President of Product Management at Qualcomm. “This means about 25 new Galileo receivers are sold every second.”

NovAtel is another long-time participant in Europe’s space and navigation programmes. The company designs, manufactures and sells high-precision GNSS receivers, antennas and reference station receivers – all of which support Galileo signals. “Our goal is to take the signals from space and maximise their performance,” says Jason Hamilton, Chief Strategy Officer at Hexagon Positioning Intelligence, NovAtel’s parent company. “It’s very exciting to see Galileo come to life, as its addition to the multi-constellation environment dramatically enhances what we can achieve with our products.”

“At NovAtel, we are always chasing our mission statement of ‘assured positioning – anywhere’,” added Sandy Kennedy, Vice President of Innovation at NovAtel. “We’ve been eagerly anticipating Galileo as it helps us adhere both to the ‘assured’ and the ‘anywhere’ aspects of this mission.”

Turning to the aviation market segment, Rockwell Collins has been a long-time supporter of the GSA’s efforts to develop European GNSS receivers for the global aviation sector. In 2014, the company’s flight management system and GNSS receiver enabled the first successful demonstration of advanced arrival and departure flight operations using EGNOS (via the EU’s FilGAPP airspace enhancement project). “In the commercial aircraft sector, Galileo gives aircraft the accuracy they need to increase positioning awareness and thus safety,” said Stephane Pelleschi Rockwell Collins.

Delivering on its mission

It is because of Galileo’s early adopters like Qualcomm, Hexagon Positioning Intelligence, NovAtel and Rockwell Collins that the GSA has been able to successfully deliver on its mission of bridging the gap between space technology and user needs.

“I would like to thank each of the early pioneers who supported our vision, saw opportunities in it and invested in Galileo from the beginning,” said des Dorides. “Because of your long-term commitment, today we can count nearly 60 smartphone models using Galileo, new car models using Galileo-enabled eCall, and 542 EGNOS-based approach procedures in 19 countries across Europe, to mention only a few of the European GNSS success stories. The provision of precise timing and positioning information for a wide range of applications translates into smarter, greener and safer services for European citizens and beyond.”

An updated list of Galileo-enabled chipsets, receivers and devices can be found at www.useGalileo.eu.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

EU citizens and businesses already benefiting from Galileo

9.8.2018 8:49  
Much of Galileo’s early success is the result of intense cooperation between the GSA and private GNSS chip and receiver manufacturers and service providers.
Published: 
09 August 2018

Following last week’s successful launch of four new Galileo satellites from the European spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana, representatives of leading industry that have adopted Galileo held a special press briefing for journalists from across the Continent.

With four new satellites having been successfully launched on-board a Ariane 5 launcher, the Galileo constellation took another big step towards full operational capability. “This launch and the Galileo services that these satellites will help provide is testament to the European Union’s ambition to position itself as one of the world’s preeminent space powers,” said Matthias Petschke, European Commission Director of EU Satellite Navigation Programmes.    

Driving this ambition is the European GNSS Agency (GSA), which is responsible for ensuring that the EU’s commitment to Galileo is translated into a return on investment for European citizens and businesses. “The GSA plays a unique role in linking space to user needs,” said GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. “Whether it be through user consultations, funding research and development or monitoring the latest developments in GNSS applications and technology, the GSA is closing the gap between satellites like those launched today and the many services and applications they provide.”   

Much of Galileo’s early success is the result of intense cooperation between the GSA and private GNSS chip and receiver manufacturers and service providers. After all, without Galileo-enabled chipsets and receivers, no one would be able to benefit from Galileo. “The partnerships that the GSA has built over the years with leading chipset and receiver manufacturers is a key asset, not only for the Agency, but for the entire European space programme,” added des Dorides. “Because of these relationships, Galileo has been quickly incorporated into phones, wearables, cars, computing and IoT devices, allowing both citizens and businesses to enjoy the benefits that European GNSS provides.”

Voices from the frontline

Representatives from several of these early adopters and innovative businesses were invited to share their experiences with using Galileo. Among them was global chipset manufacturer Qualcomm, a long-term partner of the GSA that is active in Location Based Services for smartphones, wearables, computing, IoT and the automotive market segments.

In 2016, the company made headlines when it launched the Galileo-enabled Snapdragon smartphone chipset, which was used in the BQ Aquaris X5 – the market’s first Galileo smartphone. This year, Qualcomm also introduced a number of European GNSS (Galileo, EGNOS) capable automotive chipsets for Europe’s eCall system, the emergency response location initiative now mandatory in all new vehicle types sold in Europe.

Read this: eCall satellite navigation certified for first European customers

With all of its models capable of receiving and using Galileo signals, Qualcomm sits as the world’s largest chipset manufacturer of Galileo-enabled receivers. “We sell approximately 800 million models with integrated GNSS every year and, since the end of 2016, all of our GNSS products are capable of receiving the Galileo signal,” said Francesco Grilli, Vice President of Product Management at Qualcomm. “This means about 25 new Galileo receivers are sold every second.”

NovAtel is another long-time participant in Europe’s space and navigation programmes. The company designs, manufactures and sells high-precision GNSS receivers, antennas and reference station receivers – all of which support Galileo signals. “Our goal is to take the signals from space and maximise their performance,” says Jason Hamilton, Chief Strategy Officer at Hexagon Positioning Intelligence, NovAtel’s parent company. “It’s very exciting to see Galileo come to life, as its addition to the multi-constellation environment dramatically enhances what we can achieve with our products.”

“At NovAtel, we are always chasing our mission statement of ‘assured positioning – anywhere’,” added Sandy Kennedy, Vice President of Innovation at NovAtel. “We’ve been eagerly anticipating Galileo as it helps us adhere both to the ‘assured’ and the ‘anywhere’ aspects of this mission.”

Turning to the aviation market segment, Rockwell Collins has been a long-time supporter of the GSA’s efforts to develop European GNSS receivers for the global aviation sector. In 2014, the company’s flight management system and GNSS receiver enabled the first successful demonstration of advanced arrival and departure flight operations using EGNOS (via the EU’s FilGAPP airspace enhancement project). “In the commercial aircraft sector, Galileo gives aircraft the accuracy they need to increase positioning awareness and thus safety,” said Stephane Pelleschi Rockwell Collins.

Delivering on its mission

It is because of Galileo’s early adopters like Qualcomm, Hexagon Positioning Intelligence, NovAtel and Rockwell Collins that the GSA has been able to successfully deliver on its mission of bridging the gap between space technology and user needs.

“I would like to thank each of the early pioneers who supported our vision, saw opportunities in it and invested in Galileo from the beginning,” said des Dorides. “Because of your long-term commitment, today we can count nearly 60 smartphone models using Galileo, new car models using Galileo-enabled eCall, and 542 EGNOS-based approach procedures in 19 countries across Europe, to mention only a few of the European GNSS success stories. The provision of precise timing and positioning information for a wide range of applications translates into smarter, greener and safer services for European citizens and beyond.”

An updated list of Galileo-enabled chipsets, receivers and devices can be found at www.useGalileo.eu.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Much of Galileo’s early success is the result of intense cooperation between the GSA and private GNSS chip and receiver manufacturers and service providers.

EU citizens and businesses already benefiting from Galileo

9.8.2018 8:49  
Much of Galileo’s early success is the result of intense cooperation between the GSA and private GNSS chip and receiver manufacturers and service providers.
Published: 
09 August 2018

Following last week’s successful launch of four new Galileo satellites from the European spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana, representatives of leading industry that have adopted Galileo held a special press briefing for journalists from across the Continent.

With four new satellites having been successfully launched on-board a Ariane 5 launcher, the Galileo constellation took another big step towards full operational capability. “This launch and the Galileo services that these satellites will help provide is testament to the European Union’s ambition to position itself as one of the world’s preeminent space powers,” said Matthias Petschke, European Commission Director of EU Satellite Navigation Programmes.    

Driving this ambition is the European GNSS Agency (GSA), which is responsible for ensuring that the EU’s commitment to Galileo is translated into a return on investment for European citizens and businesses. “The GSA plays a unique role in linking space to user needs,” said GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. “Whether it be through user consultations, funding research and development or monitoring the latest developments in GNSS applications and technology, the GSA is closing the gap between satellites like those launched today and the many services and applications they provide.”   

Much of Galileo’s early success is the result of intense cooperation between the GSA and private GNSS chip and receiver manufacturers and service providers. After all, without Galileo-enabled chipsets and receivers, no one would be able to benefit from Galileo. “The partnerships that the GSA has built over the years with leading chipset and receiver manufacturers is a key asset, not only for the Agency, but for the entire European space programme,” added des Dorides. “Because of these relationships, Galileo has been quickly incorporated into phones, wearables, cars, computing and IoT devices, allowing both citizens and businesses to enjoy the benefits that European GNSS provides.”

Voices from the frontline

Representatives from several of these early adopters and innovative businesses were invited to share their experiences with using Galileo. Among them was global chipset manufacturer Qualcomm, a long-term partner of the GSA that is active in Location Based Services for smartphones, wearables, computing, IoT and the automotive market segments.

In 2016, the company made headlines when it launched the Galileo-enabled Snapdragon smartphone chipset, which was used in the BQ Aquaris X5 – the market’s first Galileo smartphone. This year, Qualcomm also introduced a number of European GNSS (Galileo, EGNOS) capable automotive chipsets for Europe’s eCall system, the emergency response location initiative now mandatory in all new vehicle types sold in Europe.

Read this: eCall satellite navigation certified for first European customers

With all of its models capable of receiving and using Galileo signals, Qualcomm sits as the world’s largest chipset manufacturer of Galileo-enabled receivers. “We sell approximately 800 million models with integrated GNSS every year and, since the end of 2016, all of our GNSS products are capable of receiving the Galileo signal,” said Francesco Grilli, Vice President of Product Management at Qualcomm. “This means about 25 new Galileo receivers are sold every second.”

NovAtel is another long-time participant in Europe’s space and navigation programmes. The company designs, manufactures and sells high-precision GNSS receivers, antennas and reference station receivers – all of which support Galileo signals. “Our goal is to take the signals from space and maximise their performance,” says Jason Hamilton, Chief Strategy Officer at Hexagon Positioning Intelligence, NovAtel’s parent company. “It’s very exciting to see Galileo come to life, as its addition to the multi-constellation environment dramatically enhances what we can achieve with our products.”

“At NovAtel, we are always chasing our vision statement of ‘assured positioning – anywhere’,” added Sandy Kennedy, Vice President of Innovation at Hexagon Positioning Intelligence. “We’ve been eagerly anticipating Galileo as it helps us adhere both to the ‘assured’ and the ‘anywhere’ aspects of this mission.”

Turning to the aviation market segment, Rockwell Collins has been a long-time supporter of the GSA’s efforts to develop European GNSS receivers for the global aviation sector. In 2014, the company’s flight management system and GNSS receiver enabled the first successful demonstration of advanced arrival and departure flight operations using EGNOS (via the EU’s FilGAPP airspace enhancement project). “In the commercial aircraft sector, Galileo gives aircraft the accuracy they need to increase positioning awareness and thus safety,” said Stephane Pelleschi Rockwell Collins.

Delivering on its mission

It is because of Galileo’s early adopters like Qualcomm, Hexagon Positioning Intelligence, NovAtel and Rockwell Collins that the GSA has been able to successfully deliver on its mission of bridging the gap between space technology and user needs.

“I would like to thank each of the early pioneers who supported our vision, saw opportunities in it and invested in Galileo from the beginning,” said des Dorides. “Because of your long-term commitment, today we can count nearly 60 smartphone models using Galileo, new car models using Galileo-enabled eCall, and 542 EGNOS-based approach procedures in 19 countries across Europe, to mention only a few of the European GNSS success stories. The provision of precise timing and positioning information for a wide range of applications translates into smarter, greener and safer services for European citizens and beyond.”

An updated list of Galileo-enabled chipsets, receivers and devices can be found at www.useGalileo.eu.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Much of Galileo’s early success is the result of intense cooperation between the GSA and private GNSS chip and receiver manufacturers and service providers.

GSA to host H2020 Information Day in Prague

7.8.2018 9:58  
The event will inform about space opportunities in Horizon 2020 and beyond.
Published: 
07 August 2018

The aim of the event is to inform participants about space opportunities in Horizon 2020 and beyond and to provide first-hand information on the next H2020 Space Calls, with a special focus on the 4th H2020 EGNSS Call. 

Galileo state of play

The event is targeted at companies, universities, research institutes and public bodies and will give participants an overview of the evolution of the Galileo Programme and its current state of play, in addition to a review of market uptake for both Galileo and  Copernicus programme.

Read this: EGNSS funding opportunities – what’s on offer?

Participants will have the opportunity to talk to the authors of the Space Work Programme 2019-2020, get tips on H2020 proposal writing as well as inspiration from the latest technology trends. The event will also offer a unique opportunity for networking and for meeting potential partners through bilateral meetings and B2B matchmaking.

As the next EU Framework Programme is already under development, participants will also be able to get some advance information of what they can expect from the future programme.

Registration is open until 7 October, but to be sure of getting a place you should register now by clicking here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The event will inform about space opportunities in Horizon 2020 and beyond.

GSA to host H2020 Information Day in Prague, 11 - 12 October 2018

7.8.2018 9:58  
The event will inform about space opportunities in Horizon 2020 and beyond.
Published: 
07 August 2018

The aim of the event is to inform participants about space opportunities in Horizon 2020 and beyond and to provide first-hand information on the next H2020 Space Calls, with a special focus on the 4th H2020 EGNSS Call. 

Galileo state of play

The event is targeted at companies, universities, research institutes and public bodies and will give participants an overview of the evolution of the Galileo Programme and its current state of play, in addition to a review of market uptake for both Galileo and  Copernicus programme.

Read this: EGNSS funding opportunities – what’s on offer?

Participants will have the opportunity to talk to the authors of the Space Work Programme 2019-2020, get tips on H2020 proposal writing as well as inspiration from the latest technology trends. The event will also offer a unique opportunity for networking and for meeting potential partners through bilateral meetings and B2B matchmaking.

As the next EU Framework Programme is already under development, participants will also be able to get some advance information of what they can expect from the future programme.

Registration is open until 7 October, but to be sure of getting a place you should register now by clicking here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The event will inform about space opportunities in Horizon 2020 and beyond.

GSA to host H2020 Information Day in Prague

7.8.2018 9:58  
The event will inform about space opportunities in Horizon 2020 and beyond.
Published: 
07 August 2018

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) and the H2020 Space NCP Network COSMOS2020 are organising a Horizon 2020 International Space Information Day and Brokerage Event at the GSA’s Prague headquarters on 11-12 October 2018.

The aim of the event is to inform participants about space opportunities in Horizon 2020 and beyond and to provide first-hand information on the next H2020 Space Calls, with a special focus on the 4th H2020 EGNSS Call. 

Galileo state of play

The event is targeted at companies, universities, research institutes and public bodies and will give participants an overview of the evolution of the Galileo Programme and its current state of play, in addition to a review of market uptake for both Galileo and  Copernicus programme.

Read this: EGNSS funding opportunities – what’s on offer?

Participants will have the opportunity to talk to the authors of the Space Work Programme 2019-2020, get tips on H2020 proposal writing as well as inspiration from the latest technology trends. The event will also offer a unique opportunity for networking and for meeting potential partners through bilateral meetings and B2B matchmaking.

As the next EU Framework Programme is already under development, participants will also be able to get some advance information of what they can expect from the future programme.

Registration is open until 7 October, but to be sure of getting a place you should register now by clicking here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The event will inform about space opportunities in Horizon 2020 and beyond.

ERL Emergency 2019 – robots to the rescue!

2.8.2018 13:56  
ERL Emergency 2019 is targeting autonomous capabilities and seamless navigation for emergency robotic systems
Published: 
02 August 2018

In emergency situations, robotic systems play a key role in providing rescue teams with remote access to an emergency site. The ERL Emergency Local Tournament 2019 aims to foster advanced developments of autonomous capabilities and seamless navigation for emergency robotic systems.

The European Robotics League (ERL) is an innovative robot competition that stems from its predecessors - the euRathlon and RoCKIn competitions - and focuses on tasks that robots must execute in realistic emergency situations. The competition is composed of multiple local tournaments, held in different locations across Europe, in addition to a few major events.

The first of the challenges was announced in July 2018, and focused on land and sea robotic systems. The second, to be held in February 2019 at the premises of the Advanced Centre for Aerospace Technologies (CATEC) in Seville, Spain, will include air and land robots working in an outdoor/indoor environment. You can find more information about the challenges here.

Read this: Integrating GNSS in UAVs for faster SAR

Teams participate in a minimum of two tournaments (local and/or major) per year and get scores based on their performances. Each team’s top two tournament scores are then added together and the teams are ranked based on their cumulative score. Prizes for the top teams are awarded at the following year’s European Robotics Forum (ERF).

GSA Special Prize

The European Global Navigation Satellite Systems Agency (GSA) will award a special prize at ERL Emergency 2019 focusing on robots that make use of solutions based on Galileo and EGNOS.

For air robots, this challenge will involve two types of tasks: horizontal accuracy in landings at a specific geographic coordinate; and vertical accuracy while hovering at a specific geographic coordinate. For land robots, there will be only one type of task - horizontal accuracy during waypoint-based navigation.

Visual markers will be used to support the assessment of both types of task. To be eligible for the award, a team must have executed valid trials of the tasks. The team deemed to have achieved the best results will be declared the winner. For information on Galileo capable receivers and navigation kits for robotic systems visit https://www.usegalileo.eu/EN/.

Register now!

If you are interested in participating in this ERL Emergency Local Tournament, you should register your team by filling in this form by the deadline of August 15. For more information, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

ERL Emergency 2019 is targeting autonomous capabilities and seamless navigation for emergency robotic systems

EGNSS funding opportunities – what’s on offer?

1.8.2018 9:36  
The H2020-SPACE-EGNSS-2019 Call is set to open in October 2018
Published: 
01 August 2018

With four topics under the Horizon 2020 EGNSS MARKET UPTAKE 2019 call for proposals set to open on 16 October 2018, now is a good time to take a look at the many EU R&D funding opportunities that the GNSS community can take advantage of.

The EGNSS-related call that is set to open in October supports key EU priorities – leveraging innovation to energise economic growth and support environmental sustainability, particularly in Europe’s cities. The new call will foster the emergence of new innovative downstream applications based on either Galileo and/or EGNOS and support the EU GNSS industry, SMEs, universities, research organisations and public bodies.

The specific challenge of the first topic of the call is to address the EGNSS applications fostering green, safe and smart mobility, with the objective of developing innovative EGNSS-based applications that lead to low-emission, safer, more cost-effective and higher performance mobility and transport solutions, responding to the growing mobility needs of people and goods.

Mass market and the environment

The second topic of the call addresses EGNSS applications fostering digitisation, and its main challenge is to develop EGNSS applications contributing to digitisation of products and services that will, among its other goals, foster the adoption of EGNOS and Galileo in mass markets and provide benefits to users.

The third topic, on EGNSS applications fostering societal resilience and protecting the environment, aims to develop innovative EGNSS applications to support societal resilience, safeguard the wellbeing of EU citizens, improve emergency and disaster management as a response to climate-related natural and man-made disasters, and promote green growth.

Finally, the last topic of Awareness raising and capacity building, aims to build a mechanism to leverage EGNSS excellence, to provide opportunities for the creation of networks of industrial relationships in Europe and also globally , and facilitate EGNSS investments.

For more information on all of these calls, click here.

  

H2020 Information Day in Prague

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is organising a Horizon 2020 International Space Information Day and Brokerage Event at its headquarters in Prague on 11-12 October to provide information on space opportunities in Horizon 2020 and beyond and on the next H2020 Space Call, with a special focus on Galileo calls.

In addition to learning about space opportunities in H2020, this event will be an opportunity to meet with potential partners for the upcoming 2019-2020 space calls. To register to attend, click here.

  

Other opportunities

Other upcoming H2020 calls in  different sectors but with specific reference to EGNSS are:

Transport

A number of calls in the transport sector make reference to EGNOS and Galileo-based applications – we will cover some of them here (a more comprehensive list is available below). The topic Integrated multimodal, low-emission freight transport systems and logistics aims to speed up the transition towards the Physical Internet paradigm, demonstrating how different technologies, business cases and standards come together in real-world applications.

The topic Moving freight by water: sustainable infrastructure and innovative vessels aims to make operations at inland waterways and/or port infrastructure more efficient through the use of smart systems and automation. Meanwhile, Innovative applications of drones for safety in transport aims to develop and test technologies and operational and business models for the application of drones to increase the safety, security, and overall efficiency of air, waterborne and surface transport.

Finally, proposals under the topic Developing and testing shared, connected and cooperative automated vehicle fleets in urban areas for the mobility of all should make best use of EGNOS and Galileo to allow communication and cooperation between vehicles and infrastructure and with other road users, and enable automated, smart mobility services, innovative fleet management concepts and higher performance of automated vehicle functions.

Energy

The call Research on advanced tools and technological development targets the development and testing of a number of tools and future technologies, including GNSS timing and synchronisation for smart grids, to cover gaps and to prepare for the energy system of 2030 and beyond.

Health/ Climate Change

The use of advanced IT technologies such as high performance computing and geo-localisation data is anticipated in the topic Mining big data for early detection of infectious disease threats driven by climate change and other factors, to enable the rapid and personalised treatment of patients, and bolster the detection, tracking and control of infectious disease outbreaks.

  

EGNSS-RELATED CALLS AT A GLANCE

Leadership in Enabling and Industrial Technologies-ICT

Societal challenge 1 – Health

  • SC1-BHC-13-2019: Mining big data for early detection of infectious disease threats driven by climate change and other factors
  • SC1-DTH-03-2018: Adaptive smart working and living environments supporting active and healthy ageing
  • SC1-DTH-05-2019: Large scale implementation of digital innovation for health and care in an ageing society

Societal challenge 2 – Energy

Societal challenge 4 - Transport

  • MG-2-9-2019: Integrated multimodal, low-emission freight transport systems and logistics (Inco Flagship)
  • LC-MG-1-2-2018: Sustainable multi-modal inter-urban transport, regional mobility and spatial planning
  • MG-2-6-2019: Moving freight by water: sustainable infrastructure and innovative vessels
  • MG-2-8-2019: Innovative applications of drones for safety in transport
  • MG-3-2-2018: The Autonomous Ship
  • DT-ART-01-2018: Testing, validation and certification procedures for highly automated driving functions under various traffic scenarios based on pilot test data
  • DT-ART-04-2019: Developing and testing shared, connected and cooperative automated vehicle fleets in urban areas for the mobility of all
  • DT-ART-02-2018: Support for networking activities and impact assessment for road automation

Galileo activities are also supported via the Fundamental Elements funding mechanism.

  

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The H2020-SPACE-EGNSS-2019 Call is set to open in October 2018

ESNC 2018 – only one week to go!

27.7.2018 15:56  
ESNC has over EUR 1 million in prizes in more than 20 challenge categories!
Published: 
27 July 2018

There is only one week left to enter for this year’s European Satellite Navigation Competition (ESNC). Register your idea for an innovative and marketable European GNSS (EGNSS) application by July 31 for a chance to win great prizes!

Also known as the ‘Galileo Masters’, the ESNC awards applications, services and new ideas that use Galileo GNSS data to respond to important challenges faced by business and society. In this year’s competition, various institutions and regional partners are set to award prizes worth a total of over EUR 1 million within more than 20 challenge categories. If this is not enough to tempt you, one Xiaomi Mi 8 will be raffled between all complete submissions received by the deadline.

Proud partner

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is proud once again to be a part of this year’s event – the 10th consecutive year that the GSA has been a main partner in the competition and awarded a Special Topic prize.

This year, the GSA will award three prizes addressing the topic 'When and Where? – Exact timing and positioning matters', with special consideration given to proposals that leverage EGNSS differentiators, such as:

  • Multiple frequencies E1, E5 and E6
  • Galileo-specific signal modulation, e.g. AltBOC
  • Galileo Search and Rescue Service
  • High-precision and authentication services that will be provided by Galileo, i.e. within the Commercial Service and within the Open Service authentication (OS NMA)

Cash prizes of €3000, €5000 and €7000 will be awarded to the top three proposals. In addition, the first prize winner will benefit from extensive promotion through GSA marketing channels and at relevant industry events and, if eligible, will receive tailored EGNSS Accelerator business support worth €62,000.

New evaluation procedure

The evaluation process has changed this year and the winners will have have to pitch their idea to a panel of experts, via live streaming, at an evaluation meeting on September 25-26. Every winner will get 5 minutes for their presentation and another 5-10 minutes for questions. At the end of the second day, the experts will select the overall winner in a closed ballot. The winner will be announced at an official Awards Ceremony at European Space Week, on 4 December in Marseille.

Together with cash prizes, challenge winners will receive access to an international network of leading GNSS organisations, a crowd investment platform, and business development support. In addition, the ESNC is complemented by the E-GNSS Accelerator, which helps transform great ideas into commercially viable solutions through a tailored business coaching service. All winners of the ESNC 2018 will gain access to the E-GNSS Accelerator, if eligible.

For more details on this year's challenges, prizes, and partners, please see www.esnc.eu. To participate, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

ESNC has over EUR 1 million in prizes in more than 20 challenge categories!

ESNC 2018 – only one week to go!

27.7.2018 15:56  
ESNC has over EUR 1 million in prizes in more than 20 challenge categories!
Published: 
27 July 2018

There is only one week left to enter for this year’s European Satellite Navigation Competition (ESNC). Register your idea for an innovative and marketable European GNSS (EGNSS) application by August 6 for a chance to win great prizes!

Also known as the ‘Galileo Masters’, the ESNC awards applications, services and new ideas that use Galileo GNSS data to respond to important challenges faced by business and society. In this year’s competition, various institutions and regional partners are set to award prizes worth a total of over EUR 1 million within more than 20 challenge categories. If this is not enough to tempt you, one Xiaomi Mi 8 will be raffled between all complete submissions received by the deadline.

Proud partner

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is proud once again to be a part of this year’s event – the 10th consecutive year that the GSA has been a main partner in the competition and awarded a Special Topic prize.

This year, the GSA will award three prizes addressing the topic 'When and Where? – Exact timing and positioning matters', with special consideration given to proposals that leverage EGNSS differentiators, such as:

  • Multiple frequencies E1, E5 and E6
  • Galileo-specific signal modulation, e.g. AltBOC
  • Galileo Search and Rescue Service
  • High-precision and authentication services that will be provided by Galileo, i.e. within the Commercial Service and within the Open Service authentication (OS NMA)

Cash prizes of €3000, €5000 and €7000 will be awarded to the top three proposals. In addition, the first prize winner will benefit from extensive promotion through GSA marketing channels and at relevant industry events and, if eligible, will receive tailored EGNSS Accelerator business support worth €62,000.

New evaluation procedure

The evaluation process has changed this year and the winners will have have to pitch their idea to a panel of experts, via live streaming, at an evaluation meeting on September 25-26. Every winner will get 5 minutes for their presentation and another 5-10 minutes for questions. At the end of the second day, the experts will select the overall winner in a closed ballot. The winner will be announced at an official Awards Ceremony at European Space Week, on 4 December in Marseille.

Together with cash prizes, challenge winners will receive access to an international network of leading GNSS organisations, a crowd investment platform, and business development support. In addition, the ESNC is complemented by the E-GNSS Accelerator, which helps transform great ideas into commercially viable solutions through a tailored business coaching service. All winners of the ESNC 2018 will gain access to the E-GNSS Accelerator, if eligible.

For more details on this year's challenges, prizes, and partners, please see www.esnc.eu. To participate, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

ESNC has over EUR 1 million in prizes in more than 20 challenge categories!

eCall satellite navigation certified for first European customers

26.7.2018 13:58  
Volvo is the first car maker to integrate eCall system with Galileo capabilities. ©Volvo Cars
Published: 
26 July 2018

Following the April 1 entry into force of the European eCall regulation, requiring all new car and light van types sold in the EU to be fitted with the emergency systems, Swedish automobile manufacturer Volvo Cars has taken the lead as the first car-maker to equip its vehicles with eCall.

The eCall device in the Volvo vehicles is manufactured by ACTIA Nordic in Sweden and has been successfully tested by NavCert´s eCall Laboratory in Germany. The readiness of automotive suppliers and technical services to equip the vehicles was partially due to actions taken by the European GNSS Agency (GSA) and the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre, who launched a testing campaign and produced a joint report containing a set of guidelines to facilitate the implementation of eCall testing in compliance with the EU Regulation.

Safer roads for drivers

Cars equipped with eCall, which takes advantage of the precise positioning offered by European GNSS (EGNOS and Galileo) to quickly alert emergency services in the event of a road accident, use the same location source as for their in-vehicle navigation systems. In Europe alone, around 50 000 cars on the road are already enabled with Galileo satellite navigation capability and this is expected to rise to over 150 000 by the end of this year.

Read this: eCall emergency alert system launched

“Bringing the benefits of space technology to end users has always been a core aim of the GSA’s market development efforts. We are very happy to see Volvo leading the way in leveraging the precision offered by the European space programs EGNOS and Galileo to make Europe’s roads safer for drivers,” GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides said.

What is eCall?

eCall devices automatically dial the European emergency number 112 to alert rescue services in the event of an accident. The system sends the exact location to responders, along with the time of the incident and the direction of travel, even if the driver is unconscious or unable to make a phone call, thereby reducing the response time for road accidents and saving more lives. An eCall can also be triggered manually by pushing a button in the car, for example by a witness to a serious accident.

eCall only transmits data that is absolutely necessary when an accident occurs. Information only leaves the car in the event of a severe accident and is not stored any longer than necessary.

It is estimated that eCall will speed up emergency response times by 40% in urban areas and 50% in the countryside and reduce the number of fatalities by at least 4% and the number of severe injuries by 6%. You can find more information about eCall here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Volvo is the first car maker to integrate eCall system with Galileo capabilities. ©Volvo Cars

Galileo quartet successfully launched from Kourou

26.7.2018 11:14  
The successful launch of 4 satellites brings Galileo one step closer to full operational capacity, expected in 2020
Published: 
26 July 2018

Four new Galileo satellites were successfully launched from the European spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana on July 25, bringing the constellation to a total of 26 satellites, thereby enabling the provision of a more precise signal across a range of services.

Galileo's 10th launch, and the 3rd in a row with the European Ariane 5 launcher, lifted off at 13:25 CEST on Arianespace’s Flight VA244 from Ariane Launch Complex No. 3 (ELA 3). With this launch the Galileo constellation comes one step closer to full operational capability, expected in 2020.

GSA and the Early Orbit Phase (EOP)

For the second time, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is responsible for the Early Orbit Phase (EOP) of this mission, overseeing Spaceopal - a joint venture between Telespazio and DLR-GfR - in their role as Galileo Service Operator (GSOp) and EOP Mission Director, and CNES as EOP Operations Director. The EOP is one of the most important phases of a space mission during which the spacecraft is launched and put into the correct orbit and the first satellite elements are gradually switched on and tested.

“Today is an excellent opportunity to celebrate what Europe can achieve when resources, competences and commitments are brought together,” GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides said immediately after the launch. “Yet the success of Galileo is not measured by the number of satellites, but by the number of users, and here too we have achieved remarkable results. In the past 18 months, Galileo has moved from zero to 400 million users,” he said.

A unique European achievement

Elżbieta Bieńkowska, European Commissioner for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs, called Galileo “a unique European achievement” and said that the latest launch would give both Galileo and the EU full worldwide coverage.

“It is now up to us - the GSA, and all our partners, to lead this revolution by working together across institutions and disciplines to overcome challenges and bring space closer to Earth, added des Dorides. “Because, we have proven once again that the sky is not the limit.”

About Galileo

Galileo is the EU’s Global Satellite Navigation System and has been providing positioning and timing services to around 400 million users since the launch of Initial Services in December 2016. It is a civilian system under civilian control and aims to ensure Europe’s independence from the other satellite navigation systems and its strategic autonomy in satellite navigation. Europe’s independence in this sector will help boost the European job market, ensure a more secure Union and support emerging technologies such as Artificial Intelligence and automated vehicles.

For more information on the launch, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The successful launch of 4 satellites brings Galileo one step closer to full operational capacity, expected in 2020

Act in Space: Geospinner takes this year’s Geekie Award

19.7.2018 10:42  
Published: 
19 July 2018

Geospinner, a geocaching application in which players search for location-aware caches, was declared the winner of the GSA’s Geekie Award at this year’s Act in Space hackathon, which saw entrepreneurs, students, job seekers, developers and other creative minds come together on May 25-26 for the 3rd edition of the contest.

Over the two days in May, the hackers worked on real-life challenges to design innovative services and applications using space technologies and data, including three challenges set by the European GNSS Agency (GSA). This year’s competition saw over 3,350 competitors work on 80 challenges in 71 cities across 35 countries. Each city awarded a local winner at the end of the weekend and the international final and awards ceremony was held on 27 June, at the Toulouse Space Show 2018.

GSA Challenges

For this year’s event, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) set three challenges, the first of which – Geocaching by Satellite – asked participants to use Galileo to develop an innovative geocaching game relying on GNSS positioning. For the second GSA challenge – Art with Satellites – teams worked to develop an app to draw and write in a map using satellite navigation and the users’ movements by leveraging on Galileo-enhanced positioning.

Finally, the GNSS Satellites Selector challenge asked hackathon participants to design an app to calculate the Position Velocity and Time (PVT) solution by employing their favourite GNSS constellations and, of course, Galileo. By comparing the data obtained by single satellites, they proposed selection algorithms for satellite constellations based on different criteria.

The Geekie Award …

In total, 49 ideas were evaluated for the GSA prize by an evaluation team of six GNSS experts from the GSA. After due deliberation, the evaluation team declared Geospinner, a project submitted in the Geocaching by Satellite category, to be the winner. The judges appreciated the enthusiastic presentation of the app by the TensorScience team from Azerbaijan and felt that the idea made great use of Galileo features, particularly its enhanced accuracy. They also felt that the project could be successfully developed in the near future.

This year, Act in Space brought together over 3,350 competitors to work on 80 challenges in 71 cities across 35 countries.

Jean-Marc Piéplu, EGNOS Services Programme Manager at the GSA, presented the award to the TensorScience team. The winning team will now get the opportunity to present their application at the European Space Week Conference in Marseille on 3-6 December 2018, at the largest gathering of GNSS and Earth Observation experts in Europe.

“We were very happy receiving such an award and are looking forward to the conference in Marseille,” team member Nargiz Mammadova said. “We won’t give up on our idea and will continue innovating and making it real. As soon as we do this, Geospinner will hopefully have a great success as it is a completely new version of geocaching that should be interesting for people all over the world,” she said.

Thanks to its enhanced accuracy in urban conditions, Galileo plays a pivotal role in the game, by driving users to the caches. Once a cache is found, users find prizes inside, such as spinners, toys or discounts for shops. The caches also contain virtual spinners, which players can either use to buy real goods in local shops or convert into money for charities.

… and other prizes

Other prizes awarded at the ceremony included the ActInSpace International Grand Prize, a flight in zero gravity in the A310 ZERO-G, which was awarded to the Australian Wright Team Incorporated. This team offered a tamper-proof identification and registration system for UAV operators. The technology used is based on a CNES patent and uses Galileo.

The International Audience Award went to the Berlin-based QT-Space team, which proposes to develop a stabilised frequency laser system (Quantum clock). These clocks will play a very important role for future navigation missions and can help provide a more accurate distance.

Background

Initiated by the French Space Agency (CNES) and supported by the European GNSS Agency (GSA) and European Space Agency (ESA), ActInSpace aims to demonstrate the socio-economic potential of the space sector and show how it can have a positive impact on our daily lives. By demonstrating that space is a vector of innovation for employment and economic development, the contest hopes to boost start-up creation by encouraging young people to leverage space technologies in their businesses.

Participants are called upon to address challenges created by organisers relying on space-related technologies, data, patents and infrastructures. Designed for students but open to everyone, the objective is to foster entrepreneurship, encourage start-up creation and promote the use of space technologies.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

EGNOS Services Programme Manager Jean-Marc Piéplu presenting the Geekie Award to the TensorScience team

GSA-funded project delivering MAGNIFIC results in Africa

16.7.2018 10:48  
MAGNIFIC demonstrated the benefits of EGNSS to African stakeholders. ©Panorama
Published: 
16 July 2018

The MAGNIFIC project promoted international cooperation with a view to enabling the development of EGNSS applications in Africa. Several months after the project ended it is continuing to deliver results, as indicated by a recent contract signed by Togo and Thales Alenia Space to install a new search and rescue (SAR) ground station in Lomé.

The core aim of the MAGNIFIC (Multiplying in Africa European Global Navigation Initiatives Fostering Interlaced Cooperation) project, which was funded in the Horizon 2020 1st Galileo call, was to demonstrate the benefits of EGNSS (EGNOS and Galileo) to African stakeholders. The project focused in particular on the six priority market sectors identified in the GSA Action Plan on GNSS applications: road, aviation, maritime, precision, agriculture/environment protection, civil protection and surveillance, and LBS.

EGNSS - a catalyst for development

The effectiveness of the project’s EGNSS promotion work is evidenced by the recent signing of a contract between Togo and Thales Alenia Space for a ground station to be installed in Lomé, Togo, to be used in search and rescue (SAR) operations, mainly using the Galileo satellite positioning system. Based on Thales Alenia Space’s MEOLUT Next (Medium Orbit Local User Terminal), the latest-generation MEOSAR (Medium Orbit Search and Rescue) technology, this system will enable the instantaneous location, with unprecedented accuracy, of a distress call issued by a beacon operating through the COSPAS-SARSAT system.

Read this: GSA hosts Cospas-Sarsat meeting

“In addition to being a great commercial achievement, this contract clearly shows that Togo is taking a leading role in adopting EGNSS applications in Africa. More importantly, it shows us that Africa is a continent that sees Galileo and EGNOSas a catalyst for development. This is a clear, direct and positive result of the strategy we, as a consortium, implemented within MAGNIFIC,” Thales Alenia Space Systems Engineer Michel Monnerat said. “I am sure this first step will pave the way for many future successes in Africa,” he added.

Fully integrated

The fully integrated ground station comprises a compact, high-tech beam-shaping antenna capable of taking maximum advantage of Galileo’s SAR service, a Mission Control Centre (MCC) dedicated to managing and distributing alerts, and a Rescue Coordination Centre (RCC), which interfaces with systems already in place locally or in neighbouring countries.

The ground station will detect and locate any distress signal triggered by a ship, plane or land vehicle, thus enhancing the safety of people and goods. The unexcelled coverage provided by the beam-shaping antenna will allow Togo to receive distress signals over a radius of more than 3,000 kilometres, which means it will cover the entire Gulf of Guinea and a large part of the African continent.

Long-lasting impact

Togo was a particular target of the MAGNIFIC project, which recognised the presence of key economic drivers in the country that were compatible with the development of EGNSS. In the field of civil aviation, two LPV procedures were designed at Lomé airport, achieving minima of 250 feet, compared to 400 feet for existing LNAV procedures, and the feedback from the pilots was extremely positive. The results of this flight campaign were presented during the project’s final conference in Lomé.

Lomé hosted both MAGNIFIC’s first “European GNSS Applications Conference in Africa” in 2015 and the final conference in 2017. The contract between Togo and Thales Alenia Space bears testimony to the long-lasting impact of the Horizon 2020 project.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

MAGNIFIC demonstrated the benefits of EGNSS to African stakeholders. ©Panorama

EU space programmes centre stage at UN SDG event

13.7.2018 10:25  
GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides highlights the contribution of EU space programmes to the SDG
Published: 
13 July 2018

The contribution of Europe’s space programmes Galileo and Copernicus in building sustainable and resilient societies was in focus at the ‘My Planet, My Future: Space for the Sustainable Development Goals’ exhibition, launched at United Nations HQ in New York on July 10 and set to run until September 5.

Opening the exhibition, which showcases satellite images and videos that illustrate space technology’s contribution to the achievement of the SDGs, Pierre Delsaux, Deputy Director General at the European Commission's Directorate General for the Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and Small and Medium Enterprises said: “This is an excellent opportunity to show how the European Union’s space programme can contribute to the benefit of the entire planet.”

Delivering real services

This contribution was highlighted in a recent joint study from the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA) and the European GNSS Agency (GSA), which showed that 40% of the 169 indicators underpinning the 17 SDGs are reliant on the use of space-based science and technology.

Read this: European GNSS and the environment

Speaking at the event, GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides said that while the contribution of space services to communications, business and the economy is increasingly recognised, awareness of the benefits that space-based solutions can bring to the health, well-being and sustainability of the planet needs to be better understood.

“As the only European Union agency operating and delivering space services, the GSA is dedicated to ensuring that EU investment in independent, civil run satellite navigation systems deliver real services and benefits for people and the planet,” des Dorides said.

In his address, des Dorides noted that the synergy of Galileo and Copernicus supports the Zero Hunger, Climate Action and Better Life on Land goals through precision agriculture applications that optimise crop production. He also noted that the EU Space Programme directly contributes to the goal on Climate Action by supporting urban development and smart cities planning. “This is especially critical given that more than 60% of the global population will live in cities by 2030,” he said.

Stakeholder involvement

UNOOSA Director Simonetta Di Pippo noted that, in order to bring the benefits of space to all nations, it is necessary to raise awareness of the importance of space science and technology to sustainable development and how it can contribute to the global community’s commitment to leave no one behind. “Activities such as this exhibit offer us great avenues to communicate how space can contribute to the achievement of the SDGs and underline the need for all stakeholders and decision-makers to get involved,” she said.

The exhibition showcases satellite images and videos that illustrate space technology’s contribution to sustainable development

The exhibition, which focuses in particular on the SDGs being reviewed at a High-level Political Forum on Sustainable Development being held at UNHQ on 9-18 July, is organised by the NGO CANEUS International with the support of the UNOOSA, and sponsored by the European Commission, the GSA and the German Aerospace Centre (DLR). 

#SPACE4SDGS: The Space 2030 Agenda

On the margins of the High-level Political Forum, the side event #SPACE4SDGS: The Space 2030 Agenda was held on July 10. The joint study from UNOOSA and the GSA - European Global Navigation Satellite System and Copernicus: Supporting the Sustainable Development Goals Building Blocks towards the 2030 Agenda – was presented at this event.

The participants discussed the next steps towards establishing a coherent ‘Space2030 Agenda’ approach on how space science and technology is used to support the implementation of the UN’s sustainable development agenda. The side event also included a debrief on the results of UNISPACE+50, a global gathering of the space community held at the UN Offices in Vienna, Austria in June.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides highlights the contribution of EU space programmes to the SDG

EU space programmes centre stage at UN SDG event

13.7.2018 10:25  
GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides highlights the contribution of EU space programmes to the SDG
Published: 
13 July 2018

The contribution of Europe’s space programmes Galileo and Copernicus in building sustainable and resilient societies was in focus at the ‘My Planet, My Future: Space for the Sustainable Development Goals’ exhibition, launched at United Nations HQ in New York on July 10 and set to run until September 5.

Opening the exhibition, which showcases satellite images and videos that illustrate space technology’s contribution to the achievement of the SDGs, Pierre Delsaux, Deputy Director General at the European Commission's Directorate General for the Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and Small and Medium Enterprises said: “This is an excellent opportunity to show how the European Union’s space programme can contribute to the benefit of the entire planet.”

Delivering real services

This contribution was highlighted in a recent joint study from the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA) and the European GNSS Agency (GSA), which showed that 40% of the 169 indicators underpinning the 17 SDGs are reliant on the use of space-based science and technology.

Read this: European GNSS and the environment

Speaking at the event, GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides said that while the contribution of space services to communications, business and the economy is increasingly recognised, awareness of the benefits that space-based solutions can bring to the health, well-being and sustainability of the planet needs to be better understood.

“As the only European Union agency operating and delivering space services, the GSA is dedicated to ensuring that EU investment in independent, civil run satellite navigation systems deliver real services and benefits for people and the planet,” des Dorides said.

In his address, des Dorides noted that the synergy of Galileo and Copernicus supports the Zero Hunger, Climate Action and Better Life on Land goals through precision agriculture applications that optimise crop production. He also noted that the EU Space Programme directly contributes to the goal on Climate Action by supporting urban development and smart cities planning. “This is especially critical given that more than 60% of the global population will live in cities by 2030,” he said.

Stakeholder involvement

UNOOSA Director Simonetta Di Pippo noted that, in order to bring the benefits of space to all nations, it is necessary to raise awareness of the importance of space science and technology to sustainable development and how it can contribute to the global community’s commitment to leave no one behind. “Activities such as this exhibit offer us great avenues to communicate how space can contribute to the achievement of the SDGs and underline the need for all stakeholders and decision-makers to get involved,” she said.

The exhibition showcases satellite images and videos that illustrate space technology’s contribution to sustainable development

The exhibition, which focuses in particular on the SDGs being reviewed at a High-level Political Forum on Sustainable Development being held at UNHQ on 9-18 July, is organised by the NGO CANEUS International with the support of the UNOOSA, and sponsored by the European Commission, the GSA and the German Aerospace Centre (DLR). 

#SPACE4SDGS: The Space 2030 Agenda

On the margins of the High-level Political Forum, the side event #SPACE4SDGS: The Space 2030 Agenda was held on July 10. The joint study from UNOOSA and the GSA - European Global Navigation Satellite System and Copernicus: Supporting the Sustainable Development Goals Building Blocks towards the 2030 Agenda – was presented at this event.

The participants discussed the next steps towards establishing a coherent ‘Space2030 Agenda’ approach on how space science and technology is used to support the implementation of the UN’s sustainable development agenda. The side event also included a debrief on the results of UNISPACE+50, a global gathering of the space community held at the UN Offices in Vienna, Austria in June.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides highlights the contribution of EU space programmes to the SDG

EU space programmes centre stage at UN SDG event

13.7.2018 10:25  
EC Deputy Director General Pierre Delsaux, UN Deputy Secretary General Amina Mohammed, UNOOSA Director Simonetta Di Pippo  and GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides at the My Planet, My Future exhibition in New York
Published: 
13 July 2018

The contribution of Europe’s space programmes Galileo and Copernicus in building sustainable and resilient societies was in focus at the ‘My Planet, My Future: Space for the Sustainable Development Goals’ exhibition, launched at United Nations HQ in New York on July 10 and set to run until September 5.

Opening the exhibition, which showcases satellite images and videos that illustrate space technology’s contribution to the achievement of the SDGs, Pierre Delsaux, Deputy Director General at the European Commission's Directorate General for the Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and Small and Medium Enterprises said: “This is an excellent opportunity to show how the European Union’s space programme can contribute to the benefit of the entire planet.”

Delivering real services

This contribution was highlighted in a recent joint study from the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA) and the European GNSS Agency (GSA), which showed that 40% of the 169 indicators underpinning the 17 SDGs are reliant on the use of space-based science and technology.

Read this: European GNSS and the environment

Speaking at the event, GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides said that while the contribution of space services to communications, business and the economy is increasingly recognised, awareness of the benefits that space-based solutions can bring to the health, well-being and sustainability of the planet needs to be better understood.

“As the only European Union agency operating and delivering space services, the GSA is dedicated to ensuring that EU investment in independent, civil run satellite navigation systems deliver real services and benefits for people and the planet,” des Dorides said.

In his address, des Dorides noted that the synergy of Galileo and Copernicus supports the Zero Hunger, Climate Action and Better Life on Land goals through precision agriculture applications that optimise crop production. He also noted that the EU Space Programme directly contributes to the goal on Climate Action by supporting urban development and smart cities planning. “This is especially critical given that more than 60% of the global population will live in cities by 2030,” he said.

Stakeholder involvement

UNOOSA Director Simonetta Di Pippo noted that, in order to bring the benefits of space to all nations, it is necessary to raise awareness of the importance of space science and technology to sustainable development and how it can contribute to the global community’s commitment to leave no one behind. “Activities such as this exhibit offer us great avenues to communicate how space can contribute to the achievement of the SDGs and underline the need for all stakeholders and decision-makers to get involved,” she said.

The exhibition showcases satellite images and videos that illustrate space technology’s contribution to sustainable development

The exhibition, which focuses in particular on the SDGs being reviewed at a High-level Political Forum on Sustainable Development being held at UNHQ on 9-18 July, is organised by the NGO CANEUS International with the support of the UNOOSA, and sponsored by the European Commission, the GSA and the German Aerospace Centre (DLR). 

#SPACE4SDGS: The Space 2030 Agenda

On the margins of the High-level Political Forum, the side event #SPACE4SDGS: The Space 2030 Agenda was held on July 10. The joint study from UNOOSA and the GSA - European Global Navigation Satellite System and Copernicus: Supporting the Sustainable Development Goals Building Blocks towards the 2030 Agenda – was presented at this event.

The participants discussed the next steps towards establishing a coherent ‘Space2030 Agenda’ approach on how space science and technology is used to support the implementation of the UN’s sustainable development agenda. The side event also included a debrief on the results of UNISPACE+50, a global gathering of the space community held at the UN Offices in Vienna, Austria in June.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

EC Deputy Director General Pierre Delsaux, UN Deputy Secretary General Amina Mohammed, UNOOSA Director Simonetta Di Pippo and GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides at the My Planet, My Future exhibition in New York

ESNC 2018 – only 3 weeks left to enter!

11.7.2018 14:13  
ESNC awards applications, services and ideas that use Galileo data to respond to challenges faced by business and society
Published: 
11 July 2018

The deadline to enter for this year’s European Satellite Navigation Competition (ESNC) is July 31. So, if you have an idea for an innovative and marketable European GNSS (EGNSS) application, you only have three weeks left to register and be eligible to win great prizes!

Also known as the ‘Galileo Masters’, the ESNC seeks to award applications, services and new ideas that use Galileo GNSS data to respond to important challenges faced by business and society. In this year’s competition, various institutions and regional partners are set to award prizes worth a total of over EUR 1 million within more than 20 challenge categories.

Proud partner

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is proud once again to be a part of this year’s event – the 10th consecutive year that the GSA has been a main partner in the competition and awarded a Special Topic prize.

This year, the GSA will award three prizes addressing the topic 'When and Where? – Exact timing and positioning matters', with special consideration given to proposals that leverage EGNSS differentiators, such as:

  • Multiple frequencies E1, E5 and E6
  • Galileo-specific signal modulation, e.g. AltBOC
  • Galileo Search and Rescue Service
  • High-precision and authentication services that will be provided by Galileo, i.e. within the Commercial Service and within the Open Service authentication (OS NMA)

Cash prizes of €3000, €5000 and €7000 will be awarded to the top three proposals. In addition, the first prize winner will benefit from extensive promotion through GSA marketing channels and at relevant industry events and, if eligible, will receive tailored EGNSS Accelerator business support worth €62,000.

Two tracks

There are two tracks in the 2018 competition: regional and special prize challenges. The main target groups are SMEs, start-ups, universities and individuals in the fields of business, research, and higher education. Submissions can demonstrate the innovative use of GNSS data across a wide variety of challenge topics. Together with cash prizes, challenge winners will receive access to an international network of leading GNSS organisations, a crowd investment platform, and business development support.

In addition, the ESNC is complemented by the E-GNSS Accelerator, which helps transform great ideas into commercially viable solutions through a tailored business coaching service. All winners of the ESNC 2018 will gain access to the E-GNSS Accelerator, if eligible.

For more details on this year's challenges, prizes, and partners, please see www.esnc.eu. To participate, click here.

Check out these articles on previous GSA Special Prize winners at the ESNC:

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

ESNC awards applications, services and ideas that use Galileo data to respond to challenges faced by business and society

ESNC webinars by GSA: EGNSS in LBS and how to use Galileo data

2.7.2018 10:15  
Sign up to learn all about E-GNSS in location based services.
Published: 
02 July 2018

The European GNSS agency (GSA) is organising two EGNSS webinars in July. The first, on July 4, covers how to use Galileo data in your daily life, while the second, to be held on July 12, shows how Location Based Services can benefit from the high accuracy, integrity and security provided by EGNSS.

The revenue in the GNSS market in Europe alone is expected to be almost EUR 60 billion by 2025. Galileo is an enabler for a myriad of industries and new technologies, especially in terms of data integration. To exploit this unique potential for your idea or company, we’ll show you how to integrate and link Galileo data. If you don’t have any ideas yet, we’ll give you some inspiration with the latest market trends.

Sign up for our webinar on How to use Galileo data in your daily life at 14:30 – 15:30 CEST on 4 July 2018.

Learn more about:

  • E-GNSS market and technology trends
  • E-GNSS adoption by market segment
  • Emerging E-GNSS applications
  • E-GNSS differentiators to be leveraged
  • Q&A

The webinar will be presented by Vojtech Fort, Market Innovation Officer, GSA; and Bernardo Brum, GSA Market Development Expert.

E-GNSS in Location Based Services

Galileo is being integrated into more and more mobile phones, ranging from the latest iPhone to Samsung devices. Now is the time to be at the forefront of Galileo developers and be amongst the first to enrich your apps with E-GNSS data in Location Based Services. Galileo will open up brand new opportunities for you thanks to the high accuracy, integrity and security it offers.

Sign up for our webinar to learn about Galileo and EGNOS in Location Based Services at 11:00 – 12:00 CEST on 12 July 2018.

Learn more about:

  • Emerging LBS applications,
  • Status of EGNSS adoption in LBS,
  • EGNSS Differentiators for mass market,
  • Examples of successful projects,
  • Use of GNSS raw measurements:
    • Introduction to GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force
    • Android GNSS Raw Measurements for different applications (examples)
  • Q&A.

The webinar will be presented by Jacopo Ovarelli, GSA Market Development Expert; and Martin Sunkevic, Market Development Officer.

Access to both webinars is exclusive to ESNC-registered participants. After signing up to the database, you will receive an email to join the webinar.

Register here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Sign up to learn all about E-GNSS in location based services.

ESNC webinars by GSA: EGNSS in LBS and how to use Galileo data

2.7.2018 10:15  
Sign up to learn all about E-GNSS in location based services.
Published: 
02 July 2018

The European GNSS agency (GSA) is organising two EGNSS webinars in July. The first, on July 4, covers how to use Galileo data in your daily life, while the second, to be held on July 12, shows how Location Based Services can benefit from the high accuracy, integrity and security provided by EGNSS.

The revenue in the GNSS market in Europe alone is expected to be almost EUR 60 billion by 2025. Galileo is an enabler for a myriad of industries and new technologies, especially in terms of data integration. To exploit this unique potential for your idea or company, we’ll show you how to integrate and link Galileo data. If you don’t have any ideas yet, we’ll give you some inspiration with the latest market trends.

Sign up for our webinar on How to use Galileo data in your daily life at 14:30 – 15:30 CEST on 4 July 2018.

Learn more about:

  • E-GNSS market and technology trends
  • E-GNSS adoption by market segment
  • Emerging E-GNSS applications
  • E-GNSS differentiators to be leveraged
  • Q&A

The webinar will be presented by Vojtech Fort, Market Innovation Officer, GSA; and Bernardo Brum, GSA Market Development Expert.

E-GNSS in Location Based Services

Galileo is being integrated into more and more mobile phones, ranging from the latest iPhone to Samsung devices. Now is the time to be at the forefront of Galileo developers and be amongst the first to enrich your apps with E-GNSS data in Location Based Services. Galileo will open up brand new opportunities for you thanks to the high accuracy, integrity and security it offers.

Sign up for our webinar to learn about Galileo and EGNOS in Location Based Services at 11:00 – 12:00 CEST on 12 July 2018.

Learn more about:

  • Emerging LBS applications,
  • Status of EGNSS adoption in LBS,
  • EGNSS Differentiators for mass market,
  • Examples of successful projects,
  • Use of GNSS raw measurements:
    • Introduction to GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force
    • Android GNSS Raw Measurements for different applications (examples)
  • Q&A.

The webinar will be presented by Jacopo Ovarelli, GSA Market Development Expert; and Martin Sunkevic, Market Development Officer.

Access to both webinars is exclusive to ESNC-registered participants. After signing up to the database, you will receive an email to join the webinar.

Register here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Sign up to learn all about E-GNSS in location based services.

ESNC Webinar by GSA: E-GNSS in Location Based Services

2.7.2018 10:15  
Sign up to learn all about E-GNSS in location based services.
Published: 
02 July 2018

Galileo is being integrated into more and more mobile phones, ranging from the latest iPhone to Samsung devices. Now is the time to be at the forefront of Galileo developers and be amongst the first to enrich your apps with E-GNSS data in Location Based Services. Galileo will open up brand new opportunities for you thanks to the high accuracy, integrity and security it offers.

Sign up for our webinar to learn about Galileo and EGNOS in Location Based Services at 11:00 – 12:00 CEST on 12 July 2018.

Learn more about:

  • Emerging LBS applications,
  • Status of EGNSS adoption in LBS,
  • EGNSS Differentiators for mass market,
  • Examples of successful projects,
  • Use of GNSS raw measurements:
    • Introduction to GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force
    • Android GNSS Raw Measurements for different applications (examples)
  • Q&A.

The webinar will be presented by Jacopo Ovarelli, GSA Market Development Expert; and Martin Sunkevic, Market Development Officer.

Access to the webinar is exclusive to ESNC-registered participants. After signing up to the database, you will receive an email to join the webinar.

Register here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Sign up to learn all about E-GNSS in location based services.

ESNC webinars by GSA: EGNSS in LBS and how to use Galileo data

2.7.2018 10:15  
Sign up to learn all about E-GNSS in location based services.
Published: 
02 July 2018

The European GNSS agency (GSA) is organising two EGNSS webinars in July. The first, on July 4, covers how to use Galileo data in your daily life, while the second, to be held on July 12, shows how Location Based Services can benefit from the high accuracy, integrity and security provided by EGNSS.

The revenue in the GNSS market in Europe alone is expected to be almost EUR 60 billion by 2025. Galileo is an enabler for a myriad of industries and new technologies, especially in terms of data integration. To exploit this unique potential for your idea or company, we’ll show you how to integrate and link Galileo data. If you don’t have any ideas yet, we’ll give you some inspiration with the latest market trends.
Sign up for our webinar on How to use Galileo data in your daily life at 14:30 – 15:30 CEST on 4 July 2018.

Learn more about:

  • E-GNSS market and technology trends
  • E-GNSS adoption by market segment
  • Emerging E-GNSS applications
  • E-GNSS differentiators to be leveraged
  • Q&A

The webinar will be presented by Vojtech Fort, Market Innovation Officer, GSA; and Bernardo Brum, GSA Market Development Expert.

E-GNSS in Location Based Services

Galileo is being integrated into more and more mobile phones, ranging from the latest iPhone to Samsung devices. Now is the time to be at the forefront of Galileo developers and be amongst the first to enrich your apps with E-GNSS data in Location Based Services. Galileo will open up brand new opportunities for you thanks to the high accuracy, integrity and security it offers.

Sign up for our webinar to learn about Galileo and EGNOS in Location Based Services at 11:00 – 12:00 CEST on 12 July 2018.

Learn more about:

  • Emerging LBS applications,
  • Status of EGNSS adoption in LBS,
  • EGNSS Differentiators for mass market,
  • Examples of successful projects,
  • Use of GNSS raw measurements:
    • Introduction to GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force
    • Android GNSS Raw Measurements for different applications (examples)
  • Q&A.

The webinar will be presented by Jacopo Ovarelli, GSA Market Development Expert; and Martin Sunkevic, Market Development Officer.

Access to both webinars is exclusive to ESNC-registered participants. After signing up to the database, you will receive an email to join the webinar.

Register here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Sign up to learn all about E-GNSS in location based services.

Space for your App Hackathon – don’t miss out!

2.7.2018 9:47  
The EU Space Programmes Hackathon is a great opportunity to showcase skills and win great prizes!
Published: 
02 July 2018

Experts and developers interested in shaping the future of Earth Observation (EO), location-based services (LBS) and the Internet of Things (IoT) will be heading to Padua, Italy on 24-26 October 2018, to take part in the 2nd EU Space Programmes Hackathon. Don’t miss out on this opportunity to showcase your skills, gain a competitive advantage for your future projects and win great prizes.

At the Hackathon, experts from various fields, such as engineers, geologists, economists, and sociologists, will join with app developers, coders, graphic and web designers, data scientists, marketers, dreamers, and pioneers who want to shape the future of EO, LBS and IoT, to discover how space technologies can help transform their ideas into reality.

The assembled hackers will focus in particular on applications in the areas of smart mobility, augmented reality, geo-marketing, and mapping and GIS. Other target areas will include fitness, sport and mHealth, business applications and social networking. Participation by multidisciplinary teams from diverse and complimentary backgrounds will ensure a holistic approach to app development.

Galileo and Copernicus

The participants will have access to an API provided by the European Space Agency (ESA) that will allow easy access to Earth Observation data, in particular from the Copernicus programme. They will also have Galileo enabled hardware with GNSS raw measurements to play with. What’s more, they will be able to refer to a “White Paper on using GNSS Raw Measurements”, produced by the European GNSS Agency (GSA), for information on how to leverage raw measurements to implement advanced GNSS techniques in mass-market devices.

As users and app developers can now access GNSS raw measurements on Android 7+, Galileo’s high accuracy in timing and positioning is opening the door to a new range of applications - from drones and car navigation to search and rescue, law enforcement, and so on. Copernicus imagery and data can also be used for a wide array of applications such as sustainable development and nature protection, regional and local planning, agriculture and forestry, public health and civil protection.

Prizes and other opportunities

A board composed of senior officials from GSA, ESA, Unismart and the University of Padua will evaluate all the projects and select a prize-winner. The GSA will make it possible for the winning team to present their application at European Space Week in Marseille, on 3-6 December 2018, which will be a great opportunity to take the winning application idea further. ESA will offer the winning team the opportunity to participate in the ESA-ESRIN app camp in 2019.

Attendance at the hackathon is free of charge. For more information and to register, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The EU Space Programmes Hackathon is a great opportunity to showcase skills and win great prizes!

Space for your App Hackathon – don’t miss out!

2.7.2018 9:47  
The EU Space Programmes Hackathon is a great opportunity to showcase skills and win great prizes!
Published: 
02 July 2018

Experts and developers interested in shaping the future of Earth Observation (EO), location-based services (LBS) and the Internet of Things (IoT) will be heading to Padua, Italy on 24-26 October 2018, to take part in the 2nd EU Space Programmes Hackathon. Don’t miss out on this opportunity to showcase your skills, gain a competitive advantage for your future projects and win great prizes.

At the Hackathon, experts from various fields, such as engineers, geologists, economists, and sociologists, will join with app developers, coders, graphic and web designers, data scientists, marketers, dreamers, and pioneers who want to shape the future of EO, LBS and IoT, to discover how space technologies can help transform their ideas into reality.

The assembled hackers will focus in particular on applications in the areas of smart mobility, augmented reality, geo-marketing, and mapping and GIS. Other target areas will include fitness, sport and mHealth, business applications and social networking. Participation by multidisciplinary teams from diverse and complimentary backgrounds will ensure a holistic approach to app development.

Galileo and Copernicus

The participants will have access to an API provided by the European Space Agency (ESA) that will allow easy access to Earth Observation data, in particular from the Copernicus programme. They will also have Galileo enabled hardware with GNSS raw measurements to play with. What’s more, they will be able to refer to a “White Paper on using GNSS Raw Measurements”, produced by the European GNSS Agency (GSA), for information on how to leverage raw measurements to implement advanced GNSS techniques in mass-market devices.

As users and app developers can now access GNSS raw measurements on Android 7+, Galileo’s high accuracy in timing and positioning is opening the door to a new range of applications - from drones and car navigation to search and rescue, law enforcement, and so on. Copernicus imagery and data can also be used for a wide array of applications such as sustainable development and nature protection, regional and local planning, agriculture and forestry, public health and civil protection.

Prizes and other opportunities

A board composed of senior officials from GSA, ESA, Unismart and the University of Padua will evaluate all the projects and select a prize-winner. The GSA will make it possible for the winning team to present their application at European Space Week in Marseille, on 3-6 December 2018, which will be a great opportunity to take the winning application idea further. ESA will offer the winning team the opportunity to participate in the ESA-ESRIN app camp in 2019.

Attendance at the hackathon is free of charge. For more information and to register, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The EU Space Programmes Hackathon is a great opportunity to showcase skills and win great prizes!

Space for your App Hackathon – don’t miss out!

2.7.2018 9:47  
The EU Space Programmes Hackathon is a great opportunity to showcase skills and win great prizes!
Published: 
02 July 2018

Experts and developers interested in shaping the future of Earth Observation (EO), location-based services (LBS) and the Internet of Things (IoT) will be heading to Padua, Italy on 24-26 October 2018, to take part in the 2nd EU Space Programmes Hackathon. Don’t miss out on this opportunity to showcase your skills, gain a competitive advantage for your future projects and win great prizes.

At the Hackathon, experts from various fields, such as engineers, geologists, economists, and sociologists, will join with app developers, coders, graphic and web designers, data scientists, marketers, dreamers, and pioneers who want to shape the future of EO, LBS and IoT, to discover how space technologies can help transform their ideas into reality.

The assembled hackers will focus in particular on applications in the areas of smart mobility, augmented reality, geo-marketing, and mapping and GIS. Other target areas will include fitness, sport and mHealth, business applications and social networking. Participation by multidisciplinary teams from diverse and complimentary backgrounds will ensure a holistic approach to app development.

Galileo and Copernicus

The participants will have access to an API provided by the European Space Agency (ESA) that will allow easy access to Earth Observation data, in particular from the Copernicus programme. They will also have Galileo enabled hardware with GNSS raw measurements to play with. What’s more, they will be able to refer to a “White Paper on using GNSS Raw Measurements”, produced by the European GNSS Agency (GSA), for information on how to leverage raw measurements to implement advanced GNSS techniques in mass-market devices.

As users and app developers can now access GNSS raw measurements on Android 7+, Galileo’s high accuracy in timing and positioning is opening the door to a new range of applications - from drones and car navigation to search and rescue, law enforcement, and so on. Copernicus imagery and data can also be used for a wide array of applications such as sustainable development and nature protection, regional and local planning, agriculture and forestry, public health and civil protection.

Prizes and other opportunities

A board composed of senior officials from GSA, ESA, Unismart and the University of Padua will evaluate all the projects and select a prize-winner. The GSA will make it possible for the winning team to present their application at European Space Week in Marseille, on 3-6 December 2018, which will be a great opportunity to take the winning application idea further. ESA will offer the winning team the opportunity to participate in the ESA-ESRIN app camp in 2019.

Attendance at the hackathon is free of charge. For more information and to register, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The EU Space Programmes Hackathon is a great opportunity to showcase skills and win great prizes!

GNSS Market Report proves a useful tool across the GNSS market

28.6.2018 14:21  
The GNSS Market Report is insightful and gives a nice overview of what the GNSS market is all about.
Published: 
28 June 2018

With over 21,000 downloads since it was first published online on 21 May 2017, the GNSS Market Report 5 is proving to be a useful tool for all market players, from laymen to GNSS experts, providing a comprehensive overview of the status and trends on the GNSS market.

The GNSS Market Report, produced by the European GNSS Agency (GSA), is published every two years, with the latest edition released in May 2017. Just one year after its publication, the most recent edition of the GNSS Market Report has been downloaded over 21,000 times, indicating that the report is seen as a valuable resource by GNSS market players. The previous GNSS Market Report has been downloaded over 49,000 times since it was published in 2015.

Insightful overview

The GNSS Market Report is a comprehensive source of knowledge and information on the dynamic global GNSS market, providing comprehensive, in-depth analysis of global trends, along with the latest developments in terms of shipments, revenues and the installed base of GNSS devices and applications in key GNSS market segments – both mass market and professional.

Thanks to the GSA’s unique position, interfacing with the entire GNSS value chain, including manufacturers, service providers and app developers, it is able to identify user requirements and capture market trends and disruptive technologies, such as drones, very early on. This is a special feature of the report, and one that is valued by its users.

On trend

“The updated GNSS Market Report version 5 is insightful and gives a nice overview of what the GNSS market is all about. It’s helpful for both a laymen and an expert in this market. The trends are always interesting to read,” said Alain Suskind, Senior Director of R&D and Operations at GNSS and GPS receiver manufacturer Septentrio.

The trends identified in the previous edition of the report have been borne out by market developments, and this has cemented the report’s reputation as a source of reliable and up-to-date information.

“The GSA GNSS Market Report is a welcome addition to the source material that any GNSS business professional can use in the analysis of where the market is moving. The report is well researched, is updated regularly, and provides a wealth of data across vertical markets and geographies,” said Neil Gerein, Director of Product Management at high-precision GPS and GNSS positioning technology provider NovAtel.

GNSS User Technology Report 2 currently being drafted!

The GSA GNSS Market Report is published every second year: prior editions were published in 2015, 2013, 2012 and 2010. The Market Report alternates with the GNSS User Technology Report, which takes an in-depth look at the state-of-the-art in GNSS receiver technology and provides expert analysis on the evolutionary trends that are set to redefine the dynamic global GNSS user technology industry.

The 2018 edition of the GNSS User Technology Report is currently being drafted and is scheduled for publication on the GSA website on 24 September 2018, so stay tuned!

The GNSS Market Report 2017 is free and can be downloaded here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GNSS Market Report is insightful and gives a nice overview of what the GNSS market is all about.

Barcelona rings to the sound of BELS+

25.6.2018 11:06  
BELS+ develops GNSS markets for EU companies and helps EU GNSS applications gain a foothold in South East Asia
Published: 
25 June 2018

BELS+ aims to develop GNSS markets for EU companies and help EU GNSS applications gain a foothold in South East Asia. Towards these goals, the project is organizing a GNSS Data Processing training programme in Barcelona on July 11-13, in addition to a workshop on July 12 to raise awareness about business opportunities in South East Asia among European companies, professionals and institutions offering GNSS-based products and services.

BELS - Building European Links toward Southeast Asia - was set-up in 2015. Its second edition, named BELS+, was selected by the EU’s Horizon 2020 programme in 2018 to facilitate the breakthrough of EGNSS technology in the South East Asian (SEA) market.

Two BELS+ events will take place in July 2018 in Barcelona, Spain:

  • A workshop on “Opportunities for European GNSS companies in South East Asia”
  • Professional training on “GNSS Data Processing: Theory and Practical Exercises”

Both events are held in combination with each other but can be booked independently.

Workshop

The July 12 event “Opportunities for European GNSS companies in South East Asia”, which will take place at the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya in Barcelona, Spain will include a presentation of the BELS+ project and the NAVIS EGNSS Demonstration Centre in Hanoi, where European companies showcase their GNSS-based solutions. European companies will present their experience of working in the SEA region.

This event is an ideal opportunity for European producers of GNSS-based technologies and solutions to present their products and services as well as their motivation in trying to get a foothold in the South East Asian market. For more information on the Barcelona workshop, click here. To register to attend the workshop, go straight to the registration page.

Read this: BELS Builds Bridges to South East Asia

Professional training

The professional training programme GNSS Data Processing: Theory and Practical Exercises will run from July 11 to 13, also at the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Spain.

Supported by the European Commission and the European GNSS Agency (GSA), this training programme is aimed at professionals working in EGNSS and related fields of science and engineering from Europe and the SEA region. The course will cover the concepts and techniques used in GNSS positioning and will present the theoretical foundations for Standard and Precise Point Positioning (SPP, PPP), among other topics.

Participants in a recent BELS+ training session in Hanoi

Participants in a recent BELS+ training session in Hanoi

The course aims to cover all the elements needed to understand how the GNSS system works and how to work with it. Processing algorithms will be discussed in detail and implemented through guided exercises in laboratory sessions. For more information on the course, click here, and to register, go directly to the registration page. The training will be conducted in English and is free of charge.

There are a limited number of places available, so you should register as soon as possible!

About BELS+

The Horizon 2020-funded BELS+ project, like its predecessor BELS, conducts a range of coordinated activities to raise awareness and build capacities for the exploitation of EGNSS technologies in South East Asia. The BELS+ consortium brings together partners from Europe and South East Asia.

Founded in 2010 the NAVIS Centre serves as entry point for EU companies. Within BELS+ a GNSS Demo Centre will be established at the NAVIS. It builds upon the broad engagement of companies, researchers and stakeholders and aims at attracting EU companies.

The Centre will serve as a platform to demonstrate European GNSS expertise from hardware to software as well as service and maintenance. BELS+ supports European companies participating in the Demo Centre. In addition, the Centre offers potential customers and GNSS stakeholders in the SEA region the opportunity to see and experience European GNSS solutions within their geographical environment.

One of the project’s core aims is to promote Galileo and demonstrate how it can benefit the region. This work is particularly important as the SEA region lacks its own satellite navigation capabilities and is therefore dependent on other national or regional systems.

For more information, visit the project’s portal.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

BELS+ develops GNSS markets for EU companies and helps EU GNSS applications gain a foothold in South East Asia

Barcelona rings to the sound of BELS+

25.6.2018 11:06  
BELS+ develops GNSS markets for EU companies and helps EU GNSS applications gain a foothold in South East Asia
Published: 
25 June 2018

BELS+ aims to develop GNSS markets for EU companies and help EU GNSS applications gain a foothold in South East Asia. Towards these goals, the project is organizing a GNSS Data Processing training programme in Barcelona on July 11-13, in addition to a workshop on July 12 to raise awareness about business opportunities in South East Asia among European companies, professionals and institutions offering GNSS-based products and services.

BELS - Building European Links toward Southeast Asia - was set-up in 2015. Its second edition, named BELS+, was selected by the EU’s Horizon 2020 programme in 2018 to facilitate the breakthrough of EGNSS technology in the South East Asian (SEA) market.

Two BELS+ events will take place in July 2018 in Barcelona, Spain:

  • A workshop on “Opportunities for European GNSS companies in South East Asia”
  • Professional training on “GNSS Data Processing: Theory and Practical Exercises”

Both events are held in combination with each other but can be booked independently.

Workshop

The July 12 event “Opportunities for European GNSS companies in South East Asia”, which will take place at the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya in Barcelona, Spain will include a presentation of the BELS+ project and the NAVIS EGNSS Demonstration Centre in Hanoi, where European companies showcase their GNSS-based solutions. European companies will present their experience of working in the SEA region.

This event is an ideal opportunity for European producers of GNSS-based technologies and solutions to present their products and services as well as their motivation in trying to get a foothold in the South East Asian market. For more information on the Barcelona workshop, click here. To register to attend the workshop, go straight to the registration page.

Read this: BELS Builds Bridges to South East Asia

Professional training

The professional training programme GNSS Data Processing: Theory and Practical Exercises will run from July 11 to 13, also at the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Spain.

Supported by the European Commission and the European GNSS Agency (GSA), this training programme is aimed at professionals working in EGNSS and related fields of science and engineering from Europe and the SEA region. The course will cover the concepts and techniques used in GNSS positioning and will present the theoretical foundations for Standard and Precise Point Positioning (SPP, PPP), among other topics.

Participants in a recent BELS+ training session in Hanoi

Participants in a recent BELS+ training session in Hanoi

The course aims to cover all the elements needed to understand how the GNSS system works and how to work with it. Processing algorithms will be discussed in detail and implemented through guided exercises in laboratory sessions. For more information on the course, click here, and to register, go directly to the registration page. The training will be conducted in English and is free of charge.

There are a limited number of places available, so you should register as soon as possible!

About BELS+

The Horizon 2020-funded BELS+ project, like its predecessor BELS, conducts a range of coordinated activities to raise awareness and build capacities for the exploitation of EGNSS technologies in South East Asia. The BELS+ consortium brings together partners from Europe and South East Asia.

Founded in 2010 the NAVIS Centre serves as entry point for EU companies. Within BELS+ a GNSS Demo Centre will be established at the NAVIS. It builds upon the broad engagement of companies, researchers and stakeholders and aims at attracting EU companies.

The Centre will serve as a platform to demonstrate European GNSS expertise from hardware to software as well as service and maintenance. BELS+ supports European companies participating in the Demo Centre. In addition, the Centre offers potential customers and GNSS stakeholders in the SEA region the opportunity to see and experience European GNSS solutions within their geographical environment.

One of the project’s core aims is to promote Galileo and demonstrate how it can benefit the region. This work is particularly important as the SEA region lacks its own satellite navigation capabilities and is therefore dependent on other national or regional systems.

For more information, visit the project’s portal.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

BELS+ develops GNSS markets for EU companies and helps EU GNSS applications gain a foothold in South East Asia

Fifth Galileo IS OS Quarterly Performance Report available

15.6.2018 13:05  
Published: 
15 June 2018

The first Open Service Quarterly Performance Report of the year, covering the period from January to March 2018, has been published under the Performance Reports section of the GSC web portal.

The fifth Open Service (OS) Performance Report, and the first of 2018, is available in the Electronic Library, providing the status of the Galileo constellation and the achieved performance over the reporting period (January, February and March 2018).

These quarterly reports provide the public with the latest information on the Galileo Open Service measured performance statistics with respect to their Minimum Performance Levels (MPLs), as declared in the Galileo OS Service Definition Document (OS SDD), in particular, on parameters such as:

  • Galileo Initial OS ranging performance,
  • Galileo Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) dissemination,
  • Galileo to GPS Time Offset (GGTO) determination performance,
  • Galileo Positioning performance, and
  • Timely publication of NAGUs (Notice Advisory to Galileo Users).

Highlights from Q1 2018

As in the past year, the Galileo OS measured performance figures generally comfortably exceed their MPL thresholds.

Some highlights from the Q1 2018 performance report:

  • The Availability of both the Galileo Ranging Service at the Worst User Location (WUL) and the Healthy Signal were significantly above expectations (all above the threshold of 87%), with Availability reaching values of 100% in February and March.
  • The monthly Availability of both the Galileo UTC Determination and the GGTO Determination were achieved, with all monthly values exceeding the MPL targets (87% and 80% respectively).
  • The target MPLs for Publishing NAGUs were met in all cases, for both Planned and Unplanned events. Eight NAGUs have been published on the GSC web portal in the reporting period, none of which referred to unplanned events affecting the Space Segment.

For the most up-to-date information on the Galileo system and constellation, visit the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) website, in particular, the Galileo constellation status section. For more details on Galileo performance and its services, do not hesitate to contact the Galileo Help Desk.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Galileo Initial Open Service performance figures generally exceed the MPL targets in Q1 2018

GSA hosts Cospas-Sarsat meeting

14.6.2018 8:21  
Published: 
14 June 2018

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) hosted Cospas-Sarsat participants at its Prague headquarters on 5-11 June 2018, at a meeting to address matters related to the evolution of the Medium-Altitude Earth Orbit Search and Rescue (MEOSAR) system.

At the meeting, the Cospas-Sarsat participants focused on developing the final operational and technical steps required for the declaration of MEOSAR Initial Operational Capability (IOC), planned for 2019. By holding this meeting at the GSA headquarters in Prague, the European Commission underlined the key contribution of the SAR/Galileo service to the MEOSAR system, paving the way towards its full operational capability.

Galileo a key component

The Galileo SAR service is a fundamental European contribution to the Cospas-Sarsat International Programme, thanks to the SAR/Galileo repeaters and ground segment equipment that relay Cospas-Sarsat distress alerts to national authorities through the Cospas-Sarsat ground network.

“Galileo SAR is one of five Galileo services and is among the three initial services that were declared by the Commission in December 2016. Galileo will be the first full constellation with SAR capability,” GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides said at the meeting.

Watch this: Galileo Search and Rescue (SAR) Service

“The GSA is actively supporting beacon manufacturers in implementing Galileo differentiators into their new products and is proud to have Galileo-enabled beacons in the market as a result of our collaboration with leading EU manufacturers,” des Dorides said, adding that the GSA is also leveraging EU GNSS R&D programmes to contribute to Cospas-Sarsat priorities.

 

Cospas-Sarsat

The Cospas-Sarsat system detects and locates emergency beacons activated by aircraft, ships and people engaged in recreational activities in remote areas, and then sends these distress alerts to search-and-rescue authorities. The system utilises a network of satellites that provides coverage anywhere on Earth. Distress alerts are detected, located and forwarded to over 200 countries and territories at no cost to beacon owners or the receiving government agencies.

Between September 1982 and December 2016, the Cospas-Sarsat system provided assistance in rescuing at least 43,807 people in 12,664 SAR events. On average, six lives are saved every day with the assistance of Cospas-Sarsat.

Cospas-Sarsat delegates met at the GSA’s Prague headquarters from 5-11 June 2018, to discuss the evolution of the Medium-Altitude Earth Orbit Search and Rescue (MEOSAR) system

Cospas-Sarsat delegates met at the GSA’s Prague headquarters from 5-11 June 2018, to discuss the evolution of the Medium-Altitude Earth Orbit Search and Rescue (MEOSAR) system

And this: MEOSAR Intro

MEOSAR system

In 2004, Cospas-Sarsat initiated the development of the Medium-altitude Earth Orbiting Satellite System for Search and Rescue (MEOSAR system), with SAR repeaters placed on the GNSS satellites of Europe, Russia and the USA. Early operational capability data from the MEOSAR system has been available since December 2016. MEOSAR will initially complement the existing low-altitude LEOSAR and geostationary GEOSAR systems. The MEOSAR system will eventually replace LEOSAR to become the primary Cospas-Sarsat system.

For more information on Cospas-Sarsat, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides opening the Cospas-Sarsat meeting.

GSA hosts Cospas-Sarsat meeting

14.6.2018 8:21  
Published: 
14 June 2018

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) hosted Cospas-Sarsat participants at its Prague headquarters on 5-11 June 2018, at a meeting to address matters related to the evolution of the Medium-Altitude Earth Orbit Search and Rescue (MEOSAR) system.

At the meeting, the Cospas-Sarsat participants focused on developing the final operational and technical steps required for the declaration of MEOSAR Initial Operational Capability (IOC), planned for 2019. By holding this meeting at the GSA headquarters in Prague, the European Commission underlined the key contribution of the SAR/Galileo service to the MEOSAR system, paving the way towards its full operational capability.

Galileo a key component

The Galileo SAR service is a fundamental European contribution to the Cospas-Sarsat International Programme, thanks to the SAR/Galileo repeaters and ground segment equipment that relay Cospas-Sarsat distress alerts to national authorities through the Cospas-Sarsat ground network.

“Galileo SAR is one of five Galileo services and is among the three initial services that were declared by the Commission in December 2016. Galileo will be the first full constellation with SAR capability,” GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides said at the meeting.

Watch this: Galileo Search and Rescue (SAR) Service

“The GSA is actively supporting beacon manufacturers in implementing Galileo differentiators into their new products and is proud to have Galileo-enabled beacons in the market as a result of our collaboration with leading EU manufacturers,” des Dorides said, adding that the GSA is also leveraging EU GNSS R&D programmes to contribute to Cospas-Sarsat priorities.

 

Cospas-Sarsat

The Cospas-Sarsat system detects and locates emergency beacons activated by aircraft, ships and people engaged in recreational activities in remote areas, and then sends these distress alerts to search-and-rescue authorities. The system utilises a network of satellites that provides coverage anywhere on Earth. Distress alerts are detected, located and forwarded to over 200 countries and territories at no cost to beacon owners or the receiving government agencies.

Between September 1982 and December 2016, the Cospas-Sarsat system provided assistance in rescuing at least 43,807 people in 12,664 SAR events. On average, six lives are saved every day with the assistance of Cospas-Sarsat.

Cospas-Sarsat delegates met at the GSA’s Prague headquarters from 5-11 June 2018, to discuss the evolution of the Medium-Altitude Earth Orbit Search and Rescue (MEOSAR) system

Cospas-Sarsat delegates met at the GSA’s Prague headquarters from 5-11 June 2018, to discuss the evolution of the Medium-Altitude Earth Orbit Search and Rescue (MEOSAR) system

And this: MEOSAR Intro

MEOSAR system

In 2004, Cospas-Sarsat initiated the development of the Medium-altitude Earth Orbiting Satellite System for Search and Rescue (MEOSAR system), with SAR repeaters placed on the GNSS satellites of Europe, Russia and the USA. Early operational capability data from the MEOSAR system has been available since December 2016. MEOSAR will initially complement the existing low-altitude LEOSAR and geostationary GEOSAR systems. The MEOSAR system will eventually replace LEOSAR to become the primary Cospas-Sarsat system.

For more information on Cospas-Sarsat, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides opening the Cospas-Sarsat meeting.

GSA hosts Cospas-Sarsat meeting

14.6.2018 8:21  
Published: 
14 June 2018

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) hosted Cospas-Sarsat participants at its Prague headquarters on 5-11 June 2018, at a meeting to address matters related to the evolution of the Medium-Altitude Earth Orbit Search and Rescue (MEOSAR) system.

At the meeting, the Cospas-Sarsat participants focused on developing the final operational and technical steps required for the declaration of MEOSAR Initial Operational Capability (IOC), planned for 2019. By holding this meeting at the GSA headquarters in Prague, the European Commission underlined the key contribution of the SAR/Galileo service to the MEOSAR system, paving the way towards its full operational capability.

Galileo a key component

The Galileo SAR service is a fundamental European contribution to the Cospas-Sarsat International Programme, thanks to the SAR/Galileo repeaters and ground segment equipment that relay Cospas-Sarsat distress alerts to national authorities through the Cospas-Sarsat ground network.

“Galileo SAR is one of five Galileo services and is among the three initial services that were declared by the Commission in December 2016. Galileo will be the first full constellation with SAR capability,” GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides said at the meeting.

Watch this: Galileo Search and Rescue (SAR) Service

“The GSA is actively supporting beacon manufacturers in implementing Galileo differentiators into their new products and is proud to have Galileo-enabled beacons in the market as a result of our collaboration with leading EU manufacturers,” des Dorides said, adding that the GSA is also leveraging EU GNSS R&D programmes to contribute to Cospas-Sarsat priorities.

 

Cospas-Sarsat

The Cospas-Sarsat system detects and locates emergency beacons activated by aircraft, ships and people engaged in recreational activities in remote areas, and then sends these distress alerts to search-and-rescue authorities. The system utilises a network of satellites that provides coverage anywhere on Earth. Distress alerts are detected, located and forwarded to over 200 countries and territories at no cost to beacon owners or the receiving government agencies.

Between September 1982 and December 2016, the Cospas-Sarsat system provided assistance in rescuing at least 43,807 people in 12,664 SAR events. On average, six lives are saved every day with the assistance of Cospas-Sarsat.

Cospas-Sarsat delegates met at the GSA’s Prague headquarters from 5-11 June 2018, to discuss the evolution of the Medium-Altitude Earth Orbit Search and Rescue (MEOSAR) system

Cospas-Sarsat delegates met at the GSA’s Prague headquarters from 5-11 June 2018, to discuss the evolution of the Medium-Altitude Earth Orbit Search and Rescue (MEOSAR) system

And this: MEOSAR Intro

MEOSAR system

In 2004, Cospas-Sarsat initiated the development of the Medium-altitude Earth Orbiting Satellite System for Search and Rescue (MEOSAR system), with SAR repeaters placed on the GNSS satellites of Europe, Russia and the USA. Early operational capability data from the MEOSAR system has been available since December 2016. MEOSAR will initially complement the existing low-altitude LEOSAR and geostationary GEOSAR systems. The MEOSAR system will eventually replace LEOSAR to become the primary Cospas-Sarsat system.

For more information on Cospas-Sarsat, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides opening the Cospas-Sarsat meeting.

European Space Week 2018: Make space in your calendar

12.6.2018 14:16  
Published: 
12 June 2018

Mark your calendar for European Space Week 2018, and don’t miss out on the leading European space programmes conference, connecting business, policy-makers, international experts and space application user communities, which will take place in Marseille, France, on 3-6 December 2018.

Beginning with the EGNSS Users Consultation Platform, Copernicus Accelerator and the Galileo Accelerator, EU Space Week will combine several events in a week, in an attempt to respond to the needs of EU space programme users. The event will address how Europe is using space to tackle challenges in areas such as sustainable development, mobility, defence, economic development and the environment.

At a plenary session, participants will learn more about the state of the art of Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus, with input from keynote speakers and high-level officials. This will also be an opportunity to learn about the latest status of the EU space programmes. Other sessions dedicated to Smart Cities, sustainable land management, interconnectivity, infrastructure and marine and maritime issues will examine how European businesses, entrepreneurs and small and medium-sized companies (SMEs) are already using EU space technologies and can harness the power of space technology to build the innovative applications and services needed in these areas.

Linking space to user needs

On Tuesday 4 December, the awards ceremony for the European Satellite Navigation Competition (ESNC), known as the “Galileo Masters” and the Copernicus Masters, will take place. This competition was officially launched during the recent inauguration of the Galileo Reference Centre in Noordwijk, the Netherlands.

Registration for European Space Week has not yet opened, but you can sign up now, and receive notification when registration opens.

For updates, check the event portal regularly.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

European Space Week connects business, policy-makers, international experts and space application user communities

Taking the pulse of GNSS Raw measurements

11.6.2018 10:02  
Published: 
11 June 2018

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) hosted the GNSS Raw Measurements Taskforce workshop “GNSS Raw Measurements: From research to commercial use” on May 30, to share and explore experiences, use cases and opportunities enabled by Android GNSS Raw measurements.

The workshop was attended by over 80 participants from industry and from the academic and research communities and included over 20 presentations and two demonstrations by GEO++ and Spirent. The participants shared their experience with Android raw measurements in three exciting domains: high accuracy applications; scientific, educational and robustness applications; and applications for testing and optimisation.

Promising results arising from the use of raw measurements were presented, both involving the use of raw data for high accuracy techniques and for testing a constellation or combination of constellations. The workshop also took a look into the future, in a session on the outlook for geolocation in the mass market, where participants discussed the increased accuracy, availability and robustness that Galileo will contribute.

Frank van Diggelen, principal software engineer at Google provided a keynote presentation on Android GNSS measurements along with a vision for advanced location services. He spoke in particular about the new Android features to be enabled with new APIs (application programming interfaces) and enhancements of GNSSLogger, Google`s raw measurements analysis tool.

Dual frequency opportunities

Broadcom’s Miguel Torroja stressed how dual frequency will change performance levels in the mass market. “Until today, mass market devices have been single frequency only, but the industry is now moving towards dual frequency, with a resulting increase in accuracy in open environments and more robustness to multipath in urban scenarios,” he said.

Read this: World’s first dual-frequency GNSS smartphone hits the market

Highlighting the role of Galileo within the use of GNSS raw measurements, Airbus’ Moises Navarro Gallardo, said that by including Galileo in the position, velocity and time (PVT) solution through the use of raw measurements, users will easily experience the added accuracy and availability that Galileo provides.

New horizons with Galileo

GSA’s Fiammetta Diani provided a status update on Galileo along with an overview of new services to expect in the near future – specifically high accuracy and authentication.

“Open signal navigation message authentication will help mitigate the vulnerabilities of GNSS and is a clear differentiator of Galileo with respect to other GNSS available to the public,” she said. As regards high accuracy, she said that this would be based on Precise Point Positioning via Galileo E6 without the need for an additional communication channel. This will be gradually implemented between 2018 and 2020.

In particular, three key additions to the integrity navigation (I/NAV) message for OS users on E1B will further increase compliance with the relevant 3GPP standard.

According to GSA’s Flavio Sbardellati: “Reduced clock and ephemeris data (redCED) will enable the computation of coarse position in a faster time to first fix, while secondary synchronisation pattern (SSP) will strengthen synchronisation with mobile networks.” Sbardellati added that additional forward error correction (FEC2) would improve data tracking in difficult environments.

The presentations from the workshop can be downloaded here.

About the GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force

Launched in June 2017 and coordinated by the European GNSS Agency (GSA), the GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force aims to share knowledge and expertise on Android raw measurements and their use, including their potential for high accuracy positioning techniques relevant to mass market applications. The Task Force includes GNSS experts, scientists and market players, all of whom are dedicated to promoting a wider use of these raw measurements.

More information on the Task Force, its members and their work can be found here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Frank van Diggelen from Google explaining the new features (comparison of raw and smoothed pseudoranges) of the GNSSLogger tool

Taking the pulse of GNSS Raw measurements

11.6.2018 10:02  
Published: 
11 June 2018

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) hosted the GNSS Raw Measurements Taskforce workshop “GNSS Raw Measurements: From research to commercial use” on May 30, to share and explore experiences, use cases and opportunities enabled by Android GNSS Raw measurements.

The workshop was attended by over 80 participants from industry and from the academic and research communities and included over 20 presentations and two demonstrations by GEO++ and Spirent. The participants shared their experience with Android raw measurements in three exciting domains: high accuracy applications; scientific, educational and robustness applications; and applications for testing and optimisation.

Promising results arising from the use of raw measurements were presented, both involving the use of raw data for high accuracy techniques and for testing a constellation or combination of constellations. The workshop also took a look into the future, in a session on the outlook for geolocation in the mass market, where participants discussed the increased accuracy, availability and robustness that Galileo will contribute.

Frank van Diggelen, principal software engineer at Google provided a keynote presentation on Android GNSS measurements along with a vision for advanced location services. He spoke in particular about the new Android features to be enabled with new APIs (application programming interfaces) and enhancements of GNSSLogger, Google`s raw measurements analysis tool.

Dual frequency opportunities

Broadcom’s Miguel Torroja stressed how dual frequency will change performance levels in the mass market. “Until today, mass market devices have been single frequency only, but the industry is now moving towards dual frequency, with a resulting increase in accuracy in open environments and more robustness to multipath in urban scenarios,” he said.

Read this: World’s first dual-frequency GNSS smartphone hits the market

Highlighting the role of Galileo within the use of GNSS raw measurements, Airbus’ Moises Navarro Gallardo, said that by including Galileo in the position, velocity and time (PVT) solution through the use of raw measurements, users will easily experience the added accuracy and availability that Galileo provides.

New horizons with Galileo

GSA’s Fiammetta Diani provided a status update on Galileo along with an overview of new services to expect in the near future – specifically high accuracy and authentication.

“Open signal navigation message authentication will help mitigate the vulnerabilities of GNSS and is a clear differentiator of Galileo with respect to other GNSS available to the public,” she said. As regards high accuracy, she said that this would be based on Precise Point Positioning via Galileo E6 without the need for an additional communication channel. This will be gradually implemented between 2018 and 2020.

In particular, three key additions to the integrity navigation (I/NAV) message for OS users on E1B will further increase compliance with the relevant 3GPP standard.

According to GSA’s Flavio Sbardellati: “Reduced clock and ephemeris data (redCED) will enable the computation of coarse position in a faster time to first fix, while secondary synchronisation pattern (SSP) will strengthen synchronisation with mobile networks.” Sbardellati added that additional forward error correction (FEC2) would improve data tracking in difficult environments.

The presentations from the workshop can be downloaded here.

About the GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force

Launched in June 2017 and coordinated by the European GNSS Agency (GSA), the GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force aims to share knowledge and expertise on Android raw measurements and their use, including their potential for high accuracy positioning techniques relevant to mass market applications. The Task Force includes GNSS experts, scientists and market players, all of whom are dedicated to promoting a wider use of these raw measurements.

More information on the Task Force, its members and their work can be found here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Frank van Diggelen from Google explaining the new features (comparison of raw and smoothed pseudoranges) of the GNSSLogger tool

GSA and ESNC – a decade of partnership in innovation

8.6.2018 11:44  
Published: 
08 June 2018

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is celebrating 10 years of association with the European Satellite Navigation Competition, looking back on a fruitful alliance and looking forward to this year's batch of Competition entrants.

The 2018 edition of the European Satellite Navigation Competition (ESNC) will see the GSA awarding first-place, second-place and third-place cash prizes on the special topic 'When and Where? – Exact timing and positioning matters'. Judges are expected to be particularly attentive to proposals that leverage specific EGNSS differentiators, such as:

  • Multiple frequencies E1, E5 and E6
  • Galileo-specific signal modulation, e.g. AltBOC
  • Galileo Search and Rescue Service
  • Galileo High-Precision and Authentication services, i.e. within the Commercial Service and within the Open Service Authentication (OS NMA)

The first prize winner will also benefit from extensive promotion through GSA marketing channels and at relevant industry events. If eligible, the first prize winner will also receive tailored EGNSS Accelerator business support worth €62,000.

A winning record

As part of its primary mission, the GSA has helped to foster countless innovations, revealing unexpected trends in the burgeoning downstream satellite navigation market. And, for the past 10 years, the ESNC has been a big part of that effort. Under the banner of its GSA ESNC Special Topic Prizes, the Agency has received 811 complete submissions, more than 80 innovative proposals per year, covering new applications across the broad scope of sectors that benefit from Galileo and EGNOS. Among the brand-new and developing fields already addressed by previous participants are:

  • Augmented Reality (AR)
  • Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)
  • e-Mobility
  • Location based services
  • E-Health
  • The Internet of Things (IoT)

Especially outstanding examples of GSA Prize winners include 2010's 'Wikitude Drive', which was also the overall ESNC 2010 winner, representing the first Augmented Reality app in the Competition. Today, this all-in-one AR software development kit for mobile, tablets and smart glasses has been brought to market, is being used in 180 countries and is partnering with Adobe, SAP, Huawei and Porsche.

Another bright light is the 2011 GSA winner, CAT UAV, which put forward the first civilian UAV application in the Competition. It features an innovative traffic collision avoidance system, and the resulting start-up, based in Spain, has since established one of the first drone test and training centers, with a runway and its own segregated airspace.

These and other GSA ESNC prize winners continue to solidify the Competition's role as a positive driver for new, useful and economically viable GNSS applications.

In addition to the GSA Special Topic prize, the has GSA triggered the University Challenge, bridging the gap from GNSS research and academia to entrepreneurship, and the GNSS Living Lab Prize, supporting innovative testing of GNSS-related products.

To submit an entry in this year's ESNC, you should first register here.

 

       GSA ESNC Winners by year

       (click on the project titles for more information)

 

    The European Satellite Navigation Completion (ESNC), or the Galileo Masters, is an international competition organized by Anwendungszentrum GmbH Oberpfaffenhofen (AZO), and supported by the GSA, among others.
    Regional challenges are hosted by local partners from all over the world and special prizes are awarded by a select group of GNSS stakeholders. The overall winner is chosen from among all the regional and special prize winners by an international panel of experts.

    Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

    The GSA-ENSC partnership has helped to foster countless innovations and reveal unexpected trends in the satellite navigation market

    GSA and ESNC – a decade of partnership in innovation

    8.6.2018 11:44  
    Published: 
    08 June 2018

    The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is celebrating 10 years of association with the European Satellite Navigation Competition, looking back on a fruitful alliance and looking forward to this year's batch of Competition entrants.

    The 2018 edition of the European Satellite Navigation Competition (ESNC) will see the GSA awarding first-place, second-place and third-place cash prizes on the special topic 'When and Where? – Exact timing and positioning matters'. Judges are expected to be particularly attentive to proposals that leverage specific EGNSS differentiators, such as:

    • Multiple frequencies E1, E5 and E6
    • Galileo-specific signal modulation, e.g. AltBOC
    • Galileo Search and Rescue Service
    • Galileo High-Precision and Authentication services, i.e. within the Commercial Service and within the Open Service Authentication (OS NMA)

    The first prize winner will also benefit from extensive promotion through GSA marketing channels and at relevant industry events. If eligible, the first prize winner will also receive tailored EGNSS Accelerator business support worth €62,000.

    A winning record

    As part of its primary mission, the GSA has helped to foster countless innovations, revealing unexpected trends in the burgeoning downstream satellite navigation market. And, for the past 10 years, the ESNC has been a big part of that effort. Under the banner of its GSA ESNC Special Topic Prizes, the Agency has received 811 complete submissions, more than 80 innovative proposals per year, covering new applications across the broad scope of sectors that benefit from Galileo and EGNOS. Among the brand-new and developing fields already addressed by previous participants are:

    • Augmented Reality (AR)
    • Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)
    • e-Mobility
    • Location based services
    • E-Health
    • The Internet of Things (IoT)

    Especially outstanding examples of GSA Prize winners include 2010's 'Wikitude Drive', which was also the overall ESNC 2010 winner, representing the first Augmented Reality app in the Competition. Today, this all-in-one AR software development kit for mobile, tablets and smart glasses has been brought to market, is being used in 180 countries and is partnering with Adobe, SAP, Huawei and Porsche.

    Another bright light is the 2011 GSA winner, CAT UAV, which put forward the first civilian UAV application in the Competition. It features an innovative traffic collision avoidance system, and the resulting start-up, based in Spain, has since established one of the first drone test and training centers, with a runway and its own segregated airspace.

    These and other GSA ESNC prize winners continue to solidify the Competition's role as a positive driver for new, useful and economically viable GNSS applications.

    In addition to the GSA Special Topic prize, the has GSA triggered the University Challenge, bridging the gap from GNSS research and academia to entrepreneurship, and the GNSS Living Lab Prize, supporting innovative testing of GNSS-related products.

    To submit an entry in this year's ESNC, you should first register here.

     

           GSA ESNC Winners by year

           (click on the project titles for more information)

     

      The European Satellite Navigation Completion (ESNC), or the Galileo Masters, is an international competition organized by Anwendungszentrum GmbH Oberpfaffenhofen (AZO), and supported by the GSA, among others.
      Regional challenges are hosted by local partners from all over the world and special prizes are awarded by a select group of GNSS stakeholders. The overall winner is chosen from among all the regional and special prize winners by an international panel of experts.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      The GSA-ENSC partnership has helped to foster countless innovations and reveal unexpected trends in the satellite navigation market

      GSA and ESNC – a decade of partnership in innovation

      8.6.2018 11:44  
      Published: 
      08 June 2018

      The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is celebrating 10 years of association with the European Satellite Navigation Competition, looking back on a fruitful alliance and looking forward to this year's batch of Competition entrants.

      The 2018 edition of the European Satellite Navigation Competition (ESNC) will see the GSA awarding first-place, second-place and third-place cash prizes on the special topic 'When and Where? – Exact timing and positioning matters'. Judges are expected to be particularly attentive to proposals that leverage specific EGNSS differentiators, such as:

      • Multiple frequencies E1, E5 and E6
      • Galileo-specific signal modulation, e.g. AltBOC
      • Galileo Search and Rescue Service
      • Galileo High-Precision and Authentication services, i.e. within the Commercial Service and within the Open Service Authentication (OS NMA)

      The first prize winner will also benefit from extensive promotion through GSA marketing channels and at relevant industry events. If eligible, the first prize winner will also receive tailored EGNSS Accelerator business support worth €62,000.

      A winning record

      As part of its primary mission, the GSA has helped to foster countless innovations, revealing unexpected trends in the burgeoning downstream satellite navigation market. And, for the past 10 years, the ESNC has been a big part of that effort. Under the banner of its GSA ESNC Special Topic Prizes, the Agency has received 811 complete submissions, more than 80 innovative proposals per year, covering new applications across the broad scope of sectors that benefit from Galileo and EGNOS. Among the brand-new and developing fields already addressed by previous participants are:

      • Augmented Reality (AR)
      • Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)
      • e-Mobility
      • Location based services
      • E-Health
      • The Internet of Things (IoT)

      Especially outstanding examples of GSA Prize winners include 2010's 'Wikitude Drive', which was also the overall ESNC 2010 winner, representing the first Augmented Reality app in the Competition. Today, this all-in-one AR software development kit for mobile, tablets and smart glasses has been brought to market, is being used in 180 countries and is partnering with Adobe, SAP, Huawei and Porsche.

      Another bright light is the 2011 GSA winner, CAT UAV, which put forward the first civilian UAV application in the Competition. It features an innovative traffic collision avoidance system, and the resulting start-up, based in Spain, has since established one of the first drone test and training centers, with a runway and its own segregated airspace.

      These and other GSA ESNC prize winners continue to solidify the Competition's role as a positive driver for new, useful and economically viable GNSS applications.

      In addition to the GSA Special Topic prize, the has GSA triggered the University Challenge, bridging the gap from GNSS research and academia to entrepreneurship, and the GNSS Living Lab Prize, supporting innovative testing of GNSS-related products.

      To submit an entry in this year's ESNC, you should first register here.

       

             GSA ESNC Winners by year

             (click on the project titles for more information)

       

        The European Satellite Navigation Completion (ESNC), or the Galileo Masters, is an international competition organized by Anwendungszentrum GmbH Oberpfaffenhofen (AZO), and supported by the GSA, among others.
        Regional challenges are hosted by local partners from all over the world and special prizes are awarded by a select group of GNSS stakeholders. The overall winner is chosen from among all the regional and special prize winners by an international panel of experts.

        Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

        The GSA-ENSC partnership has helped to foster countless innovations and reveal unexpected trends in the satellite navigation market

        GSA and ESNC – a decade of partnership in innovation

        8.6.2018 11:44  
        Published: 
        08 June 2018

        The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is celebrating 10 years of association with the European Satellite Navigation Competition, looking back on a fruitful alliance and looking forward to this year's batch of Competition entrants.

        The 2018 edition of the European Satellite Navigation Competition (ESNC) will see the GSA awarding first-place, second-place and third-place cash prizes on the special topic 'When and Where? – Exact timing and positioning matters'. Judges are expected to be particularly attentive to proposals that leverage specific EGNSS differentiators, such as:

        • Multiple frequencies E1, E5 and E6
        • Galileo-specific signal modulation, e.g. AltBOC
        • Galileo Search and Rescue Service
        • Galileo High-Precision and Authentication services, i.e. within the Commercial Service and within the Open Service Authentication (OS NMA)

        The first prize winner will also benefit from extensive promotion through GSA marketing channels and at relevant industry events. If eligible, the first prize winner will also receive tailored EGNSS Accelerator business support worth €62,000.

        A winning record

        As part of its primary mission, the GSA has helped to foster countless innovations, revealing unexpected trends in the burgeoning downstream satellite navigation market. And, for the past 10 years, the ESNC has been a big part of that effort. Under the banner of its GSA ESNC Special Topic Prizes, the Agency has received 811 complete submissions, more than 80 innovative proposals per year, covering new applications across the broad scope of sectors that benefit from Galileo and EGNOS. Among the brand-new and developing fields already addressed by previous participants are:

        • Augmented Reality (AR)
        • Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)
        • e-Mobility
        • Location based services
        • E-Health
        • The Internet of Things (IoT)

        Especially outstanding examples of GSA Prize winners include 2010's 'Wikitude Drive', which was also the overall ESNC 2010 winner, representing the first Augmented Reality app in the Competition. Today, this all-in-one AR software development kit for mobile, tablets and smart glasses has been brought to market, is being used in 180 countries and is partnering with Adobe, SAP, Huawei and Porsche.

        Another bright light is the 2011 GSA winner, CAT UAV, which put forward the first civilian UAV application in the Competition. It features an innovative traffic collision avoidance system, and the resulting start-up, based in Spain, has since established one of the first drone test and training centers, with a runway and its own segregated airspace.

        These and other GSA ESNC prize winners continue to solidify the Competition's role as a positive driver for new, useful and economically viable GNSS applications.

        In addition to the GSA Special Topic prize, the has GSA triggered the University Challenge, bridging the gap from GNSS research and academia to entrepreneurship, and the GNSS Living Lab Prize, supporting innovative testing of GNSS-related products.

         

               GSA ESNC Winners by year

               (click on the project titles for more information)

         

        The European Satellite Navigation Completion (ESNC), or the Galileo Masters, is an international competition organized by Anwendungszentrum GmbH Oberpfaffenhofen (AZO), and supported by the GSA, among others.
        Regional challenges are hosted by local partners from all over the world and special prizes are awarded by a select group of GNSS stakeholders. The overall winner is chosen from among all the regional and special prize winners by an international panel of experts.

        Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

        The GSA-ENSC partnership has helped to foster countless innovations and reveal unexpected trends in the satellite navigation market

        GSA and ESNC – a decade of partnership in innovation

        8.6.2018 11:44  
        Published: 
        08 June 2018

        The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is celebrating 10 years of association with the European Satellite Navigation Competition, looking back on a fruitful alliance and looking forward to this year's batch of Competition entrants.

        The 2018 edition of the European Satellite Navigation Competition (ESNC) will see the GSA awarding first-place, second-place and third-place cash prizes on the special topic 'When and Where? – Exact timing and positioning matters'. Judges are expected to be particularly attentive to proposals that leverage specific EGNSS differentiators, such as:

        • Multiple frequencies E1, E5 and E6
        • Galileo-specific signal modulation, e.g. AltBOC
        • Galileo Search and Rescue Service
        • Galileo High-Precision and Authentication services, i.e. within the Commercial Service and within the Open Service Authentication (OS NMA)

        The first prize winner will also benefit from extensive promotion through GSA marketing channels and at relevant industry events. If eligible, the first prize winner will also receive tailored EGNSS Accelerator business support worth €62,000.

        A winning record

        As part of its primary mission, the GSA has helped to foster countless innovations, revealing unexpected trends in the burgeoning downstream satellite navigation market. And, for the past 10 years, the ESNC has been a big part of that effort. Under the banner of its GSA ESNC Special Topic Prizes, the Agency has received 811 complete submissions, more than 80 innovative proposals per year, covering new applications across the broad scope of sectors that benefit from Galileo and EGNOS. Among the brand-new and developing fields already addressed by previous participants are:

        • Augmented Reality (AR)
        • Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)
        • e-Mobility
        • Location based services
        • E-Health
        • The Internet of Things (IoT)

        Especially outstanding examples of GSA Prize winners include 2010's 'Wikitude Drive', which was also the overall ESNC 2010 winner, representing the first Augmented Reality app in the Competition. Today, this all-in-one AR software development kit for mobile, tablets and smart glasses has been brought to market, is being used in 180 countries and is partnering with Adobe, SAP, Huawei and Porsche.

        Another bright light is the 2011 GSA winner, CAT UAV, which put forward the first civilian UAV application in the Competition. It features an innovative traffic collision avoidance system, and the resulting start-up, based in Spain, has since established one of the first drone test and training centers, with a runway and its own segregated airspace.

        These and other GSA ESNC prize winners continue to solidify the Competition's role as a positive driver for new, useful and economically viable GNSS applications.

        In addition to the GSA Special Topic prize, the has GSA triggered the University Challenge, bridging the gap from GNSS research and academia to entrepreneurship, and the GNSS Living Lab Prize, supporting innovative testing of GNSS-related products.

         

               GSA ESNC Winners by year

               (click on the project titles for more information)

         

          The European Satellite Navigation Completion (ESNC), or the Galileo Masters, is an international competition organized by Anwendungszentrum GmbH Oberpfaffenhofen (AZO), and supported by the GSA, among others.
          Regional challenges are hosted by local partners from all over the world and special prizes are awarded by a select group of GNSS stakeholders. The overall winner is chosen from among all the regional and special prize winners by an international panel of experts.

          Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

          The GSA-ENSC partnership has helped to foster countless innovations and reveal unexpected trends in the satellite navigation market

          GSA and ESNC – a decade of partnership in innovation

          8.6.2018 11:44  
          Published: 
          08 June 2018

          The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is celebrating 10 years of association with the European Satellite Navigation Competition, looking back on a fruitful alliance and looking forward to this year's batch of Competition entrants.

          The 2018 edition of the European Satellite Navigation Competition (ESNC) will see the GSA awarding first-place, second-place and third-place cash prizes on the special topic 'When and Where? – Exact timing and positioning matters'. Judges are expected to be particularly attentive to proposals that leverage specific EGNSS differentiators, such as:

          • Multiple frequencies E1, E5 and E6
          • Galileo-specific signal modulation, e.g. AltBOC
          • Galileo Search and Rescue Service
          • Galileo High-Precision and Authentication services, i.e. within the Commercial Service and within the Open Service Authentication (OS NMA)

          The first prize winner will also benefit from extensive promotion through GSA marketing channels and at relevant industry events. If eligible, the first prize winner will also receive tailored EGNSS Accelerator business support worth €62,000.

          A winning record

          As part of its primary mission, the GSA has helped to foster countless innovations, revealing unexpected trends in the burgeoning downstream satellite navigation market. And, for the past 10 years, the ESNC has been a big part of that effort. Under the banner of its GSA ESNC Special Topic Prizes, the Agency has received 811 complete submissions, more than 80 innovative proposals per year, covering new applications across the broad scope of sectors that benefit from Galileo and EGNOS. Among the brand-new and developing fields already addressed by previous participants are:

          • Augmented Reality (AR)
          • Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)
          • e-Mobility
          • Location based services
          • E-Health
          • The Internet of Things (IoT)

          Especially outstanding examples of GSA Prize winners include 2010's 'Wikitude Drive', which was also the overall ESNC 2010 winner, representing the first Augmented Reality app in the Competition. Today, this all-in-one AR software development kit for mobile, tablets and smart glasses has been brought to market, is being used in 180 countries and is partnering with Adobe, SAP, Huawei and Porsche.

          Another bright light is the 2011 GSA winner, CAT UAV, which put forward the first civilian UAV application in the Competition. It features an innovative traffic collision avoidance system, and the resulting start-up, based in Spain, has since established one of the first drone test and training centers, with a runway and its own segregated airspace.

          These and other GSA ESNC prize winners continue to solidify the Competition's role as a positive driver for new, useful and economically viable GNSS applications.

          In addition to the GSA Special Topic prize, the has GSA triggered the University Challenge, bridging the gap from GNSS research and academia to entrepreneurship, and the GNSS Living Lab Prize, supporting innovative testing of GNSS-related products.

           

                 GSA ESNC Winners by year

                 (click on the project titles for more information)

           

            The European Satellite Navigation Completion (ESNC), or the Galileo Masters, is an international competition organized by Anwendungszentrum GmbH Oberpfaffenhofen (AZO), and supported by the GSA, among others.
            Regional challenges are hosted by local partners from all over the world and special prizes are awarded by a select group of GNSS stakeholders. The overall winner is chosen from among all the regional and special prize winners by an international panel of experts.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            The GSA-ENSC partnership has helped to foster countless innovations and reveal unexpected trends in the satellite navigation market

            GSA pays tribute to Per Tegnér

            7.6.2018 10:58  
            Published: 
            07 June 2018

            The European GNSS Agency (GSA) joins with the European space community in paying tribute to Per Tegnér, former chair of the GSA Administrative Board.

            Per was born in Stockholm, Sweden, on 22 April 1944. He studied at the Stockholm School of Economics, where he obtained his Master’s Degree in Economics. After working for more than 25 years with the Swedish Ministry of Industry, he was appointed Director General of the Swedish National Space Board (now the Swedish National Space Agency) in 1998, a position he held until 2009.

            Per joined the GSA Administrative Board in 2006 and served as chair from November 2008 to June 2011, which was a pivotal time for the Agency. While serving as chair of the Administrative Board, he appointed Carlo des Dorides as the Agency’s executive director.

            “With his vast experience, Per made a valuable contribution to the European GNSS Agency, bringing clear vision and strong leadership during its formative years. He was a key partner when I took over the position of executive director of the GSA, guiding me along the path the Agency needed to take. I’ll bring with me his gentle smile which was often more meaningful than many words. He will be sadly missed by all the GSA family,” des Dorides said.

            “Per served as an inspiration to those who followed in his footsteps, thanks to his dedication and experience. The space community has lost a valued colleague and dear friend,” said current GSA Administrative Board Chair Jean-Yves Le Gall.

            “In his role as Chair of the GSA Administrative Board Per Tegnér made a big contribution to making the two European flagship programmes EGNOS and Galileo work. He was a very kind man with an excellent ability to foster consensus even between the most diverging points of view. Per was an inspiration and a role model for me when I took over the post of Chair from him,” noted Sabine Dannelke, his successor in the role of AB Chair

            Before joining the GSA, Per became a European Space Agency (ESA) Council delegate in June 1998, and then served as ESA Council chair from 2002 to 2005. He later served as vice-chair for two more years before returning as acting Council chair from 2007 to 2008.

            Per will be sadly missed by all those who worked with him at the GSA.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            Per Tegner, 1944-2018

            GSA pays tribute to Per Tegnér

            7.6.2018 10:58  
            Published: 
            07 June 2018

            The European GNSS Agency (GSA) joins with the European space community in paying tribute to Per Tegnér, former chair of the GSA Administrative Board.

            Per was born in Stockholm, Sweden, on 22 April 1944. He studied at the Stockholm School of Economics, where he obtained his Master’s Degree in Economics. After working for more than 25 years with the Swedish Ministry of Industry, he was appointed Director General of the Swedish National Space Board (now the Swedish National Space Agency) in 1998, a position he held until 2009.

            Per joined the GSA Administrative Board in 2006 and served as chair from November 2008 to June 2011, which was a pivotal time for the Agency. While serving as chair of the Administrative Board, he appointed Carlo des Dorides as the Agency’s executive director.

            “With his vast experience, Per made a valuable contribution to the European GNSS Agency, bringing clear vision and strong leadership during its formative years. He was a key partner when I took over the position of executive director of the GSA, guiding me along the path the Agency needed to take. I’ll bring with me his gentle smile which was often more meaningful than many words. He will be sadly missed by all the GSA family,” des Dorides said.

            “Per served as an inspiration to those who followed in his footsteps, thanks to his dedication and experience. The space community has lost a valued colleague and dear friend,” said current GSA Administrative Board Chair Jean-Yves Le Gall.

            “In his role as Chair of the GSA Administrative Board Per Tegnér made a big contribution to making the two European flagship programmes EGNOS and Galileo work. He was a very kind man with an excellent ability to foster consensus even between the most diverging points of view. Per was an inspiration and a role model for me when I took over the post of Chair from him,” noted Sabine Dannelke, his successor in the role of AB Chair

            Before joining the GSA, Per became a European Space Agency (ESA) Council delegate in June 1998, and then served as ESA Council chair from 2002 to 2005. He later served as vice-chair for two more years before returning as acting Council chair from 2007 to 2008.

            Per will be sadly missed by all those who worked with him at the GSA.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            Per Tegner, 1944-2018

            GSA pays tribute to Per Tegnér

            7.6.2018 10:58  
            Published: 
            07 June 2018

            The European GNSS Agency (GSA) joins with the European space community in paying tribute to Per Tegnér, former chair of the GSA Administrative Board.

            Per was born in Stockholm, Sweden, on 22 April 1944. He studied at the Stockholm School of Economics, where he obtained his Master’s Degree in Economics. After working for more than 25 years with the Swedish Ministry of Industry, he was appointed Director General of the Swedish National Space Board (now the Swedish National Space Agency) in 1998, a position he held until 2009.

            Per joined the GSA Administrative Board in 2006 and served as chair from November 2008 to June 2011, which was a pivotal time for the Agency. While serving as chair of the Administrative Board, he appointed Carlo des Dorides as the Agency’s executive director.

            “With his vast experience, Per made a valuable contribution to the European GNSS Agency, bringing clear vision and strong leadership during its formative years. He was a key partner when I took over the position of executive director of the GSA, guiding me along the path the Agency needed to take. I’ll bring with me his gentle smile which was often more meaningful than many words. He will be sadly missed by all the GSA family,” des Dorides said.

            “Per served as an inspiration to those who followed in his footsteps, thanks to his dedication and experience. The space community has lost a valued colleague and dear friend,” said current GSA Administrative Board Chair Jean-Yves Le Gall.

            “In his role as Chair of the GSA Administrative Board Per Tegnér made a big contribution to making the two European flagship programmes EGNOS and Galileo work. He was a very kind man with an excellent ability to foster consensus even between the most diverging points of view. Per was an inspiration and a role model for me when I took over the post of Chair from him,” noted Sabine Dannelke, his successor in the role of AB Chair

            Before joining the GSA, Per became a European Space Agency (ESA) Council delegate in June 1998, and then served as ESA Council chair from 2002 to 2005. He later served as vice-chair for two more years before returning as acting Council chair from 2007 to 2008.

            Per will be sadly missed by all those who worked with him at the GSA.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            Per Tegner, 1944-2018

            EGNOS geostationary navigation payload services – Request for Information

            6.6.2018 10:57  
            Published: 
            06 June 2018

            The European GNSS Agency (GSA) has issued a Request for Information (RFI) in preparation for the procurement of EGNOS geostationary navigation payload services: GEO-4 and GEO-5.

            The EGNOS space segment is provided by commercial satellite operators on the basis of service contracts. The GEO-1, GEO-2 and GEO-3 service contracts currently cover the EGNOS space segment needs and the GEO-1 and GEO-2 services will be the first of these to end. These will be replaced by GEO-4 and GEO-5 - the subject of this RFI.

            The GSA is already planning how it will replace the services currently delivered by the GEO-1 and GEO-2 satellites. Ahead of this procurement, the Agency is conducting a preliminary market analysis and issuing an RFI to collect information about opportunities to embark navigation payloads on-board GEO satellites launched in a suitable timeframe. 

            Best procurement approach

            The results of the RFI will be used to decide on the best approach for the procurement of the payload services, which may be either procured at the same time or separately. The RFI will also help the GSA to define the tender specifications and decide on the most appropriate time to launch Invitation(s) to Tender. 

            With the RFI, the GSA aims to obtain information from owners of geostationary satellites that will be available for operational service from 2021 to 2027 and able to embark a navigation payload. Specifically, it is seeking information on future satellite plans and the possibility to embark SBAS payload(s) in due time to ensure an operational start date from 2021 to 2027. 

            Information requested

            Other information requested includes information on service availability and long-term payload reliability; the process for EGNOS payload procurement, in orbit testing and commissioning; information on the locations of the potential hosting sites for the EGNOS radio frequency uplink stations; and, finally, information on contractual arrangements, the payment scheme, and cost estimates.

            This information will help the Agency understand what parameters influence the service provided and, based on these, to shape the potential procurement of EGNOS navigation payload services.

            In preparing their answers, participants should take into account that the scope of the service will comprise provision of the EGNOS GEO-4 and/or GEO-5 payload service, provision of two independent uplink stations located on the territory of the European Union; and a target service provision phase of 15 years starting from the operational qualification or Operational Start Date (OSD). 

            Answers to the RFI should be sent electronically to tenders@gsa.europa.eu by 31 August 2018, at the latest.

            For more information, check here

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            The results of the RFI will be used to decide on the best approach for the procurement of the EGNOS payload services.

            EGNOS geostationary navigation payload services – Request for Information

            6.6.2018 10:57  
            Published: 
            06 June 2018

            The European GNSS Agency (GSA) has issued a Request for Information (RFI) in preparation for the procurement of EGNOS geostationary navigation payload services: GEO-4 and GEO-5.

            The EGNOS space segment is provided by commercial satellite operators on the basis of service contracts. The GEO-1, GEO-2 and GEO-3 service contracts currently cover the EGNOS space segment needs and the GEO-1 and GEO-2 services will be the first of these to end. These will be replaced by GEO-4 and GEO-5 - the subject of this RFI.

            The GSA is already planning how it will replace the services currently delivered by the GEO-1 and GEO-2 satellites. Ahead of this procurement, the Agency is conducting a preliminary market analysis and issuing an RFI to collect information about opportunities to embark navigation payloads on-board GEO satellites launched in a suitable timeframe. 

            Best procurement approach

            The results of the RFI will be used to decide on the best approach for the procurement of the payload services, which may be either procured at the same time or separately. The RFI will also help the GSA to define the tender specifications and decide on the most appropriate time to launch Invitation(s) to Tender. 

            With the RFI, the GSA aims to obtain information from owners of geostationary satellites that will be available for operational service from 2021 to 2027 and able to embark a navigation payload. Specifically, it is seeking information on future satellite plans and the possibility to embark SBAS payload(s) in due time to ensure an operational start date from 2021 to 2027. 

            Information requested

            Other information requested includes information on service availability and long-term payload reliability; the process for EGNOS payload procurement, in orbit testing and commissioning; information on the locations of the potential hosting sites for the EGNOS radio frequency uplink stations; and, finally, information on contractual arrangements, the payment scheme, and cost estimates.

            This information will help the Agency understand what parameters influence the service provided and, based on these, to shape the potential procurement of EGNOS navigation payload services.

            In preparing their answers, participants should take into account that the scope of the service will comprise provision of the EGNOS GEO-4 and/or GEO-5 payload service, provision of two independent uplink stations located on the territory of the European Union; and a target service provision phase of 15 years starting from the operational qualification or Operational Start Date (OSD). 

            Answers to the RFI should be sent electronically to tenders@gsa.europa.eu by 31 August 2018, at the latest.

            For more information, check here

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            The results of the RFI will be used to decide on the best approach for the procurement of the EGNOS payload services.

            EGNOS geostationary navigation payload services – Request for Information

            6.6.2018 10:57  
            Published: 
            06 June 2018

            The European GNSS Agency (GSA) has issued a Request for Information (RFI) in preparation for the procurement of EGNOS geostationary navigation payload services: GEO-4 and GEO-5.

            The EGNOS space segment is provided by commercial satellite operators on the basis of service contracts. The GEO-1, GEO-2 and GEO-3 service contracts currently cover the EGNOS space segment needs and the GEO-1 and GEO-2 services will be the first of these to end. These will be replaced by GEO-4 and GEO-5 - the subject of this RFI.

            The GSA is already planning how it will replace the services currently delivered by the GEO-1 and GEO-2 satellites. Ahead of this procurement, the Agency is conducting a preliminary market analysis and issuing an RFI to collect information about opportunities to embark navigation payloads on-board GEO satellites launched in a suitable timeframe. 

            Best procurement approach

            The results of the RFI will be used to decide on the best approach for the procurement of the payload services, which may be either procured at the same time or separately. The RFI will also help the GSA to define the tender specifications and decide on the most appropriate time to launch Invitation(s) to Tender. 

            With the RFI, the GSA aims to obtain information from owners of geostationary satellites that will be available for operational service from 2021 to 2027 and able to embark a navigation payload. Specifically, it is seeking information on future satellite plans and the possibility to embark SBAS payload(s) in due time to ensure an operational start date from 2021 to 2027. 

            Information requested

            Other information requested includes information on service availability and long-term payload reliability; the process for EGNOS payload procurement, in orbit testing and commissioning; information on the locations of the potential hosting sites for the EGNOS radio frequency uplink stations; and, finally, information on contractual arrangements, the payment scheme, and cost estimates.

            This information will help the Agency understand what parameters influence the service provided and, based on these, to shape the potential procurement of EGNOS navigation payload services.

            In preparing their answers, participants should take into account that the scope of the service will comprise provision of the EGNOS GEO-4 and/or GEO-5 payload service, provision of two independent uplink stations located on the territory of the European Union; and a target service provision phase of 15 years starting from the operational qualification or Operational Start Date (OSD). 

            Answers to the RFI should be sent electronically to tenders@gsa.europa.eu by 31 August 2018, at the latest.

            For more information, check here

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            The results of the RFI will be used to decide on the best approach for the procurement of the EGNOS payload services.

            EGNOS geostationary navigation payload services – Request for Information

            6.6.2018 10:57  
            Published: 
            06 June 2018

            The European GNSS Agency (GSA) has issued a Request for Information (RFI) in preparation for the procurement of EGNOS geostationary navigation payload services: GEO-4 and GEO-5.

            The EGNOS space segment is provided by commercial satellite operators on the basis of service contracts. The GEO-1, GEO-2 and GEO-3 service contracts currently cover the EGNOS space segment needs and the GEO-1 and GEO-2 services will be the first of these to end. These will be replaced by GEO-4 and GEO-5 - the subject of this RFI.

            The GSA is already planning how it will replace the services currently delivered by the GEO-1 and GEO-2 satellites. Ahead of this procurement, the Agency is conducting a preliminary market analysis and issuing an RFI to collect information about opportunities to embark navigation payloads on-board GEO satellites launched in a suitable timeframe. 

            Best procurement approach

            The results of the RFI will be used to decide on the best approach for the procurement of the payload services, which may be either procured at the same time or separately. The RFI will also help the GSA to define the tender specifications and decide on the most appropriate time to launch Invitation(s) to Tender. 

            With the RFI, the GSA aims to obtain information from owners of geostationary satellites that will be available for operational service from 2021 to 2027 and able to embark a navigation payload. Specifically, it is seeking information on future satellite plans and the possibility to embark SBAS payload(s) in due time to ensure an operational start date from 2021 to 2027. 

            Information requested

            Other information requested includes information on service availability and long-term payload reliability; the process for EGNOS payload procurement, in orbit testing and commissioning; information on the locations of the potential hosting sites for the EGNOS radio frequency uplink stations; and, finally, information on contractual arrangements, the payment scheme, and cost estimates.

            This information will help the Agency understand what parameters influence the service provided and, based on these, to shape the potential procurement of EGNOS navigation payload services.

            In preparing their answers, participants should take into account that the scope of the service will comprise provision of the EGNOS GEO-4 and/or GEO-5 payload service, provision of two independent uplink stations located on the territory of the European Union; and a target service provision phase of 15 years starting from the operational qualification or Operational Start Date (OSD). 

            Answers to the RFI should be sent electronically to tenders@gsa.europa.eu by 31 August 2018, at the latest.

            For more information, check here

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            The results of the RFI will be used to decide on the best approach for the procurement of the EGNOS payload services.

            World’s first dual-frequency GNSS smartphone hits the market

            4.6.2018 10:31  
            Published: 
            04 June 2018

            Xiaomi - one of the fastest growing mobile brands - has launched the world’s first dual-frequency GNSS smartphone. Fitted with a Broadcom BCM47755 chip, the Xiaomi Mi 8, launched on May 31, is the world’s first smartphone providing up to decimetre-level accuracy for location-based services and vehicle navigation.

            Xiaomi has launched the world’s first dual-frequency GNSS smartphone, the Mi 8. This smartphone represents a breakthrough in GNSS technology as it is the first commercial deployment of Broadcom’s revolutionary BCM47755 chip.

            The BCM47755, introduced last year, is a dual-frequency (E1/L1+E5/L5) GNSS chip that can compute location with an accuracy of up to a few decimetres. Until now, mobile location-based applications have been powered by single frequency GNSS receivers whose location accuracy is limited to a few meters. However, in recent years GNSS systems have been launching satellites broadcasting signals on new frequencies to open up new possibilities. Specifically, Galileo has the majority of satellites with E1/L1 and E5/L5 frequency capabilities.

            Leveraging Galileo for increased accuracy

            Users of the Xiaomi Mi 8 and future models with dual-frequency GNSS will benefit from better positioning and navigation experience in urban environments. This is due to the unique shape of the E5/L5 frequency, which makes it easier to distinguish real signals from the ones reflected by buildings, reducing the multipath effect (a major source of navigation error in cities and other challenging environments). The numerous Galileo satellites broadcasting E5 make this improvement available for users all around the world. In addition, the simultaneous use of two frequencies reduces other sources of error, such as those due to the ionosphere, and the frequency diversity is more robust to interference and jamming.

            In addition to making existing applications more accurate, the enhanced position precision offered by dual-frequency GNSS will also create opportunities for new applications in areas such as augmented reality, vehicle navigation, and mapping.

            Commenting on the product launch, European GNSS Agency (GSA) Head of Market Development Gian Gherardo Calini said that the arrival of the first dual-frequency GNSS smartphone to the mass-market represents a breakthrough for users all over the world. “The enhanced accuracy provided will empower developers to create new applications that meet the growing high accuracy location requirements of users and also open up applications that previously only ran in dedicated devices intended for professional use,” he said.

            Alex Chou, vice president of product marketing for the Wireless Communications and Connectivity division at Broadcom Inc., said: “Broadcom is glad to gear up Xiaomi’s flagship smartphones with the very latest dual-frequency GNSS technology. Xiaomi Mi 8, the world’s first smartphone with BCM47755, will take smartphone GNSS navigation to a whole new performance level.”

            Zhiyuan Zang, Director of Product Marketing from Xiaomi, said: ”The importance of GNSS to modern life is undisputed, and is particularly important for smartphones. Navigation and LBS-based apps these days require greater positioning accuracy to work effectively, and dual-frequency GNSS is the key to delivering a great user experience when using these apps. Xiaomi is delighted and honored to be the world's first smartphone manufacturer to support dual-frequency GNSS. We will continue to pursue innovation for everyone to enjoy.”

            Exciting times for geolocation

            The launch of the first dual-frequency GNSS smartphone, together with the opportunities offered by the availability of GNSS raw measurements in Android, creates exciting opportunities for the geolocation community. Access to raw measurements opens the door to algorithms once restricted to more advanced GNSS receivers. This, in turn, allows users to fully benefit from the differentiators offered by Galileo.

            Recognising these opportunities, last year, the GSA engaged with the academia and industry in the areas of navigation and positioning to innovate around this new feature, as part of a GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force. Then, in January this year, the GSA published a White Paper on the use of GNSS Raw Measurements in Android, providing developers with in-depth information on accessing and using raw measurements to implement advanced GNSS techniques in mass-market devices.

            Building on this work, the GSA and the Raw Measurements Taskforce shared their latest updates at a dedicated workshop – “GNSS Raw Measurements: From Research to Commercial Use” - held at the GSA headquarters in Prague on 30 May, where Broadcom presented their encouraging test results from the dual-frequency BCM47755.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            Providing enhanced performance, the Mi 8 offers users better positioning in urban environments

            World’s first dual-frequency GNSS smartphone hits the market

            4.6.2018 10:31  
            Published: 
            04 June 2018

            Xiaomi - one of the fastest growing mobile brands - has launched the world’s first dual-frequency GNSS smartphone. Fitted with a Broadcom BCM47755 chip, the Xiaomi Mi 8, launched on May 31, is the world’s first smartphone providing up to decimetre-level accuracy for location-based services and vehicle navigation.

            Xiaomi has launched the world’s first dual-frequency GNSS smartphone, the Mi 8. This smartphone represents a breakthrough in GNSS technology as it is the first commercial deployment of Broadcom’s revolutionary BCM47755 chip.

            The BCM47755, introduced last year, is a dual-frequency (E1/L1+E5/L5) GNSS chip that can compute location with an accuracy of up to a few decimetres. Until now, mobile location-based applications have been powered by single frequency GNSS receivers whose location accuracy is limited to a few meters. However, in recent years GNSS systems have been launching satellites broadcasting signals on new frequencies to open up new possibilities. Specifically, Galileo has the majority of satellites with E1/L1 and E5/L5 frequency capabilities.

            Leveraging Galileo for increased accuracy

            Users of the Xiaomi Mi 8 and future models with dual-frequency GNSS will benefit from better positioning and navigation experience in urban environments. This is due to the unique shape of the E5/L5 frequency, which makes it easier to distinguish real signals from the ones reflected by buildings, reducing the multipath effect (a major source of navigation error in cities and other challenging environments). The numerous Galileo satellites broadcasting E5 make this improvement available for users all around the world. In addition, the simultaneous use of two frequencies reduces other sources of error, such as those due to the ionosphere, and the frequency diversity is more robust to interference and jamming.

            In addition to making existing applications more accurate, the enhanced position precision offered by dual-frequency GNSS will also create opportunities for new applications in areas such as augmented reality, vehicle navigation, and mapping.

            Commenting on the product launch, European GNSS Agency (GSA) Head of Market Development Gian Gherardo Calini said that the arrival of the first dual-frequency GNSS smartphone to the mass-market represents a breakthrough for users all over the world. “The enhanced accuracy provided will empower developers to create new applications that meet the growing high accuracy location requirements of users and also open up applications that previously only ran in dedicated devices intended for professional use,” he said.

            Alex Chou, vice president of product marketing for the Wireless Communications and Connectivity division at Broadcom Inc., said: “Broadcom is glad to gear up Xiaomi’s flagship smartphones with the very latest dual-frequency GNSS technology. Xiaomi Mi 8, the world’s first smartphone with BCM47755, will take smartphone GNSS navigation to a whole new performance level.”

            Zhiyuan Zang, Director of Product Marketing from Xiaomi, said: ”The importance of GNSS to modern life is undisputed, and is particularly important for smartphones. Navigation and LBS-based apps these days require greater positioning accuracy to work effectively, and dual-frequency GNSS is the key to delivering a great user experience when using these apps. Xiaomi is delighted and honored to be the world's first smartphone manufacturer to support dual-frequency GNSS. We will continue to pursue innovation for everyone to enjoy.”

            Exciting times for geolocation

            The launch of the first dual-frequency GNSS smartphone, together with the opportunities offered by the availability of GNSS raw measurements in Android, creates exciting opportunities for the geolocation community. Access to raw measurements opens the door to algorithms once restricted to more advanced GNSS receivers. This, in turn, allows users to fully benefit from the differentiators offered by Galileo.

            Recognising these opportunities, last year, the GSA engaged with the academia and industry in the areas of navigation and positioning to innovate around this new feature, as part of a GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force. Then, in January this year, the GSA published a White Paper on the use of GNSS Raw Measurements in Android, providing developers with in-depth information on accessing and using raw measurements to implement advanced GNSS techniques in mass-market devices.

            Building on this work, the GSA and the Raw Measurements Taskforce shared their latest updates at a dedicated workshop – “GNSS Raw Measurements: From Research to Commercial Use” - held at the GSA headquarters in Prague on 30 May, where Broadcom presented their encouraging test results from the dual-frequency BCM47755.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            Providing enhanced performance, the Mi 8 offers users better positioning in urban environments

            World’s first dual-frequency GNSS smartphone hits the market

            4.6.2018 10:31  
            Published: 
            04 June 2018

            Xiaomi - one of the fastest growing mobile brands - has launched the world’s first dual-frequency GNSS smartphone. Fitted with a Broadcom BCM47755 chip, the Xiaomi Mi 8, launched on May 31, is the world’s first smartphone providing up to decimetre-level accuracy for location-based services and vehicle navigation.

            Xiaomi has launched the world’s first dual-frequency GNSS smartphone, the Mi 8. This smartphone represents a breakthrough in GNSS technology as it is the first commercial deployment of Broadcom’s revolutionary BCM47755 chip.

            The BCM47755, introduced last year, is a dual-frequency (E1/L1+E5/L5) GNSS chip that can compute location with an accuracy of up to a few decimetres. Until now, mobile location-based applications have been powered by single frequency GNSS receivers whose location accuracy is limited to a few meters. However, in recent years GNSS systems have been launching satellites broadcasting signals on new frequencies to open up new possibilities. Specifically, Galileo has the majority of satellites with E1/L1 and E5/L5 frequency capabilities.

            Leveraging Galileo for increased accuracy

            Users of the Xiaomi Mi 8 and future models with dual-frequency GNSS will benefit from better positioning and navigation experience in urban environments. This is due to the unique shape of the E5/L5 frequency, which makes it easier to distinguish real signals from the ones reflected by buildings, reducing the multipath effect (a major source of navigation error in cities and other challenging environments). The numerous Galileo satellites broadcasting E5 make this improvement available for users all around the world. In addition, the simultaneous use of two frequencies reduces other sources of error, such as those due to the ionosphere, and the frequency diversity is more robust to interference and jamming.

            In addition to making existing applications more accurate, the enhanced position precision offered by dual-frequency GNSS will also create opportunities for new applications in areas such as augmented reality, vehicle navigation, and mapping.

            Commenting on the product launch, European GNSS Agency (GSA) Head of Market Development Gian Gherardo Calini said that the arrival of the first dual-frequency GNSS smartphone to the mass-market represents a breakthrough for users all over the world. “The enhanced accuracy provided will empower developers to create new applications that meet the growing high accuracy location requirements of users and also open up applications that previously only ran in dedicated devices intended for professional use,” he said.

            Alex Chou, vice president of product marketing for the Wireless Communications and Connectivity division at Broadcom Inc., said: “Broadcom is glad to gear up Xiaomi’s flagship smartphones with the very latest dual-frequency GNSS technology. Xiaomi Mi 8, the world’s first smartphone with BCM47755, will take smartphone GNSS navigation to a whole new performance level.”

            Zhiyuan Zang, Director of Product Marketing from Xiaomi, said: ”The importance of GNSS to modern life is undisputed, and is particularly important for smartphones. Navigation and LBS-based apps these days require greater positioning accuracy to work effectively, and dual-frequency GNSS is the key to delivering a great user experience when using these apps. Xiaomi is delighted and honored to be the world's first smartphone manufacturer to support dual-frequency GNSS. We will continue to pursue innovation for everyone to enjoy.”

            Exciting times for geolocation

            The launch of the first dual-frequency GNSS smartphone, together with the opportunities offered by the availability of GNSS raw measurements in Android, creates exciting opportunities for the geolocation community. Access to raw measurements opens the door to algorithms once restricted to more advanced GNSS receivers. This, in turn, allows users to fully benefit from the differentiators offered by Galileo.

            Recognising these opportunities, last year, the GSA engaged with the academia and industry in the areas of navigation and positioning to innovate around this new feature, as part of a GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force. Then, in January this year, the GSA published a White Paper on the use of GNSS Raw Measurements in Android, providing developers with in-depth information on accessing and using raw measurements to implement advanced GNSS techniques in mass-market devices.

            Building on this work, the GSA and the Raw Measurements Taskforce shared their latest updates at a dedicated workshop – “GNSS Raw Measurements: From Research to Commercial Use” - held at the GSA headquarters in Prague on 30 May, where Broadcom presented their encouraging test results from the dual-frequency BCM47755.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            Providing enhanced performance, the Mi 8 offers users better positioning in urban environments

            World’s first dual-frequency GNSS smartphone hits the market

            4.6.2018 10:31  
            Published: 
            04 June 2018

            Xiaomi - one of the fastest growing mobile brands - has launched the world’s first dual-frequency GNSS smartphone. Fitted with a Broadcom BCM47755 chip, the Xiaomi Mi 8, launched on May 31, is the world’s first smartphone providing up to decimetre-level accuracy for location-based services and vehicle navigation.

            Xiaomi has launched the world’s first dual-frequency GNSS smartphone, the Mi 8. This smartphone represents a breakthrough in GNSS technology as it is the first commercial deployment of Broadcom’s revolutionary BCM47755 chip.

            The BCM47755, introduced last year, is a dual-frequency (E1/L1+E5/L5) GNSS chip that can compute location with an accuracy of up to a few decimetres. Until now, mobile location-based applications have been powered by single frequency GNSS receivers whose location accuracy is limited to a few meters. However, in recent years GNSS systems have been launching satellites broadcasting signals on new frequencies to open up new possibilities. Specifically, Galileo has the majority of satellites with E1/L1 and E5/L5 frequency capabilities.

            Leveraging Galileo for increased accuracy

            Users of the Xiaomi Mi 8 and future models with dual-frequency GNSS will benefit from better positioning and navigation experience in urban environments. This is due to the unique shape of the E5/L5 frequency, which makes it easier to distinguish real signals from the ones reflected by buildings, reducing the multipath effect (a major source of navigation error in cities and other challenging environments). The numerous Galileo satellites broadcasting E5 make this improvement available for users all around the world. In addition, the simultaneous use of two frequencies reduces other sources of error, such as those due to the ionosphere, and the frequency diversity is more robust to interference and jamming.

            In addition to making existing applications more accurate, the enhanced position precision offered by dual-frequency GNSS will also create opportunities for new applications in areas such as augmented reality, vehicle navigation, and mapping.

            Commenting on the product launch, European GNSS Agency (GSA) Head of Market Development Gian Gherardo Calini said that the arrival of the first dual-frequency GNSS smartphone to the mass-market represents a breakthrough for users all over the world. “The enhanced accuracy provided will empower developers to create new applications that meet the growing high accuracy location requirements of users and also open up applications that previously only ran in dedicated devices intended for professional use,” he said.

            Alex Chou, vice president of product marketing for the Wireless Communications and Connectivity division at Broadcom Inc., said: “Broadcom is glad to gear up Xiaomi’s flagship smartphones with the very latest dual-frequency GNSS technology. Xiaomi Mi 8, the world’s first smartphone with BCM47755, will take smartphone GNSS navigation to a whole new performance level.”

            Zhiyuan Zang, Director of Product Marketing from Xiaomi, said: ”The importance of GNSS to modern life is undisputed, and is particularly important for smartphones. Navigation and LBS-based apps these days require greater positioning accuracy to work effectively, and dual-frequency GNSS is the key to delivering a great user experience when using these apps. Xiaomi is delighted and honored to be the world's first smartphone manufacturer to support dual-frequency GNSS. We will continue to pursue innovation for everyone to enjoy.”

            Exciting times for geolocation

            The launch of the first dual-frequency GNSS smartphone, together with the opportunities offered by the availability of GNSS raw measurements in Android, creates exciting opportunities for the geolocation community. Access to raw measurements opens the door to algorithms once restricted to more advanced GNSS receivers. This, in turn, allows users to fully benefit from the differentiators offered by Galileo.

            Recognising these opportunities, last year, the GSA engaged with the academia and industry in the areas of navigation and positioning to innovate around this new feature, as part of a GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force. Then, in January this year, the GSA published a White Paper on the use of GNSS Raw Measurements in Android, providing developers with in-depth information on accessing and using raw measurements to implement advanced GNSS techniques in mass-market devices.

            Building on this work, the GSA and the Raw Measurements Taskforce shared their latest updates at a dedicated workshop – “GNSS Raw Measurements: From Research to Commercial Use” - held at the GSA headquarters in Prague on 30 May, where Broadcom presented their encouraging test results from the dual-frequency BCM47755.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            Providing enhanced performance, the Mi 8 offers users better positioning in urban environments

            World’s first dual-frequency GNSS smartphone hits the market

            4.6.2018 10:31  
            Published: 
            04 June 2018

            Xiaomi - one of the fastest growing mobile brands - has launched the world’s first dual-frequency GNSS smartphone. Fitted with a Broadcom BCM47755 chip, the Xiaomi Mi 8, launched on May 31, is the world’s first smartphone providing up to decimetre-level accuracy for location-based services and vehicle navigation.

            Xiaomi has launched the world’s first dual-frequency GNSS smartphone, the Mi 8. This smartphone represents a breakthrough in GNSS technology as it is the first commercial deployment of Broadcom’s revolutionary BCM47755 chip.

            The BCM47755, introduced last year, is a dual-frequency (E1/L1+E5/L5) GNSS chip that can compute location with an accuracy of up to a few decimetres. Until now, mobile location-based applications have been powered by single frequency GNSS receivers whose location accuracy is limited to a few meters. However, in recent years GNSS systems have been launching satellites broadcasting signals on new frequencies to open up new possibilities. Specifically, Galileo has the majority of satellites with E1/L1 and E5/L5 frequency capabilities.

            Leveraging Galileo for increased accuracy

            Users of the Xiaomi Mi 8 and future models with dual-frequency GNSS will benefit from better positioning and navigation experience in urban environments. This is due to the unique shape of the E5/L5 frequency, which makes it easier to distinguish real signals from the ones reflected by buildings, reducing the multipath effect (a major source of navigation error in cities and other challenging environments). The numerous Galileo satellites broadcasting E5 make this improvement available for users all around the world. In addition, the simultaneous use of two frequencies reduces other sources of error, such as those due to the ionosphere, and the frequency diversity is more robust to interference and jamming.

            In addition to making existing applications more accurate, the enhanced position precision offered by dual-frequency GNSS will also create opportunities for new applications in areas such as augmented reality, vehicle navigation, and mapping.

            Commenting on the product launch, European GNSS Agency (GSA) Head of Market Development Gian Gherardo Calini said that the arrival of the first dual-frequency GNSS smartphone to the mass-market represents a breakthrough for users all over the world. “The enhanced accuracy provided will empower developers to create new applications that meet the growing high accuracy location requirements of users and also open up applications that previously only ran in dedicated devices intended for professional use,” he said.

            Alex Chou, vice president of product marketing for the Wireless Communications and Connectivity division at Broadcom Inc., said: “Broadcom is glad to gear up Xiaomi’s flagship smartphones with the very latest dual-frequency GNSS technology. Xiaomi Mi 8, the world’s first smartphone with BCM47755, will take smartphone GNSS navigation to a whole new performance level.”

            Zhiyuan Zang, Director of Product Marketing from Xiaomi, said: ”The importance of GNSS to modern life is undisputed, and is particularly important for smartphones. Navigation and LBS-based apps these days require greater positioning accuracy to work effectively, and dual-frequency GNSS is the key to delivering a great user experience when using these apps. Xiaomi is delighted and honored to be the world's first smartphone manufacturer to support dual-frequency GNSS. We will continue to pursue innovation for everyone to enjoy.”

            Exciting times for geolocation

            The launch of the first dual-frequency GNSS smartphone, together with the opportunities offered by the availability of GNSS raw measurements in Android, creates exciting opportunities for the geolocation community. Access to raw measurements opens the door to algorithms once restricted to more advanced GNSS receivers. This, in turn, allows users to fully benefit from the differentiators offered by Galileo.

            Recognising these opportunities, last year, the GSA engaged with the academia and industry in the areas of navigation and positioning to innovate around this new feature, as part of a GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force. Then, in January this year, the GSA published a White Paper on the use of GNSS Raw Measurements in Android, providing developers with in-depth information on accessing and using raw measurements to implement advanced GNSS techniques in mass-market devices.

            Building on this work, the GSA and the Raw Measurements Taskforce shared their latest updates at a dedicated workshop – “GNSS Raw Measurements: From Research to Commercial Use” - held at the GSA headquarters in Prague on 30 May, where Broadcom presented their encouraging test results from the dual-frequency BCM47755.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            Providing enhanced performance, the Mi 8 offers users better positioning in urban environments

            H2H – leveraging EGNSS for safer maritime navigation

            29.5.2018 11:50  
            Published: 
            29 May 2018

            Using EGNSS (EGNOS and Galileo), the Hull to Hull (H2H) project is developing a system that will allow maritime vessels to navigate safely in close proximity to each other and to stationary objects, supporting mariners as they take navigation decisions and creating the fundamental conditions for autonomous maritime navigation.

            Funded by the European GNSS Agency (GSA) under Horizon 2020, the H2H system will combine sensor information with 3D models to create digital models of vessels and other objects of interest. This digital model can be visualized by the mariner in 3D, or in 2D format using slices of the 3D model, and used to derive crucial navigation information in real time. The quality of the sensors and the 3D model will drive the quality of the digital model, and consequently the quality of the navigation information that is derived from the model.

            The H2H approach will allow mariners to establish proximity zones for their own vessels and for neighbouring objects with a high level of precision and integrity. Other examples of navigation information that will be derived from the model include the shortest distances and relative speeds between vessels and other objects.

            The project leverages EGNSS - in particular the accuracy offered by Galileo’s dual frequency and multi-constellation capacity

            The project leverages EGNSS - in particular the accuracy offered by Galileo’s dual frequency and multi-constellation capacity

            High accuracy positioning

            Autonomous vessels may need, depending on the operation, the assurance of decimetre-level accuracy. To provide the required relative position measurements, the project leverages EGNSS - in particular the accuracy offered by Galileo’s dual frequency and multi-constellation capacity.  This will be augmented by data gathered from a variety of sensors, including IMU, AIS, LIDAR, RADAR, cameras and other proximity sensors.

            The project will also examine the possibility of using existing data from vessels, e.g. from load and stability systems. All this data will be integrated to get a comprehensive 3D model of the vessel's speed, direction, attitude and location relative to other vessels and objects in the area of operation, providing a high-integrity and resilient position solution. Sensor data, as well as 3D models, will be shared among the vessels that are involved in an operation.

            The project is coordinated by Kongsberg Seatex, a subsidiary of Kongsberg Maritime, developing solutions for maritime sensing and connectivity. Expert project partners include SINTEF Ocean and SINTEF Digital for broad research-based expertise; KU Leuven, a leading European university and expert on inland waterways navigation; and Mampaey Offshore Industries, a Dutch company specialized in towing, berthing and mooring systems.

            Commenting on the project’s expected impact, Project Coordinator Per Erik Kvam said that the H2H concept would provide mariners with crucial navigation information that will allow performing operations in closer proximity. “Operations that normally would not be permitted, or need to be aborted using present systems, can now be performed with H2H, which will increase operability accordingly. The system will be equally important for traditional operations with humans in the loop, as well as for more remote and autonomous operations,” he said.

            “By allowing vessels to share sensor data and 3D models, the H2H project also opens up numerous new applications, many of which might not be known today. Examples are wave prediction and controlling crane operations involving two moving objects,” Kvam said.

            Safe autonomous navigation

            If autonomous ships are to be approved for commercial use, they will need to be at least as safe as conventional vehicles performing similar functions. For vessels to operate safely, sensor data should be exchanged continuously. This will require an open standard, high speed, reliable communication link to securely exchange navigation data, capable of supporting relative positioning and the exchange of 3D models. To meet this requirement, Norway’s SINTEF Digital, one of the project partners, will analyse and propose a safe and secure communications overlay based on experience gained from, among other things, the offshore industry and rail.

            The communications solution will be an integral part of the H2H safety system. This is an important aspect of the project, as future regulations are likely to require that control and navigation systems for autonomous ships be certified in line with functional safety requirements. With this in mind, the project will also define a framework for safe hull-to-hull navigation and propose amendments to existing standards and regulations, thereby making a strategic contribution to the development of solutions towards a higher degree of autonomy in maritime navigation. 

            Kick-off in Prague

            The three-year project kicked-off with a meeting of the project partners at the GSA headquarters in Prague in December 2017. A first project workshop was held on 7- 9 May 2018 during Ocean Week in Trondheim, Norway.  In addition to presenting the project at the Ocean Week Conference, the H2H partners participated in technical meetings to define user requirements for demonstrations of a pilot sensor package planned in Norway, the Netherlands and Belgium.

            The demonstration in Norway will feature autonomous vessels in simultaneous operations, while the one in the Netherlands will emphasise the auto-mooring aspect of an autonomous vessel, and the demonstration in Belgium will test the usability of the H2H EGNSS module for localization on inland waterways in various conditions. This work will be underpinned by dissemination and communication activities to support the process of adapting byelaws, standards, regulations and legislation for autonomous navigation.

            By leveraging EGNSS, the H2H project will open up new maritime applications, paving the way towards autonomous navigation in the shipping sector while simultaneously increasing the safety and reducing the cost of maritime operations.

            For more information, visit the project website.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            H2H will allow maritime vessels to navigate safely in close proximity to each other and to stationary objects

            H2H – leveraging EGNSS for safer maritime navigation

            29.5.2018 11:50  
            Published: 
            29 May 2018

            Using EGNSS (EGNOS and Galileo), the Hull to Hull (H2H) project is developing a system that will allow maritime vessels to navigate safely in close proximity to each other and to stationary objects, supporting mariners as they take navigation decisions and creating the fundamental conditions for autonomous maritime navigation.

            Funded by the European GNSS Agency (GSA) under Horizon 2020, the H2H system will combine sensor information with 3D models to create digital models of vessels and other objects of interest. This digital model can be visualized by the mariner in 3D, or in 2D format using slices of the 3D model, and used to derive crucial navigation information in real time. The quality of the sensors and the 3D model will drive the quality of the digital model, and consequently the quality of the navigation information that is derived from the model.

            The H2H approach will allow mariners to establish proximity zones for their own vessels and for neighbouring objects with a high level of precision and integrity. Other examples of navigation information that will be derived from the model include the shortest distances and relative speeds between vessels and other objects.

            The project leverages EGNSS - in particular the accuracy offered by Galileo’s dual frequency and multi-constellation capacity

            The project leverages EGNSS - in particular the accuracy offered by Galileo’s dual frequency and multi-constellation capacity

            High accuracy positioning

            Autonomous vessels may need, depending on the operation, the assurance of decimetre-level accuracy. To provide the required relative position measurements, the project leverages EGNSS - in particular the accuracy offered by Galileo’s dual frequency and multi-constellation capacity.  This will be augmented by data gathered from a variety of sensors, including IMU, AIS, LIDAR, RADAR, cameras and other proximity sensors.

            The project will also examine the possibility of using existing data from vessels, e.g. from load and stability systems. All this data will be integrated to get a comprehensive 3D model of the vessel's speed, direction, attitude and location relative to other vessels and objects in the area of operation, providing a high-integrity and resilient position solution. Sensor data, as well as 3D models, will be shared among the vessels that are involved in an operation.

            The project is coordinated by Kongsberg Seatex, a subsidiary of Kongsberg Maritime, developing solutions for maritime sensing and connectivity. Expert project partners include SINTEF Ocean and SINTEF Digital for broad research-based expertise; KU Leuven, a leading European university and expert on inland waterways navigation; and Mampaey Offshore Industries, a Dutch company specialized in towing, berthing and mooring systems.

            Commenting on the project’s expected impact, Project Coordinator Per Erik Kvam said that the H2H concept would provide mariners with crucial navigation information that will allow performing operations in closer proximity. “Operations that normally would not be permitted, or need to be aborted using present systems, can now be performed with H2H, which will increase operability accordingly. The system will be equally important for traditional operations with humans in the loop, as well as for more remote and autonomous operations,” he said.

            “By allowing vessels to share sensor data and 3D models, the H2H project also opens up numerous new applications, many of which might not be known today. Examples are wave prediction and controlling crane operations involving two moving objects,” Kvam said.

            Safe autonomous navigation

            If autonomous ships are to be approved for commercial use, they will need to be at least as safe as conventional vehicles performing similar functions. For vessels to operate safely, sensor data should be exchanged continuously. This will require an open standard, high speed, reliable communication link to securely exchange navigation data, capable of supporting relative positioning and the exchange of 3D models. To meet this requirement, Norway’s SINTEF Digital, one of the project partners, will analyse and propose a safe and secure communications overlay based on experience gained from, among other things, the offshore industry and rail.

            The communications solution will be an integral part of the H2H safety system. This is an important aspect of the project, as future regulations are likely to require that control and navigation systems for autonomous ships be certified in line with functional safety requirements. With this in mind, the project will also define a framework for safe hull-to-hull navigation and propose amendments to existing standards and regulations, thereby making a strategic contribution to the development of solutions towards a higher degree of autonomy in maritime navigation. 

            Kick-off in Prague

            The three-year project kicked-off with a meeting of the project partners at the GSA headquarters in Prague in December 2017. A first project workshop was held on 7- 9 May 2018 during Ocean Week in Trondheim, Norway.  In addition to presenting the project at the Ocean Week Conference, the H2H partners participated in technical meetings to define user requirements for demonstrations of a pilot sensor package planned in Norway, the Netherlands and Belgium.

            The demonstration in Norway will feature autonomous vessels in simultaneous operations, while the one in the Netherlands will emphasise the auto-mooring aspect of an autonomous vessel, and the demonstration in Belgium will test the usability of the H2H EGNSS module for localization on inland waterways in various conditions. This work will be underpinned by dissemination and communication activities to support the process of adapting byelaws, standards, regulations and legislation for autonomous navigation.

            By leveraging EGNSS, the H2H project will open up new maritime applications, paving the way towards autonomous navigation in the shipping sector while simultaneously increasing the safety and reducing the cost of maritime operations.

            For more information, visit the project website.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            H2H will allow maritime vessels to navigate safely in close proximity to each other and to stationary objects

            H2H – leveraging EGNSS for safer maritime navigation

            29.5.2018 11:50  
            Published: 
            29 May 2018

            Using EGNSS (EGNOS and Galileo), the Hull to Hull (H2H) project is developing a system that will allow maritime vessels to navigate safely in close proximity to each other and to stationary objects, supporting mariners as they take navigation decisions and creating the fundamental conditions for autonomous maritime navigation.

            Funded by the European GNSS Agency (GSA) under Horizon 2020, the H2H system will combine sensor information with 3D models to create digital models of vessels and other objects of interest. This digital model can be visualized by the mariner in 3D, or in 2D format using slices of the 3D model, and used to derive crucial navigation information in real time. The quality of the sensors and the 3D model will drive the quality of the digital model, and consequently the quality of the navigation information that is derived from the model.

            The H2H approach will allow mariners to establish proximity zones for their own vessels and for neighbouring objects with a high level of precision and integrity. Other examples of navigation information that will be derived from the model include the shortest distances and relative speeds between vessels and other objects.

            The project leverages EGNSS - in particular the accuracy offered by Galileo’s dual frequency and multi-constellation capacity

            The project leverages EGNSS - in particular the accuracy offered by Galileo’s dual frequency and multi-constellation capacity

            High accuracy positioning

            Autonomous vessels may need, depending on the operation, the assurance of decimetre-level accuracy. To provide the required relative position measurements, the project leverages EGNSS - in particular the accuracy offered by Galileo’s dual frequency and multi-constellation capacity.  This will be augmented by data gathered from a variety of sensors, including IMU, AIS, LIDAR, RADAR, cameras and other proximity sensors.

            The project will also examine the possibility of using existing data from vessels, e.g. from load and stability systems. All this data will be integrated to get a comprehensive 3D model of the vessel's speed, direction, attitude and location relative to other vessels and objects in the area of operation, providing a high-integrity and resilient position solution. Sensor data, as well as 3D models, will be shared among the vessels that are involved in an operation.

            The project is coordinated by Kongsberg Seatex, a subsidiary of Kongsberg Maritime, developing solutions for maritime sensing and connectivity. Expert project partners include SINTEF Ocean and SINTEF Digital for broad research-based expertise; KU Leuven, a leading European university and expert on inland waterways navigation; and Mampaey Offshore Industries, a Dutch company specialized in towing, berthing and mooring systems.

            Commenting on the project’s expected impact, Project Coordinator Per Erik Kvam said that the H2H concept would provide mariners with crucial navigation information that will allow performing operations in closer proximity. “Operations that normally would not be permitted, or need to be aborted using present systems, can now be performed with H2H, which will increase operability accordingly. The system will be equally important for traditional operations with humans in the loop, as well as for more remote and autonomous operations,” he said.

            “By allowing vessels to share sensor data and 3D models, the H2H project also opens up numerous new applications, many of which might not be known today. Examples are wave prediction and controlling crane operations involving two moving objects,” Kvam said.

            Safe autonomous navigation

            If autonomous ships are to be approved for commercial use, they will need to be at least as safe as conventional vehicles performing similar functions. For vessels to operate safely, sensor data should be exchanged continuously. This will require an open standard, high speed, reliable communication link to securely exchange navigation data, capable of supporting relative positioning and the exchange of 3D models. To meet this requirement, Norway’s SINTEF Digital, one of the project partners, will analyse and propose a safe and secure communications overlay based on experience gained from, among other things, the offshore industry and rail.

            The communications solution will be an integral part of the H2H safety system. This is an important aspect of the project, as future regulations are likely to require that control and navigation systems for autonomous ships be certified in line with functional safety requirements. With this in mind, the project will also define a framework for safe hull-to-hull navigation and propose amendments to existing standards and regulations, thereby making a strategic contribution to the development of solutions towards a higher degree of autonomy in maritime navigation. 

            Kick-off in Prague

            The three-year project kicked-off with a meeting of the project partners at the GSA headquarters in Prague in December 2017. A first project workshop was held on 7- 9 May 2018 during Ocean Week in Trondheim, Norway.  In addition to presenting the project at the Ocean Week Conference, the H2H partners participated in technical meetings to define user requirements for demonstrations of a pilot sensor package planned in Norway, the Netherlands and Belgium.

            The demonstration in Norway will feature autonomous vessels in simultaneous operations, while the one in the Netherlands will emphasise the auto-mooring aspect of an autonomous vessel, and the demonstration in Belgium will test the usability of the H2H EGNSS module for localization on inland waterways in various conditions. This work will be underpinned by dissemination and communication activities to support the process of adapting byelaws, standards, regulations and legislation for autonomous navigation.

            By leveraging EGNSS, the H2H project will open up new maritime applications, paving the way towards autonomous navigation in the shipping sector while simultaneously increasing the safety and reducing the cost of maritime operations.

            For more information, visit the project website.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            H2H will allow maritime vessels to navigate safely in close proximity to each other and to stationary objects

            European GNSS and the environment

            24.5.2018 10:26  
            Published: 
            24 May 2018

            With the 2018 edition of the European Union’s annual Green Week taking place across Europe from 21 to 25 May it is timely to consider the contributions that the European GNSS (EGNSS) – EGNOS and Galileo - are making to improving and protecting our environment.

            The 2018 Green Week takes as its main theme ‘Green Cities for a Greener Future’ and will be exploring the ways in which the EU is helping cities to become better places to live and work. To be a Green City an urban area must be a Smart City: a city with smart mobility and connected services.

            Mobility is an important part of everyone's daily lives. EGNSS, including EGNOS, is making life on the road easier by significantly reducing congestion and, consequently, reducing greenhouse gas emissions such as carbon dioxide (CO2). EGNOS and Galileo are helping urban authorities to improve the efficiency of road transportation through navigation, fleet management opportunities and satellite road traffic monitoring.

            Read this: Galileo: a critical component for autonomous driving

            Location, location, location

            The enhanced positioning capabilities of EGNSS is a key element in the safe and sustainable development of autonomous vehicles. These vehicles, ranging from passenger carriers to drone parcel delivery services, will help to further reduce congestion and pollution.

            EGNSS technologies and location-based services are now becoming ubiquitous in urban areas. All mass market electronic devices, from smartphones and wearable devices, such as fitness monitors, to traffic lights and other components of the expanding Internet of Things (IoT), now have the capability to broadcast their location. This enables the provision of a new generation of location-based smart services for citizens and corporations that includes health and well-being monitoring and security applications and the control and optimisation of energy systems.

            Sustainable development

            Globally EGNSS is working with its sister programme Copernicus, Europe’s Earth Observation programme, to help the world meet the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) that include a range of environmental targets.

            The combination of Galileo’s high accuracy positioning and navigation with Copernicus’ services and analysis is increasingly creating opportunities in nearly every market segment. From providing the maps needed for finding the best locations for renewable energy infrastructure to outlining the most fuel-efficient flight paths, optimising road transportation routes and monitoring CO2 emissions, applications using both EGNSS and Earth Observation are providing answers to environmental issues.

            A recent study, “EGNSS and COPERNICUS: Supporting the Sustainable Development Goals. Building blocks towards the 2030 Agenda”, showed how EU space technologies support the fulfilment of the UN SDGs. The analysis shows that all the SDGs are positively impacted by the benefits stemming from the use of EGNSS and Copernicus applications and that almost 40% of the associated indicators directly benefit from using their services, either supporting the monitoring of the status of achievement of a given SDG or actively contributing to their fulfilment.

            Also read: Boosting EGNOS for better precision farming

            Escape to the country

            Closer to home, today, some 72% of European Precision Agriculture farmers rely on EGNOS to enhance precision agriculture: a solution for higher productivity and farm profitability. The main EGNSS application for precision agriculture is tractor guidance and automated tractor steering. Combined with Earth Observation data this allows, for example, highly efficient and reduced distribution of chemical fertilizer reducing environmental impact.

            The detection of reflected GNSS signals can also directly measure soil moisture. This technique, called GNSS-R, can be used in all terrains to map soil humidity and optimise water resource management. It can also be used to monitor vulnerable wetlands for conservation purposes or flooded areas during an emergency.

            Read more: GSA-funded GNSS-R project Mistrale

            The ability to predict landslides and implement early interventions is critical when it comes to saving human lives and reducing damage. The sister EU programmes offer joint solutions for monitoring land movements: EGNSS provides highly accurate horizontal displacements, while Copernicus’s In-SAR data detects vertical displacements. This data can be used to formulate early warnings and to support timely interventions.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            From transport to agriculture, EGNSS contributes to improved environmental performance.

            European GNSS and the environment

            24.5.2018 10:26  
            Published: 
            24 May 2018

            With the 2018 edition of the European Union’s annual Green Week taking place across Europe from 21 to 25 May it is timely to consider the contributions that the European GNSS (EGNSS) – EGNOS and Galileo - are making to improving and protecting our environment.

            The 2018 Green Week takes as its main theme ‘Green Cities for a Greener Future’ and will be exploring the ways in which the EU is helping cities to become better places to live and work. To be a Green City an urban area must be a Smart City: a city with smart mobility and connected services.

            Mobility is an important part of everyone's daily lives. EGNSS, including EGNOS, is making life on the road easier by significantly reducing congestion and, consequently, reducing greenhouse gas emissions such as carbon dioxide (CO2). EGNOS and Galileo are helping urban authorities to improve the efficiency of road transportation through navigation, fleet management opportunities and satellite road traffic monitoring.

            Read this: Galileo: a critical component for autonomous driving

            Location, location, location

            The enhanced positioning capabilities of EGNSS is a key element in the safe and sustainable development of autonomous vehicles. These vehicles, ranging from passenger carriers to drone parcel delivery services, will help to further reduce congestion and pollution.
            EGNSS technologies and location-based services are now becoming ubiquitous in urban areas. All mass market electronic devices, from smartphones and wearable devices, such as fitness monitors, to traffic lights and other components of the expanding Internet of Things (IoT), now have the capability to broadcast their location. This enables the provision of a new generation of location-based smart services for citizens and corporations that includes health and well-being monitoring and security applications and the control and optimisation of energy systems.

            Sustainable development

            Globally EGNSS is working with its sister programme Copernicus, Europe’s Earth Observation programme, to help the world meet the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) that include a range of environmental targets.

            The combination of Galileo’s high accuracy positioning and navigation with Copernicus’ services and analysis is increasingly creating opportunities in nearly every market segment. From providing the maps needed for finding the best locations for renewable energy infrastructure to outlining the most fuel-efficient flight paths, optimising road transportation routes and monitoring CO2 emissions, applications using both EGNSS and Earth Observation are providing answers to environmental issues.

            A recent study, “EGNSS and COPERNICUS: Supporting the Sustainable Development Goals. Building blocks towards the 2030 Agenda”, showed how EU space technologies support the fulfilment of the UN SDGs. The analysis shows that all the SDGs are positively impacted by the benefits stemming from the use of EGNSS and Copernicus applications and that almost 40% of the associated indicators directly benefit from using their services, either supporting the monitoring of the status of achievement of a given SDG or actively contributing to their fulfilment.

            Also read: Boosting EGNOS for better precision farming

            Escape to the country

            Closer to home, today, some 72% of European Precision Agriculture farmers rely on EGNOS to enhance precision agriculture: a solution for higher productivity and farm profitability. The main EGNSS application for precision agriculture is tractor guidance and automated tractor steering. Combined with Earth Observation data this allows, for example, highly efficient and reduced distribution of chemical fertilizer reducing environmental impact.

            The detection of reflected GNSS signals can also directly measure soil moisture. This technique, called GNSS-R, can be used in all terrains to map soil humidity and optimise water resource management. It can also be used to monitor vulnerable wetlands for conservation purposes or flooded areas during an emergency.

            Read more: GSA-funded GNSS-R project Mistrale

            The ability to predict landslides and implement early interventions is critical when it comes to saving human lives and reducing damage. The sister EU programmes offer joint solutions for monitoring land movements: EGNSS provides highly accurate horizontal displacements, while Copernicus’s In-SAR data detects vertical displacements. This data can be used to formulate early warnings and to support timely interventions.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            From transport to agriculture, EGNSS contributes to improved environmental performance.

            European GNSS and the environment

            24.5.2018 10:26  
            Published: 
            24 May 2018

            With the 2018 edition of the European Union’s annual Green Week taking place across Europe from 21 to 25 May it is timely to consider the contributions that the European GNSS (EGNSS) – EGNOS and Galileo - are making to improving and protecting our environment.

            The 2018 Green Week takes as its main theme ‘Green Cities for a Greener Future’ and will be exploring the ways in which the EU is helping cities to become better places to live and work. To be a Green City an urban area must be a Smart City: a city with smart mobility and connected services.

            Mobility is an important part of everyone's daily lives. EGNSS, including EGNOS, is making life on the road easier by significantly reducing congestion and, consequently, reducing greenhouse gas emissions such as carbon dioxide (CO2). EGNOS and Galileo are helping urban authorities to improve the efficiency of road transportation through navigation, fleet management opportunities and satellite road traffic monitoring.

            Read this: Galileo: a critical component for autonomous driving

            Location, location, location

            The enhanced positioning capabilities of EGNSS is a key element in the safe and sustainable development of autonomous vehicles. These vehicles, ranging from passenger carriers to drone parcel delivery services, will help to further reduce congestion and pollution.

            EGNSS technologies and location-based services are now becoming ubiquitous in urban areas. All mass market electronic devices, from smartphones and wearable devices, such as fitness monitors, to traffic lights and other components of the expanding Internet of Things (IoT), now have the capability to broadcast their location. This enables the provision of a new generation of location-based smart services for citizens and corporations that includes health and well-being monitoring and security applications and the control and optimisation of energy systems.

            Sustainable development

            Globally EGNSS is working with its sister programme Copernicus, Europe’s Earth Observation programme, to help the world meet the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) that include a range of environmental targets.

            The combination of Galileo’s high accuracy positioning and navigation with Copernicus’ services and analysis is increasingly creating opportunities in nearly every market segment. From providing the maps needed for finding the best locations for renewable energy infrastructure to outlining the most fuel-efficient flight paths, optimising road transportation routes and monitoring CO2 emissions, applications using both EGNSS and Earth Observation are providing answers to environmental issues.

            A recent study, “EGNSS and COPERNICUS: Supporting the Sustainable Development Goals. Building blocks towards the 2030 Agenda”, showed how EU space technologies support the fulfilment of the UN SDGs. The analysis shows that all the SDGs are positively impacted by the benefits stemming from the use of EGNSS and Copernicus applications and that almost 40% of the associated indicators directly benefit from using their services, either supporting the monitoring of the status of achievement of a given SDG or actively contributing to their fulfilment.

            Also read: Boosting EGNOS for better precision farming

            Escape to the country

            Closer to home, today, some 72% of European Precision Agriculture farmers rely on EGNOS to enhance precision agriculture: a solution for higher productivity and farm profitability. The main EGNSS application for precision agriculture is tractor guidance and automated tractor steering. Combined with Earth Observation data this allows, for example, highly efficient and reduced distribution of chemical fertilizer reducing environmental impact.

            The detection of reflected GNSS signals can also directly measure soil moisture. This technique, called GNSS-R, can be used in all terrains to map soil humidity and optimise water resource management. It can also be used to monitor vulnerable wetlands for conservation purposes or flooded areas during an emergency.

            Read more: GSA-funded GNSS-R project Mistrale

            The ability to predict landslides and implement early interventions is critical when it comes to saving human lives and reducing damage. The sister EU programmes offer joint solutions for monitoring land movements: EGNSS provides highly accurate horizontal displacements, while Copernicus’s In-SAR data detects vertical displacements. This data can be used to formulate early warnings and to support timely interventions.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            From transport to agriculture, EGNSS contributes to improved environmental performance.

            European GNSS and the environment

            24.5.2018 10:26  
            Published: 
            24 May 2018

            With the 2018 edition of the European Union’s annual Green Week taking place across Europe from 21 to 25 May it is timely to consider the contributions that the European GNSS (EGNSS) – EGNOS and Galileo - are making to improving and protecting our environment.

            The 2018 Green Week takes as its main theme ‘Green Cities for a Greener Future’ and will be exploring the ways in which the EU is helping cities to become better places to live and work. To be a Green City an urban area must be a Smart City: a city with smart mobility and connected services.

            Mobility is an important part of everyone's daily lives. EGNSS, including EGNOS, is making life on the road easier by significantly reducing congestion and, consequently, reducing greenhouse gas emissions such as carbon dioxide (CO2). EGNOS and Galileo are helping urban authorities to improve the efficiency of road transportation through navigation, fleet management opportunities and satellite road traffic monitoring.

            Read this: Galileo: a critical component for autonomous driving

            Location, location, location

            The enhanced positioning capabilities of EGNSS is a key element in the safe and sustainable development of autonomous vehicles. These vehicles, ranging from passenger carriers to drone parcel delivery services, will help to further reduce congestion and pollution.

            EGNSS technologies and location-based services are now becoming ubiquitous in urban areas. All mass market electronic devices, from smartphones and wearable devices, such as fitness monitors, to traffic lights and other components of the expanding Internet of Things (IoT), now have the capability to broadcast their location. This enables the provision of a new generation of location-based smart services for citizens and corporations that includes health and well-being monitoring and security applications and the control and optimisation of energy systems.

            Sustainable development

            Globally EGNSS is working with its sister programme Copernicus, Europe’s Earth Observation programme, to help the world meet the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) that include a range of environmental targets.

            The combination of Galileo’s high accuracy positioning and navigation with Copernicus’ services and analysis is increasingly creating opportunities in nearly every market segment. From providing the maps needed for finding the best locations for renewable energy infrastructure to outlining the most fuel-efficient flight paths, optimising road transportation routes and monitoring CO2 emissions, applications using both EGNSS and Earth Observation are providing answers to environmental issues.

            A recent study, “EGNSS and COPERNICUS: Supporting the Sustainable Development Goals. Building blocks towards the 2030 Agenda”, showed how EU space technologies support the fulfilment of the UN SDGs. The analysis shows that all the SDGs are positively impacted by the benefits stemming from the use of EGNSS and Copernicus applications and that almost 40% of the associated indicators directly benefit from using their services, either supporting the monitoring of the status of achievement of a given SDG or actively contributing to their fulfilment.

            Also read: Boosting EGNOS for better precision farming

            Escape to the country

            Closer to home, today, some 72% of European Precision Agriculture farmers rely on EGNOS to enhance precision agriculture: a solution for higher productivity and farm profitability. The main EGNSS application for precision agriculture is tractor guidance and automated tractor steering. Combined with Earth Observation data this allows, for example, highly efficient and reduced distribution of chemical fertilizer reducing environmental impact.

            The detection of reflected GNSS signals can also directly measure soil moisture. This technique, called GNSS-R, can be used in all terrains to map soil humidity and optimise water resource management. It can also be used to monitor vulnerable wetlands for conservation purposes or flooded areas during an emergency.

            Read more: GSA-funded GNSS-R project Mistrale

            The ability to predict landslides and implement early interventions is critical when it comes to saving human lives and reducing damage. The sister EU programmes offer joint solutions for monitoring land movements: EGNSS provides highly accurate horizontal displacements, while Copernicus’s In-SAR data detects vertical displacements. This data can be used to formulate early warnings and to support timely interventions.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            From transport to agriculture, EGNSS contributes to improved environmental performance.

            2018 European Satellite Navigation Competition launched at GRC inauguration

            23.5.2018 9:34  
            Published: 
            23 May 2018

            Organizers launched the 2018 edition of the European Satellite Navigation Competition, known as the ‘Galileo Masters’, on 16 May at the GSA's new Galileo Reference Centre in Noordwijk, highlighting the long-standing partnership between the GSA and the Competition.

            The race is on to come up with 2018's most innovative and marketable European GNSS (EGNSS) applications. For the European GNSS Agency (GSA), the European Satellite Navigation Competition (ESNC) represents an important means for scouting new downstream business ideas that harness satellite navigation. As such, it is directly in line with one of the Agency's key objectives– to help foster the best use and widest uptake of EGNSS.

            The ESNC launch took place in conjunction with the inauguration of the GSA's new Galileo Reference Centre (GRC) in Noordwijk. Carlo des Dorides, Executive Director of the GSA said: “The European Satellite Navigation Competition is a unique platform for promoting Galileo and EGNOS. It is an innovation competition providing a gateway to a wide range of useful business applications based on European GNSS. This is why the GSA is a proud partner and has been hosting its own special ESNC challenge since 2008.”

            Over the past ten years, he said, the GSA has received more than 800 proposals, with full business cases, in response to its ESNC challenge, and it has awarded prizes on topics including E-mobility, augmented reality (AR), unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV), the internet of things (IoT) and others.

            This year, the GSA will award three prizes addressing the topic 'When and Where? – Exact timing and positioning matters', with special consideration being given to proposals that leverage EGNSS differentiators, such as:

            • Multiple frequencies E1, E5 and E6
            • Galileo-specific signal modulation, e.g. AltBOC
            • Galileo Search and Rescue Service
            • High-precision and authentication services that will be provided by Galileo, i.e. within the Commercial Service and within the Open Service authentication (OS NMA)

            Cash prizes of €3000, €5000 and €7000 will be awarded to the top three proposals. In addition, the first prize winner will benefit from extensive promotion through GSA marketing channels and at relevant industry events and, if eligible, will receive tailored EGNSS Accelerator business support worth €62,000.

            Lending some perspective

            Thorsten Rudolph is Managing Director of Anwendungszentrum GmbH Oberpfaffenhofen (AZO), co-founder of the ESNC along with the German Aerospace Centre (DLR) and the Bavarian Ministry of Economic Affairs and Media. He said: "While the GSA has been with us as a key sponsor for a decade, the ESNC Galileo Masters is actually celebrating its 15th year." Over this time, he said, more than 11,500 individuals have participated in the Competition, and it has provided a total of €11 million to fund real, down-to-earth start-ups, products and services.

            "As a matter of fact," Rudolph said, "the Director of this beautiful new GRC, Peter Buist, himself won the ESNC South Holland Challenge in 2011, and when we see where he is today I think we can consider this a real ESNC success story!"

            Rudolph recalled the early years of the Competition: "When we started, most of today's satellite navigation apps were not yet invented. And since then the number of new companies, business cases and applications has constantly increased and has led to a boom in the consumer market."

            More recently, he said, the launch of Galileo Initial Services in 2016, the sale of millions of Galileo compatible devices in 2017, and the fact that 95% of chipsets now on the market are Galileo compatible, all of this is triggering a new wave of more precise navigation services for the masses. "And this is a perfect situation for the European industries to increase their market share," he concluded.

            For more details on this year's GSA challenge and the prizes, see www.esnc.eu/prize/gsa-2018.

            For more about the European Satellite Navigation Competition, see www.esnc.eu.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides (right) and AZO Managing Director Thorsten Rudolph launch the ESNC at the GRC in Noordwijk

            2018 European Satellite Navigation Competition launched at GRC inauguration

            23.5.2018 9:34  
            Published: 
            23 May 2018

            Organizers launched the 2018 edition of the European Satellite Navigation Competition, known as the ‘Galileo Masters’, on 16 May at the GSA's new Galileo Reference Centre in Noordwijk, highlighting the long-standing partnership between the GSA and the Competition.

            The race is on to come up with 2018's most innovative and marketable European GNSS (EGNSS) applications. For the European GNSS Agency (GSA), the European Satellite Navigation Competition (ESNC) represents an important means for scouting new downstream business ideas that harness satellite navigation. As such, it is directly in line with one of the Agency's key objectives– to help foster the best use and widest uptake of EGNSS.

            The ESNC launch took place in conjunction with the inauguration of the GSA's new Galileo Reference Centre (GRC) in Noordwijk. Carlo des Dorides, Executive Director of the GSA said: “The European Satellite Navigation Competition is a unique platform for promoting Galileo and EGNOS. It is an innovation competition providing a gateway to a wide range of useful business applications based on European GNSS. This is why the GSA is a proud partner and has been hosting its own special ESNC challenge since 2008.”

            Over the past ten years, he said, the GSA has received more than 800 proposals, with full business cases, in response to its ESNC challenge, and it has awarded prizes on topics including E-mobility, augmented reality (AR), unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV), the internet of things (IoT) and others.

            This year, the GSA will award three prizes addressing the topic 'When and Where? – Exact timing and positioning matters', with special consideration being given to proposals that leverage EGNSS differentiators, such as:

            • Multiple frequencies E1, E5 and E6
            • Galileo-specific signal modulation, e.g. AltBOC
            • Galileo Search and Rescue Service
            • High-precision and authentication services that will be provided by Galileo, i.e. within the Commercial Service and within the Open Service authentication (OS NMA)

            Cash prizes of €3000, €5000 and €7000 will be awarded to the top three proposals. In addition, the first prize winner will benefit from extensive promotion through GSA marketing channels and at relevant industry events and, if eligible, will receive tailored EGNSS Accelerator business support worth €62,000.

            Lending some perspective

            Thorsten Rudolph is Managing Director of Anwendungszentrum GmbH Oberpfaffenhofen (AZO), co-founder of the ESNC along with the German Aerospace Centre (DLR) and the Bavarian Ministry of Economic Affairs and Media. He said: "While the GSA has been with us as a key sponsor for a decade, the ESNC Galileo Masters is actually celebrating its 15th year." Over this time, he said, more than 11,500 individuals have participated in the Competition, and it has provided a total of €11 million to fund real, down-to-earth start-ups, products and services.

            "As a matter of fact," Rudolph said, "the Director of this beautiful new GRC, Peter Buist, himself won the ESNC South Holland Challenge in 2011, and when we see where he is today I think we can consider this a real ESNC success story!"

            Rudolph recalled the early years of the Competition: "When we started, most of today's satellite navigation apps were not yet invented. And since then the number of new companies, business cases and applications has constantly increased and has led to a boom in the consumer market."

            More recently, he said, the launch of Galileo Initial Services in 2016, the sale of millions of Galileo compatible devices in 2017, and the fact that 95% of chipsets now on the market are Galileo compatible, all of this is triggering a new wave of more precise navigation services for the masses. "And this is a perfect situation for the European industries to increase their market share," he concluded.

            For more details on this year's GSA challenge and the prizes, see www.esnc.eu/prize/gsa-2018.

            For more about the European Satellite Navigation Competition, see www.esnc.eu.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides (right) and AZO Managing Director Thorsten Rudolph launch the ESNC at the GRC in Noordwijk

            2018 European Satellite Navigation Competition launched at GRC inauguration

            23.5.2018 9:34  
            Published: 
            23 May 2018

            Organizers launched the 2018 edition of the European Satellite Navigation Competition, known as the ‘Galileo Masters’, on 16 May at the GSA's new Galileo Reference Centre in Noordwijk, highlighting the long-standing partnership between the GSA and the Competition.

            The race is on to come up with 2018's most innovative and marketable European GNSS (EGNSS) applications. For the European GNSS Agency (GSA), the European Satellite Navigation Competition (ESNC) represents an important means for scouting new downstream business ideas that harness satellite navigation. As such, it is directly in line with one of the Agency's key objectives– to help foster the best use and widest uptake of EGNSS.

            The ESNC launch took place in conjunction with the inauguration of the GSA's new Galileo Reference Centre (GRC) in Noordwijk. Carlo des Dorides, Executive Director of the GSA said: “The European Satellite Navigation Competition is a unique platform for promoting Galileo and EGNOS. It is an innovation competition providing a gateway to a wide range of useful business applications based on European GNSS. This is why the GSA is a proud partner and has been hosting its own special ESNC challenge since 2008.”

            Over the past ten years, he said, the GSA has received more than 800 proposals, with full business cases, in response to its ESNC challenge, and it has awarded prizes on topics including E-mobility, augmented reality (AR), unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV), the internet of things (IoT) and others.

            This year, the GSA will award three prizes addressing the topic 'When and Where? – Exact timing and positioning matters', with special consideration being given to proposals that leverage EGNSS differentiators, such as:

            • Multiple frequencies E1, E5 and E6
            • Galileo-specific signal modulation, e.g. AltBOC
            • Galileo Search and Rescue Service
            • High-precision and authentication services that will be provided by Galileo, i.e. within the Commercial Service and within the Open Service authentication (OS NMA)

            Cash prizes of €3000, €5000 and €7000 will be awarded to the top three proposals. In addition, the first prize winner will benefit from extensive promotion through GSA marketing channels and at relevant industry events and, if eligible, will receive tailored EGNSS Accelerator business support worth €62,000.

            Lending some perspective

            Thorsten Rudolph is Managing Director of Anwendungszentrum GmbH Oberpfaffenhofen (AZO), co-founder of the ESNC along with the German Aerospace Centre (DLR) and the Bavarian Ministry of Economic Affairs and Media. He said: "While the GSA has been with us as a key sponsor for a decade, the ESNC Galileo Masters is actually celebrating its 15th year." Over this time, he said, more than 11,500 individuals have participated in the Competition, and it has provided a total of €11 million to fund real, down-to-earth start-ups, products and services.

            "As a matter of fact," Rudolph said, "the Director of this beautiful new GRC, Peter Buist, himself won the ESNC South Holland Challenge in 2011, and when we see where he is today I think we can consider this a real ESNC success story!"

            Rudolph recalled the early years of the Competition: "When we started, most of today's satellite navigation apps were not yet invented. And since then the number of new companies, business cases and applications has constantly increased and has led to a boom in the consumer market."

            More recently, he said, the launch of Galileo Initial Services in 2016, the sale of millions of Galileo compatible devices in 2017, and the fact that 95% of chipsets now on the market are Galileo compatible, all of this is triggering a new wave of more precise navigation services for the masses. "And this is a perfect situation for the European industries to increase their market share," he concluded.

            For more details on this year's GSA challenge and the prizes, see www.esnc.eu/prize/gsa-2018.

            For more about the European Satellite Navigation Competition, see www.esnc.eu.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides (right) and AZO Managing Director Thorsten Rudolph launch the ESNC at the GRC in Noordwijk

            Bruno Vermeire appointed chair of the Security Accreditation Board

            22.5.2018 9:30  
            New EU GNSS SAB Chair Bruno Vermeire
            Published: 
            22 May 2018

            The European GNSS Agency (GSA) congratulates Bruno Vermeire on his appointment as the new EU GNSS Security Accreditation Board (SAB) chair and thanks outgoing chair Jeremy Blyth for his dedicated service. The SAB chairperson is responsible for representing the GSA on security accreditation matters.

            In taking up his position, the newly appointed SAB chair Bruno Vermeire, who is currently Head of Information Security at the National Security Authority Belgium, highlighted the complexity of security accreditation for the European space programmes. “Security accreditation of EGNOS and Galileo is a very complex exercise. It is an honour that the EU Member States have placed their confidence in me as their Chairman. I will work very hard with my colleagues on the accreditation board and the programme to accommodate the security requirements in this magnificent European programme to the best extent possible,” he said.

            Outgoing chair Jeremy Blyth highlighted that, during his four-year term, the SAB had jointly made some important and challenging decisions that have enabled the flagship Galileo programme to progress and deliver the services that European citizens deserve, in a secure manner.

            “It has been an honour and a privilege to have had the confidence and friendship of my EU Member State colleagues during my mandate as their Chairman of the EU GNSS Security Accreditation Board,” he said, adding: “In Bruno Vermeire, I know my colleagues in the SAB have chosen a dedicated professional and a leader who will enable. I wish you all, and the programme, the very best for the future.”

            The outgoing and incoming EU GNSS SAB Chairs Jeremy Blyth and Bruno Vermeire

            The outgoing and incoming EU GNSS SAB Chairs Jeremy Blyth and Bruno Vermeire

            GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides expressed his gratitude to the outgoing SAB chairman: “I would like to thank Jeremy Blyth for his great work over the four years of his mandate. He has guided SAB with his many sound and balanced decisions and has made a valuable contribution to the Galileo programme.”

            Core activity

            Security is one of the core activities entrusted to the GSA by the European Commission. The Agency is responsible for the security accreditation of the European GNSS systems and is charged with verifying compliance with the applicable security rules and regulations established by the Council and the European Commission.

            To meet this obligation, an independent Security Accreditation Board (SAB) was set up as one of the three official bodies of the GSA, together with the Administration Board and the Executive Director. The SAB is the sole Security Accreditation Authority of the European GNSS systems and acts independently of the authorities in charge of the programmes, notably the European Commission, the European Space Agency (ESA) and the rest of the GSA.

            The SAB is composed of one representative per Member State, one representative from the Commission and one from the High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy. A representative of the ESA is also invited to attend SAB meetings as an observer. In specific situations, representatives of third countries or international organisations may also be invited to attend meetings as observers.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            New EU GNSS SAB Chair Bruno Vermeire

            Bruno Vermeire appointed chair of the Security Accreditation Board

            22.5.2018 9:30  
            New EU GNSS SAB Chair Bruno Vermeire
            Published: 
            22 May 2018

            The European GNSS Agency (GSA) congratulates Bruno Vermeire on his appointment as the new EU GNSS Security Accreditation Board (SAB) chair and thanks outgoing chair Jeremy Blyth for his dedicated service. The SAB chairperson is responsible for representing the GSA on security accreditation matters.

            In taking up his position, the newly appointed SAB chair Bruno Vermeire, who is currently Head of Information Security at the National Security Authority Belgium, highlighted the complexity of security accreditation for the European space programmes. “Security accreditation of EGNOS and Galileo is a very complex exercise. It is an honour that the EU Member States have placed their confidence in me as their Chairman. I will work very hard with my colleagues on the accreditation board and the programme to accommodate the security requirements in this magnificent European programme to the best extent possible,” he said.

            Outgoing chair Jeremy Blyth highlighted that, during his four-year term, the SAB had jointly made some important and challenging decisions that have enabled the flagship Galileo programme to progress and deliver the services that European citizens deserve, in a secure manner.

            “It has been an honour and a privilege to have had the confidence and friendship of my EU Member State colleagues during my mandate as their Chairman of the EU GNSS Security Accreditation Board,” he said, adding: “In Bruno Vermeire, I know my colleagues in the SAB have chosen a dedicated professional and a leader who will enable. I wish you all, and the programme, the very best for the future.”

            The outgoing and incoming EU GNSS SAB Chairs Jeremy Blyth and Bruno Vermeire

            The outgoing and incoming EU GNSS SAB Chairs Jeremy Blyth and Bruno Vermeire

            GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides expressed his gratitude to the outgoing SAB chairman: “I would like to thank Jeremy Blyth for his great work over the four years of his mandate. He has guided SAB with his many sound and balanced decisions and has made a valuable contribution to the Galileo programme.”

            Core activity

            Security is one of the core activities entrusted to the GSA by the European Commission. The Agency is responsible for the security accreditation of the European GNSS systems and is charged with verifying compliance with the applicable security rules and regulations established by the Council and the European Commission.

            To meet this obligation, an independent Security Accreditation Board (SAB) was set up as one of the three official bodies of the GSA, together with the Administration Board and the Executive Director. The SAB is the sole Security Accreditation Authority of the European GNSS systems and acts independently of the authorities in charge of the programmes, notably the European Commission, the European Space Agency (ESA) and the rest of the GSA.

            The SAB is composed of one representative per Member State, one representative from the Commission and one from the High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy. A representative of the ESA is also invited to attend SAB meetings as an observer. In specific situations, representatives of third countries or international organisations may also be invited to attend meetings as observers.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            New EU GNSS SAB Chair Bruno Vermeire

            Bruno Vermeire appointed chair of the Security Accreditation Board

            22.5.2018 9:30  
            New EU GNSS SAB Chair Bruno Vermeire
            Published: 
            22 May 2018

            The European GNSS Agency (GSA) congratulates Bruno Vermeire on his appointment as the new EU GNSS Security Accreditation Board (SAB) chair and thanks outgoing chair Jeremy Blyth for his dedicated service. The SAB chairperson is responsible for representing the GSA on security accreditation matters.

            In taking up his position, the newly appointed SAB chair Bruno Vermeire, who is currently Head of Information Security at the National Security Authority Belgium, highlighted the complexity of security accreditation for the European space programmes. “Security accreditation of EGNOS and Galileo is a very complex exercise. It is an honour that the EU Member States have placed their confidence in me as their Chairman. I will work very hard with my colleagues on the accreditation board and the programme to accommodate the security requirements in this magnificent European programme to the best extent possible,” he said.

            Outgoing chair Jeremy Blyth highlighted that, during his four-year term, the SAB had jointly made some important and challenging decisions that have enabled the flagship Galileo programme to progress and deliver the services that European citizens deserve, in a secure manner.

            “It has been an honour and a privilege to have had the confidence and friendship of my EU Member State colleagues during my mandate as their Chairman of the EU GNSS Security Accreditation Board,” he said, adding: “In Bruno Vermeire, I know my colleagues in the SAB have chosen a dedicated professional and a leader who will enable. I wish you all, and the programme, the very best for the future.”

            The outgoing and incoming EU GNSS SAB Chairs Jeremy Blyth and Bruno Vermeire

            The outgoing and incoming EU GNSS SAB Chairs Jeremy Blyth and Bruno Vermeire

            GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides expressed his gratitude to the outgoing SAB chairman: “I would like to thank Jeremy Blyth for his great work over the four years of his mandate. He has guided SAB with his many sound and balanced decisions and has made a valuable contribution to the Galileo programme.”

            Core activity

            Security is one of the core activities entrusted to the GSA by the European Commission. The Agency is responsible for the security accreditation of the European GNSS systems and is charged with verifying compliance with the applicable security rules and regulations established by the Council and the European Commission.

            To meet this obligation, an independent Security Accreditation Board (SAB) was set up as one of the three official bodies of the GSA, together with the Administration Board and the Executive Director. The SAB is the sole Security Accreditation Authority of the European GNSS systems and acts independently of the authorities in charge of the programmes, notably the European Commission, the European Space Agency (ESA) and the rest of the GSA.

            The SAB is composed of one representative per Member State, one representative from the Commission and one from the High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy. A representative of the ESA is also invited to attend SAB meetings as an observer. In specific situations, representatives of third countries or international organisations may also be invited to attend meetings as observers.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            New EU GNSS SAB Chair Bruno Vermeire

            Galileo Reference Centre now officially open

            18.5.2018 15:29  
            Published: 
            18 May 2018

            The official inauguration of the Galileo Reference Centre took place on 16 May 2018 in Noordwijk, the Netherlands. The Centre represents another crucial Galileo Programme element now in place, supporting the provision of services to the core system and its users.

            Speaking at the Galileo Reference Centre (GRC) inauguration event in Noordwijk, which also comprised a short seminar, Pierre Delsaux, Deputy Director-General of the European Commission's DG GROW said, "I love the slogan: 'Linking Space and User Needs'. This is exactly what we want – new services based on space systems, bringing these services to new consumers, which means economic growth and more jobs for European citizens."

            The role of public authorities like the Commission, Delsaux said, is to provide the tools that allow businesses and new start-ups to realise their ideas, and with tools like EGNOS, Galileo and Copernicus, the Union is indeed providing a very powerful set of tools. Galileo is now well into its service provision phase, European GNSS is a reality, and the way is now clear for exploitation.

            Minister Cora van Nieuwenhuizen officially inaugurated the Galileo Reference Centre (GRC)

            Minister Cora van Nieuwenhuizen officially inaugurated the Galileo Reference Centre (GRC)

            "Using satellites is more important than launching them," Delsaux said. "People need to be aware of all that is made possible by space. We want our businesses to grow and use space. We are investing money, and that money is being invested in Europe and by Europe because we want economic benefits for Europe."

            GRC an important new player

            Galileo is operated and maintained under the aegis of the European GNSS Agency (GSA). One of the GSA's most vital tasks is to work to keep end-user needs at the centre of the Galileo Programme, and the new GRC will be an important part of that process, monitoring the additional accuracy and availability delivered by Galileo and the disseminating this information free of charge.

            GRC Manager Peter Buist provided a clear description of the Centre's mission:

            • Performing independent monitoring and assessment of Galileo service provision;
            • Assessing, when feasible, the compatibility and interoperability of Galileo vis-a-vis other GNSS;
            • Providing service performance expertise to the Programme;
            • Supporting investigations of service performance and service degradations;
            • Providing an archiving service for performance data over the nominal operational lifetime of the system; and
            • Integrating data and products from EU Member States, and Norway and Switzerland.

            Among GRC deliverables are regular reports, on daily, monthly and quarterly bases. "The first quarterly report is already available," Buist said, "and it reveals excellent performance by Galileo, much better than the 7m accuracy target, in spite of the fact that the full system is not yet deployed."

            The GRC architecture is fully independent of the Galileo Service Operator (GSOp) and monitors each Galileo service against Key Performance Indicators and Figures of Merit.

            Buist stressed the consolidating role of the GRC, bringing together information from all possible data sources to assess and provide information on Galileo performance. "We of course have our own advanced hardware and other technical facilities here at the GRC, but we are also maintaining good relationships with the EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, where they have a lot of their own national expertise and resources that can help us with additional information to monitor GNSS performances. And this also extends to our international partners – that's GPS, GLONASS, and so forth – with whom we have agreed to monitoring the various GNSS systems."

            Galileo on a roll

            The new levels of GNSS performance provided by Galileo will enable a range of new applications and services, a few of which were outlined by GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. He started by reflecting on the past two years, which saw, among other things, the rapid completion of the GRC itself. "It's a special feeling to see this new building, this beautiful centre," he said, "and we do want to thank the European Space Agency, with  ESTEC just nearby, for hosting us in the interim. We have here a very good example of meaningful working relationship with ESA and it is a great thing to be with them in Noordwijk.

            Long-time space proponent and host of the Noordwijk event, , now Dutch Minister for Infrastructure and Water Management, also had positive words to say about the location: "The potential synergy that we have here, now with the GRC and with ESA ESTEC, this is an important concentration of knowledge and people."

            GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides (right), Dutch Minister for Infrastructure and Water Management Cora van Nieuwenhuizen, and DG GROW Deputy Director-General Pierre Delsaux at GRC inauguration

            GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides (right), Dutch Minister for Infrastructure and Water Management Cora van Nieuwenhuizen, and DG GROW Deputy Director-General Pierre Delsaux at GRC inauguration.

            "As for Galileo," des Dorides continued, "we have a commitment to a specific level of performance, and there are more satellite launches coming this year and more services. We will have the authentication feature and a new high-accuracy service coming soon. So Galileo is very quickly taking shape and taking its place in the world market."

            Des Dorides mentioned clear opportunities in the automotive sector, with connected cars and automated cars not too far in the future. "By 2025," he said, "the market for automotive-related GNSS is now projected at 22 to 26 billion dollars per year, so this is a new frontier. Galileo will be a fundamental part of the future multi-constellation, high-accuracy, fast time-to-first-fix, and dual-frequency GNSS environment."

            Civil aviation, unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) and rail transport sectors, des Dorides said, also represent key opportunities for the GNSS industry, but there are many others.

            Coming back to the immediate subject of the event, des Dorides said, "This GRC is here to monitor and assess independently the performance of Galileo, and we think this could potentially also serve a secondary role in the sense of establishing the important element of trustworthiness, especially for the safety-of-life applications, like aviation and other safety-critical applications. This is clearly a potential area of growth for the GRC."

            For the last words, we return to Pierre Delsaux: "We've heard it here today – we have heard so many great ideas – it is clear that space is now fundamental to economic growth. If we don't do it, someone else will." And he recalled the words he heard himself as a young student in France in May '68: "L'magination au pouvior! Power to imagination!" words that, in this very new context, are still as inspirational as they were 50 years ago.

              

            The GRC helps turn Earth into art

            Dutch law requires 1% of new building budgets be allocated to artistic works. The GRC dedicated its contribution to the new 'Galileo Painted Earth' app, launched at the GRC inauguration event in Noordwijk.

            With this app, anyone and everyone with a GNSS-equipped smartphone can be part of the process. By moving around in the real world, participants 'paint' virtually on canvas Earth. The result is cumulative over time, so one day participants may see the entire world 'painted' on their screens.

            The Painted Earth web site offers a number of features and viewing options: https://painted.earth/.

              

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            The Galileo Reference Centre was inaugurated on 16 May 2018 in Noordwijk, the Netherlands

            Galileo Reference Centre now officially open

            18.5.2018 15:29  
            Published: 
            18 May 2018

            The official inauguration of the Galileo Reference Centre took place on 16 May 2018 in Noordwijk, the Netherlands. The Centre represents another crucial Galileo Programme element now in place, supporting the provision of services to the core system and its users.

            Speaking at the Galileo Reference Centre (GRC) inauguration event in Noordwijk, which also comprised a short seminar, Pierre Delsaux, Deputy Director-General of the European Commission's DG GROW said, "I love the slogan: 'Linking Space and User Needs'. This is exactly what we want – new services based on space systems, bringing these services to new consumers, which means economic growth and more jobs for European citizens."

            The role of public authorities like the Commission, Delsaux said, is to provide the tools that allow businesses and new start-ups to realise their ideas, and with tools like EGNOS, Galileo and Copernicus, the Union is indeed providing a very powerful set of tools. Galileo is now well into its service provision phase, European GNSS is a reality, and the way is now clear for exploitation.

            Minister Cora van Nieuwenhuizen officially inaugurated the Galileo Reference Centre (GRC)

            Minister Cora van Nieuwenhuizen officially inaugurated the Galileo Reference Centre (GRC)

            "Using satellites is more important than launching them," Delsaux said. "People need to be aware of all that is made possible by space. We want our businesses to grow and use space. We are investing money, and that money is being invested in Europe and by Europe because we want economic benefits for Europe."

            GRC an important new player

            Galileo is operated and maintained under the aegis of the European GNSS Agency (GSA). One of the GSA's most vital tasks is to work to keep end-user needs at the centre of the Galileo Programme, and the new GRC will be an important part of that process, monitoring the additional accuracy and availability delivered by Galileo and the disseminating this information free of charge.

            GRC Manager Peter Buist provided a clear description of the Centre's mission:

            • Performing independent monitoring and assessment of Galileo service provision;
            • Assessing, when feasible, the compatibility and interoperability of Galileo vis-a-vis other GNSS;
            • Providing service performance expertise to the Programme;
            • Supporting investigations of service performance and service degradations;
            • Providing an archiving service for performance data over the nominal operational lifetime of the system; and
            • Integrating data and products from EU Member States, and Norway and Switzerland.

            Among GRC deliverables are regular reports, on daily, monthly and quarterly bases. "The first quarterly report is already available," Buist said, "and it reveals excellent performance by Galileo, much better than the 7m accuracy target, in spite of the fact that the full system is not yet deployed."

            The GRC architecture is fully independent of the Galileo Service Operator (GSOp) and monitors each Galileo service against Key Performance Indicators and Figures of Merit.

            Buist stressed the consolidating role of the GRC, bringing together information from all possible data sources to assess and provide information on Galileo performance. "We of course have our own advanced hardware and other technical facilities here at the GRC, but we are also maintaining good relationships with the EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, where they have a lot of their own national expertise and resources that can help us with additional information to monitor GNSS performances. And this also extends to our international partners – that's GPS, GLONASS, and so forth – with whom we have agreed to monitoring the various GNSS systems."

            Galileo on a roll

            The new levels of GNSS performance provided by Galileo will enable a range of new applications and services, a few of which were outlined by GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. He started by reflecting on the past two years, which saw, among other things, the rapid completion of the GRC itself. "It's a special feeling to see this new building, this beautiful centre," he said, "and we do want to thank the European Space Agency, with  ESTEC just nearby, for hosting us in the interim. We have here a very good example of meaningful working relationship with ESA and it is a great thing to be with them in Noordwijk.

            Long-time space proponent and host of the Noordwijk event, , now Dutch Minister for Infrastructure and Water Management, also had positive words to say about the location: "The potential synergy that we have here, now with the GRC and with ESA ESTEC, this is an important concentration of knowledge and people."

            GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides (right), Dutch Minister for Infrastructure and Water Management Cora van Nieuwenhuizen, and DG GROW Deputy Director-General Pierre Delsaux at GRC inauguration

            GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides (right), Dutch Minister for Infrastructure and Water Management Cora van Nieuwenhuizen, and DG GROW Deputy Director-General Pierre Delsaux at GRC inauguration.

            "As for Galileo," des Dorides continued, "we have a commitment to a specific level of performance, and there are more satellite launches coming this year and more services. We will have the authentication feature and a new high-accuracy service coming soon. So Galileo is very quickly taking shape and taking its place in the world market."

            Des Dorides mentioned clear opportunities in the automotive sector, with connected cars and automated cars not too far in the future. "By 2025," he said, "the market for automotive-related GNSS is now projected at 22 to 26 billion dollars per year, so this is a new frontier. Galileo will be a fundamental part of the future multi-constellation, high-accuracy, fast time-to-first-fix, and dual-frequency GNSS environment."

            Civil aviation, unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) and rail transport sectors, des Dorides said, also represent key opportunities for the GNSS industry, but there are many others.

            Coming back to the immediate subject of the event, des Dorides said, "This GRC is here to monitor and assess independently the performance of Galileo, and we think this could potentially also serve a secondary role in the sense of establishing the important element of trustworthiness, especially for the safety-of-life applications, like aviation and other safety-critical applications. This is clearly a potential area of growth for the GRC."

            For the last words, we return to Pierre Delsaux: "We've heard it here today – we have heard so many great ideas – it is clear that space is now fundamental to economic growth. If we don't do it, someone else will." And he recalled the words he heard himself as a young student in France in May '68: "L'magination au pouvior! Power to imagination!" words that, in this very new context, are still as inspirational as they were 50 years ago.

              

            The GRC helps turn Earth into art

            Dutch law requires 1% of new building budgets be allocated to artistic works. The GRC dedicated its contribution to the new 'Galileo Painted Earth' app, launched at the GRC inauguration event in Noordwijk.

            With this app, anyone and everyone with a GNSS-equipped smartphone can be part of the process. By moving around in the real world, participants 'paint' virtually on canvas Earth. The result is cumulative over time, so one day participants may see the entire world 'painted' on their screens.

            The Painted Earth web site offers a number of features and viewing options: https://painted.earth/.

              

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            The Galileo Reference Centre was inaugurated on 16 May 2018 in Noordwijk, the Netherlands

            Galileo Reference Centre now officially open

            18.5.2018 15:29  
            Published: 
            18 May 2018

            The official inauguration of the Galileo Reference Centre took place on 16 May 2018 in Noordwijk, the Netherlands. The Centre represents another crucial Galileo Programme element now in place, supporting the provision of services to the core system and its users.

            Speaking at the Galileo Reference Centre (GRC) inauguration event in Noordwijk, which also comprised a short seminar, Pierre Delsaux, Deputy Director-General of the European Commission's DG GROW said, "I love the slogan: 'Linking Space and User Needs'. This is exactly what we want – new services based on space systems, bringing these services to new consumers, which means economic growth and more jobs for European citizens."

            The role of public authorities like the Commission, Delsaux said, is to provide the tools that allow businesses and new start-ups to realise their ideas, and with tools like EGNOS, Galileo and Copernicus, the Union is indeed providing a very powerful set of tools. Galileo is now well into its service provision phase, European GNSS is a reality, and the way is now clear for exploitation.

            Minister Cora van Nieuwenhuizen officially inaugurated the Galileo Reference Centre (GRC)

            Minister Cora van Nieuwenhuizen officially inaugurated the Galileo Reference Centre (GRC)

            "Using satellites is more important than launching them," Delsaux said. "People need to be aware of all that is made possible by space. We want our businesses to grow and use space. We are investing money, and that money is being invested in Europe and by Europe because we want economic benefits for Europe."

            GRC an important new player

            Galileo is operated and maintained under the aegis of the European GNSS Agency (GSA). One of the GSA's most vital tasks is to work to keep end-user needs at the centre of the Galileo Programme, and the new GRC will be an important part of that process, monitoring the additional accuracy and availability delivered by Galileo and the disseminating this information free of charge.

            GRC Manager Peter Buist provided a clear description of the Centre's mission:

            • Performing independent monitoring and assessment of Galileo service provision;
            • Assessing, when feasible, the compatibility and interoperability of Galileo vis-a-vis other GNSS;
            • Providing service performance expertise to the Programme;
            • Supporting investigations of service performance and service degradations;
            • Providing an archiving service for performance data over the nominal operational lifetime of the system; and
            • Integrating data and products from EU Member States, and Norway and Switzerland.

            Among GRC deliverables are regular reports, on daily, monthly and quarterly bases. "The first quarterly report is already available," Buist said, "and it reveals excellent performance by Galileo, much better than the 7m accuracy target, in spite of the fact that the full system is not yet deployed."

            The GRC architecture is fully independent of the Galileo Service Operator (GSOp) and monitors each Galileo service against Key Performance Indicators and Figures of Merit.

            Buist stressed the consolidating role of the GRC, bringing together information from all possible data sources to assess and provide information on Galileo performance. "We of course have our own advanced hardware and other technical facilities here at the GRC, but we are also maintaining good relationships with the EU Member States, where they have a lot of their own national expertise and resources that can help us with additional information to monitor GNSS performances. And this also extends to our international partners – that's GPS, GLONASS, and so forth – with whom we have agreements on monitoring the various GNSS systems."

            Galileo on a roll

            The new levels of GNSS performance provided by Galileo will enable a range of new applications and services, a few of which were outlined by GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. He started by reflecting on the past two years, which saw, among other things, the rapid completion of the GRC itself. "It's a special feeling to see this new building, this beautiful centre," he said, "and we do want to thank the European Space Agency, with  ESTEC just nearby, for hosting us in the interim. We have here a very good example of a meaningful working relationship with ESA and it is a great thing to be with them in Noordwijk.

            Long-time space proponent and host of the Noordwijk event, , now Dutch Minister for Infrastructure and Water Management, also had positive words to say about the location: "The potential synergy that we have here, now with the GRC and with ESA ESTEC, this is an important concentration of knowledge and people."

            GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides (right), Dutch Minister for Infrastructure and Water Management Cora van Nieuwenhuizen, and DG GROW Deputy Director-General Pierre Delsaux at GRC inauguration

            GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides (right), Dutch Minister for Infrastructure and Water Management Cora van Nieuwenhuizen, and DG GROW Deputy Director-General Pierre Delsaux at GRC inauguration.

            "As for Galileo," des Dorides continued, "we have a commitment to a specific level of performance, and there are more satellite launches coming this year and more services. We will have the authentication feature and a new high-accuracy service coming soon. So Galileo is very quickly taking shape and taking its place in the world market."

            Des Dorides mentioned clear opportunities in the automotive sector, with connected cars and automated cars not too far in the future. "By 2025," he said, "the market for automotive-related GNSS is now projected at 22 to 26 billion dollars per year, so this is a new frontier. Galileo will be a fundamental part of the future multi-constellation, high-accuracy, fast time-to-first-fix, and dual-frequency GNSS environment."

            Civil aviation, unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) and rail transport sectors, des Dorides said, also represent key opportunities for the GNSS industry, but there are many others.

            Coming back to the immediate subject of the event, des Dorides said, "This GRC is here to monitor and assess independently the performance of Galileo, and we think this could potentially also serve a secondary role in the sense of establishing the important element of trustworthiness, especially for the safety-of-life applications, like aviation and other safety-critical applications. This is clearly a potential area of growth for the GRC."

            For the last words, we return to Pierre Delsaux: "We've heard it here today – we have heard so many great ideas – it is clear that space is now fundamental to economic growth. If we don't do it, someone else will." And he recalled the words he heard himself as a young student in France in May '68: "L'magination au pouvior! Power to imagination!" words that, in this very new context, are still as inspirational as they were 50 years ago.

              

            The GRC helps turn Earth into art

            Dutch law requires 1% of new building budgets be allocated to artistic works. The GRC dedicated its contribution to the new 'Galileo Painted Earth' app, launched at the GRC inauguration event in Noordwijk.

            With this app, anyone and everyone with a GNSS-equipped smartphone can be part of the process. By moving around in the real world, participants 'paint' virtually on canvas Earth. The result is cumulative over time, so one day participants may see the entire world 'painted' on their screens.

            The Painted Earth web site offers a number of features and viewing options: https://painted.earth/.

              

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            The Galileo Reference Centre was inaugurated on 16 May 2018 in Noordwijk, the Netherlands

            Galileo Reference Centre now officially open

            18.5.2018 15:29  
            Published: 
            18 May 2018

            The official inauguration of the Galileo Reference Centre took place on 16 May 2018 in Noordwijk, the Netherlands. The Centre represents another crucial Galileo Programme element now in place, supporting the provision of services to the core system and its users.

            Speaking at the Galileo Reference Centre (GRC) inauguration event in Noordwijk, which also comprised a short seminar, Pierre Delsaux, Deputy Director-General of the European Commission's DG GROW said, "I love the slogan: 'Linking Space and User Needs'. This is exactly what we want – new services based on space systems, bringing these services to new consumers, which means economic growth and more jobs for European citizens."

            The role of public authorities like the Commission, Delsaux said, is to provide the tools that allow businesses and new start-ups to realise their ideas, and with tools like EGNOS, Galileo and Copernicus, the Union is indeed providing a very powerful set of tools. Galileo is now well into its service provision phase, European GNSS is a reality, and the way is now clear for exploitation.

            Minister Cora van Nieuwenhuizen officially inaugurated the Galileo Reference Centre (GRC)

            Minister Cora van Nieuwenhuizen officially inaugurated the Galileo Reference Centre (GRC)

            "Using satellites is more important than launching them," Delsaux said. "People need to be aware of all that is made possible by space. We want our businesses to grow and use space. We are investing money, and that money is being invested in Europe and by Europe because we want economic benefits for Europe."

            GRC an important new player

            Galileo is operated and maintained under the aegis of the European GNSS Agency (GSA). One of the GSA's most vital tasks is to work to keep end-user needs at the centre of the Galileo Programme, and the new GRC will be an important part of that process, monitoring the additional accuracy and availability delivered by Galileo and the disseminating this information free of charge.

            GRC Manager Peter Buist provided a clear description of the Centre's mission:

            • Performing independent monitoring and assessment of Galileo service provision;
            • Assessing, when feasible, the compatibility and interoperability of Galileo vis-a-vis other GNSS;
            • Providing service performance expertise to the Programme;
            • Supporting investigations of service performance and service degradations;
            • Providing an archiving service for performance data over the nominal operational lifetime of the system; and
            • Integrating data and products from EU Member States, and Norway and Switzerland.

            Among GRC deliverables are regular reports, on daily, monthly and quarterly bases. "The first quarterly report is already available," Buist said, "and it reveals excellent performance by Galileo, much better than the 7m accuracy target, in spite of the fact that the full system is not yet deployed."

            The GRC architecture is fully independent of the Galileo Service Operator (GSOp) and monitors each Galileo service against Key Performance Indicators and Figures of Merit.

            Buist stressed the consolidating role of the GRC, bringing together information from all possible data sources to assess and provide information on Galileo performance. "We of course have our own advanced hardware and other technical facilities here at the GRC, but we are also maintaining good relationships with the EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, where they have a lot of their own national expertise and resources that can help us with additional information to monitor GNSS performances. And this also extends to our international partners – that's GPS, GLONASS, and so forth – with whom we have agreed to monitoring the various GNSS systems."

            Galileo on a roll

            The new levels of GNSS performance provided by Galileo will enable a range of new applications and services, a few of which were outlined by GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. He started by reflecting on the past two years, which saw, among other things, the rapid completion of the GRC itself. "It's a special feeling to see this new building, this beautiful centre," he said, "and we do want to thank the European Space Agency, with  ESTEC just nearby, for hosting us in the interim. We have here a very good example of meaningful working relationship with ESA and it is a great thing to be with them in Noordwijk.

            Long-time space proponent and host of the Noordwijk event, , now Dutch Minister for Infrastructure and Water Management, also had positive words to say about the location: "The potential synergy that we have here, now with the GRC and with ESA ESTEC, this is an important concentration of knowledge and people."

            GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides (right), Dutch Minister for Infrastructure and Water Management Cora van Nieuwenhuizen, and DG GROW Deputy Director-General Pierre Delsaux at GRC inauguration

            GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides (right), Dutch Minister for Infrastructure and Water Management Cora van Nieuwenhuizen, and DG GROW Deputy Director-General Pierre Delsaux at GRC inauguration.

            "As for Galileo," des Dorides continued, "we have a commitment to a specific level of performance, and there are more satellite launches coming this year and more services. We will have the authentication feature and a new high-accuracy service coming soon. So Galileo is very quickly taking shape and taking its place in the world market."

            Des Dorides mentioned clear opportunities in the automotive sector, with connected cars and automated cars not too far in the future. "By 2025," he said, "the market for automotive-related GNSS is now projected at 22 to 26 billion dollars per year, so this is a new frontier. Galileo will be a fundamental part of the future multi-constellation, high-accuracy, fast time-to-first-fix, and dual-frequency GNSS environment."

            Civil aviation, unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) and rail transport sectors, des Dorides said, also represent key opportunities for the GNSS industry, but there are many others.

            Coming back to the immediate subject of the event, des Dorides said, "This GRC is here to monitor and assess independently the performance of Galileo, and we think this could potentially also serve a secondary role in the sense of establishing the important element of trustworthiness, especially for the safety-of-life applications, like aviation and other safety-critical applications. This is clearly a potential area of growth for the GRC."

            For the last words, we return to Pierre Delsaux: "We've heard it here today – we have heard so many great ideas – it is clear that space is now fundamental to economic growth. If we don't do it, someone else will." And he recalled the words he heard himself as a young student in France in May '68: "L'magination au pouvior! Power to imagination!" words that, in this very new context, are still as inspirational as they were 50 years ago.

              

            The GRC helps turn Earth into art

            Dutch law requires 1% of new building budgets be allocated to artistic works. The GRC dedicated its contribution to the new 'Galileo Painted Earth' app, launched at the GRC inauguration event in Noordwijk.

            With this app, anyone and everyone with a GNSS-equipped smartphone can be part of the process. By moving around in the real world, participants 'paint' virtually on canvas Earth. The result is cumulative over time, so one day participants may see the entire world 'painted' on their screens.

            The Painted Earth web site offers a number of features and viewing options: https://painted.earth/.

              

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            The Galileo Reference Centre was inaugurated on 16 May 2018 in Noordwijk, the Netherlands

            Galileo both an enabler and a model for space businesses

            18.5.2018 9:37  
            Galileo is enabling business services and applications in a range of sectors.
            Published: 
            18 May 2018

            EGNSS is not only a business enabler, providing the data needed for countless new services and applications, the ‘Galileo model’ can also serve as a template for nascent space businesses, ensuring that they reap the greatest possible economic benefit from their efforts, according to speakers at the Challenges in Arctic Navigation workshop in Olos, Muonio, Finland on 16-18 April.

            Participants in the Arctic navigation workshop noted that GNSS is no longer a breakthrough technology - it is already a business enabler that is used as the basis for service provision in many sectors, and the opportunities provided by GNSS are being embraced by the business community both in the Arctic region and elsewhere.

            Enabling business development

            At the workshop, Pauli Stigell, a senior advisor at Business Finland, spoke about his organisation’s New Space Economy programme, which funds start-ups and provides export services for space-related businesses. He said that the programme aims to double the exports of participating companies by 2020 while achieving an annual turnover of at least EUR 600 million in services within the sector. Stigell noted in particular the business-enabling potential of Galileo. “Galileo will be ready in 2020 and this will definitely create business,” he said.

            A number of factors that might potentially hamper the development of GNSS-based businesses in the Arctic were highlighted during the workshop presentations. These included low satellite coverage and that the fact that signals in the Arctic region are vulnerable to space weather and ionospheric scintillation. However, it was also noted that the expansion of EGNOS coverage, along with new receiver designs and navigation systems, would improve redundancy and help mitigate the impact of these negative factors.

            Watch this: EGNOS is Growing

            In his presentation, Gian Gherardo Calini, the GSA’s Head of Market Development, highlighted funding opportunities that would address these restraining factors and contribute to the development of the EGNSS market in the Arctic region. He highlighted two open calls in particular:

            Galileo business model

            During the workshop presentations, speakers noted that not only is Galileo an enabler of new businesses, services and applications; Galileo’s operating model can be used as a template for the commercial satellite sector. It was noted that the life-cycle of small commercial satellites of three to five years, or even of the larger commercial satellites, costing around EUR 100 million, of 10 years, is a very short time in which to build a business ecosystem on the ground.

            In these conditions, it is crucial that businesses leveraging satellite technology are able to ramp up their service to a minimum service configuration, like the EU has been doing with Galileo, Juha-Matti Liukkonen, Director of Space and New Technologies at Reaktor, said.  “You start a minimum service as soon as possible to establish the viability of the business case and then you add capacity and coverage. Incremental development is the way to go,” he said.

            Galileo launched its initial services in December 2016, when it had 18 satellites in orbit, which means that the system has started providing positioning, navigation and timing services to users around the world long before the constellation reaches full capacity in 2020.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            Galileo is enabling business services and applications in a range of sectors.

            Galileo both an enabler and a model for space businesses

            18.5.2018 9:37  
            Galileo is enabling business services and applications in a range of sectors.
            Published: 
            18 May 2018

            EGNSS is not only a business enabler, providing the data needed for countless new services and applications, the ‘Galileo model’ can also serve as a template for nascent space businesses, ensuring that they reap the greatest possible economic benefit from their efforts, according to speakers at the Challenges in Arctic Navigation workshop in Olos, Muonio, Finland on 16-18 April.

            Participants in the Arctic navigation workshop noted that GNSS is no longer a breakthrough technology - it is already a business enabler that is used as the basis for service provision in many sectors, and the opportunities provided by GNSS are being embraced by the business community both in the Arctic region and elsewhere.

            Enabling business development

            At the workshop, Pauli Stigell, a senior advisor at Business Finland, spoke about his organisation’s New Space Economy programme, which funds start-ups and provides export services for space-related businesses. He said that the programme aims to double the exports of participating companies by 2020 while achieving an annual turnover of at least EUR 600 million in services within the sector. Stigell noted in particular the business-enabling potential of Galileo. “Galileo will be ready in 2020 and this will definitely create business,” he said.

            A number of factors that might potentially hamper the development of GNSS-based businesses in the Arctic were highlighted during the workshop presentations. These included low satellite coverage and that the fact that signals in the Arctic region are vulnerable to space weather and ionospheric scintillation. However, it was also noted that the expansion of EGNOS coverage, along with new receiver designs and navigation systems, would improve redundancy and help mitigate the impact of these negative factors.

            Watch this: EGNOS is Growing

            In his presentation, Gian Gherardo Calini, the GSA’s Head of Market Development, highlighted funding opportunities that would address these restraining factors and contribute to the development of the EGNSS market in the Arctic region. He highlighted two open calls in particular:

            Galileo business model

            During the workshop presentations, speakers noted that not only is Galileo an enabler of new businesses, services and applications; Galileo’s operating model can be used as a template for the commercial satellite sector. It was noted that the life-cycle of small commercial satellites of three to five years, or even of the larger commercial satellites, costing around EUR 100 million, of 10 years, is a very short time in which to build a business ecosystem on the ground.

            In these conditions, it is crucial that businesses leveraging satellite technology are able to ramp up their service to a minimum service configuration, like the EU has been doing with Galileo, Juha-Matti Liukkonen, Director of Space and New Technologies at Reaktor, said.  “You start a minimum service as soon as possible to establish the viability of the business case and then you add capacity and coverage. Incremental development is the way to go,” he said.

            Galileo launched its initial services in December 2016, when it had 18 satellites in orbit, which means that the system has started providing positioning, navigation and timing services to users around the world long before the constellation reaches full capacity in 2020.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            Galileo is enabling business services and applications in a range of sectors.

            2018 CLGE Young Surveyors Prize open for submissions

            17.5.2018 12:38  
            Contenders for the GSA special prize should submit a paper describing how their project leverages Galileo, EGNOS or Copernicus
            Published: 
            17 May 2018

            The Council of European Geodetic Surveyors (CLGE), in partnership with the European GNSS Agency (GSA), has launched the seventh edition of its Young Surveyors Prize. The 2018 edition of the competition is open for submissions and, as in previous years, the GSA is sponsoring a special prize for ideas leveraging Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus.

            For the seventh consecutive year, the Young Surveyor’s Prize is inviting students of topography, GIS, geodesy, mapping and related studies to submit unique and innovative ideas in their field of expertise. Each winner or winning team stands to win a prize of EUR 1000.

            There are 5 categories in total: 

            • Geodesy, Topography,
            • Galileo, EGNOS, Copernicus,
            • GIS, Mapping,
            • Cadastre and Property Surveying,
            • Student and youngster engagement.

            The contest is open to all Bachelor and Masters students in the surveying sector or a related field from all European countries. The 2018 edition is also open to surveyors under the age of 36 or those who have been registered as surveyors for less than 10 years in a category - Student and youngster engagement. The winners will be invited an award ceremony, to be held during INTERGEO in Frankfurt on 17 October 2018.

            GSA Prize

            Applicants for the GSA special prize should submit a paper describing how their project leverages Galileo, EGNOS or Copernicus for use in professional receivers, mobile phones, drones, etc. before the 10 August 2018 by email at the address: contest@clge.eu. For further information please consult www.clge.eu/document. Papers that combine all three programmes are especially encouraged. The papers should not exceed 4000 words and should include an abstract of 300 words.

            Last year’s winner

            Last year’s winning entry in the Galileo, EGNOS, Copernicus category was Sander Varbla from the Tallinn University of Technology in Estonia. Varbla's paper, entitled 'Assessment of marine geoid models by ship-borne GNSS profiles', presented the results of a 2016 marine gravity and GNSS campaign carried out on board the Estonian Maritime Administration survey vessel 'Jakob Prei' in the West Estonian archipelago.

             

            For more information on how to apply please click here.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            Contenders for the GSA special prize should submit a paper describing how their project leverages Galileo, EGNOS or Copernicus

            2018 CLGE Young Surveyors Prize open for submissions

            17.5.2018 12:38  
            Contenders for the GSA special prize should submit a paper describing how their project leverages Galileo, EGNOS or Copernicus
            Published: 
            17 May 2018

            The Council of European Geodetic Surveyors (CLGE), in partnership with the European GNSS Agency (GSA), has launched the seventh edition of its Young Surveyors Prize. The 2018 edition of the competition is open for submissions and, as in previous years, the GSA is sponsoring a special prize for ideas leveraging Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus.

            For the seventh consecutive year, the Young Surveyor’s Prize is inviting students of topography, GIS, geodesy, mapping and related studies to submit unique and innovative ideas in their field of expertise. Each winner or winning team stands to win a prize of EUR 1000.

            There are 5 categories in total: 

            • Geodesy, Topography,
            • Galileo, EGNOS, Copernicus,
            • GIS, Mapping,
            • Cadastre and Property Surveying,
            • Student and youngster engagement.

            The contest is open to all Bachelor and Masters students in the surveying sector or a related field from all European countries. The 2018 edition is also open to surveyors under the age of 36 or those who have been registered as surveyors for less than 10 years in a category - Student and youngster engagement. The winners will be invited an award ceremony, to be held during INTERGEO in Frankfurt on 17 October 2018.

            GSA Prize

            Applicants for the GSA special prize should submit a paper describing how their project leverages Galileo, EGNOS or Copernicus for use in professional receivers, mobile phones, drones, etc. before the 10 August 2018 by email at the address: contest@clge.eu. For further information please consult www.clge.eu/document. Papers that combine all three programmes are especially encouraged. The papers should not exceed 4000 words and should include an abstract of 300 words.

            Last year’s winner

            Last year’s winning entry in the Galileo, EGNOS, Copernicus category was Sander Varbla from the Tallinn University of Technology in Estonia. Varbla's paper, entitled 'Assessment of marine geoid models by ship-borne GNSS profiles', presented the results of a 2016 marine gravity and GNSS campaign carried out on board the Estonian Maritime Administration survey vessel 'Jakob Prei' in the West Estonian archipelago.

             

            For more information on how to apply please click here.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            Contenders for the GSA special prize should submit a paper describing how their project leverages Galileo, EGNOS or Copernicus

            GSA showcases EGNOS at Aero 2018

            15.5.2018 9:58  
            Published: 
            15 May 2018

            AERO 2018 brought aviation industry stakeholders from Europe and across the world to Friedrichshafen, Germany, in April. At the event, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) showcased the benefits of EGNOS, with a particular focus on its safety benefits for general aviation.

            The GSA is working with the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) to enable LPV approaches at non-instrument runways, adding that this work included holding consultations with aviation stakeholders and preparing safety promotional materials for the general aviation community. This has been underlined by the GSA Market Development Team during a specific workshop highlighting the funding opportunities for General aviation.

            Noting that EASA had set the introduction of instrument flight rules (IFR) procedures as one of its strategic objectives, Strelcova, GSA officer,  said that this objective was being supported by EGNOS, which was enabling a large number of airports to increase their accessibility through GNSS-based IFR procedures. This was previously only possible using very expensive ground-based equipment such as instrument landing systems (ILS).

            In turn, “EASA sees significant potential for EGNOS based procedures to increase general aviation safety.” said Dominique Roland from EASA.

            Watch this: EGNOS in Aviation - LPV-200 lands in Europe

            Strelcova stressed that most general aviation aircraft models are already LPV capable and, for many others, there are retrofit solutions available, which will allow them to take advantage of the fact that over 500 EGNOS-based procedures are operational at European airports.

            AERO 2018 visitors were able to check out the benefits of EGNOS for themselves, in an ALSIM AL250 simulator

            AERO 2018 visitors were able to check out the benefits of EGNOS for themselves, in an ALSIM AL250 simulator.

            It wasn’t all talk at AERO 2018 - visitors to the air show had the opportunity to check out the benefits of EGNOS for general aviation for themselves, by flying with EGNOS in a simulator, very popular element of the GSA stand.

            Aviation Grant Programme

            As part of her presentation, Strelcova highlighted funding opportunities available under the GSA’s 3rd aviation call for proposals, which aims to promote EGNOS operational implementation in aviation. This call targets, among other objectives, the design and operational implementation of EGNOS-based low level IFR routes at various European airports.

            Read this: 3rd Call for EGNOS adoption in aviation, want to be part of it?

            This call is targeting all aviation segments: general, regional, business, commercial aviation and rotorcraft users interested in EGNOS operational implementation. The objective of the call is to foster the use of EGNOS for navigation and surveillance applications, increase network effect and maximise public benefits.

              

            3rd EGNOS Aviation Call – At a Glance

            • Deadline for submitting applications: 21 May 2018 – at 18:00 CET
            • Maximum budget allocated for EU financing under this call: EUR 10,000,000.00
            • Indicative EU financing amount for each project: EUR 800,000.00
            • Maximum EU financing rate of eligible costs: 60%
            • Indicative number of projects: 12
              

            If you are interested in this call for proposals and have a question you would like answered, you can send it to: gnss.grants@gsa.europa.eu. For more detailed information on the call, check here.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            GSA showcased the benefits of EGNOS, with a particular focus on its safety benefits for general aviation.

            GSA showcases EGNOS at Aero 2018

            15.5.2018 9:58  
            Published: 
            15 May 2018

            AERO 2018 brought aviation industry stakeholders from Europe and across the world to Friedrichshafen, Germany, in April. At the event, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) showcased the benefits of EGNOS, with a particular focus on its safety benefits for general aviation.

            The GSA is working with the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) to enable LPV approaches at non-instrument runways, and this work includes holding consultations with aviation stakeholders and preparing safety promotional materials for the general aviation community. This was underlined by the GSA Market Development Team during a specific workshop highlighting the funding opportunities for general aviation.

            Noting that EASA had set the introduction of instrument flight rules (IFR) procedures as one of its strategic objectives, GSA Aviation Market Development Innovation Officer Katerina Strelcova said that this objective was being supported by EGNOS, which was enabling a large number of airports to increase their accessibility through GNSS-based IFR procedures. This was previously only possible using very expensive ground-based equipment such as instrument landing systems (ILS).

            In turn, “EASA sees significant potential for EGNOS based procedures to increase general aviation safety,” said Dominique Roland from EASA.

            Watch this: EGNOS in Aviation - LPV-200 lands in Europe

            Strelcova stressed that most general aviation aircraft models are already LPV capable and, for many others, there are retrofit solutions available, which will allow them to take advantage of the fact that over 500 EGNOS-based procedures are operational at European airports.

            AERO 2018 visitors were able to check out the benefits of EGNOS for themselves, in an ALSIM AL250 simulator

            AERO 2018 visitors were able to check out the benefits of EGNOS for themselves, in an ALSIM AL250 simulator.

            It wasn’t all talk at AERO 2018 - visitors to the air show had the opportunity to check out the benefits of EGNOS for general aviation for themselves, by flying with EGNOS in a simulator, very popular element of the GSA stand.

            Aviation Grant Programme

            As part of her presentation, Strelcova highlighted funding opportunities available under the GSA’s 3rd aviation call for proposals, which aims to promote EGNOS operational implementation in aviation. This call targets, among other objectives, the design and operational implementation of EGNOS-based low level IFR routes at various European airports.

            Read this: 3rd Call for EGNOS adoption in aviation, want to be part of it?

            This call is targeting all aviation segments: general, regional, business, commercial aviation and rotorcraft users interested in EGNOS operational implementation. The objective of the call is to foster the use of EGNOS for navigation and surveillance applications, increase network effect and maximise public benefits.

              

            3rd EGNOS Aviation Call – At a Glance

            • Deadline for submitting applications: 21 May 2018 – at 18:00 CET
            • Maximum budget allocated for EU financing under this call: EUR 10,000,000.00
            • Indicative EU financing amount for each project: EUR 800,000.00
            • Maximum EU financing rate of eligible costs: 60%
            • Indicative number of projects: 12
              

            If you are interested in this call for proposals and have a question you would like answered, you can send it to: gnss.grants@gsa.europa.eu. For more detailed information on the call, check here.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            GSA showcased the benefits of EGNOS, with a particular focus on its safety benefits for general aviation.

            GSA showcases EGNOS at Aero 2018

            15.5.2018 9:58  
            Published: 
            15 May 2018

            AERO 2018 brought aviation industry stakeholders from Europe and across the world to Friedrichshafen, Germany, in April. At the event, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) showcased the benefits of EGNOS, with a particular focus on its safety benefits for general aviation.

            The GSA is working with the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) to enable LPV approaches at non-instrument runways, and this work includes holding consultations with aviation stakeholders and preparing safety promotional materials for the general aviation community. This was underlined by the GSA Market Development Team during a specific workshop highlighting the funding opportunities for general aviation.

            Noting that EASA had set the introduction of instrument flight rules (IFR) procedures as one of its strategic objectives, GSA Aviation Market Development Innovation Officer Katerina Strelcova said that this objective was being supported by EGNOS, which was enabling a large number of airports to increase their accessibility through GNSS-based IFR procedures. This was previously only possible using very expensive ground-based equipment such as instrument landing systems (ILS).

            In turn, “EASA sees significant potential for EGNOS based procedures to increase general aviation safety,” said Dominique Roland from EASA.

            Watch this: EGNOS in Aviation - LPV-200 lands in Europe

            Strelcova stressed that most general aviation aircraft models are already LPV capable and, for many others, there are retrofit solutions available, which will allow them to take advantage of the fact that over 500 EGNOS-based procedures are operational at European airports.

            AERO 2018 visitors were able to check out the benefits of EGNOS for themselves, in an ALSIM AL250 simulator

            AERO 2018 visitors were able to check out the benefits of EGNOS for themselves.

            It wasn’t all talk at AERO 2018 - visitors to the air show had the opportunity to check out the benefits of EGNOS for general aviation for themselves, by flying with EGNOS in a simulator, very popular element of the GSA stand.

            Aviation Grant Programme

            As part of her presentation, Strelcova highlighted funding opportunities available under the GSA’s 3rd aviation call for proposals, which aims to promote EGNOS operational implementation in aviation. This call targets, among other objectives, the design and operational implementation of EGNOS-based low level IFR routes at various European airports.

            Read this: 3rd Call for EGNOS adoption in aviation, want to be part of it?

            This call is targeting all aviation segments: general, regional, business, commercial aviation and rotorcraft users interested in EGNOS operational implementation. The objective of the call is to foster the use of EGNOS for navigation and surveillance applications, increase network effect and maximise public benefits.

              

            3rd EGNOS Aviation Call – At a Glance

            • Deadline for submitting applications: 21 May 2018 – at 18:00 CET
            • Maximum budget allocated for EU financing under this call: EUR 10,000,000.00
            • Indicative EU financing amount for each project: EUR 800,000.00
            • Maximum EU financing rate of eligible costs: 60%
            • Indicative number of projects: 12
              

            If you are interested in this call for proposals and have a question you would like answered, you can send it to: gnss.grants@gsa.europa.eu. For more detailed information on the call, check here.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            GSA showcased the benefits of EGNOS, with a particular focus on its safety benefits for general aviation.

            GSA takes part in Europe Day celebrations in Prague

            11.5.2018 8:39  
            Published: 
            11 May 2018

            To celebrate Europe Day on May 9, local EU offices in Europe and all over the world organise a variety of activities and, each year, thousands of people take part in visits, debates, concerts and other events to mark the day and raise awareness about the EU. This year, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) participated in the Europe Day celebrations in Prague, where the Agency’s headquarters are located.

            The GSA took part in this year’s celebrations with a stand from which a GSA team informed visitors about the Galileo and EGNOS space programmes and talked about how all Europeans are already benefitting from space technology.
            Europe Day is especially important for the GSA, as Galileo and EGNOS are a perfect example of what can be achieved from cooperation between all EU Member States - the European space programmes would not have been possible for one country alone to create. The multi-national nature of the EU space programmes is in clear evidence in a video produced by the GSA to mark the occasion, in which GSA team members from across Europe wish viewers all the best on the day.

            Watch this: Happy Europe Day

            The Prague celebrations included games and competitions for all ages, presentations by embassies of EU Member States and a keynote address by Věra Jourová, European Commissioner for Justice, Consumers and Gender Equality.

            The GSA team informed visitors about how Europeans are already benefitting from the Galileo and EGNOS space programmes

            The GSA team informed visitors about how Europeans are already benefitting from the Galileo and EGNOS space programmes

            Why May 9?

            Europe Day, held on 9 May every year, celebrates peace and unity in Europe. The date marks the anniversary of the historical 'Schuman Declaration'. At a speech in Paris in 1950, Robert Schuman, the then French foreign minister, set out his idea for a new form of political cooperation in Europe, which would make war between Europe's nations unthinkable.

            His vision was to create a European institution that would pool and manage coal and steel production. A treaty creating such a body was signed just under a year later. Schuman's proposal is considered to be the beginning of what is now the European Union.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            This year, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) participated in the Europe Day celebrations in Prague.

            2018 European Satellite Navigation Competition open for submissions!

            9.5.2018 14:46  
            ESNC awards applications, services and ideas that use Galileo data to respond to challenges faced by business and society
            Published: 
            09 May 2018

            The European Satellite Navigation Competition (ESNC), also known as the ‘Galileo Masters’, has opened for submissions in its 15th edition. The competition, which aims to foster the development of new ideas, service delivery and applications based on Galileo and EGNOS, will be officially launched during the inauguration of the Galileo Reference Centre (GRC) in Noordwijk, the Netherlands, on May 16.

            Navigation information has become an essential part of our daily lives. With the launch of Galileo Initial Services over a year ago, the sale of approximately 75 million Galileo-ready smart phones in 2017, and the fact 95% of chipsets on the market are currently Galileo-compatible, priorities in satellite navigation have shifted from infrastructure deployment to service delivery.

            Tapping into this priority shift, the ESNC seeks to award applications, services and new ideas that use Galileo GNSS data to respond to important challenges faced by business and society. With this in mind, from now until July 31 the ESNC will be searching for the most forward‐thinking applications based on satellite navigation.

            In this year’s competition, various institutions and regional partners are set to award prizes worth a total of over EUR 1 million within more than 20 challenge categories. The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is proud once again to be a part of this year’s event – the 10th consecutive year that the GSA has been a main partner in the competition and awarded a Special Topic prize.

            Read this: Partner up with the Galileo Masters

            “The European Satellite Navigation Competition (ESNC) has always been ahead of its time. I am especially excited to see GNSS-based ideas boosting innovation in the field of Smart Cities, the Internet of Things, Mobile Health, and many other applications. GSA has been a partner of the Competition since its early days, and we are looking forward to the creation of more innovative ways to harness the benefits of European GNSS,” GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides said.

            Two tracks

            There are two tracks in the 2018 competition: regional and special prize challenges. The main target groups are SMEs, start-ups, universities and individuals in the fields of business, research, and higher education. Submissions can demonstrate the innovative use of GNSS data across a wide variety of challenge topics. Together with cash prizes, challenge winners will receive access to an international network of leading GNSS organisations, a crowd investment platform, and business development support.

            In addition, the ESNC is complemented by the E-GNSS Accelerator, which helps transform great ideas into commercially viable solutions through a tailored business coaching service. All winners of the ESNC 2018 will gain access to the E-GNSS Accelerator, if eligible.

            “We're proud of the active role the ESNC is playing in the commercialisation of GNSS products and services," said Thorsten Rudolph, Managing Director of AZO Anwendungszentrum GmbH Oberpfaffenhofen, the competition organiser. "Since 2004, the competition has selected 307 winners in total. They were chosen out of more than 11,500 entrants from 90 different countries, who submitted over 4,000 cutting-edge business ideas. This is an excellent demonstration of how the innovation competition functions as a European deal flow pipeline for Earth observation."

            For more details on this year's challenges, prizes, and partners, please see www.esnc.eu.

              

            Check out these articles on previous GSA Special Prize winners at the ESNC:

              

             

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            ESNC awards applications, services and ideas that use Galileo data to respond to challenges faced by business and society

            2018 European Satellite Navigation Competition open for submissions!

            9.5.2018 14:46  
            Published: 
            09 May 2018

            The European Satellite Navigation Competition (ESNC), also known as the ‘Galileo Masters’, has opened for submissions in its 15th edition. The competition, which aims to foster the development of new ideas, service delivery and applications based on Galileo and EGNOS, will be officially launched during the inauguration of the Galileo Reference Centre (GRC) in Noordwijk, the Netherlands, on May 16.

            Navigation information has become an essential part of our daily lives. With the launch of Galileo Initial Services over a year ago, the sale of approximately 75 million Galileo-ready smart phones in 2017, and the fact 95% of chipsets on the market are currently Galileo-compatible, priorities in satellite navigation have shifted from infrastructure deployment to service delivery.

            Tapping into this priority shift, the ESNC seeks to award applications, services and new ideas that use Galileo GNSS data to respond to important challenges faced by business and society. With this in mind, from now until July 31 the ESNC will be searching for the most forward‐thinking applications based on satellite navigation.

            In this year’s competition, various institutions and regional partners are set to award prizes worth a total of over EUR 1 million within more than 20 challenge categories. The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is proud once again to be a part of this year’s event – the 10th consecutive year that the GSA has been a main partner in the competition and awarded a Special Topic prize.

            Read this: Partner up with the Galileo Masters

            “The European Satellite Navigation Competition (ESNC) has always been ahead of its time. I am especially excited to see GNSS-based ideas boosting innovation in the field of Smart Cities, the Internet of Things, Mobile Health, and many other applications. GSA has been a partner of the Competition since its early days, and we are looking forward to the creation of more innovative ways to harness the benefits of European GNSS,” GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides said.

            Two tracks

            There are two tracks in the 2018 competition: regional and special prize challenges. The main target groups are SMEs, start-ups, universities and individuals in the fields of business, research, and higher education. Submissions can demonstrate the innovative use of GNSS data across a wide variety of challenge topics. Together with cash prizes, challenge winners will receive access to an international network of leading GNSS organisations, a crowd investment platform, and business development support.

            In addition, the ESNC is complemented by the E-GNSS Accelerator, which helps transform great ideas into commercially viable solutions through a tailored business coaching service. All winners of the ESNC 2018 will gain access to the E-GNSS Accelerator, if eligible.

            “We're proud of the active role the ESNC is playing in the commercialisation of GNSS products and services," said Thorsten Rudolph, Managing Director of AZO Anwendungszentrum GmbH Oberpfaffenhofen, the competition organiser. "Since 2004, the competition has selected 307 winners in total. They were chosen out of more than 11,500 entrants from 90 different countries, who submitted over 4,000 cutting-edge business ideas. This is an excellent demonstration of how the innovation competition functions as a European deal flow pipeline for Earth observation."

            For more details on this year's challenges, prizes, and partners, please see www.esnc.eu.

              

            Check out these articles on previous GSA Special Prize winners at the ESNC:

              

             

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            ESNC awards applications, services and ideas that use Galileo data to respond to challenges faced by business and society

            2018 European Satellite Navigation Competition open for submissions!

            9.5.2018 14:46  
            Published: 
            09 May 2018

            The European Satellite Navigation Competition (ESNC), also known as the ‘Galileo Masters’, has opened for submissions in its 15th edition. The competition, which aims to foster the development of new ideas, service delivery and applications based on Galileo and EGNOS, will be officially launched during the inauguration of the Galileo Reference Centre (GRC) in Noordwijk, the Netherlands, on May 16.

            Navigation information has become an essential part of our daily lives. With the launch of Galileo Initial Services over a year ago, the sale of approximately 75 million Galileo-ready smart phones in 2017, and the fact 95% of chipsets on the market are currently Galileo-compatible, priorities in satellite navigation have shifted from infrastructure deployment to service delivery.

            Tapping into this priority shift, the ESNC seeks to award applications, services and new ideas that use Galileo GNSS data to respond to important challenges faced by business and society. With this in mind, from now until July 31 the ESNC will be searching for the most forward‐thinking applications based on satellite navigation.

            In this year’s competition, various institutions and regional partners are set to award prizes worth a total of over EUR 1 million within more than 20 challenge categories. The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is proud once again to be a part of this year’s event – the 10th consecutive year that the GSA has been a main partner in the competition and awarded a Special Topic prize.

            Read this: Partner up with the Galileo Masters

            “The European Satellite Navigation Competition (ESNC) has always been ahead of its time. I am especially excited to see GNSS-based ideas boosting innovation in the field of Smart Cities, the Internet of Things, Mobile Health, and many other applications. GSA has been a partner of the Competition since its early days, and we are looking forward to the creation of more innovative ways to harness the benefits of European GNSS,” GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides said.

            Two tracks

            There are two tracks in the 2018 competition: regional and special prize challenges. The main target groups are SMEs, start-ups, universities and individuals in the fields of business, research, and higher education. Submissions can demonstrate the innovative use of GNSS data across a wide variety of challenge topics. Together with cash prizes, challenge winners will receive access to an international network of leading GNSS organisations, a crowd investment platform, and business development support.

            In addition, the ESNC is complemented by the E-GNSS Accelerator, which helps transform great ideas into commercially viable solutions through a tailored business coaching service. All winners of the ESNC 2018 will gain access to the E-GNSS Accelerator, if eligible.

            “We're proud of the active role the ESNC is playing in the commercialisation of GNSS products and services," said Thorsten Rudolph, Managing Director of AZO Anwendungszentrum GmbH Oberpfaffenhofen, the competition organiser. "Since 2004, the competition has selected 307 winners in total. They were chosen out of more than 11,500 entrants from 90 different countries, who submitted over 4,000 cutting-edge business ideas. This is an excellent demonstration of how the innovation competition functions as a European deal flow pipeline for Earth observation."

            For more details on this year's challenges, prizes, and partners, please see www.esnc.eu.

              

            Check out these articles on previous GSA Special Prize winners at the ESNC:

              

             

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            ESNC awards applications, services and ideas that use Galileo data to respond to challenges faced by business and society

            2018 European Satellite Navigation Competition open for submissions!

            9.5.2018 14:46  
            ESNC awards applications, services and ideas that use Galileo data to respond to challenges faced by business and society
            Published: 
            09 May 2018

            The European Satellite Navigation Competition (ESNC), also known as the ‘Galileo Masters’, has opened for submissions in its 15th edition. The competition, which aims to foster the development of new ideas, service delivery and applications based on Galileo and EGNOS, will be officially launched during the inauguration of the Galileo Reference Centre (GRC) in Noordwijk, the Netherlands, on May 16.

            Navigation information has become an essential part of our daily lives. With the launch of Galileo Initial Services over a year ago, the sale of approximately 75 million Galileo-ready smart phones in 2017, and the fact 95% of chipsets on the market are currently Galileo-compatible, priorities in satellite navigation have shifted from infrastructure deployment to service delivery.

            Tapping into this priority shift, the ESNC seeks to award applications, services and new ideas that use Galileo GNSS data to respond to important challenges faced by business and society. With this in mind, from now until July 31 the ESNC will be searching for the most forward‐thinking applications based on satellite navigation.

            In this year’s competition, various institutions and regional partners are set to award prizes worth a total of over EUR 1 million within more than 20 challenge categories. The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is proud once again to be a part of this year’s event – the 10th consecutive year that the GSA has been a main partner in the competition and awarded a Special Topic prize.

            Read this: Partner up with the Galileo Masters

            “The European Satellite Navigation Competition (ESNC) has always been ahead of its time. I am especially excited to see GNSS-based ideas boosting innovation in the field of Smart Cities, the Internet of Things, Mobile Health, and many other applications. GSA has been a partner of the Competition since its early days, and we are looking forward to the creation of more innovative ways to harness the benefits of European GNSS,” GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides said.

            Two tracks

            There are two tracks in the 2018 competition: regional and special prize challenges. The main target groups are SMEs, start-ups, universities and individuals in the fields of business, research, and higher education. Submissions can demonstrate the innovative use of GNSS data across a wide variety of challenge topics. Together with cash prizes, challenge winners will receive access to an international network of leading GNSS organisations, a crowd investment platform, and business development support.

            In addition, the ESNC is complemented by the E-GNSS Accelerator, which helps transform great ideas into commercially viable solutions through a tailored business coaching service. All winners of the ESNC 2018 will gain access to the E-GNSS Accelerator, if eligible.

            “We're proud of the active role the ESNC is playing in the commercialisation of GNSS products and services," said Thorsten Rudolph, Managing Director of AZO Anwendungszentrum GmbH Oberpfaffenhofen, the competition organiser. "Since 2004, the competition has selected 307 winners in total. They were chosen out of more than 11,500 entrants from 90 different countries, who submitted over 4,000 cutting-edge business ideas. This is an excellent demonstration of how the innovation competition functions as a European deal flow pipeline for Earth observation."

            For more details on this year's challenges, prizes, and partners, please see www.esnc.eu.

              

            Check out these articles on previous GSA Special Prize winners at the ESNC:

              

             

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            ESNC awards applications, services and ideas that use Galileo data to respond to challenges faced by business and society

            2018 European Satellite Navigation Competition open for submissions!

            9.5.2018 14:46  
            ESNC awards applications, services and ideas that use Galileo data to respond to challenges faced by business and society
            Published: 
            09 May 2018

            The European Satellite Navigation Competition (ESNC), also known as the ‘Galileo Masters’, has opened for submissions in its 15th edition. The competition, which aims to foster the development of new ideas, service delivery and applications based on Galileo and EGNOS, will be officially launched during the inauguration of the Galileo Reference Centre (GRC) in Noordwijk, the Netherlands, on May 16.

            Navigation information has become an essential part of our daily lives. With the launch of Galileo Initial Services over a year ago, the sale of approximately 75 million Galileo-ready smart phones in 2017, and the fact 95% of chipsets on the market are currently Galileo-compatible, priorities in satellite navigation have shifted from infrastructure deployment to service delivery.

            Tapping into this priority shift, the ESNC seeks to award applications, services and new ideas that use Galileo GNSS data to respond to important challenges faced by business and society. With this in mind, from now until July 31 the ESNC will be searching for the most forward‐thinking applications based on satellite navigation.

            In this year’s competition, various institutions and regional partners are set to award prizes worth a total of over EUR 1 million within more than 20 challenge categories. The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is proud once again to be a part of this year’s event – the 10th consecutive year that the GSA has been a main partner in the competition and awarded a Special Topic prize.

            Read this: Partner up with the Galileo Masters

            “The European Satellite Navigation Competition (ESNC) has always been ahead of its time. I am especially excited to see GNSS-based ideas boosting innovation in the field of Smart Cities, the Internet of Things, Mobile Health, and many other applications. GSA has been a partner of the Competition since its early days, and we are looking forward to the creation of more innovative ways to harness the benefits of European GNSS,” GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides said.

            Two tracks

            There are two tracks in the 2018 competition: regional and special prize challenges. The main target groups are SMEs, start-ups, universities and individuals in the fields of business, research, and higher education. Submissions can demonstrate the innovative use of GNSS data across a wide variety of challenge topics. Together with cash prizes, challenge winners will receive access to an international network of leading GNSS organisations, a crowd investment platform, and business development support.

            In addition, the ESNC is complemented by the E-GNSS Accelerator, which helps transform great ideas into commercially viable solutions through a tailored business coaching service. All winners of the ESNC 2018 will gain access to the E-GNSS Accelerator, if eligible.

            “We're proud of the active role the ESNC is playing in the commercialisation of GNSS products and services," said Thorsten Rudolph, Managing Director of AZO Anwendungszentrum GmbH Oberpfaffenhofen, the competition organiser. "Since 2004, the competition has selected 307 winners in total. They were chosen out of more than 11,500 entrants from 90 different countries, who submitted over 4,000 cutting-edge business ideas. This is an excellent demonstration of how the innovation competition functions as a European deal flow pipeline for Earth observation."

            For more details on this year's challenges, prizes, and partners, please see www.esnc.eu.

              

            Check out these articles on previous GSA Special Prize winners at the ESNC:

              

             

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            ESNC awards applications, services and ideas that use Galileo data to respond to challenges faced by business and society

            GPS and Galileo working together will make the world more precise

            7.5.2018 9:58  
            Tomasz Husak delivers his keynote address at the 34th Space Symposium (April 17, 2018 in Colorado Springs, Colorado, U.S.A).
            Published: 
            07 May 2018

            Keynote address at the 34th Space Symposium, the premier space event in the world, reviewed the achievements of the European Union’s (EU) flagship space programmes– Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus – and outlined the three paradigms driving future EU space policies.

            European Commission Head of Cabinet Tomasz Husak outlined the achievements of the European Union’s (EU) flagship space programmes while emphasising the three major paradigm shifts driving future European space policies during his keynote address at the 34th Space Symposium April 17, 2018, in Colorado Springs, Colorado. U.S.A.

            The four-day conference is the premier international event for the space sector, and annually attracts thousands of participants, hundreds of exhibits and big-name speakers.

            “Our three operational programmes, Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus are on track and on budget,” reported Husak. “Over the past three years, with Copernicus, the EU has become one of the biggest data providers in the world. The quality of Copernicus Sentinels data and products are setting a global standard in Earth observation. Our services are offering the most accurate climate and environmental data 24/7.”

            The EU Space Programmes stand team present Galileo, EGNSOS and Copernicus at the 34th Space Symposium

            The EU Space Programmes stand team present Galileo, EGNSOS and Copernicus at the 34th Space Symposium

            He also noted that a little over one year after the declaration of “initial services,” Galileo, the European satellite navigation infrastructure, is experiencing significant market adoption.

            “We estimate that some 75 million Galileo-enabled smartphones have been sold globally,” said Husak. “The benefits of Galileo will only increase as we are moving toward completion of the constellation and full operational capabilities.”

            Galileo currently consists of 22 spacecraft with four more satellites launching this year. Major manufacturers, such as Apple, Google, Samsung and Sony now offer Galileo-enabled products. And due to the combined signals between the United States’ Global Positioning System (GPS) and Galileo, global users will enjoy much better geo-positioning. 

            “Thanks to the GPS and Galileo working together, the world can expect more precise navigation,” explained Husak. “The use of data provided by these two systems will deliver improved emergency services, safer aviation and numerous other applications that will drive new business innovation, such as automated cars and the Internet of Things.”

            Husak added that while Europe’s civilian-led satellite technology programmes were designed to achieve autonomy and depart in mission somewhat from the dual military/civil GPS programme of the United States, it doesn’t mean that the EU excludes collaboration with others – far from it.

            No one is powerful enough to boldly go alone

            His remarks reinforced the position set forth by EU Commissioner Elżbieta Bieńkowska in a recent commentary piece featured in the Space Symposium issue of Space News.

            “In space, no one is powerful enough to boldly go alone,” proclaimed  Bieńkowska. “Space matters in Europe and it is a top political priority. But the European Union’s efforts to achieve autonomy in space don’t mean we act in isolation. Europe wants to make itself an attractive place for public and private investors, including Americans, who want to invest in space startups and other businesses. Venture capital investment will be incentivised in Europe. As free marketers, we obviously trust that innovation and free competition will [drive] new ideas [on] how to use combined GPS and Galileo [to] drive business on both sides of the Atlantic. ”

            Beyond free enterprise, Bieńkowska cited space research and exploration as two other great societal benefits of space collaboration.

            “On space exploration and satellite navigation the European Space Agency [ESA] cooperates with NASA on the International Space Station, telescopes and robotic space missions,” she wrote. “ESA provides the service modules for the future Orion capsule and will launch the James Webb Space Telescope. And a Belgian Michael Gillon, funded by EU money, led the international team that discovered the planetary system TRAPPIST-1 in February 2018. The discovery came from cooperation between Americans and Europeans.”

            No resting on laurels. Looking ahead to future EU space policies

            Noting that Europe will not rest on its laurels, Husak in his Symposium address went on to underscore the three major changes occurring within the space sector that will influence the future of EU space policies.

            “First, space has become truly important for our economy and society, so we will continue to put users at the centre of our space programmes,” he said. “Second, space is the enabler of security and defence, two top concerns among our citizens. Third, the role of the private sector is changing as an initiator of space projects. Public programmes need to work hand-in-hand with these new dynamics.”

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            Tomasz Husak delivers his keynote address at the 34th Space Symposium (April 17, 2018 in Colorado Springs, Colorado, U.S.A).

            Precise and robust positioning for automated road transportation

            4.5.2018 9:54  
            Autonomous truck
            Published: 
            04 May 2018

            The Horizon 2020 funded PRoPART project is developing an enhanced Real Time Kinematic (RTK) software solution for automated vehicles and advanced driver assistance systems. To do this, project researchers are combining some of Galileo’s distinguishing features with other positioning and sensor technologies.  

            ‘Vision Zero’ is a point in the future that is free of deadly and catastrophic motor vehicle accidents. Thanks to the development of automated vehicles and other advanced driver assistance systems, which are predicted to reduce traffic density and increase travel efficiency, this vision is quickly becoming a reality. 

            However, before we can reach Vision Zero, we first need to develop the precise and robust positioning technology that these automated vehicles and advanced driver assistance systems demand – which is exactly what the GSA-funded Horizon 2020 PRoPART project has set out to do. 

            Today’s autonomous vehicles use a variety of sensors, starting from GNSS but also including cameras, laser scanners, ultrasonic and radar. The connected and automated vehicle applications currently being developed depend on these systems being able to cooperate in order to determine the vehicle’s absolute position relative to any obstacles. 

            “No single technology is capable of providing the required absolute positioning in all situations, and when we combine different technologies, it becomes vital that we understand the integrity of the available information,” explains Project Coordinator Stefan Nord. “The PRoPART project aims to develop and enhance an existing GNSS RTK (Real Time Kinematic) software solution by exploiting the distinguished features of Galileo signals, as well as combining it with other positioning and sensor technologies.” 

            The GNSS benefit 

            To provide this required integrity, PRoPART proposes an RTK technique that is already widely used for precise GNSS positioning based on the use of code and carrier phase measurements coming from the main GNSS constellations (i.e., GPS, Galileo). Although the use of carrier phase measurements allows for centimetre level accuracies, it also means one must confirm the integrity of such signals – which is a complex and time-consuming process. 

            “One limitation with the RTK technique is that it requires reference data from a location relatively close to the user in order to mitigate against signal errors caused by, for example, satellite position error,” explains Nord. “Similar to all satellite positioning technologies there can also be areas with poor coverage or signal interference, such as in tunnels or urban canyons.” 

            Luckily, Galileo ensures higher multipath mitigation and a substantial improvement on the reliability of the carrier phase’s ambiguity resolution. “By including Galileo, the PRoPART project will provide users with a deeply integrated, multi-constellation, multi-channel navigation system that fulfils the requirements on availability and precision for an automated driving function,” adds Nord.  The PRoPART project will also augment road infrastructure to provide the reference data required for high accuracy positioning.

            Transition period

            Nord notes that because there will be a transition period where a lot of vehicles are neither connected nor fully automated, there is a market need for solutions offering high impact during low penetration. PRoPART meets this market need by implementing a Road Side Unit, or RSU, with high precision positioning and that uses both UWB and a traffic monitoring sensor to supply ranging, object perception and EGNSS RTK correction data to the connected automated vehicle. “This allows the vehicle to make safe decisions based on robust data,” he says.

            PRoPART will demonstrate its positioning solution using a truck capable of automated driving on motorway conditions.

            The project is a consortium of seven partners: RISE, AstaZero, Scania, Waysure, Fraunhofer IIS, Ceit-IK4, Baselabs and Commsignia.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            Autonomous truck

            Partner up with the Galileo Masters

            3.5.2018 9:07  
            The European Satellite Navigation Competition (ESNC) is a way to transform your idea into a commercial solution.
            Published: 
            03 May 2018

            Galileo Masters, or the European Satellite Navigation Competition, is seeking partners ready to play an integral part in building tomorrow’s innovative GNSS applications and services.

            From the mobile phone in your hand to the drone in the air, from the connected car of tomorrow to the connected devices that make up the Internet of Things – behind all these applications is Galileo, Europe’s very own Global Satellite Navigation System. Since going live in 2016, users around the world are being guided using the positioning, navigation and timing information provided by Galileo’s satellite constellation.

            The additional accuracy and availability provided by Galileo enables a range of new applications and services. Now is the time to take advantage of the many innovative opportunities that only Galileo makes possible, and one of the ways to do so is joining the European Satellite Navigation Competition.

            The European Satellite Navigation Competition (ESNC) is an opportunity to transform your idea into a commercial solution. On a mission to spur the development of market-driven applications, the annual competition awards the best services, products and business ideas using satellite navigation – and Galileo in particular – in everyday life. Since its launch in 2004, over 11,500 people from 90 countries have participated in the ESNC, each of whom have been competing for a piece of the EUR 1 million prize pool. 

            A unique opportunity 

            Do you want to be at the forefront in innovation scouting and help support Europe’s leading entrepreneurs using Galileo? Get in touch with future-oriented start-ups addressing a specific GNSS-related topic of interest to your organisation? Or boost your region’s capacity for high-tech innovation? 

            Then don’t miss this unique opportunity to become an official ESNC partner!

            Event organiser AZO is currently seeking industry visionaries to join its list of 140 global partners and 200 international experts. “With Galileo now operational and the GSA being officially responsible for Galileo operations and its service provision, we are looking to shift the competition’s focus towards the commercialisation of Galileo,” says AZO Head of Competitions Kathrin Lenvain. “By opening Europe’s only Galileo innovation network to industry partners, we can offer them significant innovation and marketing benefits.”  

            As a ESNC partner, you’ll play an integral part in building the innovative GNSS applications and services that will form the backbone of tomorrow’s digitally connected world. Specifically, industry partners will benefit from:

            Direct access to leading start-ups and top entrepreneurs with Galileo-enabled business cases and the potential to become future business partners

            Insight on emerging trends in technology and the latest innovation ideas

            Being part of a network that includes Europe’s top space stakeholders, including the European GNSS Agency (GSA), European Space Agency (ESA), the German Aerospace Centre and other national space agencies

            Invitations to exclusive networking events, including the Space Oscars

            Promotion through a network of more than 20 involved regions and events from across Europe

            “In addition, our partners are directly involved in the evaluation of proposals, giving them a unique first look at the competition’s best business cases,” adds Lenvain. “Partners can become even more involved by organising their own dedicated challenge and prize, similar to what the GSA, a long-time partner, does with its Galileo Special Prize.”

            The 2018 competition is already open to industry partners to join. To learn more about all our unique partnership opportunities, please visit https://www.esnc.eu/partners/ 

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            The European Satellite Navigation Competition (ESNC) is a way to transform your idea into a commercial solution.

            Remembering Per Enge, a leading light in the GNSS community

            2.5.2018 14:02  
            Per K. Enge, 1953-2018
            Published: 
            02 May 2018

            The European GNSS Agency (GSA) joins the international GNSS community in remembering Professor Per Kristian Enge, a friend and colleague who inspired many Europeans as one of the world’s foremost experts in GNSS technologies. 

            A professor at Stanford University, where he co-founded and directed the Stanford Centre for Position, Navigation and Time, Per pioneered research that led to the development of the Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) and Local Area Augmentation Systems (LAAS). WAAS, which provides the same service in the United States as EGNOS in Europe, became fully operational for aviation in the US in 2003.

            The GSA in particular remembers Per for his outstanding contribution to the Horizon 2020 project RHINOS, where he brought his GNSS aeronautics experience to rail applications to create a new high integrity concept for trains. Per’s dedication will always be an example, and the GSA would like to honour him by continuing our joint work, building on his enthusiasm and his visionary approach. 

            "Per has long been a guiding light for the GNSS community, including for the GSA. More recently he has inspired us with his work on the convergence between satellite navigation and the rail sector. The best way we can honour his memory now is to continue working in the direction he has shown us," said GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides.

            Per Enge with H2020 RHINOS team in Stanford, Rail-GNSS workshop, November 2016

             

            Lasting legacy

            It was not only his colleagues at the GSA that benefited from his experience, Per was a teacher and mentor to many Ph.D. and other graduate-level students at Stanford and helped launch a popular massive open online course (MOOC) for the GPS community outside the university.

            Per was born Oct. 29, 1953, in Bergen, Norway. He immigrated at the age of 2 to the United States. He earned his BS in electrical engineering at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst in 1975 and his MS and PhD at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign in 1979 and 1983, respectively.

            Further biographical information is available in the Stanford News.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            Per K. Enge, 1953-2018

            Remembering Per Enge, a leading light in the GNSS community

            2.5.2018 14:02  
            Per K. Enge, 1953-2018
            Published: 
            02 May 2018

            A professor at Stanford University, where he co-founded and directed the Stanford Centre for Position, Navigation and Time, Per pioneered research that led to the development of the Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) and Local Area Augmentation Systems (LAAS). WAAS, which provides the same service in the United States as EGNOS in Europe, became fully operational for aviation in the US in 2003.

            The GSA in particular remembers Per for his outstanding contribution to the Horizon 2020 project RHINOS, where he brought his GNSS aeronautics experience to rail applications to create a new high integrity concept for trains. Per’s dedication will always be an example, and the GSA would like to honour him by continuing our joint work, building on his enthusiasm and his visionary approach. 

            "Per has long been a guiding light for the GNSS community, including for the GSA. More recently he has inspired us with his work on the convergence between satellite navigation and the rail sector. The best way we can honour his memory now is to continue working in the direction he has shown us," said GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides.

            Lasting legacy

            It was not only his colleagues at the GSA that benefited from his experience, Per was a teacher and mentor to many Ph.D. and other graduate-level students at Stanford and helped launch a popular massive open online course (MOOC) for the GPS community outside the university.

            Per was born Oct. 29, 1953, in Bergen, Norway. He immigrated at the age of 2 to the United States. He earned his BS in electrical engineering at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst in 1975 and his MS and PhD at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign in 1979 and 1983, respectively.

            Further biographical information is available in the Stanford News.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            Per K. Enge, 1953-2018

            Remembering Per Enge, a leading light in the GNSS community

            2.5.2018 14:02  
            Per K. Enge, 1953-2018
            Published: 
            02 May 2018

            The European GNSS Agency (GSA) joins the international GNSS community in remembering Professor Per Kristian Enge, a friend and colleague who inspired many Europeans as one of the world’s foremost experts in GNSS technologies. 

            A professor at Stanford University, where he co-founded and directed the Stanford Centre for Position, Navigation and Time, Per pioneered research that led to the development of the Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) and Local Area Augmentation Systems (LAAS). WAAS, which provides the same service in the United States as EGNOS in Europe, became fully operational for aviation in the US in 2003.

            The GSA in particular remembers Per for his outstanding contribution to the Horizon 2020 project RHINOS, where he brought his GNSS aeronautics experience to rail applications to create a new high integrity concept for trains. Per’s dedication will always be an example, and the GSA would like to honour him by continuing our joint work, building on his enthusiasm and his visionary approach. 

            "Per has long been a guiding light for the GNSS community, including for the GSA. More recently he has inspired us with his work on the convergence between satellite navigation and the rail sector. The best way we can honour his memory now is to continue working in the direction he has shown us," said GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides.

            Lasting legacy

            It was not only his colleagues at the GSA that benefited from his experience, Per was a teacher and mentor to many Ph.D. and other graduate-level students at Stanford and helped launch a popular massive open online course (MOOC) for the GPS community outside the university.

            Per was born Oct. 29, 1953, in Bergen, Norway. He immigrated at the age of 2 to the United States. He earned his BS in electrical engineering at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst in 1975 and his MS and PhD at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign in 1979 and 1983, respectively.

            Further biographical information is available in the Stanford News.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            Per K. Enge, 1953-2018

            Galileo’s progress aligns with “Space in the Mainstream” theme at 2018 Space Generation Fusion Forum

            25.4.2018 9:26  
            GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides talks about the mainstreaming of space services
            Published: 
            25 April 2018

            As Galileo moves closer to full services, an international group of young professionals gathered to discuss how space has entered the mainstream in our daily culture.

            For the second year in a row, leaders from the European GNSS Agency (GSA) were part of discussions and learning at the Space Generation Fusion Forum (Fusion Forum), this year held on April 14-15 in Colorado Springs, U.S.A. The two-day development and networking event for approximately 60 students and young space professionals is held annually in conjunction with the International Space Symposium.

            Sixty years after the launch of Sputnik, the gathering of individuals 35 years old and younger met to explore the core theme “Space in the Mainstream.” Through discussion tracks, expert panels, keynote presentations and interactive activities, the attendees discussed how space-related innovations, such as global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) have become mainstream to our culture and common in our everyday and professional lives. 

            Rodrigo da Costa moderates a group discussion at the Space Generation Fusion Forum

            GSA's Rodrigo da Costa moderates a group discussion at the Space Generation Fusion Forum

            Delivering maximum performance

            Rodrigo da Costa, Galileo Services Programme Manager at the GSA, moderated the “Innovative Influences of Space on Earth” discussion track. As a backdrop to the conversation, da Costa noted that the European global navigation constellation, Galileo, is already providing service to millions of people, with more satellites launching into service this year.

            “Four more Galileo satellites were launched in December 2017 and will enter service in 2018,” noted da Costa. “These satellites will join the 18 others already in space, and four more are scheduled for launch in July. The result is a next generation of location technology that will deliver maximum performance, flexibility and reliability to further evolve services into our daily lives.”

            Carlo des Dorides, Executive Director of the GSA, provided the closing remarks at Fusion Forum. Through a presentation entitled “The dream becomes a reality,” des Dorides provided perspectives of the transition of space from myth to ‘mainstream.’

            GNSS – a truly pervasive reality

            “A primary mainstream case is GNSS,” said des Dorides. “There were 25 navigation satellites 20 years ago, today there are more than 80. GNSS is an invisible revolution that has helped to turn the science fiction of the 1960s into a truly pervasive reality. Today, everyone has a space receiver in their pocket. Satellites in the mainstream help us move, play and work – from traffic management apps to guiding tourists and precision farming.”

            Citing what to expect on the horizon, des Dorides outlined how satellite technology will advance to enable ubiquitous positioning capabilities, autonomous vehicles and farming, along with passive to active augmented reality.

            “All of this innovation is becoming mainstream as Galileo grows closer to full services,” concluded da Costa. “GSA is Europe’s ‘mainstream space catalyst’. We are changing the technology paradigm and focussing on evolving user requirements as we approach the threshold of living on a planet where every person has a GNSS device.”

              

            GSA Scholarship winner outlines how satellite technology can help fulfil the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals

            As part of its participation in the 2018 Fusion Forum, the European GNSS Agency (GSA), in cooperation with the Space Generation Advisory Council (SGAC), sponsored the Young GSA – Space Systems Synergy Scholarship, which funded attendance to the event for one delegate.

            Participants were asked to share their views on how the integrated use of space infrastructure – global satellite communications, satellite navigation (including Europe’s Galileo and EGNOS), and Earth observation/monitoring (including Europe’s Copernicus) – also known as the ‘system of three,’ can create a safer and more sustainable world.

            The winning submission came from Sissi Enestam, an aspiring space professional who is completing her doctorate in Space Science and Technology at Aalto University, in Espoo Finland. Enestam outlined how the “system of three” could aid in multiple ways to help society fulfil all 17 of the United Nations’ (UN) sustainable development goals. GSA’s  Rodrigo da Costa presents the award to Sissi Enestam, the recipient of the 2018 Young GSA – Space Systems Synergy

            Rodrigo da Costa presents the award to Sissi Enestam, the recipient of the 2018 Young GSA – Space Systems Synergy

            “As number 2 on the list, the UN lists a goal of zero hunger,” described Enestam. “Here, navigation and Earth observation could be used to help determine the most suitable land near the farmer’s location, leading to more precise and productive farming.”

            Enestam further posed how satellite technology delivers meteorological data to prompt timely harvesting to avoid food waste – one of the developed world’s larger challenges in food production today. And for the UN goal of Good Health and Wellbeing & Life on Land, she suggested that the ‘system of three’ can aid in preserving life by providing real-time data during natural disasters, while also monitoring the long-term effects of climate change.

            “My essay gives just a few examples, but I believe the possibilities are endless,” concluded Enestam “For the UN goal 16, which calls for peace, justice and strong institutions, I think this is what space is really all about,” she concluded. “The world is beginning to realize that in order to solve issues on Earth, we need to utilise space. And this is a task where cooperation is vital.”

              

            A recently study from the European GNSS Agency (GSA) and the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA): “EGNSS and COPERNICUS: Supporting the Sustainable Development Goals. Building blocks towards the 2030 Agenda” investigates how EU space technologies support the fulfilment of the UN SDGs. You can read the study here.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides talks about the mainstreaming of space services

            GNSS: addressing the challenges of Arctic navigation

            24.4.2018 11:47  
            Published: 
            24 April 2018

            Participants in the Challenges in Arctic Navigation workshop in Olos, Muonio, Finland on April 16-18 discussed how GNSS can address some of the difficulties posed by navigation in the Arctic, in addition to how satellite navigation itself can be improved in the region, which is also a challenging environment for GNSS.

            The Challenges in Arctic Navigation workshop was held under the Finnish Chairmanship of the Arctic Council. The workshop was organised by the Ministry and Communications (Mrs Seija Miettinen-Bellevergue) and the Finnish Geospatial Research Institute (Prof. Heidi Kuusniemi) and funded by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

            A number of challenges to both conventional and satellite navigation were highlighted during the conference. These range from severe climatic and ice conditions, to the long distances involved in navigating in the region, all of which result in longer emergency response times for search and rescue. The challenge of sparse telecommunications coverage in the Arctic was also highlighted.

            Low EGNOS coverage due to the poor visibility of geostationary (GEO) satellites received a lot of attention. This was highlighted as a significant obstacle to the expansion of SBAS-based navigation in Arctic aviation. Specifically, poor EGNOS LPV 200 coverage in the North and the Arctic means that it is not possible to use this service for landing aircraft. New satellite constellations in low-Earth or highly elliptic orbits were seen as a promising solution. Some participants also noted specific challenges with the reception of GNSS signals at Auroral latitudes.

            The panel discusses challenges and opportunities in Arctic navigation in Olos, Muonio

            In addition to GNSS and telecommunications, navigation in the Arctic also benefits from other space-based technologies, especially in the maritime domain. "Sea currents are chaotic and not well predictable if satellite images are not available," Veli Luukkala, Chief Officer at Arctia Icebreaking Ltd., said.

            While acknowledging these challenges in his address at the conference, Gian Gherardo Calini, the GSA’s Head of Market Development, also stressed some of the opportunities offered by EGNSS for different applications. The ones coming from implementation of EGNOS based procedures in aviation are: improved accessibility and operational capability, reduced environmental impacts and costs, infrastructure rationalisation, and increased safety. With regard to the low level of EGNOS coverage, he said that extension of the commitment areas for APV-I, NPA and LPV-200 up to 72ºN in Norway and Finland is planned for 2018 according to the EGNOS SoL Implementation Roadmap.

            Watch this: EGNOS is growing

            Regarding the issue of emergency response times, Calini said that, with the increased positioning accuracy provided by Galileo integrated into COSPAS-SARSAT, users would benefit from reduced detection times, improved localisation, increased availability and the return link function. “If a person in distress knows that their message has been heard and that help is on the way, this is very important. This is a key differentiator of Galileo,” he said.

            In his address at the workshop, Eric Guyader, Galileo Programme Administrator at the European Commission, said that since 2013, the European Commission has been developing modernisation plans for Galileo, to ensure that the system can respond to new challenges in the use of GNSS. He said that the EC’s approach is to capture the strategic priorities of the Member States, including in the Arctic, and to understand the changing GNSS environment.

            Regarding the specific challenges posed by the Arctic region, he said that the Commission is in open dialogue with countries in the region to establish priorities. He said that Galileo provides good service overall in both navigation and SAR, and that, in combination with GPS and GLONASS, it would offer excellent service.

            Guyader said that the Galileo modernisation includes plans for Advanced Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring (ARAIM), and emergency warning service and an ionosphere prediction service, which will make it possible to quickly react to sudden signal degradation.

            In another presentation, a representative from academia noted that ionospheric scintillation, or the rapid modification of radio waves by small-scale structures in the ionosphere, was an important concern in the Arctic, primarily for service availability and continuity, rather than integrity. He said that dual-frequency GNSS offered a possible solution, as it would allow users to directly and robustly estimate ionospheric delay.

            A potential solution to the problem of poor visibility of GEO satellites was offered by Kjersti Moldekelev, Senior Adviser at the Norwegian Space Centre. Moldeklev said that the company Space Norway was planning to launch HEO satellites in 2022, which would provide broadband access to the Arctic region. She said that if these HEO satellites were to carry SBAS payload, this would give the EU a foothold in the Arctic. "This will definitely be a solution for communications challenges in the region and perhaps for navigation challenges also,” she said.

            Local stakeholders in Arctic navigation were well represented at the workshop, including the Finnish Defence Forces, the Finnish Communications Regulatory Authority, and companies such as Finnair, KNL Networks, and Reaktor. The stakeholders actively contributed to the workshop by giving keynote addresses, participating in panel discussions, and working in expert groups to build a roadmap towards resolving the challenges of Arctic navigation.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            Challenges and opportunities were discussed in Arctic navigation in Olos, Muonio

            GNSS: addressing the challenges of Arctic navigation

            24.4.2018 11:47  
            Published: 
            24 April 2018

            Participants in the Challenges in Arctic Navigation workshop in Olos, Muonio, Finland on April 16-18 discussed how GNSS can address some of the difficulties posed by navigation in the Arctic, in addition to how satellite navigation itself can be improved in the region, which is also a challenging environment for GNSS.

            The Challenges in Arctic Navigation workshop was held under the Finnish Chairmanship of the Arctic Council. The workshop was organised by the Ministry and Communications (Mrs Seija Miettinen-Bellevergue) and the Finnish Geospatial Research Institute (Prof. Heidi Kuusniemi) and funded by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

            A number of challenges to both conventional and satellite navigation were highlighted during the conference. These range from severe climatic and ice conditions, to the long distances involved in navigating in the region, all of which result in longer emergency response times for search and rescue. The challenge of sparse telecommunications coverage in the Arctic was also highlighted.

            Low EGNOS coverage due to the poor visibility of geostationary (GEO) satellites received a lot of attention. This was highlighted as a significant obstacle to the expansion of SBAS-based navigation in Arctic aviation. Specifically, poor EGNOS LPV 200 coverage in the North and the Arctic means that it is not possible to use this service for landing aircraft. New satellite constellations in low-Earth or highly elliptic orbits were seen as a promising solution. Some participants also noted specific challenges with the reception of GNSS signals at Auroral latitudes.

            The panel discusses challenges and opportunities in Arctic navigation in Olos, Muonio

            In addition to GNSS and telecommunications, navigation in the Arctic also benefits from other space-based technologies, especially in the maritime domain. "Sea currents are chaotic and not well predictable if satellite images are not available," Veli Luukkala, Chief Officer at Arctia Icebreaking Ltd., said.

            While acknowledging these challenges in his address at the conference, Gian Gherardo Calini, the GSA’s Head of Market Development, also stressed some of the opportunities offered by EGNSS for different applications. The ones coming from implementation of EGNOS based procedures in aviation are: improved accessibility and operational capability, reduced environmental impacts and costs, infrastructure rationalisation, and increased safety. With regard to the low level of EGNOS coverage, he said that extension of the commitment areas for APV-I, NPA and LPV-200 up to 72ºN in Norway and Finland is planned for 2018 according to the EGNOS SoL Implementation Roadmap.

            Watch this: EGNOS is growing

            Regarding the issue of emergency response times, Calini said that, with the increased positioning accuracy provided by Galileo integrated into COSPAS-SARSAT, users would benefit from reduced detection times, improved localisation, increased availability and the return link function. “If a person in distress knows that their message has been heard and that help is on the way, this is very important. This is a key differentiator of Galileo,” he said.

            In his address at the workshop, Eric Guyader, Galileo Programme Administrator at the European Commission, said that since 2013, the European Commission has been developing modernisation plans for Galileo, to ensure that the system can respond to new challenges in the use of GNSS. He said that the EC’s approach is to capture the strategic priorities of the Member States, including in the Arctic, and to understand the changing GNSS environment.

            Regarding the specific challenges posed by the Arctic region, he said that the Commission is in open dialogue with countries in the region to establish priorities. He said that Galileo provides good service overall in both navigation and SAR, and that, in combination with GPS and GLONASS, it would offer excellent service.

            Guyader said that the Galileo modernisation includes plans for Advanced Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring (ARAIM), and emergency warning service and an ionosphere prediction service, which will make it possible to quickly react to sudden signal degradation.

            In another presentation, a representative from academia noted that ionospheric scintillation, or the rapid modification of radio waves by small-scale structures in the ionosphere, was an important concern in the Arctic, primarily for service availability and continuity, rather than integrity. He said that dual-frequency GNSS offered a possible solution, as it would allow users to directly and robustly estimate ionospheric delay.

            A potential solution to the problem of poor visibility of GEO satellites was offered by Kjersti Moldekelev, Senior Adviser at the Norwegian Space Centre. Moldeklev said that the company Space Norway was planning to launch HEO satellites in 2022, which would provide broadband access to the Arctic region. She said that if these HEO satellites were to carry SBAS payload, this would give the EU a foothold in the Arctic. "This will definitely be a solution for communications challenges in the region and perhaps for navigation challenges also,” she said.

            Local stakeholders in Arctic navigation were well represented at the workshop, including the Finnish Defence Forces, the Finnish Communications Regulatory Authority, and companies such as Finnair, KNL Networks, and Reaktor. The stakeholders actively contributed to the workshop by giving keynote addresses, participating in panel discussions, and working in expert groups to build a roadmap towards resolving the challenges of Arctic navigation.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            Challenges and opportunities were discussed in Arctic navigation in Olos, Muonio

            GNSS: addressing the challenges of Arctic navigation

            24.4.2018 11:47  
            Published: 
            24 April 2018

            Participants in the Challenges in Arctic Navigation workshop in Olos, Muonio, Finland on April 16-18 discussed how GNSS can address some of the difficulties posed by navigation in the Arctic, in addition to how satellite navigation itself can be improved in the region, which is also a challenging environment for GNSS.

            The Challenges in Arctic Navigation workshop was held under the Finnish Chairmanship of the Arctic Council. The workshop was organised by the Ministry and Communications (Mrs Seija Miettinen-Bellevergue) and the Finnish Geospatial Research Institute (Prof. Heidi Kuusniemi) and funded by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

            A number of challenges to both conventional and satellite navigation were highlighted during the conference. These range from severe climatic and ice conditions, to the long distances involved in navigating in the region, all of which result in longer emergency response times for search and rescue. The challenge of sparse telecommunications coverage in the Arctic was also highlighted.

            Low EGNOS coverage due to the poor visibility of geostationary (GEO) satellites received a lot of attention. This was highlighted as a significant obstacle to the expansion of SBAS-based navigation in Arctic aviation. Specifically, poor EGNOS LPV 200 coverage in the North and the Arctic means that it is not possible to use this service for landing aircraft. New satellite constellations in low-Earth or highly elliptic orbits were seen as a promising solution. Some participants also noted specific challenges with the reception of GNSS signals at Auroral latitudes.

            The panel discusses challenges and opportunities in Arctic navigation in Olos, Muonio

            Challenges and opportunities were discussed in Arctic navigation in Olos, Muonio

            In addition to GNSS and telecommunications, navigation in the Arctic also benefits from other space-based technologies, especially in the maritime domain. "Sea currents are chaotic and not well predictable if satellite images are not available," Veli Luukkala, Chief Officer at Arctia Icebreaking Ltd., said.

            While acknowledging these challenges in his address at the conference, Gian Gherardo Calini, the GSA’s Head of Market Development, also stressed some of the opportunities offered by EGNSS for different applications. The ones coming from implementation of EGNOS based procedures in aviation are: improved accessibility and operational capability, reduced environmental impacts and costs, infrastructure rationalisation, and increased safety. With regard to the low level of EGNOS coverage, he said that extension of the commitment areas for APV-I, NPA and LPV-200 up to 72ºN in Norway and Finland is planned for 2018 according to the EGNOS SoL Implementation Roadmap.

            Watch this: EGNOS is growing

            Regarding the issue of emergency response times, Calini said that, with the increased positioning accuracy provided by Galileo integrated into COSPAS-SARSAT, users would benefit from reduced detection times, improved localisation, increased availability and the return link function. “If a person in distress knows that their message has been heard and that help is on the way, this is very important. This is a key differentiator of Galileo,” he said.

            In his address at the workshop, Eric Guyader, Galileo Programme Administrator at the European Commission, said that since 2013, the European Commission has been developing modernisation plans for Galileo, to ensure that the system can respond to new challenges in the use of GNSS. He said that the EC’s approach is to capture the strategic priorities of the Member States, including in the Arctic, and to understand the changing GNSS environment.

            Regarding the specific challenges posed by the Arctic region, he said that the Commission is in open dialogue with countries in the region to establish priorities. He said that Galileo provides good service overall in both navigation and SAR, and that, in combination with GPS and GLONASS, it would offer excellent service.

            Guyader said that the Galileo modernisation includes plans for Advanced Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring (ARAIM), and emergency warning service and an ionosphere prediction service, which will make it possible to quickly react to sudden signal degradation.

            In another presentation, a representative from academia noted that ionospheric scintillation, or the rapid modification of radio waves by small-scale structures in the ionosphere, was an important concern in the Arctic, primarily for service availability and continuity, rather than integrity. He said that dual-frequency GNSS offered a possible solution, as it would allow users to directly and robustly estimate ionospheric delay.

            A potential solution to the problem of poor visibility of GEO satellites was offered by Kjersti Moldekelev, Senior Adviser at the Norwegian Space Centre. Moldeklev said that the company Space Norway was planning to launch HEO satellites in 2022, which would provide broadband access to the Arctic region. She said that if these HEO satellites were to carry SBAS payload, this would give the EU a foothold in the Arctic. "This will definitely be a solution for communications challenges in the region and perhaps for navigation challenges also,” she said.

            Local stakeholders in Arctic navigation were well represented at the workshop, including the Finnish Defence Forces, the Finnish Communications Regulatory Authority, and companies such as Finnair, KNL Networks, and Reaktor. The stakeholders actively contributed to the workshop by giving keynote addresses, participating in panel discussions, and working in expert groups to build a roadmap towards resolving the challenges of Arctic navigation.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            GNSS: addressing the challenges of Arctic navigation

            24.4.2018 11:47  
            Published: 
            24 April 2018

            Participants in the Challenges in Arctic Navigation workshop in Olos, Muonio, Finland on April 16-18 discussed how GNSS can address some of the difficulties posed by navigation in the Arctic, in addition to how satellite navigation itself can be improved in the region, which is also a challenging environment for GNSS.

            The Challenges in Arctic Navigation workshop was held under the Finnish Chairmanship of the Arctic Council. The workshop was organised by the Ministry and Communications (Mrs Seija Miettinen-Bellevergue) and the Finnish Geospatial Research Institute (Prof. Heidi Kuusniemi) and funded by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

            A number of challenges to both conventional and satellite navigation were highlighted during the conference. These range from severe climatic and ice conditions, to the long distances involved in navigating in the region, all of which result in longer emergency response times for search and rescue. The challenge of sparse telecommunications coverage in the Arctic was also highlighted.

            Low EGNOS coverage due to the poor visibility of geostationary (GEO) satellites received a lot of attention. This was highlighted as a significant obstacle to the expansion of SBAS-based navigation in Arctic aviation. Specifically, poor EGNOS LPV 200 coverage in the North and the Arctic means that it is not possible to use this service for landing aircraft. New satellite constellations in low-Earth or highly elliptic orbits were seen as a promising solution. Some participants also noted specific challenges with the reception of GNSS signals at Auroral latitudes.

            In addition to GNSS and telecommunications, navigation in the Arctic also benefits from other space-based technologies, especially in the maritime domain. "Sea currents are chaotic and not well predictable if satellite images are not available," Veli Luukkala, Chief Officer at Arctia Icebreaking Ltd., said.

            While acknowledging these challenges in his address at the conference, Gian Gherardo Calini, the GSA’s Head of Market Development, also stressed some of the opportunities offered by EGNSS for different applications. The ones coming from implementation of EGNOS based procedures in aviation are: improved accessibility and operational capability, reduced environmental impacts and costs, infrastructure rationalisation, and increased safety. With regard to the low level of EGNOS coverage, he said that extension of the commitment areas for APV-I, NPA and LPV-200 up to 72ºN in Norway and Finland is planned for 2018 according to the EGNOS SoL Implementation Roadmap.

            Watch this: EGNOS is growing

            Regarding the issue of emergency response times, Calini said that, with the increased positioning accuracy provided by Galileo integrated into COSPAS-SARSAT, users would benefit from reduced detection times, improved localisation, increased availability and the return link function. “If a person in distress knows that their message has been heard and that help is on the way, this is very important. This is a key differentiator of Galileo,” he said.

            In his address at the workshop, Eric Guyader, Galileo Programme Administrator at the European Commission, said that since 2013, the European Commission has been developing modernisation plans for Galileo, to ensure that the system can respond to new challenges in the use of GNSS. He said that the EC’s approach is to capture the strategic priorities of the Member States, including in the Arctic, and to understand the changing GNSS environment.

            Regarding the specific challenges posed by the Arctic region, he said that the Commission is in open dialogue with countries in the region to establish priorities. He said that Galileo provides good service overall in both navigation and SAR, and that, in combination with GPS and GLONASS, it would offer excellent service.

            Guyader said that the Galileo modernisation includes plans for Advanced Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring (ARAIM), and emergency warning service and an ionosphere prediction service, which will make it possible to quickly react to sudden signal degradation.

            In another presentation, a representative from academia noted that ionospheric scintillation, or the rapid modification of radio waves by small-scale structures in the ionosphere, was an important concern in the Arctic, primarily for service availability and continuity, rather than integrity. He said that dual-frequency GNSS offered a possible solution, as it would allow users to directly and robustly estimate ionospheric delay.

            A potential solution to the problem of poor visibility of GEO satellites was offered by Kjersti Moldekelev, Senior Adviser at the Norwegian Space Centre. Moldeklev said that the company Space Norway was planning to launch HEO satellites in 2022, which would provide broadband access to the Arctic region. She said that if these HEO satellites were to carry SBAS payload, this would give the EU a foothold in the Arctic. "This will definitely be a solution for communications challenges in the region and perhaps for navigation challenges also,” she said.

            Local stakeholders in Arctic navigation were well represented at the workshop, including the Finnish Defence Forces, the Finnish Communications Regulatory Authority, and companies such as Finnair, KNL Networks, and Reaktor. The stakeholders actively contributed to the workshop by giving keynote addresses, participating in panel discussions, and working in expert groups to build a roadmap towards resolving the challenges of Arctic navigation.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            Challenges and opportunities were discussed in Arctic navigation in Olos, Muonio

            Boosting EGNOS for better precision farming

            20.4.2018 10:02  
            AUDITOR is set to enable a range of precision agriculture applications.
            Published: 
            20 April 2018
            The Horizon 2020 AUDITOR project, funded by the European GNSS Agency (GSA), enables cost-effective precision agriculture services to small and mid-sized farmers in areas where EGNOS availability is limited.

             

            From automatic steering to farm machinery guidance, variable rate application, yield and soil monitoring and livestock tracking, precision agriculture depends on the precise positioning provided by GNSS.

            However, in order to get the level of precision these types of farming applications demand, GNSS signals must be augmented. In Europe, this augmentation is provided by EGNOS.

             

            Although EGNOS is widely available, there are remote and rural areas in Europe where coverage is lacking. Other augmentation providers may provide coverage in the areas, however typically they are expensive, sometimes due to high subscription fees, and are not easy to tailor to the agricultural needs. To help fill the needs of such small farms, the Horizon 2020 AUDITOR project is developing a ground-based GNSS augmentation system that will deliver high-performance and cost-efficient services and applications for the agriculture industry.

            “The purpose of this project is to develop an improved GNSS ground-based augmentation system using modern and proven algorithms in highly configurable, cost-effect receivers,” says Project Coordinator Esther Lopez. “As a result, AUDITOR will enable cost-effective precision agriculture services for farmers, especially those with small and mid-sized farms in areas where EGNOS availability is limited.”
            The future of farming

            The AUDITOR system is based on a radio frequency (RF) dual-band multi-constellation GNSS front-end and an embedded digital processing platform. The front-end receiver acquires the GNSS signals and embeds all analogue and digital hardware required to convert the RF signal to digital samples. The digital processing platform then converts and customises the signals for the AUDITOR systems. The system serves as the basis for providing higher-level services for the end user via cloud-based web and/or mobile applications.

            Once finalised, AUDITOR is set to be used in a range of precision agriculture applications. For example, with AUDITOR applications, farmers will be able to accurately measure spatial variability in soils and crops. This information, expressed in the form of yield maps, allows a farmer to precisely apply fertiliser, water and pesticides – thus reducing production costs and the farm’s environmental impact. AUDITOR’s high-accuracy positioning will also enable the use of autonomous mobile robotic units for identifying weeds, pests and diseases.

            “Producing precise maps of the soil and crops, as well as the spatially varying application of fertiliser that these maps enable, is completely dependent on the availability of an augmented GNSS signal,” says Lopez. “Thanks to AUDITOR, even areas in Eastern and Southern Europe that once were unable to get the required precise GNSS signal can reap the benefits of precision agriculture.”

            With the ever-increasing requirement for augmented yield and profitability and energy and cost savings, the future of farming is precision agriculture. By focusing on providing the augmentation needed to enable existing precision agriculture applications in Europe alone, Lopez is confident that AUDITOR will be well-positioned to compete on the market.
            A version of this article originally appeared on the EU’s CORDIS website.

             

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            AUDITOR is set to enable a range of precision agriculture applications.

            Boosting EGNOS for better precision farming

            20.4.2018 10:02  
            AUDITOR is set to enable a range of precision agriculture applications.
            Published: 
            20 April 2018
            The Horizon 2020 AUDITOR project, funded by the European GNSS Agency (GSA), enables cost-effective precision agriculture services to small and mid-sized farmers in areas where EGNOS availability is limited.

             

            From automatic steering to farm machinery guidance, variable rate application, yield and soil monitoring and livestock tracking, precision agriculture depends on the precise positioning provided by GNSS.

            However, in order to get the level of precision these types of farming applications demand, GNSS signals must be augmented. In Europe, this augmentation is provided by EGNOS.

             

            Although EGNOS is widely available, there are remote and rural areas in Europe where coverage is lacking. Other augmentation providers may provide coverage in the areas, however typically they are expensive, sometimes due to high subscription fees, and are not easy to tailor to the agricultural needs. To help fill the needs of such small farms, the Horizon 2020 AUDITOR project is developing a ground-based GNSS augmentation system that will deliver high-performance and cost-efficient services and applications for the agriculture industry.

            “The purpose of this project is to develop an improved GNSS ground-based augmentation system using modern and proven algorithms in highly configurable, cost-effect receivers,” says Project Coordinator Esther Lopez. “As a result, AUDITOR will enable cost-effective precision agriculture services for farmers, especially those with small and mid-sized farms in areas where EGNOS availability is limited.”

            The future of farming

            The AUDITOR system is based on a radio frequency (RF) dual-band multi-constellation GNSS front-end and an embedded digital processing platform. The front-end receiver acquires the GNSS signals and embeds all analogue and digital hardware required to convert the RF signal to digital samples. The digital processing platform then converts and customises the signals for the AUDITOR systems. The system serves as the basis for providing higher-level services for the end user via cloud-based web and/or mobile applications.

            Once finalised, AUDITOR is set to be used in a range of precision agriculture applications. For example, with AUDITOR applications, farmers will be able to accurately measure spatial variability in soils and crops. This information, expressed in the form of yield maps, allows a farmer to precisely apply fertiliser, water and pesticides – thus reducing production costs and the farm’s environmental impact. AUDITOR’s high-accuracy positioning will also enable the use of autonomous mobile robotic units for identifying weeds, pests and diseases.

            “Producing precise maps of the soil and crops, as well as the spatially varying application of fertiliser that these maps enable, is completely dependent on the availability of an augmented GNSS signal,” says Lopez. “Thanks to AUDITOR, even areas in Eastern and Southern Europe that once were unable to get the required precise GNSS signal can reap the benefits of precision agriculture.”

            With the ever-increasing requirement for augmented yield and profitability and energy and cost savings, the future of farming is precision agriculture. By focusing on providing the augmentation needed to enable existing precision agriculture applications in Europe alone, Lopez is confident that AUDITOR will be well-positioned to compete on the market.
            A version of this article originally appeared on the EU’s CORDIS website.

             

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            AUDITOR is set to enable a range of precision agriculture applications.

            BLUEGNSS accelerates 3D GNSS approach implementation

            13.4.2018 13:58  
            ENAV flight inspection aircraft used in BLUEGNSS project ©ENAV S.p.A.
            Published: 
            13 April 2018

            The GSA-funded BLUEGNSS project (Promoting EGNSS Operational Adoption in BLUEMED) was launched in 2016 with the aim of promoting the adoption of European GNSS in the BLUEMED Functional Airspace Block. Preliminary results, presented at the World ATM Congress in Madrid on March 6, show significant gains in safety and airport accessibility in the target countries.

            To achieve its overarching goal of promoting EGNSS adoption, the BLUEGNSS project’s primary objective is to harmonise the implementation of PBN approach operations among the BLUE MED FAB states - Greece, Cyprus, Malta and Italy - using EGNSS (EGNOS and Galileo). With this in mind, the project focuses on three main streams: GNSS procedures design and validation; GNSS training; and GNSS monitoring.

            Good results

            BLUEGNSS is designing 3D GNSS procedures, known as RNP approach (Required Navigation Performance), for 11 selected airports (4 in Greece, 4 in Italy, 2 in Cyprus and 1 in Malta) to increase their accessibility and safety. In this way, the project supports BLUE MED countries in accelerating GNSS 3D approaches in view of the European PBN Implementing Rule, which is under discussion and which proposes implementation of 3D GNSS approaches by 2024, either as the primary approach or as a back-up for precision approaches.

            Watch this: EGNOS for Aviation - High Precision, Low investment

            The project got off to a good start in 2018 with the successful validation in January of 3 new GNSS procedures for Lamezia, Parma and Cuneo airports in Italy. This was followed by validations for Larnaca and Paphos in Cyprus in March. The GNSS approaches in Cyprus were successfully validated despite bad weather, further demonstrating the safety benefits of GNSS vertical guidance in adverse weather conditions. To date, 14 GNSS procedures have been designed and validated by the BLUEGNSS project. The last remaining one, Bolzano, is the most challenging due to its orography and the need to test RNP Authorization Required procedures, which is the first time Italy has had to deal with this.

            Supporting implementation

            The project is also providing training, to ensure that airspace procedure designers are able to deal with the design of RNP approach procedures and related minima. Specific workshops were organised to share and discuss the design principles among design task leaders and project members. In 2016, training was provided on Advanced Procedures for Air Navigation Services, Operations (PANS OPS) design and in 2017 there have been air traffic controller (ATCO) and non-ATCO training courses for instructors, all of which have been delivered by the certified ENAV Academy.

            In addition, the project recognises GNSS performance monitoring as one of the main enablers for the implementation and acceptance of the new RNP APCH operations, paving the way for Galileo acceptance in aviation. With this in mind, the project is adopting a regional and multi-source approach to monitoring through the deployment of an innovative dedicated network devoted not only to standard GNSS performance assessment, but also to interference assessment and reporting, and GNSS data recording.

            The project’s GNSS monitoring solution is the first to be fully ICAO compliant, it is modular and interoperable with other systems, and cost-benefit analyses at regional level have shown positive results. The system automatically generates daily and monthly monitoring reports, which are available in the restricted area of the BLUEMED portal www.bluemed.aero.

            Speaking at the World ATM Congress in Madrid on March 6, BLUEGNSS Project Coordinator Patrizio Vanni was upbeat about the project results achieved so far. “The project is in good health and close to completion, almost all of the challenges have been successfully completed,” Vanni said.

            Cross-fertilization

            BLUEGNSS is the first time in Europe that a RNP approach implementation project has been coordinated at FAB level. One of the advantages of this approach is that countries and air navigation service providers with limited experience in RNP approach operational implementation can benefit from intra-FAB cross-fertilization.

            BLUEGNSS is one of the Horizon 2020-Galileo-2015-1 projects selected for co-financing by the GSA. The consortium, led by ENAV, is composed of the BLUE MED FAB ANSP partners - DCAC, HCAA and MATS - and IDS (Ingegneria dei Sistemi) which is the only industrial partner. Launched in January 2016, the project is scheduled to last 30 months.

            For more information, check the project website or the project page on the GSA site.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            ENAV flight inspection aircraft used in BLUEGNSS project ©ENAV S.p.A.

            GSA sets challenges for ActInSpace participants

            10.4.2018 12:04  
            Published: 
            10 April 2018

            On May 25-26 the ActInSpace innovation contest will bring entrepreneurs, students, job seekers, developers and creative minds together in over 60 cities across 5 continents to work on real-life challenges and to design innovative services and applications using space technologies and data. This year the European GNSS Agency (GSA) has set three challenges in the contest.

            Initiated by the French Space Agency (CNES) and supported by the European GNSS Agency and European Space Agency (ESA), ActInSpace aims to demonstrate the socio-economic potential of the space sector and show how it can have a positive impact on our daily lives. By demonstrating that space is a vector of innovation for employment and economic development, the contest hopes to boost start-up creation by encouraging young people to leverage space technologies in their businesses.

            GSA Challenges

            For this year’s event, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) has set three challenges, the first of which – Geocaching by Satellite - asks participants to use Galileo to develop an innovative geocaching game relying on GNSS positioning. For the second GSA challenge – Art with Satellites – teams should develop an app to draw and write in a map using satellite navigation and the users’ movements by leveraging on Galileo-enhanced positioning.

            Finally, the GNSS Satellites Selector challenge asks hackathon participants to design an app that allows them to calculate the Position Velocity and Time (PVT) solution by employing their favourite GNSS constellations and, of course, Galileo. By comparing the data obtained by single satellites, they should propose selection algorithms for satellite constellations based on different criteria.

            GSA prize

            During the contest the GSA will present its Galileo Geekie Award to the team considered to have best responded to one of the above challenges. The lucky winner will be selected to present their application at European Space Week 2018, the largest gathering of GNSS and Earth Observation experts in Europe, to be held in Marseille on 3-6 December. The GSA will offer the winner a three-day stay at the conference and the possibility to present their application idea.

            Bringing creative minds together

            The competition is open to teams of from two to five people made up of individuals - business creators, students, researchers, entrepreneurs, developers, users, creators and space experts, job seekers, etc. and/or private legal entities (associations, companies), represented by an individual delegated to participate in the competition. There are no limitations regarding nationality.

            Each team will present its project to a jury at an 8-minute presentation which will take place at the end of the competition. The winning teams will proceed to national and then international finals, where they will present their project to an international jury of experts on technology transfer and business development.

            Registration for the hackathon is now open – if you would like to take part, you can register here.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            GSA has set three challenges for participants in this year’s ActInSpace hackathon

            GSA sets challenges for ActInSpace participants

            10.4.2018 12:04  
            Published: 
            10 April 2018

            On May 25-26 the ActInSpace innovation contest will bring entrepreneurs, students, job seekers, developers and creative minds together in over 60 cities across 5 continents to work on real-life challenges and to design innovative services and applications using space technologies and data. This year the European GNSS Agency (GSA) has set three challenges in the contest.

            Initiated by the French Space Agency (CNES) and supported by the European GNSS Agency and European Space Agency (ESA), ActInSpace aims to demonstrate the socio-economic potential of the space sector and show how it can have a positive impact on our daily lives. By demonstrating that space is a vector of innovation for employment and economic development, the contest hopes to boost start-up creation by encouraging young people to leverage space technologies in their businesses.

            GSA Challenges

            For this year’s event, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) has set three challenges, the first of which – Geocaching by Satellite - asks participants to use Galileo to develop an innovative geocaching game relying on GNSS positioning. For the second GSA challenge – Art with Satellites – teams should develop an app to draw and write in a map using satellite navigation and the users’ movements by leveraging on Galileo-enhanced positioning.

            Finally, the GNSS Satellites Selector challenge asks hackathon participants to design an app that allows them to calculate the Position Velocity and Time (PVT) solution by employing their favourite GNSS constellations and, of course, Galileo. By comparing the data obtained by single satellites, they should propose selection algorithms for satellite constellations based on different criteria.

            GSA prize

            During the contest the GSA will present its Galileo Geekie Award to the team considered to have best responded to one of the above challenges. The lucky winner will be selected to present their application at European Space Week 2018, the largest gathering of GNSS and Earth Observation experts in Europe, to be held in Marseille on 3-6 December. The GSA will offer the winner a three-day stay at the conference and the possibility to present their application idea.

            Bringing creative minds together

            The competition is open to teams of from two to five people made up of individuals - business creators, students, researchers, entrepreneurs, developers, users, creators and space experts, job seekers, etc. and/or private legal entities (associations, companies), represented by an individual delegated to participate in the competition. There are no limitations regarding nationality.

            Each team will present its project to a jury at an 8-minute presentation which will take place at the end of the competition. The winning teams will proceed to national and then international finals, where they will present their project to an international jury of experts on technology transfer and business development.

            Registration for the hackathon is now open – if you would like to take part, you can register here.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            GSA has set three challenges for participants in this year’s ActInSpace hackathon

            GSA sets challenges for ActInSpace participants

            10.4.2018 12:04  
            Published: 
            10 April 2018

            On May 25-26 the ActInSpace innovation contest will bring entrepreneurs, students, job seekers, developers and creative minds together in over 60 cities across 5 continents to work on real-life challenges and to design innovative services and applications using space technologies and data. This year the European GNSS Agency (GSA) has set three challenges in the contest.

            Initiated by the French Space Agency (CNES) and supported by the European GNSS Agency and European Space Agency (ESA), ActInSpace aims to demonstrate the socio-economic potential of the space sector and show how it can have a positive impact on our daily lives. By demonstrating that space is a vector of innovation for employment and economic development, the contest hopes to boost start-up creation by encouraging young people to leverage space technologies in their businesses.

            GSA Challenges

            For this year’s event, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) has set three challenges, the first of which – Geocaching by Satellite - asks participants to use Galileo to develop an innovative geocaching game relying on GNSS positioning. For the second GSA challenge – Art with Satellites – teams should develop an app to draw and write in a map using satellite navigation and the users’ movements by leveraging on Galileo-enhanced positioning.

            Finally, the GNSS Satellites Selector challenge asks hackathon participants to design an app that allows them to calculate the Position Velocity and Time (PVT) solution by employing their favourite GNSS constellations and, of course, Galileo. By comparing the data obtained by single satellites, they should propose selection algorithms for satellite constellations based on different criteria.

            GSA prize

            During the contest the GSA will present its Galileo Geekie Award to the team considered to have best responded to one of the above challenges. The lucky winner will be selected to present their application at European Space Week 2018, the largest gathering of GNSS and Earth Observation experts in Europe, to be held in Marseille on 3-6 December. The GSA will offer the winner a three-day stay at the conference and the possibility to present their application idea.

            Bringing creative minds together

            The competition is open to teams of from two to five people made up of individuals - business creators, students, researchers, entrepreneurs, developers, users, creators and space experts, job seekers, etc. and/or private legal entities (associations, companies), represented by an individual delegated to participate in the competition. There are no limitations regarding nationality.

            Each team will present its project to a jury at an 8-minute presentation which will take place at the end of the competition. The winning teams will proceed to national and then international finals, where they will present their project to an international jury of experts on technology transfer and business development.

            Registration for the hackathon is now open – if you would like to take part, you can register here.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            GSA has set three challenges for participants in this year’s ActInSpace hackathon

            A new generation of OS-NMA user terminals

            9.4.2018 11:15  
            The Fundamental Elements funded PATROL project is an important milestone for the satellite navigation industry, as it aims to prove the importance of Galileo OS authentication.
            Published: 
            09 April 2018

            The GSA has awarded the PATROL project a contract to develop, supply and test Galileo’s Open Service Navigation Message Authentication (OS NMA).

            To ensure that the next generation of Galileo services are driven by user needs, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is developing Galileo’s Open Service Navigation Message Authentication (OS NMA) capability. By allowing users to verify that a navigation message comes from a Galileo satellite and not a potentially malicious source, the OS NMA service will play a key role in meeting such emerging needs as autonomous applications.

            OS-NMA Signal-in-Space transmission is expected to begin in 2019, reaching full service capability in 2020. Once fully operational, this free-of-charge authenticated signal for mass market applications will be one of Galileo’s key differentiators over other GNSS constellations. However, before full service can be achieved, a new generation of OS-NMA-enabled user terminals must be developed, tested and implemented – which is where the PATROL project comes.

            Building a future-proof solution

            Coordinated by Qascom, a leader in GNSS authentication, the PATROL project aims to deliver a market-ready technology that guarantees robust and secure positioning using Galileo’s OS-NMA capability. Targeting the road sector, PATROL will develop a user terminal capable of providing a trusted position, velocity and precise time (PVT) to smart tachographs and other positioning applications.

            “This project is an important milestone for the satellite navigation industry, as it aims to prove the importance of Galileo OS authentication in fulfilling the emerging security needs of many applications,” says GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides.

            Galileo authentication is used in combination with other anti-spoofing techniques that are implemented at the receiver level and backed by standard IT security. “With authentication, users are guaranteed that they are utilising navigation data from Galileo satellites and not from another source,” adds the PATROL project’s Alessandro Pozzobon. “The PATROL project supports this authentication by validating the user terminal against a broad set of threats, creating a future-proof solution that fulfils the emerging security needs of several civil applications.”

            About Fundamental Elements

            The EUR 2 264 853 in funding allocated to the PATROL project comes from the GSA’s Fundamental Elements mechanism, which supports the development of European GNSS-enabled chipsets, receivers and antennas. Fundamental Elements projects are part of the overall European GNSS strategy for market uptake, led by the GSA. The objectives of the programme can be summarised as follows:

            • Facilitate the adoption of European GNSS, building on innovative services and differentiators;
            • Improve the competitiveness of EU industry;
            • Address user needs in priority market segments;
            • Maximise benefits to European citizens.

            The total budget for projects to be carried out in 2015 – 2020 is EUR 111.5 million.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            The Fundamental Elements funded PATROL project is an important milestone for the satellite navigation industry, as it aims to prove the importance of Galileo OS authentication.

            Fourth SAR/Galileo IS Quarterly Performance Report available

            6.4.2018 9:32  
            Galileo Initial Open Service and SAR Service performance figures exceed Minimum Performance Level targets in Q4.
            Published: 
            06 April 2018

            The last SAR/Galileo Initial Service Quarterly Performance Report of 2017 (from October to December) has been published in the Performance Reports section of the GSC web portal.

            The fourth SAR/Galileo Initial Service Performance Report is available in the Electronic Library, providing the status of the Galileo constellation and the achieved performance over the reporting period (October, November and December 2017).

            These quarterly reports provide the public with the latest information on the SAR/Galileo Initial Service measured performance statistics with respect to their Minimum Performance Levels (MPLs), as declared in the SAR/Galileo Initial Service - Service Definition Document (SAR - SDD), in particular, on parameters such as:

            • Detection performance;
            • Location performance;
            • Infrastructure availability performance;

            Highlights from Q4 2017

            As in the preceding three quarters of 2017, the measured SAR/Galileo Initial Service performance figures generally exceed the MPL targets by significant margins.

            Some highlights from the Q4 performance report:

            • Detection Probability for each of the Reference Beacons (REFBE) was always above the Minimum Performance Level (which is 99%).
            • Both the single and multi-burst Location Probabilities for each REFBE were, in all cases, well above the MPLs (which are 75% and 98%, respectively).
            • SAR/Galileo Infrastructure Performance is measured by the availability of the Ground Segment, Space Segment and SAR Server. As an example of the Ground Segment availability, the MEOLUTs of Larnaca and Spitzbergen have achieved good values during the whole period (average availability of respectively 97.3% and 98.2% in "Nominal" mode).

            For the most up-to-date information on the Galileo system and constellation, visit the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) website, in particular, the Galileo constellation status section. For more details on Galileo performance and its Services, do not hesitate to contact the Galileo Help Desk.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            Galileo Initial Open Service and SAR Service performance figures exceed Minimum Performance Level targets in Q4.

            GSA to host GNSS Raw Measurements Taskforce Workshop “GNSS Raw Measurements: From research to commercial use” on May 30

            4.4.2018 10:41  
            Taskforce experts will explain how to use GNSS raw measurements for scientific purposes, to optimise performance, or to improve robustness
            Published: 
            04 April 2018

            Following the publication of the White Paper Using GNSS Raw Measurements on Android Devices, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) and the Raw Measurements Taskforce will share their experiences around the use of raw measurements at a dedicated workshop - GNSS Raw Measurements: From research to commercial use” - to be held at the GSA headquarters in Prague on May 30.

            There are several advantages to using GNSS raw measurements in smartphones and IoT devices. Use of these measurements can lead to increased GNSS performance, as they open the door to more advanced GNSS processing techniques that, until recently, have been restricted to more professional GNSS receivers.

            Android GNSS raw measurements in practice

            Several application areas stand to profit from this increased accuracy, such as augmented reality, location-based advertising, mobile health and asset management. The raw measurements also make it possible to optimise multi-GNSS solutions and to select satellites or constellations based on their performances or differentiators.

            At the Prague workshop, experts from the GSA and the Raw Measurements Taskforce, which includes GNSS experts, scientists and GNSS market players, will share their experience of raw measurements use.

            Discussions at the event will cover:

            • Contributions from Taskforce members on four following topics:
              • High accuracy position provision,
              • Educational applications,
              • Testing and performance optimization,
              • Robustness increase;
            • Google`s vision on advanced location services;
            • Future outlook for High accuracy in mass market including Galileo contribution.

            If you would like to learn more about the topics mentioned above, come join the experts at GSA HQ in Prague on May 30. To register for the workshop – click here.

            The GNSS Raw Measurements Taskforce is dedicated to promoting the wider use of GNSS raw measurements. Membership is open to anybody interested in GNSS raw measurements, to join the Taskforce contact: market@gsa.europa.eu.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            Taskforce experts will explain how to use GNSS raw measurements for scientific purposes, to optimise performance, or to improve robustness

            GSA to host GNSS Raw Measurements Taskforce Workshop “GNSS Raw Measurements: From research to commercial use” on May 30

            4.4.2018 10:41  
            askforce experts will explain how to use GNSS raw measurements for scientific purposes, to optimise performance, or to improve robustness
            Published: 
            04 April 2018

            Following the publication of the White Paper Using GNSS Raw Measurements on Android Devices, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) and the Raw Measurements Taskforce will share their experiences around the use of raw measurements at a dedicated workshop - GNSS Raw Measurements: From research to commercial use” - to be held at the GSA headquarters in Prague on May 30.

            There are several advantages to using GNSS raw measurements in smartphones and IoT devices. Use of these measurements can lead to increased GNSS performance, as they open the door to more advanced GNSS processing techniques that, until recently, have been restricted to more professional GNSS receivers.

            Android GNSS raw measurements in practice

            Several application areas stand to profit from this increased accuracy, such as augmented reality, location-based advertising, mobile health and asset management. The raw measurements also make it possible to optimise multi-GNSS solutions and to select satellites or constellations based on their performances or differentiators.

            At the Prague workshop, experts from the GSA and the Raw Measurements Taskforce, which includes GNSS experts, scientists and GNSS market players, will share their experience of raw measurements use.

            Discussions at the event will cover:

            • Contributions from Taskforce members on four following topics:
              • High accuracy position provision,
              • Educational applications,
              • Testing and performance optimization,
              • Robustness increase;
            • Google`s vision on advanced location services;
            • Future outlook for High accuracy in mass market including Galileo contribution.

            If you would like to learn more about the topics mentioned above, come join the experts at GSA HQ in Prague on May 30. To register for the workshop – click here.

            The GNSS Raw Measurements Taskforce is dedicated to promoting the wider use of GNSS raw measurements. Membership is open to anybody interested in GNSS raw measurements, to join the Taskforce contact: market@gsa.europa.eu.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            Taskforce experts will explain how to use GNSS raw measurements for scientific purposes, to optimise performance, or to improve robustness

            GSA to host GNSS Raw Measurements Taskforce Workshop “GNSS Raw Measurements: From research to commercial use” on May 30

            4.4.2018 10:41  
            askforce experts will explain how to use GNSS raw measurements for scientific purposes, to optimise performance, or to improve robustness
            Published: 
            04 April 2018

            Following the publication of the White Paper Using GNSS Raw Measurements on Android Devices, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) and the Raw Measurements Taskforce will share their experiences around the use of raw measurements at a dedicated workshop - GNSS Raw Measurements: From research to commercial use” - to be held at the GSA headquarters in Prague on May 30.

            There are several advantages to using GNSS raw measurements in smartphones and IoT devices. Use of these measurements can lead to increased GNSS performance, as they open the door to more advanced GNSS processing techniques that, until recently, have been restricted to more professional GNSS receivers.

            Android GNSS raw measurements in practice

            Several application areas stand to profit from this increased accuracy, such as augmented reality, location-based advertising, mobile health and asset management. The raw measurements also make it possible to optimise multi-GNSS solutions and to select satellites or constellations based on their performances or differentiators.

            At the Prague workshop, experts from the GSA and the Raw Measurements Taskforce, which includes GNSS experts, scientists and GNSS market players, will share their experience of raw measurements use.

            Discussions at the event will cover:

            • Contributions from Taskforce members on four following topics:
              • High accuracy position provision,
              • Educational applications,
              • Testing and performance optimization,
              • Robustness increase;
            • Google`s vision on advanced location services;
            • Future outlook for High accuracy in mass market including Galileo contribution.

            If you would like to learn more about the topics mentioned above, come join the experts at GSA HQ in Prague on May 30. To register for the workshop – click here.

            The GNSS Raw Measurements Taskforce is dedicated to promoting the wider use of GNSS raw measurements. Membership is open to anybody interested in GNSS raw measurements, to join the Taskforce contact: market@gsa.europa.eu.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            Taskforce experts will explain how to use GNSS raw measurements for scientific purposes, to optimise performance, or to improve robustness

            eCall emergency alert system launched

            29.3.2018 15:32  
            Published: 
            03 April 2018

            As of 31 March 2018, all new car and light van models sold in the EU have to be fitted with eCall devices that automatically alert rescue services in the event of an accident, sending their position. The aim of the system is to reduce the emergency response time for road accidents and to save lives.

            eCall is activated automatically as soon as in-vehicle sensors detect a serious crash. Once activated, the system dials the European emergency number 112 and establishes a telephone link to the appropriate emergency call centre.

            Leveraging EGNSS (Galileo and EGNOS), the system sends the time of incident, the accurate position of the crashed vehicle and the direction of travel to the emergency services, enabling the emergency responders to get to the accident site faster. An eCall can also be triggered manually by pushing a button in the car, for example by a witness to a serious accident.

            GSA Guidelines

            Ahead of the eCall launch, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) and the Joint Research Centre, the European Commission’s in-house science service, published a set of guidelines to help the eCall industry value chain to pre-test the accuracy of their new devices and understand how to reap the benefits of Galileo.

            Commenting on the eCall launch, GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides said that knowing the precise location of a road accident would speed up the emergency response. “Thanks also to EGNOS and Galileo, eCall will enable emergency response teams to locate an accident faster and with much greater accuracy, thereby saving more lives, an important day for Europe and Galileo!” he said.

            In fact, it is estimated that eCall can speed up emergency response times by 40% in urban areas and 50% in the countryside and can reduce the number of fatalities by at least 4% and the number of severe injuries by 6%.

            Background

            Over 25,500 people were killed and 135,000 people were seriously injured in road accidents in the EU 2016, according to figures released by the European Commission. In addition to the tragedy of loss of life and injury, this also carries an economic burden of around EUR 130 billion in costs to society every year.

            Against this backdrop, the estimated cost of eCall devices of less than EUR 100 per vehicle at the date of entry into force of the proposed regulation does not seem very high. Moreover, this cost is expected to decrease even further in the future, following cost trends for electronic components and also due to economies of scale.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            eCall leverages EGNSS to get emergency responders to accident sites faster

            EGNOS and Galileo – opening the door to new drone applications

            29.3.2018 9:08  
            The growing importance of drones was on full display during the Mobile World Congress (MWC) in Barcelona, where the GSA highlighted a number of innovative drone applications that utilise EGNOS and Galileo.
            Published: 
            29 March 2018

            With European GNSS providing the positioning accuracy that drones need to operate safely, more and more drone-based applications are hitting the market. The GSA highlighted a number of these innovative services during the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona.

            The integration of EGNOS and Galileo into drone and UAV technology enhances positioning and opens the door to a wide range of new applications and services. In fact, according to the latest edition of the European GNSS Agency’s (GSA) Market Report, by 2025 the installed base of GNSS devices in drones will reach 70 million – more than twice the sum of other professional market segments combined. But with this growing market comes growing concerns about how to ensure the safe operation of drones.

            Luckily, European GNSS offers a solution.

            To operate safely, today’s drones are increasingly dependent on the precise positioning and navigation information provided by EGNOS and Galileo. As a result, drones and UAVs are used for applications and services spanning from search and rescue to providing photovoltaic maintenance. They also represent a promising growth market for European GNSS. “Highly precise positioning is key for operating drones, and this is where Galileo and EGNOS can really make a difference - on one hand enhancing the precision in manoeuvring the drone and on the other making flying operations safer,” GSA Market Development Officer Carmen Aguilera said.

            This growing role of drones was on full display during the Mobile World Congress (MWC) in Barcelona, where the GSA highlighted a number of Horizon 2020-funded drone and UAV applications that utilise EGNOS and Galileo:  

            REAL

            Researchers with the REAL project are developing EGNOS-based navigation and surveillance sensors for two Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS), one for urgent medical transport and the other for providing linear powerline inspections. “REAL integrates EGNOS positioning in support of aviation and surveillance functions for UAVs,” explains project researcher Santiago Soley. “The idea is to exploit EGNOS’ positioning and, more importantly, the integrity that it provides.” 

            EASY-PV

            The EASY-PV project has developed a time-efficient and cost-effective maintenance solution for photovoltaic plants. Using a drone equipped with a European GNSS high-accuracy receiver, the system flies over a photovoltaic field and collects such relevant data as visible and thermal images. “This data is then automatically geo-referenced and processed, producing a detailed report on which modules need to be replaced,” explains project coordinator Marco Nisi.

            GAUSS

            To better regulate drone traffic in Europe, the EU has launched a UAV Traffic Management initiative. “GAUSS integrates EGNOS and Galileo’s navigation and location services into this initiative to provide the level of accuracy needed to safely position drones in the sky,” says project coordinator Jiménez González. 

            GEOVISION

            To increase emergency response times, GEO-VISION captures images and video streaming from the UAV, which are then sent to the pilot and routed in real-time to a control room. “In emergency search and rescue situations, everything is about time – the quicker you know what is happening, the faster you can respond to it,” says project coordinator Harald Skinnemoen. “GEOVISION results is an increased efficiency in emergency response, leading to more lives being saved.”

            MAPKITE

            This mapping-based project integrates drones with terrestrial mobile mapping systems to provide surveyors and mappers with an end-to- end solution for 3D high-resolution corridor mapping. “For drone applications such as MAPKITE, EGNOS is the standard for accuracy,” explains project coordinator Pere Molina. “Galileo plays an important role too, adding more satellites in view and by offering some resilience against hacking.”

            ARGONAUT

            ARGONAUT combines an advanced, multi-constellation GNSS receiver and a powerful navigation data processing cloud service for more accurate and affordable geolocation. “For us, the use of Galileo basically translates into being able to provide a better service,” says project coordinator Xavier Banqué-Casanovas. “Because ARGONAUT is a multi-constellation solution, we can offer drone users a more robust solution for overcoming such adverse scenarios as obstructions.”

            Want to learn more about the role of European GNSS in drone applications and services? Stay tuned as our EGNOS, Galileo and Drones series takes a behind-the-scenes look at each of these projects in the coming weeks.  

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            The growing importance of drones was on full display during the Mobile World Congress (MWC) in Barcelona, where the GSA highlighted a number of innovative drone applications that utilise EGNOS and Galileo.

            EGNOS and Galileo – opening the door to new drone applications

            29.3.2018 9:08  
            The growing importance of drones was on full display during the Mobile World Congress (MWC) in Barcelona, where the GSA highlighted a number of innovative drone applications that utilise EGNOS and Galileo.
            Published: 
            29 March 2018

            With European GNSS providing the positioning accuracy that drones need to operate safely, more and more drone-based applications are hitting the market. The GSA highlighted a number of these innovative services during the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona.

            The integration of EGNOS and Galileo into drone and UAV technology enhances positioning and opens the door to a wide range of new applications and services. In fact, according to the latest edition of the European GNSS Agency’s (GSA) Market Report, by 2025 the installed base of GNSS devices in drones will reach 70 million – more than twice the sum of other professional market segments combined. But with this growing market comes growing concerns about how to ensure the safe operation of drones.

            Luckily, European GNSS offers a solution.

            To operate safely, today’s drones are increasingly dependent on the precise positioning and navigation information provided by EGNOS and Galileo. As a result, drones and UAVs are used for applications and services spanning from search and rescue to providing photovoltaic maintenance. They also represent a promising growth market for European GNSS. “Highly precise positioning is key for operating drones, and this is where Galileo and EGNOS can really make a difference - on one hand enhancing the precision in manoeuvring the drone and on the other making flying operations safer,” GSA Market Development Officer Carmen Aguilera said.

            This growing role of drones was on full display during the Mobile World Congress (MWC) in Barcelona, where the GSA highlighted a number of Horizon 2020-funded drone and UAV applications that utilise EGNOS and Galileo:  

            REAL

            Researchers with the REAL project are developing EGNOS-based navigation and surveillance sensors for two Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS), one for urgent medical transport and the other for providing linear powerline inspections. “REAL integrates EGNOS positioning in support of aviation and surveillance functions for UAVs,” explains project researcher Santiago Soley. “The idea is to exploit EGNOS’ positioning and, more importantly, the integrity that it provides.” 

            EASY-PV

            The EASY-PV project has developed a time-efficient and cost-effective maintenance solution for photovoltaic plants. Using a drone equipped with a European GNSS high-accuracy receiver, the system flies over a photovoltaic field and collects such relevant data as visible and thermal images. “This data is then automatically geo-referenced and processed, producing a detailed report on which modules need to be replaced,” explains project coordinator Marco Nisi.

            GAUSS

            To better regulate drone traffic in Europe, the EU has launched a UAV Traffic Management initiative. “GAUSS integrates EGNOS and Galileo’s navigation and location services into this initiative to provide the level of accuracy needed to safely position drones in the sky,” says project coordinator Jiménez González. 

            GEOVISION

            To increase emergency response times, GEO-VISION captures images and video streaming from the UAV, which are then sent to the pilot and routed in real-time to a control room. “In emergency search and rescue situations, everything is about time – the quicker you know what is happening, the faster you can respond to it,” says project coordinator Harald Skinnemoen. “GEOVISION results is an increased efficiency in emergency response, leading to more lives being saved.”

            MAPKITE

            This mapping-based project integrates drones with terrestrial mobile mapping systems to provide surveyors and mappers with an end-to- end solution for 3D high-resolution corridor mapping. “For drone applications such as MAPKITE, EGNOS is the standard for accuracy,” explains project coordinator Pere Molina. “Galileo plays an important role too, adding more satellites in view and by offering some resilience against hacking.”

            ARGONAUT

            ARGONAUT combines an advanced, multi-constellation GNSS receiver and a powerful navigation data processing cloud service for more accurate and affordable geolocation. “For us, the use of Galileo basically translates into being able to provide a better service,” says project coordinator Xavier Banqué-Casanovas. “Because ARGONAUT is a multi-constellation solution, we can offer drone users a more robust solution for overcoming such adverse scenarios as obstructions.”

            Want to learn more about the role of European GNSS in drone applications and services? Stay tuned as our EGNOS, Galileo and Drones series takes a behind-the-scenes look at each of these projects in the coming weeks.  

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            The growing importance of drones was on full display during the Mobile World Congress (MWC) in Barcelona, where the GSA highlighted a number of innovative drone applications that utilise EGNOS and Galileo.

            Fourth Galileo IS OS Quarterly Performance Report available

            28.3.2018 9:47  
            Galileo Initial Open Service performance figures exceed Minimum Performance Level targets in Q4
            Published: 
            28 March 2018

            The last Open Service Quarterly Performance Report of 2017 (from October to December) has been published in the Performance Reports section of the GSC web portal.

            The fourth OS Performance Report is available in the Electronic Library, providing the status of the Galileo constellation and the achieved performance over the reporting period (October, November and December 2017).

            These quarterly reports provide the public with the latest information on the Galileo Open Service measured performance statistics with respect to their Minimum Performance Levels (MPLs), as declared in the Galileo OS Service Definition Document (OS SDD), in particular, on parameters such as:

            • Galileo Initial OS ranging performance,
            • Galileo Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) dissemination,
            • Galileo to GPS Time Offset (GGTO) determination performance, and
            • Timely publication of NAGUs (Notice Advisory to Galileo Users).

            Highlights from Q4 2017

            As in the preceding three quarters of 2017, the measured Galileo Initial Open Service performance figures generally exceed the MPL targets by significant margins.

            Some highlights from the Q4 performance report:

            • Availability of both the Galileo Ranging Service at the Worst User Location (WUL) and Healthy Signal has been significantly better than expected: both have achieved values above the threshold (which is 87%).
            • Availability of the Galileo UTC Determination and the GGTO Determination Services were achieved, with all monthly values above MPL targets (in particular, 100% in November and December);
            • MPLs of the Timely Publication of NAGUs were met during the whole period for both Planned and Unplanned events: target of at least 24 hours before the start of a scheduled event is always achieved, as well as not more than 72 hours after an unscheduled one.

            For the most up-to-date information on the Galileo system and constellation, visit the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) website, in particular, the Galileo constellation status section. For more details on Galileo performance and its Services, do not hesitate to contact the Galileo Help Desk.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            Galileo Initial Open Service performance figures exceed Minimum Performance Level targets in Q4

            GSA supporting development of all PRS user segments

            27.3.2018 9:12  
            Published: 
            27 March 2018

            Deployment of the Galileo Public Regulated Service (PRS) has been ongoing in recent years and the European GNSS Agency (GSA) has been actively contributing to the development of all user segments to ensure the widespread uptake of the service. GSA PRS Service Manager Charles Villie gave participants in the Munich Satellite Navigation Summit on March 7 a status update on the Galileo PRS and outlined plans for the future.

            The Galileo PRS is an encrypted navigation service that is designed to be more resistant to jamming, involuntary interference and spoofing than other services. The launch of Galileo initial services at the end of 2016 also marked the start of the initial Galileo PRS service phase, during which receivers are being tested and all declared PRS functionalities and infrastructure are functional and operational.

            Speaking at the Munich Summit, Villie said that the plan for this year is to move to the PRS enhanced service, during which pre-operational receivers will be tested. In preparation for enhanced delivery, the GSA will continue to update PRS functionalities and procedures and improve the navigation performance of PRS, which will benefit from the new satellites added to the constellation, he said.

            This work is being conducted in preparation for the initial operational capability (IOC) phase, which is timed for delivery according to the European Commission Galileo roadmap. “IOC is a very important target for us, because it will be the moment when the service and the functionalities will be completely operational and the user segment will be ready to start using operational receivers,” Villie said.

            He said that, ahead of IOC, the GSA is actively contributing to the development of all PRS user segments to ensure that user needs are met. This support is provided in three main axes: technical assistance to Competent PRS Authorities (CPA) in the form of workshops and training; operational demonstration and validation in PRS pilot projects and grants for joint test activities; and, finally, support for the development of user equipment, provided through Horizon 2020 and the Fundamental Elements funding mechanism.

            High resilience to threats

            Richard Bowden, Programme Manager at UK receiver producer QinetiQ noted at the Summit session that, as the Galileo PRS moves towards operational capacity, there is recognition of its benefits in the civil sector, but that a number of challenges remain to widespread uptake. He said that positioning, navigation, and timing (PNT) would need to be at least as good as Open Service alternatives, with substantially higher resilience to threats.

            This was one of the issues addressed by Villie in his presentation. Citing encryption as the main differentiator of the PRS, Villie said that the key differences between PRS and other Galileo services are the fact PRS access is ensured by an access management policy for users, which means that continuity of service to authorised users is ensured even when access to other navigation services is denied.

            “In cases of malicious or unintentional interference, the PRS increases the likelihood of continuous availability of the signal-in-space and provides an authenticated position, velocity and timing service,” he said.

            High interest among users

            One essential pre-requisite for the future adoption of PRS by multiple user communities is the availability of receivers for different applications. In his presentation at the Summit, Alessandro Ambri from Italian receiver producer Leonardo outlined some of the company’s main Galileo PRS receiver projects, including the GSA-funded projects P3RS-2, PRISMA, and DISPATCH.

            Ambri said that his company sees the installation of Galileo PRS on its platforms as an opportunity, as it can be used in many sectors - critical infrastructure, in the military, and by emergency and security services. “We are active in all these areas and our customers have expressed an interest in the Galileo PRS,” he said.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            The Galileo PRS is resistant to jamming, involuntary interference and spoofing

            GSA supporting development of all PRS user segments

            27.3.2018 9:12  
            The Galileo PRS is resistant to jamming, involuntary interference and spoofing
            Published: 
            27 March 2018

            Deployment of the Galileo Public Regulated Service (PRS) has been ongoing in recent years and the European GNSS Agency (GSA) has been actively contributing to the development of all user segments to ensure the widespread uptake of the service. GSA PRS Service Manager Charles Villie gave participants in the Munich Satellite Navigation Summit on March 7 a status update on the Galileo PRS and outlined plans for the future.

            The Galileo PRS is an encrypted navigation service that is designed to be more resistant to jamming, involuntary interference and spoofing than other services. The launch of Galileo initial services at the end of 2016 also marked the start of the initial Galileo PRS service phase, during which receivers are being tested and all declared PRS functionalities and infrastructure are functional and operational.

            Speaking at the Munich Summit, Villie said that the plan for this year is to move to the PRS enhanced service, during which pre-operational receivers will be tested. In preparation for enhanced delivery, the GSA will continue to update PRS functionalities and procedures and improve the navigation performance of PRS, which will benefit from the new satellites added to the constellation, he said.

            This work is being conducted in preparation for the initial operational capability (IOC) phase, which is timed for delivery according to the European Commission Galileo roadmap. “IOC is a very important target for us, because it will be the moment when the service and the functionalities will be completely operational and the user segment will be ready to start using operational receivers,” Villie said.

            He said that, ahead of IOC, the GSA is actively contributing to the development of all PRS user segments to ensure that user needs are met. This support is provided in three main axes: technical assistance to Competent PRS Authorities (CPA) in the form of workshops and training; operational demonstration and validation in PRS pilot projects and grants for joint test activities; and, finally, support for the development of user equipment, provided through Horizon 2020 and the Fundamental Elements funding mechanism.

            High resilience to threats

            Richard Bowden, Programme Manager at UK receiver producer QuinetiQ noted at the Summit session that, as the Galileo PRS moves towards operational capacity, there is recognition of its benefits in the civil sector, but that a number of challenges remain to widespread uptake. He said that positioning, navigation, and timing (PNT) would need to be at least as good as Open Service alternatives, with substantially higher resilience to threats.

            This was one of the issues addressed by Villie in his presentation. Citing encryption as the main differentiator of the PRS, Villie said that the key differences between PRS and other Galileo services are the fact PRS access is ensured by an access management policy for users, which means that continuity of service to authorised users is ensured even when access to other navigation services is denied.

            “In cases of malicious or unintentional interference, the PRS increases the likelihood of continuous availability of the signal-in-space and provides an authenticated position, velocity and timing service,” he said.

            High interest among users

            One essential pre-requisite for the future adoption of PRS by multiple user communities is the availability of receivers for different applications. In his presentation at the Summit, Alessandro Ambri from Italian receiver producer Leonardo outlined some of the company’s main Galileo PRS receiver projects, including the GSA-funded projects P3RS-2, PRISMA, and DISPATCH.

            Ambri said that his company sees the installation of Galileo PRS on its platforms as an opportunity, as it can be used in many sectors - critical infrastructure, in the military, and by emergency and security services. “We are active in all these areas and our customers have expressed an interest in the Galileo PRS,” he said.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            The Galileo PRS is resistant to jamming, involuntary interference and spoofing

            GSA supporting development of all PRS user segments

            27.3.2018 9:12  
            Published: 
            27 March 2018

            Deployment of the Galileo Public Regulated Service (PRS) has been ongoing in recent years and the European GNSS Agency (GSA) has been actively contributing to the development of all user segments to ensure the widespread uptake of the service. GSA PRS Service Manager Charles Villie gave participants in the Munich Satellite Navigation Summit on March 7 a status update on the Galileo PRS and outlined plans for the future.

            The Galileo PRS is an encrypted navigation service that is designed to be more resistant to jamming, involuntary interference and spoofing than other services. The launch of Galileo initial services at the end of 2016 also marked the start of the initial Galileo PRS service phase, during which receivers are being tested and all declared PRS functionalities and infrastructure are functional and operational.

            Speaking at the Munich Summit, Villie said that the plan for this year is to move to the PRS enhanced service, during which pre-operational receivers will be tested. In preparation for enhanced delivery, the GSA will continue to update PRS functionalities and procedures and improve the navigation performance of PRS, which will benefit from the new satellites added to the constellation, he said.

            This work is being conducted in preparation for the initial operational capability (IOC) phase, which is timed for delivery according to the European Commission Galileo roadmap. “IOC is a very important target for us, because it will be the moment when the service and the functionalities will be completely operational and the user segment will be ready to start using operational receivers,” Villie said.

            He said that, ahead of IOC, the GSA is actively contributing to the development of all PRS user segments to ensure that user needs are met. This support is provided in three main axes: technical assistance to Competent PRS Authorities (CPA) in the form of workshops and training; operational demonstration and validation in PRS pilot projects and grants for joint test activities; and, finally, support for the development of user equipment, provided through Horizon 2020 and the Fundamental Elements funding mechanism.

            High resilience to threats

            Richard Bowden, Programme Manager at UK receiver producer QuinetiQ noted at the Summit session that, as the Galileo PRS moves towards operational capacity, there is recognition of its benefits in the civil sector, but that a number of challenges remain to widespread uptake. He said that positioning, navigation, and timing (PNT) would need to be at least as good as Open Service alternatives, with substantially higher resilience to threats.

            This was one of the issues addressed by Villie in his presentation. Citing encryption as the main differentiator of the PRS, Villie said that the key differences between PRS and other Galileo services are the fact PRS access is ensured by an access management policy for users, which means that continuity of service to authorised users is ensured even when access to other navigation services is denied.

            “In cases of malicious or unintentional interference, the PRS increases the likelihood of continuous availability of the signal-in-space and provides an authenticated position, velocity and timing service,” he said.

            High interest among users

            One essential pre-requisite for the future adoption of PRS by multiple user communities is the availability of receivers for different applications. In his presentation at the Summit, Alessandro Ambri from Italian receiver producer Leonardo outlined some of the company’s main Galileo PRS receiver projects, including the GSA-funded projects P3RS-2, PRISMA, and DISPATCH.

            Ambri said that his company sees the installation of Galileo PRS on its platforms as an opportunity, as it can be used in many sectors - critical infrastructure, in the military, and by emergency and security services. “We are active in all these areas and our customers have expressed an interest in the Galileo PRS,” he said.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            The Galileo PRS is resistant to jamming, involuntary interference and spoofing

            End of EOP for Galileo satellite quartet

            26.3.2018 9:04  
            Published: 
            26 March 2018

            The four Galileo satellites launched on December 12 have successfully transitioned from Early Orbit Phase to In Orbit Testing.

            On December 12, four Galileo satellites started their journey on an Ariane 5 rocket from the European Spaceport in Kourou. Shortly after leaving the rocket, the satellites – named Nicole, Zofia, Alexandre and Irina – reached stable configuration and established first contact with Earth.

            This launch marked the first time that the European GNSS Agency (GSA) was responsible for the Early Orbit Phase (EOP) of the mission. EOP is one of the most important phases of a space mission as it positions the satellites into the correct orbits and gradually switches on and tests the first elements. For example, just days after the launch, the four satellites were transitioned from sun acquisition mode to Earth tracking mode, also known as nominal operational mode (NOM). In this mode, the satellites point to the Earth with all antennas oriented towards the ground.

            Next, the satellites began moving to their destination Galileo orbit with a set of very precise manoeuvres, with Nicole and Zofia reaching their final target orbits on February 6, and Alexandre and Irina following suit on February 14. With all four satellites in their final slots, EOP came to an end on February 26.

            Time for In Orbit Testing

            The quartet of Galileo satellites are now starting the In Orbit Testing phase, a comprehensive characterization and evaluation of the satellites’ behaviour in space. Although extensive tests were performed before launch, the space environment cannot be fully represented on ground, and thus extra testing in space is necessary. This includes transmitting test navigation signals, whose performance will be carefully monitored and tested. The performance tests ensure that the satellites’ in-orbit performance is in line with the predictions made during on-ground testing. 

            Once the performance testing is concluded and deemed satisfactory, the satellites will enter into service as part of the Galileo constellation – bringing the total number of satellites to 22.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            Once the performance testing is concluded and deemed satisfactory, the satellites will enter into service as part of the Galileo constellation.

            Agriculture: A new frontier for European space policy

            23.3.2018 10:47  
            Space offers the possibility for transformative change in agriculture.
            Published: 
            23 March 2018

            Europe’s space policy is already delivering results for businesses and citizens. The European Parliament held a conference on 6 March, on how agriculture is the new frontier. The event was hosted by Eric Andrieu MEP, who is the S&D (The Progressives) co-ordinator for Agriculture and Rural Development.

            MEP Andrieu believes that Europe should be more ambitious in making use of its extensive data and space infrastructure to drive innovation in the farming sector. This is why he organised this conference with MEP Peillon.

            “Space offers the possibility for transformative change in agriculture and wider benefits to rural communities. Europe’s space data and services are world class – and often world leading. The next step is to harness this data and develop applications to optimise Europe’s agriculture industry, making it more precise, sustainable and cost effective,” MEP Peillon said.

            The conference comes at a decisive moment. The European Commission has fired the starting shot for the revision of the Common Agricultural Policy post-2020. MEPs say they want a more forward-looking policy; one that offers the opportunity to release the full potential of space.

            EGNOS, Galileo and Copernicus

            DG GROW Deputy-Director General Pierre Delsaux, who is responsible for European Space Policy, underlined the progress that has already been made: “With Galileo we will have high-accuracy precision within 20 cm, which is extremely accurate. If you apply this to agriculture equipment, it would improve systems. Our Earth Observation system, Copernicus, gives a massive amount of information on the situation of the land – the composition, and where you need to put seeds and fertilizers. We need to combine EGNOS, Galileo and Copernicus to develop services that are useful to agriculture and other sectors.”

            Hervé Pillaud, a farmer himself and expert on digital farming, leads a network of French farmers who are using space and digital technologies – he also collaborates with start-ups to help them design the technologies of the future.

            Pillaud spoke at the conference and called on Europe to do a better job of incorporating in the future agriculture policy: “A future CAP must be better than today’s. The European Commission must help farmers to make better use of the tools and possibilities available. We need an agricultural system that can feed its citizens, but is equally conscious of environmental concerns, such as carbon capture and the use of renewable energy.”

            Pillaud highlighted many areas where better data and tools could make a real difference. He underlined the role of Europe’s space services in mitigating risk: “Risk is an enormous question! Satellite information that allows us to anticipate events are more important as climatic conditions are less predictable. This will help farmers to reduce losses.”

            Farming by Satellite Prize

            Pillaud also welcomed the launch of the Farming by Satellite Prize targeted at young people: “The involvement of young people in finding solutions is absolutely necessary. The digital generation will not ask the questions in the same way.”

            Delsaux added: “The Farming by Satellite Prize will generate new ideas and innovation. We want students from everywhere in Europe to ask what we can develop as new services, strategies and processes to make agriculture more efficient. We need new ideas and imagination. We don’t know what exactly the benefits will be, this is a path on which we cannot go back – it is clear that space will be more fundamental in the future. The farmers are also fully aware of the potential benefits, but we need to keep up and move fast.”

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            Space offers the possibility for transformative change in agriculture.

            MWC Report: European GNSS answers the call for solutions

            22.3.2018 11:13  
            Published: 
            22 March 2018

            Whether it is dual frequency chipsets or new smartphones, European GNSS was behind many of the technology announcements made during Mobile World Congress 2018.

            As the world’s premiere mobile technology trade show, the Mobile World Congress (MWC) is traditionally technology driven. But, according to Stuart Carlaw, Chief Research Officer at ABI Research, this is starting to change. “The mobile community continues to peddle technology rather than offer holistic solutions,” he says. “But enterprises want solutions, not an alphabet soup of three letter abbreviations.”

            Answering this call for solutions are the GNSS mass market innovations on display in Barcelona during MWC 2018. Whether it is chipsets, smartphones, drones, robots or autonomous vehicles, most depend on GNSS – including Galileo – to translate this technology into actual solutions.  

            Here we look at the role European GNSS plays in some of the announcements coming out of MWC 2018. 

            Dual frequency chipsets

            Although much of the news coming from chipset manufacturers like Intel, Qualcomm and Mediatek was about 5G connectivity plans, several also launched new dual frequency chipsets. Traditionally, mobile, location-based applications have been powered by single-frequency GNSS receivers operating under stringent battery power and footprint constraints. When using a dual frequency chipset, however, mass market devices benefit from better accuracy, ionosphere error cancellation, improved code tracking pseudorange estimates and better multipath resistance – among other benefits.

            “With connected cars and autonomous vehicles quickly becoming a reality, there is a clear need for accurate and reliable positioning information,” explains GSA Deputy Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “Dual frequency chipsets are the answer for these types of safety-critical applications.” 

            Following Broadcom’s recent launch of the BCM47755 – the world’s first mass-market, dual frequency GNSS receiver device for smartphones – several other manufacturers followed suit by announcing their own dual frequency chipsets at MWC. For example, uBlox launched its F9 chip for industrial and automotive applications. The chip uses GNSS signals in multiple frequency bands (L1/L2/L5) to correct ionosphere-caused positioning errors and deliver a fast time to first fix. By supporting all GNSS constellations, including Galileo, the chipset improves performance by increasing the number of satellites visible at any given time. Last but not least, thanks to on-chip Real Time Kinematic (RTK) technology, the F9 also offers improved levels of accuracy.

            Not to be outdone, STM came to MWC to promote a dual-frequency chip dedicated to automotive safety-critical applications. Being developed as part of the GSA-funded ESCAPE project, the Galileo-enabled chip is being enhanced to receive and process the upcoming Galileo Open Service authenticated signals – a key differentiator of European GNSS.

            New Galileo-enabled smartphones

            Since 2016, when the first Galileo-enabled smartphone was launched, more and more manufacturers have started to include Galileo in their flagship models. “A growing number of premium smartphones are integrating Galileo in order to provide users with better accuracy and availability, especially in difficult environments,” says Justyna Redelkiewicz, GSA’s Market Development Officer in charge of LBS.

            In-line with this trend, both Sony and Samsung launched new, Galileo-enabled phones during MWC 2018. Sony’s new flagship Xperia XZ2 and XZ2 Compact smartphones and Samsung’s S9 and S9+ models are each equipped with a Galileo-enabled processor. All four phones are also shipped with Android Oreo 8.0, which gives users access to GNSS raw data.

            The GSA highlighted the growing role of European GNSS in smartphones by having a range of Galileo-enabled devices on display at their booth. Visitors who had a smartphone that was already using Galileo received a free ‘I #UseGalileo’ t-shirt to commemorate their MWC experience. 

            Want to learn more about the role of European GNSS in drone applications and services? Stay tuned as our EGNOS, Galileo and Drones series takes a behind-the-scenes look at each of these projects in the coming weeks.

            Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

            Several of the new chipsets and smartphones that were announced during MWC 2018 feature Galileo capability.
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