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Looking for a Galileo Masters idea? Take inspiration from past winners!

17.6.2019 10:56  
Register now, even if your idea is still a work in progress, so you can benefit from support activities and stay informed on all developments.
Published: 
17 June 2019

If you are struggling to formulate your idea for consideration in this year’s Galileo Masters, which opened for submissions on May 1, perhaps you could take inspiration from some of the innovative ideas that won the GSA Special Prize in previous editions of the competition. Already have an idea? Then register for this year’s competition here.

Sports applications have featured highly in previous editions of the Galileo Masters. Last year the prize went to Smart Gate, a system designed to measure time precisely during sporting activities – in this case skiing and snowboarding. Using GNSS precise timing combined with radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology, the application provides precise times on ski/snowboard runs, which sportspeople can use to hone their skills and techniques.

Then, in 2013, the GSA Special prize went to JOHAN, an application that also targeted improved sports performance. The JOHAN solution used tiny wearable GNSS receivers to monitor field sports in real-time and enable assessment of players’ performances and the development of new tactics based on players’ capabilities.

Finally, back in 2009 the prize went to Nogago, which leveraged the unique properties of EGNOS in a family of smartphone applications that turned smartphones into outdoor navigation devices targeting various needs: 'Nogago Outdoor' for hiking and trekking, 'Nogago Guide' for sightseeing and pedestrian navigation, and 'Nogago Sport' for running and biking.

Specific societal needs

Other winning solutions in the past have sought to address very specific societal needs. The CENTRIP (ChildrEN TRIp Protector) early warning system, which won the GSA Special Prize in 2017, aimed to help teachers to keep track of young children outdoors. The project combined a lightweight GNSS tracking device installed in a durable bracelet, which is worn by the child, with a geo-fence set up around a specified area, enabling teachers to track the location of each child.

Also addressing a very specific societal need, the winning application in 2012 was 3SOUND - a personal navigation solution based on the integration of acoustic binaural technologies (i.e. 3D sounds) and GNSS technologies. Designed to help vision impaired people navigate using sound cues and augmented satellite navigation signals, the technology could also help emergency services operate in low visibility environments.

Mass market potential

Mass market solutions can potentially generate mass profits, so it is no surprise that solutions with the potential for mass market uptake have featured prominently in the competition. In 2015, the prize went to the KYNEO project, which developed cheap, flexible Galileo and EGNOS-enabled modules that allow ubiquitous positioning data for applications in the Internet of Things – a potentially massive global market.

Then there was the Galileo for ARA project by Elecnor Deimos, which took the prize in 2014 and which also had its eye on the mass market. This innovative concept aimed to develop Galileo modules for the Google ARA modular smartphone concept – a potential game changer for positioning in the mobile phone market.

UAV and navigation

UAVs have featured prominently in winning applications from previous years. In 2016, the Drones2GNSS project combined Galileo’s multi-constellation capacity with unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) in an innovative approach that addressed a timeless problem of surveying engineers: positioning accuracy in urban canyons and vegetated areas. Earlier, in 2011, the Catalonian company CATNUV won the prize with a mini-UAV Traffic Collision Avoidance System (TCAS) that uses GPS and EGNOS to allow drones to navigate safely in controlled airspace.

Finally, the 2010 winner of the GSA special prize was the Wikitude Drive system from Austrian company Mobilizy. This application transformed a smartphone into an augmented reality dashboard satnav device, which overlays video captured through the camera with driving instructions. This allows users to drive through their phone, watching the road even while they are looking at directions.

This year’s categories

This year the competition is structured in two class categories– ‘Start-up of the Year’ and ‘Idea of the Year’ - both of which are sponsored by the GSA. In addition to the two general categories, you can also submit your solution to be eligible for one of six special prizes:

  • Galileo-Copernicus Synergy Challenge;
  • Galileo 5G IoT Challenge;
  • DLR Artificial Intelligence Navigation Challenge;
  • University Challenge;
  • BMVI Special Prize; and
  • GNSS Living Lab Prize.

There is also a Regional Challenge, where participants can choose a challenge set by a regional partner from around the world that best matches their business case.

If you would like to learn more about the Galileo-Copernicus Synergy Challenge, then take part in a webinar to be held on 19 July 2019 at 10:00 (CEST) to explore the synergies between these systems and see the potential applications with commercial and societal benefits.

Has the above given you inspiration? Even if your idea is not fully formed, make sure to register now so you can receive information about all the great support activities and additional opportunities that arise throughout the submission phase. Registration is free and available to participants all around the world. To find out more, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Register now, even if your idea is still a work in progress, so you can benefit from support activities and stay informed on all developments.

Flying green with airBaltic

13.6.2019 11:34  
“E-GEN is delivering real results with real benefits,” airBaltic Senior Vice President for Flight Operations Pauls Cālītis
Published: 
13 June 2019

AirBaltic’s Senior Vice President for Flight Operations Pauls Cālītis talks about the E-GEN project, EGNOS implementation and plans for the future.

Can you tell me a little about the E-GEN project and the ’green flying’ concept? What are its objectives?

At airBaltic, the green flying concept is all about utilising the latest commercial aviation technological advances and applying them to improve the efficiency of our operations. We continuously monitor the available technologies and the resulting economies. Other highly important factors include our environmental footprint and the level of emissions and noise, which we are seeking to reduce.

The implementation of satellite-based navigation procedures is a practical example of a modernisation effort, which has proven highly useful for airBaltic’s operational efficiency. airBaltic’s E-GEN project (“EGNOS Enabled – North”) entailed an upgrade of the full airBaltic Q400 fleet with the latest satellite navigation systems. The project was implemented together with the European GNSS Agency (GSA), which co-financed it. The upgrade enabled the implementation of satellite-based navigation, specifically for use of LPV approaches/for landing by LPV (Localiser Performance with Vertical guidance), which ensures horizontal and vertical guidance based on EGNOS geo-stationary satellites providing navigation signal improvements for the GPS navigation service. The implementation of satellite-based navigation required a comprehensive, step-by-step process, which involved a number of different divisions of our airline operations. It encompassed fleet aircraft replacement decisions, approvals from authorities, implementation of new operational procedures, retrofit of technical hardware and crew training.

Read this: EGNSS enabling change in General Aviation

Prior to the E-GEN project, did you have any experience of EGNOS implementation?

We had previous experience on a smaller scale with our AMBER project, but E-GEN was significantly more complex. Therefore the timing and project planning for the E-GEN project was critical. It was planned by creating a full business implementation schedule. Before the actual implementation, we carefully analysed the satellite navigation technology and performed a demonstration study, to provide solid justification for the required investment. During the E-GEN project, we carefully followed the project plan and gradually implemented the procedures into everyday line operations. It also served as a stepping stone for the introduction of our brand new Airbus A220 fleet into service. This state-of-the-art airliner already has LPV and other satellite navigation capabilities built in and ready for use from the very beginning.

How has EGNOS helped you to improve your environmental performance?

We value the reduced environmental impact. The increased efficiency directly translates into improved environmental performance and reduced impact. But airBaltic also views LPV approaches as an important incremental improvement in the safety of air transportation by leveraging advanced flight-deck procedures and the increased automation of aircraft. Also, the benefit in terms of economic efficiency is significant because it permits more reliable operations by minimising the possibility of diversions. This is a win-win for both passengers and the airline.

And this: GSA hosts RAISG meeting at its Prague HQ

What form did your cooperation with the GSA take on this project, and how has the experience been?

Cooperation with GSA has been an important enabler for the project. The project is co-financed by the European GNSS Agency via the grant program “Acceleration of EGNOS adoption in the field of civil aviation”. The co-financing made all the difference by turning the investment into a positive business case. Also, GSA, with its oversight role on EU satellite navigation activities, was perfectly placed to provide the best available knowledge on system performance and helped with a wide range of practical questions.

Now that the project has concluded, what are your plans for the future as regards ‘green flying’ and EGNOS implementation?

The project has already provided a positive contribution to the European aviation industry. Prior to our E-GEN project there were no EASA approved STC (supplemental type certificates) available for the Q400 aircraft type. Now, thanks to E-GEN, this certification is available to all Q400 operators. Several European airlines are already following the path we created.

Since the implementation of the project, airBaltic has already performed more than 500 LPV approaches across European airports, which would not have happened otherwise. So the project is delivering real results with real benefits. Following this development, we will make over 5000 LPV approaches on our Q400 fleet alone. When combined with the satellite-based approaches conducted by our A220 operations, airBaltic is proud to be truly one of the future navigation pioneers in Europe.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

“E-GEN is delivering real results with real benefits,” airBaltic Senior Vice President for Flight Operations Pauls Cālītis

Accuracy Matters: spreading the word about the benefits of Galileo

11.6.2019 9:47  
Three quarters of a billion people with Galileo-enabled smartphones are already benefitting from Galileo’s added accuracy.
Published: 
11 June 2019

The Galileo - Accuracy Matters campaign has been making an impact. Launched last December to raise awareness about how Galileo is making a real difference in the lives of the almost three quarters of a billion users who have Galileo’s added accuracy in their phones, the campaign has been resonating with the public.

There are almost 750 million Galileo-enabled smartphones already in use, yet people are often unaware of the fact that Galileo is improving the navigation signal that their smartphone receives, providing added accuracy and precision. The Accuracy Matters campaign aims to help change this.

The campaign began with a series of light-hearted videos showcasing everyday situations where ‘Accuracy Matters’ to anyone using location data on their smartphones.

A Europe-wide social media campaign was launched across Facebook, Instagram and Twitter in March and April this year. EU Member States were targeted with messages in 24 languages, with a total of almost 60 million impressions – which refers to the number of times the ad is shown to viewers. The response to the campaign has been impressive.

In total, the Accuracy Matters videos have been viewed over 2.5 million times, generating almost 250,000 link clicks, over 95,000 likes and almost 11,000 retweets. Video ads on YouTube, launched only last week in 10 countries, have already generated almost half a million views, with a view rate almost double the average, at 25.4%. The online campaign was complemented by outdoor ads, which were placed in airports and on public transport in various locations across Europe.

Galileo saving lives

The campaign’s second phase, launched recently, took a more serious tone – highlighting how Galileo’s added accuracy makes a real difference in an emergency. The three videos in this series show how having Galileo in your phone helps emergency responders quickly find you to administer first aid, whether you have had a health emergency in a strange city, or just had a fall while jogging in the forest.

Watch these: Accuracy Matters when saving lives

Timed to coincide with the run-up to the European Parliament elections, the second phase of the campaign was an important reminder to Europeans that the Galileo programme is a real EU success story that would not have been possible for any single Member State to accomplish alone. The programme is already providing benefits to the 750 million people with Galileo-enabled phones in terms of added accuracy, while contributing to space-related economic growth and job creation in Europe.

Read this: New Regulation mandates Galileo capability for all smartphones sold in the EU

These benefits are particularly felt in the area of emergency response. Most calls to the 112 emergency number in Europe are placed from mobile phones. Reflecting the value of Galileo’s added accuracy, last December the European Commission published a Delegated Regulation setting out measures to introduce GNSS capability, particularly Galileo capability, in smartphones placed on the European Union market from 17 March 2022.

Unsure about whether your phone is Galileo-enabled?  You can check out all the devices that are already Galileo-enabled here: UseGalileo.eu

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Three quarters of a billion people with Galileo-enabled smartphones are already benefitting from Galileo’s added accuracy.

Accuracy Matters: spreading the word about the benefits of Galileo

11.6.2019 9:47  
Three quarters of a billion people with Galileo-enabled smartphones are already benefitting from Galileo’s added accuracy.
Published: 
11 June 2019

The Galileo - Accuracy Matters campaign has been making an impact. Launched last December to raise awareness about how Galileo is making a real difference in the lives of the almost three quarters of a billion users who have Galileo’s added accuracy in their phones, the campaign has been resonating with the public.

There are almost 750 million Galileo-enabled smartphones already in use, yet people are often unaware of the fact that Galileo is improving the navigation signal that their smartphone receives, providing added accuracy and precision. The Accuracy Matters campaign aims to help change this.

The campaign began with a series of light-hearted videos showcasing everyday situations where ‘Accuracy Matters’ to anyone using location data on their smartphones.

A Europe-wide social media campaign was launched across Facebook, Instagram and Twitter in March and April this year. EU Member States were targeted with messages in 24 languages, with a total of almost 60 million impressions – which refers to the number of times the ad is shown to viewers. The response to the campaign has been impressive.

In total, the Accuracy Matters videos have been viewed over 2.5 million times, generating almost 250,000 link clicks, over 95,000 likes and almost 11,000 shares and retweets. Video ads on YouTube, launched only last week in 10 countries, have already generated almost half a million views, with a view rate almost double the average, at 25.4%. The online campaign was complemented by outdoor ads, which were placed in airports and on public transport in various locations across Europe.

Galileo saving lives

The campaign’s second phase, launched recently, took a more serious tone – highlighting how Galileo’s added accuracy makes a real difference in an emergency. The three videos in this series show how having Galileo in your phone helps emergency responders quickly find you to administer first aid, whether you have had a health emergency in a strange city, or just had a fall while jogging in the forest.

Watch these: Accuracy Matters when saving lives

Timed to coincide with the run-up to the European Parliament elections, the second phase of the campaign was an important reminder to Europeans that the Galileo programme is a real EU success story that would not have been possible for any single Member State to accomplish alone. The programme is already providing benefits to the 750 million people with Galileo-enabled phones in terms of added accuracy, while contributing to space-related economic growth and job creation in Europe.

Read this: New Regulation mandates Galileo capability for all smartphones sold in the EU

These benefits are particularly felt in the area of emergency response. Most calls to the 112 emergency number in Europe are placed from mobile phones. Reflecting the value of Galileo’s added accuracy, last December the European Commission published a Delegated Regulation setting out measures to introduce GNSS capability, particularly Galileo capability, in smartphones placed on the European Union market from 17 March 2022.

Unsure about whether your phone is Galileo-enabled?  You can check out all the devices that are already Galileo-enabled here: UseGalileo.eu

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Three quarters of a billion people with Galileo-enabled smartphones are already benefitting from Galileo’s added accuracy.

Accuracy Matters: spreading the word about the benefits of Galileo

11.6.2019 9:47  
Three quarters of a billion people with Galileo-enabled smartphones are already benefitting from Galileo’s added accuracy.
Published: 
11 June 2019

The Galileo - Accuracy Matters campaign has been making an impact. Launched last December to raise awareness about how Galileo is making a real difference in the lives of the almost three quarters of a billion users who have Galileo’s added accuracy in their phones, the campaign has been resonating with the public.

There are almost 750 million Galileo-enabled smartphones already in use, yet people are often unaware of the fact that Galileo is improving the navigation signal that their smartphone receives, providing added accuracy and precision. The Accuracy Matters campaign aims to help change this.

The campaign began with a series of light-hearted videos showcasing everyday situations where ‘Accuracy Matters’ to anyone using location data on their smartphones.

A Europe-wide social media campaign was launched across Facebook, Instagram and Twitter in March and April this year. EU Member States were targeted with messages in 24 languages, with a total of almost 57 million impressions – which refers to the number of times the ad is shown to viewers. The response to the campaign has been impressive.

In total, the Accuracy Matters videos have been viewed over 2.5 million times, generating almost 215,000 link clicks, over 85,000 likes and almost 9,000 retweets. Video ads on YouTube, launched only last week in 10 countries, have already generated almost half a million views, with a view rate almost double the average, at 25.4%. The online campaign was complemented by outdoor ads, which were placed in airports and on public transport in various locations across Europe.

Galileo saving lives

The campaign’s second phase, launched recently, took a more serious tone – highlighting how Galileo’s added accuracy makes a real difference in an emergency. The three videos in this series show how having Galileo in your phone helps emergency responders quickly find you to administer first aid, whether you have had a health emergency in a strange city, or just had a fall while jogging in the forest.

Watch these: Accuracy Matters when saving lives

Timed to coincide with the run-up to the European Parliament elections, the second phase of the campaign was an important reminder to Europeans that the Galileo programme is a real EU success story that would not have been possible for any single Member State to accomplish alone. The programme is already providing benefits to the 750 million people with Galileo-enabled phones in terms of added accuracy, while contributing to space-related economic growth and job creation in Europe.

Read this: New Regulation mandates Galileo capability for all smartphones sold in the EU

These benefits are particularly felt in the area of emergency response. Most calls to the 112 emergency number in Europe are placed from mobile phones. Reflecting the value of Galileo’s added accuracy, last December the European Commission published a Delegated Regulation setting out measures to introduce GNSS capability, particularly Galileo capability, in smartphones placed on the European Union market from 17 March 2022.

Unsure about whether your phone is Galileo-enabled?  You can check out all the devices that are already Galileo-enabled here: UseGalileo.eu

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Three quarters of a billion people with Galileo-enabled smartphones are already benefitting from Galileo’s added accuracy.

Locating you in an emergency – what you need to know about E112

10.6.2019 9:10  
E112 is a location-enhanced version of the 112 emergency service, allowing responders to quickly and accurately locate people in distress
Published: 
10 June 2019

Videos shared on social media as part of the Galileo Accuracy Matters campaign, highlighting Galileo’s contribution to the European Commission’s E112 emergency response service, have generated a number of questions from users across Europe. Here we address some of the main queries raised in an effort to bring more clarity on the issue.

112 is the European emergency number. It can be dialled free of charge from most mobile phones and, in some countries, fixed telephones to reach emergency services such as ambulance, fire and rescue, or the police. The 112 service is in place everywhere in the European Union and in other European countries.

Location enhanced

E112 is a location-enhanced version of the 112 emergency service, where emergency responders receive the position of the person in distress, similar to the eCall system for cars, enabling them to locate the caller’s position quickly and accurately. To support this, in December 2018, the European Commission adopted new measures requiring all smartphones sold in the EU from 17 March 2022 to have GNSS capability, particularly Galileo capability, so that they can use GNSS to provide caller location information to the emergency services.

Watch these: Accuracy Matters when saving lives

However, there is already a solution in place that uses GNSS technology in emergency calls made from smartphones. Advanced Mobile Location, or AML, transmits a ‘fused location’ comprising the GNSS, Wi-Fi or cell-ID information available on the caller's smartphone via a message to a dedicated end-point, known as a Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP, the place where the emergency calls are answered), which makes the caller location available to emergency responders.

It should be noted that 112 does not have an inherent ability to locate people making emergency calls. For this to be possible two conditions should be met. Firstly, the PSAP must have AML technology in place and, secondly, the caller’s handset must be AML-enabled (AML is deployed in all Android-based smartphones and in iPhones running iOS 11.3 and above). Otherwise, the person making the call will have to inform the responder of their location, if they know it.

So, in short: 112 is the emergency service, E112 is a location-enhanced version of this service, and AML is a technological platform for locating callers to the 112 number. However, not all 112 operators are equipped with AML. For those that are, the Galileo-enabled E112 service will support the provision of accurate GNSS positioning as part of the fused location. Check with your local emergency services if you would like to know whether caller location is deployed in your area.

Getting to you faster

Testing conducted as part of the European Commission (EC)-funded HELP112 project showed that Public Safety Answering Points receive most location messages within 30 seconds of the start of the call. This means that by the time the caller has given their name and described the situation, the PSAP already knows their position. Location by cell-ID alone, which uses the GSM tower routing the call, is the fastest but least precise method of locating a caller.

Read this: Do eCall devices conform?

The project found that the average location accuracy using Cell-ID was about 1.6 km, using Wi-Fi it was 23 metres and using GNSS it was about 16 metres. This means that in a situation where only cell-ID is used, the rescuers would need to get close to the location and then search for the victims. With GNSS or Wi-Fi they would most likely be able to see the victims as soon as they arrived. GNSS combined with Wi-Fi provides an ideal indoor-outdoor solution.

The EC study found, based on tests conducted in three Member States, that on average 59% of the calls used GNSS as the main positioning method, 28% used Wi-Fi, 9% used Cell-ID and 4% of calls returned no position. Testing is currently being carried out to assess the accuracy gains provided by Galileo.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

E112 is a location-enhanced version of the 112 emergency service, allowing responders to quickly and accurately locate people in distress

SARA scores at football match

5.6.2019 13:58  
The SARA solution has multiple applications – from SAR to security surveillance and sports broadcasting.
Published: 
05 June 2019

SARA, a GSA-funded project developing a turnkey solution for search and rescue (SAR) and surveillance operations, has been successfully tested at a recent football match. Based on the test, the economic viability of using the solution for event filming and monitoring/surveying is currently being investigated.

The SARA project is working on engineering and commercialising a tethered drone-based SAR and surveillance solution using an already existing prototype. The solution is able to guarantee continuous operations by means of a patented cable used for power supply and as a secure data link. For drone navigation and control, as well as for target identification and localisation, SARA uses high-accuracy Galileo-enabled GNSS receivers.

Successful test

The test was carried out continuously for the duration of the football match, which offered an interesting test case requiring continuous surveillance over a two-hour period. The SARA terminal was set to monitor several players, whose positions were tracked over time. The footballers were localised using a Galileo-enabled GNSS receiver installed on the drone, which provided a reference, along with a computer vision algorithm that transformed pixels into 2D geographical positions.

Watch this: SARA for Football

A profile of the positions (one per second) was created and compared with the video material. “This qualitative test revealed interesting results in terms of target identification (the right player) and localisation within the football field zone, and also in terms of the limited cost of the equipment used,” said Marco Nisi, Head of Integrated GNSS Solutions at project partner Sistematica.

“This use case is now being studied) to evaluate the economic viability of using the solution to film at events and to carry out monitoring and surveillance operations,” he said.

Range of applications

Maritime SAR is the primary target market but, as the football match test has shown, the solution has potential applications in other areas. One such area is security surveillance, particularly with the aim of preventing trespassing and detecting potential threats in open spaces. Possible use cases include monitoring and surveillance of building sites and other infrastructure, and security surveillance at major sporting events.

Read this: KAUST wins GSA Special Prize at ERL Emergency Local Tournament 2019

“In particular, as a very promising side market, the SARA team is continuing to address the technological challenges and to experiment with the business model with a view to reaching the sports domain as a provider of event surveillance management solutions and livestream broadcasting,” Nisi said.

The solution will be further tested in Szczecin, Poland in September 2019, where the drone will be operated on board a vessel to simulate a maritime SAR scenario. In this case, the drone will act as a vertical pylon and will be set up in “follow the ship” mode, making it possible to survey and identify and locate targets with an extended coverage of several nautical miles.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The SARA solution has multiple applications – from SAR to security surveillance and sports broadcasting.

SARA scores at football match

5.6.2019 13:58  
The SARA solution has multiple applications – from SAR to security surveillance and sports broadcasting.
Published: 
05 June 2019

SARA, a GSA-funded project developing a turnkey solution for search and rescue (SAR) and surveillance operations, has been successfully tested at a recent football match. Based on the test, the economic viability of using the solution for event filming and monitoring/surveying is currently being investigated.

The SARA project is working on engineering and commercialising a tethered drone-based SAR and surveillance solution using an already existing prototype. The solution is able to guarantee continuous operations by means of a patented cable used for power supply and as a secure data link. For drone navigation and control, as well as for target identification and localisation, SARA uses high-accuracy Galileo-enabled GNSS receivers.

Successful test

The test was carried out continuously for the duration of the football match, which offered an interesting test case requiring continuous surveillance over a two-hour period. The SARA terminal was set to monitor several players, whose positions were tracked over time. The footballers were localised using a Galileo-enabled GNSS receiver installed on the drone, which provided a reference, along with a computer vision algorithm that transformed pixels into 2D geographical positions.

Watch this: SARA for Football

A profile of the positions (one per second) was created and compared with the video material. “This qualitative test revealed interesting results in terms of target identification (the right player) and localisation within the football field zone, and also in terms of the limited cost of the equipment used,” said Marco Nisi, Head of Integrated GNSS Solutions at project partner Sistematica.

“This use case is now being studied) to evaluate the economic viability of using the solution to film at events and to carry out monitoring and surveillance operations,” he said.

Range of applications

Maritime SAR is the primary target market but, as the football match test has shown, the solution has potential applications in other areas. One such area is security surveillance, particularly with the aim of preventing trespassing and detecting potential threats in open spaces. Possible use cases include monitoring and surveillance of building sites and other infrastructure, and security surveillance at major sporting events.

Read this: KAUST wins GSA Special Prize at ERL Emergency Local Tournament 2019

“In particular, as a very promising side market, the SARA team is continuing to address the technological challenges and to experiment with the business model with a view to reaching the sports domain as a provider of event surveillance management solutions and livestream broadcasting,” Nisi said.

The solution will be further tested in Szczecin, Poland in September 2019, where the drone will be operated on board a vessel to simulate a maritime SAR scenario. In this case, the drone will act as a vertical pylon and will be set up in “follow the ship” mode, making it possible to survey and identify and locate targets with an extended coverage of several nautical miles.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The SARA solution has multiple applications – from SAR to security surveillance and sports broadcasting.

SARA scores at football match

5.6.2019 13:58  
The SARA solution has multiple applications – from SAR to security surveillance and sports broadcasting.
Published: 
05 June 2019

SARA, a GSA-funded project developing a turnkey solution for search and rescue (SAR) and surveillance operations, has been successfully tested at a recent football match. Based on the test, the economic viability of using the solution for event filming and monitoring/surveying is currently being investigated.

The SARA project is working on engineering and commercialising a tethered drone-based SAR and surveillance solution using an already existing prototype. The solution is able to guarantee continuous operations by means of a patented cable used for power supply and as a secure data link. For drone navigation and control, as well as for target identification and localisation, SARA uses high-accuracy Galileo-enabled GNSS receivers.

Successful test

The test was carried out continuously for the duration of the football match, which offered an interesting test case requiring continuous surveillance over a two-hour period. The SARA terminal was set to monitor several players, whose positions were tracked over time. The footballers were localised using a Galileo-enabled GNSS receiver installed on the drone, which provided a reference, along with a computer vision algorithm that transformed pixels into 2D geographical positions.

Watch this: SARA for Football

A profile of the positions (one per second) was created and compared with the video material. “This qualitative test revealed interesting results in terms of target identification (the right player) and localisation within the football field zone, and also in terms of the limited cost of the equipment used,” said Marco Nisi, Head of Integrated GNSS Solutions at project partner Sistematica.

“This use case is now being studied to evaluate the economic viability of using the solution to film at events and to carry out monitoring and surveillance operations,” he said.

Range of applications

Maritime SAR is the primary target market but, as the football match test has shown, the solution has potential applications in other areas. One such area is security surveillance, particularly with the aim of preventing trespassing and detecting potential threats in open spaces. Possible use cases include monitoring and surveillance of building sites and other infrastructure, and security surveillance at major sporting events.

Read this: KAUST wins GSA Special Prize at ERL Emergency Local Tournament 2019

“In particular, as a very promising side market, the SARA team is continuing to address the technological challenges and to experiment with the business model with a view to reaching the sports domain as a provider of event surveillance management solutions and livestream broadcasting,” Nisi said.

The solution will be further tested in Szczecin, Poland in September 2019, where the drone will be operated on board a vessel to simulate a maritime SAR scenario. In this case, the drone will act as a vertical pylon and will be set up in “follow the ship” mode, making it possible to survey and identify and locate targets with an extended coverage of several nautical miles.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The SARA solution has multiple applications – from SAR to security surveillance and sports broadcasting.

Demetra delivers dividends for ELPROMA

3.6.2019 10:41  
Safe Time represents a special version of the ELPROMA Rubidium NTS-5000 Time Server powered by Horizon 2020 DEMETRA TSI#2 technology
Published: 
03 June 2019

ELPROMA, a Polish manufacturer of NTP/PTP time servers, has won a seven-figure US$ contract to supply Rubidium IEEE1588 NTS-5000 servers to support a country-scale modern smart grid system in Asia. The servers, which are custom built (designated “Safe Time”), incorporate a modified version of the cyber-security TSI#2 solution developed as part of the Horizon 2020 ‘DEMonstrator of EGNSS services based on Time Reference Architecture’ (Demetra) project, in which ELPROMA participated in 2015-2016.

While it is not yet possible, for reasons of commercial secrecy, to name the client country, we can reveal that the contract is for a total of over 350 mostly advanced Rubidium-class PTP IEEE1588 time servers. These servers will ensure the cyber security and robust nanosecond synchronisation of the country-scale electricity grid, which is in the process of transition from a classical grid to a state-of-the-art IEC61850 system capable of safely distributing power throughout the country.

Read thisTime as a service with Galileo

“This is the biggest one-off deal of its kind so far,” Tomasz Widomski, a member of the ELPROMA Supervisory Board, said. “For comparison, a stock exchange or a new 5G telecom network requires approximately 10-15 grandmaster PTP IEEE1588 servers to operate efficiently, so 350 is a really huge number of servers,” he said. Due to the server volume, the system requires a special management and monitoring facility to ensure the accuracy and time domain operation of the IEC61850 smart grid.

Nanosecond accuracy

The PTP servers will be customised according to the specific needs of the client to ensure reliable, country-scale synchronisation and time domain operation. The Demetra TSI#2 solution is a core element of the new smart grid, with a modified version of the solution implemented inside the NTS-5000 dual oscillator servers (Rubidium and OCXO), helping to ensure the delivery of nanosecond accuracy and top-level cyber security. The key is real-time auditing, which ensures that everything stays stable during power distribution management.

“ELPROMA is the first supplier in the world of this level of synchronisation and this size of system, which will be more and more popular once Industry 4.0 technology becomes a reality,” Widomski said, adding that Galileo accuracy is a key element for improving security. “The ELPROMA servers are multi-constellation and are able to select the GNSS system that they operate with, however Galileo is the preferred one, with GPS, BaiDou and Glonass as a backup,” he said.

Watch this: Demetra – Time as a Service

ELPROMA is currently in the process of delivering the servers to the client and these will be gradually deployed over the next two to three months. “It is expected that the system will be fully operational at the end of 2019,” Widomski said.

Demetra solution

ELPROMA was member of Demetra Horizon 2020 project (2015-2016), which developed a prototype of an EGNSS-based time disseminator that provides time certification, redundancy, resilience, integrity and improved accuracy, while validating the concept of ‘time as a service’.

The Demetra developers engaged with the main timing and synchronisation users, including energy companies, to ensure that their needs were incorporated into the project design. The demonstrator was built around the concept of a common core infrastructure hosting advanced time services. It was deployed as an open and scalable architecture with common interfaces, making it easier to integrate new services and enabling service developers to focus on performance at user level.

The ELPROMA contract is a good example of how EGNSS-based innovations, such as the solutions created by Demetra, are driving economic growth and job creation in Europe. “The servers are 100% manufactured in the EU, in Poland,” Widomski said.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Safe Time represents a special version of the ELPROMA Rubidium NTS-5000 Time Server powered by Horizon 2020 DEMETRA TSI#2 technology

Galileo supporting Mobility as a Service

29.5.2019 11:40  
Galileo delivers the accuracy and reliability needed to support Mobility as a Service applications.
Published: 
29 May 2019

With an increasing number of people moving to big cities, clean and efficient urban mobility is more important than ever. New urban mobility schemes are rapidly evolving due to social, economic and technological changes. Against this backdrop, Galileo can deliver new accuracy and reliability for location-dependant services that get people where they need to go.

The omnipresence of smart mobile devices is allowing new business models to emerge based on the sharing of goods and services, the so-called sharing economy. The growth of the sharing economy in recent years involves a shift from the owning of goods towards accessing them when you need them. Particularly in urban settings, we now see the appearance of 'Mobility as a Service' (MaaS), enabling people to make the mobility choices that best suit their needs.

"Here's the way to think about MaaS," said Josep Maria Salanova, Senior Researcher at the Hellenic Institute of Transport. "It's like today you have your data agreement for your mobile phone; you pay a certain amount for a certain amount of data and then you can use it. With MaaS, you could have the same thing on your mobile phone, but it's a mobility credit. You will pay an amount per month and you will have access to a variety of mobility options, busses, taxis, car sharing and so on."

Galileo 4 mobility

Salanova's Hellenic Institute of Transport (HIT) is part of the Centre for Research and Technology Hellas (CERTH). "Under the EU-funded 'GALILEO 4 MOBILITY' project, HIT/CERTH is coordinating a pilot study in Thessaloniki," he said. "This is aimed at testing a mobile-based MaaS platform with a fleet of taxis."

Read this: Satellite positioning is changing how we move

Salanova explained how it works: "In Thessaloniki we have a ride sharing service. So, we are asking people who use their cars to go to work if they would like to share a taxi instead." Customers need to have a mobile phone with the ride-sharing app. They can request a one-off trip, or they can request regular transport on a scheduled basis.

Users can access all kinds of information on previous and pending trips, real-time location of their taxi, and so forth. The trip starts when they are in the taxi and they are automatically debited for the amount of mobility received.

Galileo connection

"So what does this have to do with Galileo?" asked Salanova. "Well, when you do this it's important to know the location of the customer, because this is really a location-based service. You don't have to give an address but the taxi has to find you. They have to know where you are standing, for example maybe on what side of the road, on what corner. So we want to demonstrate that Galileo will make this system work better. In Thessaloniki we have already had cases where drivers are complaining that they can't find the customer."

There is already ample evidence to show that Galileo, especially in conjunction with other GNSS constellations, improves accuracy and location fixes in difficult real-world environments, such as in cities where urban canyons create multipath effects and obstruct views of satellites.

The Thessaloniki pilot is currently running and will run through July 2019. "We will analyse the data and then perhaps have a second round from September 2019," said Salanova.

More than a trial

The GALILEO 4 MOBILITY project encompasses a number of MaaS-oriented pilots, one of which is the Thessaloniki taxi-sharing scheme. "Overall I would say the idea of GALILEO 4 MOBILITY is to support the introduction of GALILEO technology within the Mobility as a Service context," said Martí Jofre, coordinator of the project from Pildo Labs. "We want to see if this works or not. Does Galileo bring added value? We expect yes, but we want to test this, to show this. So we have pilots in other locations and with different kinds of schemes."

And this: Satellites and the City

"In Paris we have a bicycle-sharing and a car-sharing scheme, and then we also have a number of pilots in Barcelona. With one of them we have buses and the customer can declare whether or not he is at the bus stop, and if not the bus can change its route to skip the stop. And also in Barcelona there is an autonomous shuttle at a local university using Galileo to do routes and pick-ups on the university campus. This one is not yet mature, but it is coming."

On top of actually running the pilots, Jofre said, the GALILEO 4 MOBILITY team is concerned with developing new tools for data analysis, reviewing the newest and most convincing business models, and, crucially, considering ways to accelerate the acceptance of new mobility schemes among local authorities and their use by the general public.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Galileo delivers the accuracy and reliability needed to support Mobility as a Service applications.

GNSS.asia highlights Europe-India cooperation

27.5.2019 14:17  
The GNSS.asia roundtable promoted cooperation between GNSS research and industrial communities in Europe and Asia-Pacific.
Published: 
27 May 2019

The EU-funded GNSS.asia H2020 project hosted a major roundtable discussion around the theme of 'Europe meets India' at the Munich Satellite Navigation Summit back in March. The event aimed at promoting cooperation between the GNSS research and industrial communities in Europe and Asia-Pacific.

Speaking on behalf of the European Commission, Christoph Kautz, Deputy Head of Unit, Galileo Directorate, DG GROW, reaffirmed the EU's commitment to partnering with India, as illustrated by the recent visit to India of Elzbieta Bienkowska, European Commissioner for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs. Kautz also described the current operational status of the European satellite navigation programmes, Galileo and EGNOS. There are now 26 Galileo satellites in orbit, 22 of which are fully operational. The constellation is set for completion by 2020.

The keynote was delivered by Manish Saxena, Associate Director, Satellite Navigation Directorate, India Space Research Organisation (ISRO). He talked about the Indian Regional Navigation Satellite System (IRNSS), also known as NavIC, which means 'the sky' in Hindi. NavIC is an autonomous regional satellite navigation system that provides accurate real-time positioning and timing services. It covers India and a region extending more than 1000 km around it, with plans for further extension.

"One of our very important ultimate goals is to have NavIC available in mobile phones," said Saxena. "This will open up scope for many applications in a compact form factor and a convenient interface. This initiative needs to be pursued by developers to benefit the common citizens." Saxena pointed out that the recently unveiled Xiaomi MI8 smartphone is NavIC-enabled.

Meanwhile, India's GAGAN is a satellite-based augmentation system (SBAS) for the Indian airspace. Its purpose is to serve safety-of-life civil aviation applications. The system has been successfully completed and is interoperable with other international SBAS systems, such as WAAS in the US, Europe's EGNOS and the Japanese MSAS. GAGAN's footprint extends from Africa to Australia and can be expanded for seamless SBAS navigation services across regions.

One of the key challenges for GAGAN, Saxena explained, is that India falls under equatorial regions, where ionospheric scintillation effects are most pronounced and can affect signal quality. Thus, the results of research work on these effects will be of interest to the wider GNSS community.

GSA contribution

The very important topic of 'downstream ecosystem dynamics' was introduced by Martin Sunkevic, Market Development Officer at the European GNSS Agency (GSA). The GSA is responsible for market development and operations of Galileo and EGNOS. It publishes the GNSS Market Report and the GNSS User Technology Report, each of which presents trends and forecasting in their respective subject areas.

Among its other tasks, the GSA also supports research towards the development of new GNSS receivers and applications, and the creation of new business. "What's really important for us right now is to create synergies with other space data," said Sunkevic, "and to bring the GNSS industrial and research communities together to identify new downstream applications."

Next to speak was SV Satish, Executive Director of Air Traffic Management for India's Airport Authority. He discussed a range of new applications being made possible by the NavIC system, for helping fisherman to identify fishing zone boundaries, for receiving targeted weather alerts. "There are various downstream applications that we can imagine for the common public," Satish said. "This is a huge market. It will change agriculture. All application developers should be looking at this; India is a vast country, with oceans and mountains. So we have the marine field. There are definitely opportunities all over the place."

More background on the European GNSS initiatives was provided by Thierry Racaud, CEO of the EGNOS Satellite Service Provider (ESSP). ”Our main mission is to act as the EGNOS service provider. The EGNOS contract is funded by the EU and managed through the GSA, and it gives us a clear mandate to help foster the use of satellite navigation within Europe and particularly in the domain of aviation," he said.

In addition to EGNOS Services, ESSP delivers consultancy services for aviation, and global, satellite-based communication, navigation and surveillance (CNS) services for aviation.

Industry steps forward

The GNSS.asia initiative brings together European and Asian GNSS and industrial communities with the aim of forming partnerships. European industry took the spotlight, in the persons of Philippe Badia, Business Development officer at Syntony, Alexander Rügamer, Group Leader at Fraunhofer IIS, Luis Serrano, Technical Marketing Manager at STMicroelectronics, and Petr Bares, CEO of Iguassu Software. Each of them delivered a brief pitch, explaining what their companies can do in the field of GNSS, and specifically what kinds of things they can offer in terms of cooperation with India and other Asian partners.

Also joining the 'Europe meets India' roundtable event was Sanguk Lee of ETRI, based in Korea. ETRI is a global IT research institute that has been making an immense effort to stimulate growth in Korea in the field of IT. Indeed, Korea is the latest member of the international GNSS club, having just recently launched the new KPS (Korean Positioning System) programme. Meanwhile, the EU-Korea Galileo Agreement has been in place since 2006. The Agreement provides for co-operative activities in the areas of scientific research and training, industrial cooperation, trade and market development, standards, certification and regulatory measures, regional and local augmentations, etc.

Lee presented the EU-funded STRIKE3 project, whose overall objective is to develop and validate new international standards for the monitoring, reporting and testing of GNSS threats. "We have particular problems in South Korea with hostile jamming and other issues," said Lee. "International standards require international collaboration and international agreement. Moreover, such an ambitious task is only possible by bringing together existing organisations and technologies."

STRIKE3 will also provide a crucial new tool for police forces, highway authorities, toll operators, port authorities and governmental organisations, essentially creating an international task-force to defend against the criminal use of jamming technologies.

Joining hands with India

Closing remarks were delivered by Matthias Petschke, European Commission Director of European GNSS Programmes. "We see a huge potential and a very vibrant start-up scene in India," he said. "The visit of Commissioner Bienkowska to India resulted in, among many other things, a new joint bilateral GNSS working group, which is very significant. So this is just the start of our bilateral relations and we look forward to our future cooperation."

The EU-India exchange didn't end there. The Indian delegation of course attended the Munich Satellite Navigation Summit, which opened in the same venue just after the 'Europe meets India' event ended and they also enjoyed industrial visits and Bavarian-style networking across the region on subsequent days.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GNSS.asia roundtable promoted cooperation between GNSS research and industrial communities in Europe and Asia-Pacific.

MyGalileoApp : top 30 revealed!

23.5.2019 18:09  
The 30 selected projects will now work on the beta versions of their apps.
Published: 
24 May 2019

The top 30 applications, recently selected to advance to the next round of the MyGalileoApp competition, have now been revealed. The projects cover a range of applications that leverage Galileo’s added accuracy to provide solutions to social and environmental challenges. You can check out the full list here.

The 30 shortlisted projects were selected from a total of 148 submissions based on their level of innovation. Other key criteria taken into consideration included their market potential, their technical feasibility and the extent to which they leverage Galileo.

The shortlisted projects cover eight of the 11 innovation areas open to submissions. The innovation areas with the most selected projects in the second round of the competition are Mapping, GIS and Agriculture, with a total of eight projects, followed by Augmented Reality and Games, with four.

A taste of what to expect

The applications target a wide range of societal and environmental challenges and needs. The need to move more efficiently around our cities is something we have all experienced. Addressing this, one of the apps in this year’s competition monitors traffic lights and provides optimal speed recommendations, enabling drivers to arrive at the lights just as they turn green. Another matches people looking for parking spots with others leaving a spot, reducing headaches for drivers and benefitting retailers in areas with bad parking conditions.

It’s not just smart mobility needs that are addressed – one app helps farmers to visualise their in-field positions, providing constant feedback to optimise their work, while another helps drone users perfect their skills, supporting them in taking the best flight decisions.

There when you need it

One team is developing an app that sends distress signals even when the user is no longer able to access the device. Another crowdsources the location of your favourite products and delicatessens, while another integrates augmented reality and blockchain for geomarketing and an out-of-this world customer experience.

Mixing gamification, crowdsourcing and positioning can lead users to new worlds, but also help them experience their familiar spots in a completely different way, or empower users to overcome obstacles and find a tailored experience that suits their needs.

All in all, the applications in this year’s competition are impressive in terms of the range and scope of the challenges that the address, they might not change the world, but they certainly have the potential to become solutions that improve our lives, make our societies more inclusive and help protect the environment.

Next steps

The 30 selected projects will now work on developing a beta version of their app until 15 July 2019. The beta versions will then be reviewed and the 30 shortlisted projects will be narrowed down further, with a maximum of 10 teams being selected to advance to the second development phase.

During the second development phase the projects should work on delivering a finalised version of their app with 100% functionality and a report of testing results. At the end of the phase, the application should be already available for download on the Google Play and Apple platforms.

The most creative and innovative projects from the second development phase will be invited to the finals, to be held in October 2019, where they will present their application to the GSA evaluation board. Following the presentations, the judges will announce the winners, with the first-place winner receiving a EUR 100,000 prize. The runner up and third place finishers will receive EUR 50,000 and EUR 30,000 respectively.

Information partners

MyGalileoApp has three key information partners. Geoawesomeness is a blog about geospatial technologies and everything related to them, providing constructive commentary on all that is happening in the geo-industry. Secondly, Aerospace Valley is a major innovation cluster in France in the fields of aeronautics, space and embedded systems, with members from industry and academia. Finally, Spaceoneers, an initiative of Design & Data GmbH, seeks to spur creativity and innovation within the space sector in Europe.

"Geoawesomeness is delighted to see the creativity and ingenuity of the 30 shortlisted projects to emerge from the MyGalileoApp competition. At Geoawesomeness, we are always on the lookout for the next big idea in the Geospatial industry and these shortlisted projects certainly have us excited! We wish the teams the very best for the next stages," Managing Editor Muthukumar Kumar said.

Philippe Lattes, deputy director for Space Sector at Aerospace Valley commented: “At Aerospace Valley we are supporting startup creation and development of new services using space. Acting together with a European Agency like GSA is a powerful way to support young startups and promote European innovations.”

Spaceoneers Editor-in-Chief Ryan Laird had this to say: “At Spaceoneers we are always keen to follow the creativity and innovation within the space sector in Europe. We’re very excited to see the diversity of ideas from this competition and look forward to following the next stages.”

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The 30 selected projects will now work on the beta versions of their apps.

MyGalileoApp : top 30 revealed!

23.5.2019 18:09  
The 30 selected projects will now work on the beta versions of their apps.
Published: 
24 May 2019

The top 30 applications, recently selected to advance to the next round of the MyGalileoApp competition, have now been revealed. The projects cover a range of applications that leverage Galileo’s added accuracy to provide solutions to social and environmental challenges. You can check out the full list here.

The 30 shortlisted projects were selected from a total of 148 submissions based on their level of innovation. Their market potential, their technical feasibility and the extent to which they leverage Galileo.

The shortlisted projects cover eight of the 11 innovation areas open to submissions. The innovation areas with the most selected projects in the second round of the competition are Mapping, GIS and Agriculture, with a total of eight projects, followed by Augmented Reality and Games, with four.

A taste of what to expect

The applications target a wide range of societal and environmental challenges and needs. The need to move more efficiently around our cities is something we have all experienced. Addressing this, one of the apps in this year’s competition monitors traffic lights and provides optimal speed recommendations, enabling drivers to arrive at the lights just as they turn green. Another matches people looking for parking spots with others leaving a spot, reducing headaches for drivers and benefitting retailers in areas with bad parking conditions.

It’s not just smart mobility needs that are addressed – one app helps farmers to visualise their in-field positions, providing constant feedback to optimise their work, while another helps drone users perfect their skills, supporting them in taking the best flight decisions.

There when you need it

One team is developing an app that sends distress signals even when the user is no longer able to access the device. Another crowdsources the location of your favourite products and delicatessens, while another integrates augmented reality and blockchain for geomarketing and an out-of-this world customer experience.

Mixing gamification, crowdsourcing and positioning can lead users to new worlds, but also help them experience their familiar spots in a completely different way, or empower users to overcome obstacles and find a tailored experience that suits their needs.

All in all, the applications in this year’s competition are impressive in terms of the range and scope of the challenges that the address, they might not change the world, but they certainly have the potential to become solutions that improve our lives, make our societies more inclusive and help protect the environment.

Next steps

The 30 selected projects will now work on developing a beta version of their app until 15 July 2019. The beta versions will then be reviewed and the 30 shortlisted projects will be narrowed down further, with a maximum of 10 teams being selected to advance to the second development phase.

During the second development phase the projects should work on delivering a finalised version of their app with 100% functionality and a report of testing results. At the end of the phase, the application should be already available for download on the Google Play and Apple platforms.

The best ranked projects from the second development phase will be invited to the finals, to be held in October 2019, where they will present their application to the GSA evaluation board. Following the presentations, theaward will take place, with the first-place winner receiving a EUR 100,000 prize. The runner up and third place finishers will receive EUR 50,000 and EUR 30,000 respectively.

Information partners

MyGalileoApp has three key information partners. Geoawesomeness is a blog about geospatial technologies and everything related to them, providing constructive commentary on all that is happening in the geo-industry. Secondly, Aerospace Valley is a major innovation cluster in France in the fields of aeronautics, space and embedded systems, with members from industry and academia. Finally, Spaceoneers, an initiative of Design & Data GmbH, seeks to spur creativity and innovation within the space sector in Europe.

"Geoawesomeness is delighted to see the creativity and ingenuity of the 30 shortlisted projects to emerge from the MyGalileoApp competition. At Geoawesomeness, we are always on the lookout for the next big idea in the Geospatial industry and these shortlisted projects certainly have us excited! We wish the teams the very best for the next stages," Managing Editor Muthukumar Kumar said.

Philippe Lattes, deputy director for Space Sector at Aerospace Valley commented: “At Aerospace Valley we are supporting startup creation and development of new services using space. Acting together with a European Agency like GSA is a powerful way to support young startups and promote European innovations.”

Spaceoneers Editor-in-Chief Ryan Laird had this to say: “At Spaceoneers we are always keen to follow the creativity and innovation within the space sector in Europe. We’re very excited to see the diversity of ideas from this competition and look forward to following the next stages.”

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The 30 selected projects will now work on the beta versions of their apps.

MyGalileoApp : top 30 revealed!

23.5.2019 18:09  
The 30 selected projects will now work on the beta versions of their apps.
Published: 
24 May 2019

The top 30 applications, recently selected to advance to the next round of the MyGalileoApp competition, have now been revealed. The projects cover a range of applications that leverage Galileo’s added accuracy to provide solutions to social and environmental challenges. You can check out the full list here.

The 30 shortlisted projects were selected from a total of 148 submissions based on their level of innovation. Their market potential, their technical feasibility and the extent to which they leverage Galileo.

The shortlisted projects cover eight of the 11 innovation areas open to submissions. The innovation areas with the most selected projects in the second round of the competition are Mapping, GIS and Agriculture, with a total of eight projects, followed by Augmented Reality and Games, with four.

A taste of what to expect

The applications target a wide range of societal and environmental challenges and needs. The need to move more efficiently around our cities is something we have all experienced. Addressing this, one of the apps in this year’s competition monitors traffic lights and provides optimal speed recommendations, enabling drivers to arrive at the lights just as they turn green. Another matches people looking for parking spots with others leaving a spot, reducing headaches for drivers and benefitting retailers in areas with bad parking conditions.

It’s not just smart mobility needs that are addressed – one app helps farmers to visualise their in-field positions, providing constant feedback to optimise their work, while another helps drone users perfect their skills, supporting them in taking the best flight decisions.

There when you need it

One team is developing an app that sends distress signals even when the user is no longer able to access the device. Another crowdsources the location of your favourite products and delicatessens, while another integrates augmented reality and blockchain for geomarketing and an out-of-this world customer experience.

Mixing gamification, crowdsourcing and positioning can lead users to new worlds, but also help them experience their familiar spots in a completely different way, or empower users to overcome obstacles and find a tailored experience that suits their needs.

All in all, the applications in this year’s competition are impressive in terms of the range and scope of the challenges that the address, they might not change the world, but they certainly have the potential to become solutions that improve our lives, make our societies more inclusive and help protect the environment.

Next steps

The 30 selected projects will now work on developing a beta version of their app until 15 July 2019. The beta versions will then be reviewed and the 30 shortlisted projects will be narrowed down further, with a maximum of 10 teams being selected to advance to the second development phase.

During the second development phase the projects should work on delivering a finalised version of their app with 100% functionality and a report of testing results. At the end of the phase, the application should be already available for download on the Google Play and Apple platforms.

The best ranked projects from the second development phase will be invited to the finals, to be held in October 2019, where they will present their application to the GSA evaluation board. Following the presentations, theaward will take place, with the first-place winner receiving a EUR 100,000 prize. The runner up and third place finishers will receive EUR 50,000 and EUR 30,000 respectively.

Information partners

MyGalileoApp has three key information partners. Geoawesomeness is a blog about geospatial technologies and everything related to them, providing constructive commentary on all that is happening in the geo-industry. Secondly, Aerospace Valley is a major innovation cluster in France in the fields of aeronautics, space and embedded systems, with members from industry and academia. Finally, Spaceoneers, an initiative of Design & Data GmbH, seeks to spur creativity and innovation within the space sector in Europe.

"Geoawesomeness is delighted to see the creativity and ingenuity of the 30 shortlisted projects to emerge from the MyGalileoApp competition. At Geoawesomeness, we are always on the lookout for the next big idea in the Geospatial industry and these shortlisted projects certainly have us excited! We wish the teams the very best for the next stages," Managing Editor Muthukumar Kumar said.

Philippe Lattes, deputy director for Space Sector at Aerospace Valley commented: “At Aerospace Valley we are supporting startup creation and development of new services using space. Acting together with a European Agency like GSA is a powerful way to support young startups and promote European innovations.”

Spaceoneers Editor-in-Chief Ryan Laird had this to say: “At Spaceoneers we are always keen to follow the creativity and innovation within the space sector in Europe. We’re very excited to see the diversity of ideas from this competition and look forward to following the next stages.”

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The 30 selected projects will now work on the beta versions of their apps.

EGNSS enabling change in General Aviation

21.5.2019 15:56  
EGNSS is changing the face of general aviation
Published: 
21 May 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) was once again at the AERO International General Aviation Fair at Friedrichshafen, Germany emphasising the advantages that European GNSS can bring to all general aviation users and, effectively, changing the way they fly.

This 27th edition of the international aviation exhibition saw a record number of visitors with over 32 000 attendees from around the world. The GSA was present with a stand in the main exhibition hall and contributed a number of presentations to capacity audiences.

The GSA’s first speaking contribution was as part of the European Air Safety Agency (EASA) update session on its roadmap for general aviation. The session outlined the achievements of the General Aviation Roadmap so far, and described the exciting activities ahead to develop the next phase: the EASA GA Roadmap 2.0.

Recently appointed EASA Certification Director Rachel Daeschler and a range of speakers from the European Commission and other stakeholders presented the latest successes and the path forward. EASA underlined its continued commitment to making general aviation easier and safer by embracing innovation and affordability. EASA’s new Basic Regulation for General Aviation, adopted last year, allows for much greater flexibility across the sector.

EGNOS increasing safety for general aviation

Katerina Strelcova from the GSA described the Agency’s work on the development of safety promotional material on the implementation of GNSS-based Instrument Flight Procedures (IFP) for General Aviation. This was coordinated by EASA and other stakeholders and is intended to be published under the EASA Safety Promotion – Safety Together initiative. This document provides an assessment of the existing regulatory framework and a complete analysis of current enablers, and shares best practices that can facilitate implementation of IFP.

Satellite technologies, such as EGNOS, can in effect implement an instrument approach to a small field. Bringing more IFP into general aviation will increase safety in Europe, which is the ultimate objective of EASA. The document will be available soon and should be considered as an initial step, with further and fuller guidance in the pipeline, including on how to tackle specific areas of implementation.

Changing how we fly

In addition to the contribution to the EASA event, the GSA organised a dedicated session on satellite navigation for general aviation on 12 April that attracted a full room of participants.

The current status of European GNSS (EGNOS and Galileo), how it is contributing to landing, surveillance and Search and Rescue operations, and actions targeting every aviation user were highlighted at the session. Easier access to instrument flight rules for general aviation through the use of EGNOS and localiser performance with vertical guidance (LPV) was described by Julian Scarfe, deputy chairman of PPL/IR – Europe, the leading group for private pilots across Europe interested in instrument flying. He said: "Today we have EGNOS that can enable vertical approaches to non-instrument runways. The GSA is running a project to enable this. This will change the way we fly."

Other speakers in the session were Martin Robinson, CEO of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA), who described aircraft tracking for general aviation and Philip Church, director of engineering consultancy Helios, who talked about ADS-B (Automatic Dependent Surveillance—Broadcast), a surveillance technology in which an aircraft determines its position using satellite navigation technologies and periodically broadcasts its location, thereby enabling accurate tracking.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

EGNSS is changing the face of general aviation

GSA hosts RAISG meeting at its Prague HQ

17.5.2019 11:01  
EGNOS-based approach procedures are operational at 326 airports in 23 countries
Published: 
17 May 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) together with air traffic management organisation EUROCONTROL jointly organised the 16th meeting of the RNP Approach Implementation Support Group (RAISG) together with the Aviation Grants programme workshop at the GSA’s Prague headquarters.

The two-day meeting featured an interesting blend of presentations and roundtable discussions focused on required navigation performance (RNP) approach implementation and sharing experience and project implementation of different GSA co-funded aviation projects fostering EGNOS adoption in aviation. As of March 2019, 617 EGNOS-based approach procedures are operational at 326 airports in 23 countries, of which 324 procedures are localiser performance with vertical guidance (LPV) and 169 are LPV-200.

The meeting, which was organised within the context of a Framework Partnership Agreement between EUROCONTROL and the GSA, attracted 90 participants from various backgrounds, including National Air Navigation Service Providers and authorities, civil and military aircraft operators, pilots, international aviation associations, equipment manufacturers and rotorcraft.

Watch this: EGNOS for Aviation

Success stories

The first day of the meeting was devoted to the Aviation Grant Programme, the GSA’s funding tool designed to foster EGNOS adoption in aviation. Through the various success stories of GSA-funded projects, the participants had the opportunity to exchange best practices, discuss the specificities of RNP approach implementation in different countries and equipping the European fleet with EGNOS.

The GSA established its Aviation Grants Programme in 2014 to promote EGNOS operational implementation and stimulate EGNOS adoption in aviation. There was a significant increase in demand from applicants in the last call and, so far, it has awarded 42 projects with a total budget of EUR 22 million.

Thanks to the Programme, more than 100 LPV procedures have been implemented and more than 50 EGNOS-enabled aircraft are operating in Europe. The Grants Programme will soon be responsible for an additional 60 EGNOS-based LPV approaches at European airports and another 70 EGNOS equipped aircraft (including 20 rotorcraft), thereby making a significant contribution to increasing safety and accessibility in the aviation sector and boosting the EGNOS based network in Europe.

Improving accessibility

Since 2014, EUROCONTROL and the GSA have worked together to develop advanced systems and operations for aviation-based space technology, contributing jointly to Europe’s GNSS policies. In particular, they are focused on improving airport accessibility, aviation efficiency and air traffic management capacity, while also reducing safety risks. “The success of the previous RAISG meeting in Prague in 2016 encouraged us to renew this organisation as part of our collaboration with EUROCONTROL,” said Fiammetta Diani, GSA Head of Market Development.

Read this: Getting ready for the evolution of EGNOS

As part of the agreement, EUROCONTROL and the GSA also aim to coordinate aviation research and development (R&D), standardise aviation regulations and monitor aviation-specific GNSS performance, while supporting the uptake of EGNSS for aviation at the international level. In addition, in July 2018, the EC published the PBN regulation, mandating RNP approaches to all instrument runway ends with two milestones: 2020 and 2024. These approaches will implement the three minima (LNAV, LNAV/VNAV and LPV), so there will be EGNOS approaches in all airports by that date. The GSA is working together with EC, EUROCONTROL, EASA and SDM to facilitate implementation in airports and aircraft.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

EGNOS-based approach procedures are operational at 326 airports in 23 countries

Third GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop - Register now!

15.5.2019 12:56  
The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop provides a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.
Published: 
15 May 2019

Registration is now open for the third GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop, which will take place on 26 June 2019 at the GSA Headquarters in Prague. Participants in the workshop will gain access to the Task Force’s wealth of experience and learn about progress around the use of raw measurements in Android devices, so register now!

In 2017, the European GNSS agency published a White Paper on Using GNSS Raw Measurements on Android devices and launched the Raw Measurements Task Force to bridge the existing knowledge gap among potential raw measurement users. The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshops play a major role in these efforts by providing a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.

Workshop agenda

The workshop agenda is being finalised, however you can already look forward to a keynote presentation from Google`s Frank Van Diggelen, focusing on upcoming disrupting innovations soon available for Android users.

Furthermore, selected Task Force members will present summaries of their activities around analyses and development trends that are driving the interest of the community, be it in the high accuracy, authentication, testing, education and other domains benefitting from Android raw measurements.

Finally, a discussion will be held on how to make good use of the Android raw measurements to best leverage the latest announced services and enhancements, focusing on Open Service Navigation Message Authentication (OS-NMA) that will be offered for free to all users worldwide.

Users` benefits

There are several advantages to using GNSS raw measurements in smartphones and IoT devices. Use of these measurements can lead to greater flexibility when building multi-GNSS solutions (e.g. selection of the satellites or constellations based on their performances or differentiators) and increased GNSS performance, as they open the door to more advanced GNSS processing techniques that were previously restricted to more professional receivers.

Read this: FLAMINGO unveils high-accuracy solution for smartphones

What’s more, dual-frequency smartphones are starting to come on the market following the launch of the first dual-frequency phone, the Xiaomi Mi8, in June last year. Combined with access to raw measurements, dual frequency capability is delivering significant benefits in terms of ubiquity and accuracy.

In addition, the recent announcement of the upcoming Open Service Navigation Message Authentication service is generating great interest in the application developers` community and its pioneering through raw measurements is being assessed.

Several applications stand to profit from increased accuracy and authentication, such as augmented reality, blockchain, location-based advertising, mobile health and asset management.

Don’t miss this opportunity to get more insights on this and exchange ideas with the major experts in the sector!

Join the Task Force

The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force is dedicated to promoting a better and wider use of GNSS raw measurements. Task Force members have access to a dedicated discussion forum, and to the raw measurement database, where they can upload data logs and relevant documents.

Since its launch in 2017, the Task Force has expanded from a handful of experts to a community of over 100 agencies, universities, research institutes and companies. Membership is open to anybody interested in GNSS raw measurements. To join the Task Force contact: market@gsa.europa.eu.

You can check the agenda here and register to the workshop here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop provides a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.

Third GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop - Register now!

15.5.2019 12:56  
The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop provides a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.

Registration is now open for the third GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop, which will take place on 26 June 2019 at the GSA Headquarters in Prague. Participants in the workshop will gain access to the Task Force’s wealth of experience and learn about progress around the use of raw measurements in Android devices, so register now!

In 2017, the European GNSS agency published a White Paper on Using GNSS Raw Measurements on Android devices and launched the Raw Measurements Task Force to bridge the existing knowledge gap among potential raw measurement users. The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshops play a major role in these efforts by providing a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.

Proposed agenda

The workshop agenda is not yet finalised, however you can already look forward to a keynote presentation from Google`s Frank Van Diggelen, focusing on innovations expected soon from Android. 

Furthermore, selected Task Force members will present summaries of their activities, be it in the testing, education, authentication, high accuracy or other domains using Android raw measurements and already delivering clear benefits or with promising results anticipated in the near future.

Finally, the GSA will present how two Galileo differentiators, Open Service Navigation Message Authentication (OS-NMA) and Integrity Navigation Message (I/NAV) improvements, can be exploited thanks to raw measurements, in addition to other interesting presentations.

Numerous advantages

There are several advantages to using GNSS raw measurements in smartphones and IoT devices. Use of these measurements can lead to increased GNSS performance, as they open the door to more advanced GNSS processing techniques that were previously restricted to more professional receivers.

Read this: FLAMINGO unveils high-accuracy solution for smartphones

What’s more, dual-frequency smartphones are starting to come on the market following the launch of the first dual-frequency phone, the Xiaomi Mi8, in June last year. Combined with access to raw measurements, dual frequency capability is delivering significant benefits in terms of ubiquity and accuracy. 

Several applications stand to profit from this increased accuracy, such as augmented reality, location-based advertising, mobile health and asset management. The raw measurements also make it possible to optimise multi-GNSS solutions and to select satellites or constellations based on their performances or differentiators.

Join the Task Force

The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force is dedicated to promoting the wider use of GNSS raw measurements. Task Force members have access to a dedicated discussion forum, and to the raw measurement database, where they can upload data logs and relevant documents.

Since its launch in 2017, the Task Force has expanded from a handful of experts to a community of over 100 agencies, universities, research institutes and companies. Membership is open to anybody interested in GNSS raw measurements. To join the Task Force contact: market@gsa.europa.eu.

To register to take part in the workshop, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop provides a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.

Third GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop - Register now!

15.5.2019 12:56  
The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop provides a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.
Published: 
15 May 2019

Registration is now open for the third GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop, which will take place on 26 June 2019 at the GSA Headquarters in Prague. Participants in the workshop will gain access to the Task Force’s wealth of experience and learn about progress around the use of raw measurements in Android devices, so register now!

In 2017, the European GNSS agency published a White Paper on Using GNSS Raw Measurements on Android devices and launched the Raw Measurements Task Force to bridge the existing knowledge gap among potential raw measurement users. The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshops play a major role in these efforts by providing a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.

Workshop agenda

The workshop agenda can be found here. You can already look forward to a keynote presentation from Google`s Frank Van Diggelen, focusing on upcoming disrupting innovations soon available for Android users.
Furthermore, selected Task Force members will present summaries of their activities around analyses and development trends that are driving the interest of the community, be it in the high accuracy, authentication, testing, education and other domains benefitting from Android raw measurements.

Finally, a discussion will be held on how to make good use of the Android raw measurements to best leverage the latest announced services and enhancements, focusing on Open Service Navigation Message Authentication (OS-NMA) that will be offered for free to all users worldwide.

Users` benefits

There are several advantages to using GNSS raw measurements in smartphones and IoT devices. Use of these measurements can lead to greater flexibility when building multi-GNSS solutions (e.g. selection of the satellites or constellations based on their performances or differentiators) and increased GNSS performance, as they open the door to more advanced GNSS processing techniques that were previously restricted to more professional receivers.

Read this: FLAMINGO unveils high-accuracy solution for smartphones

What’s more, dual-frequency smartphones are starting to come on the market following the launch of the first dual-frequency phone, the Xiaomi Mi8, in June last year. Combined with access to raw measurements, dual frequency capability is delivering significant benefits in terms of ubiquity and accuracy.

In addition, the recent announcement of the upcoming Open Service Navigation Message Authentication service is generating great interest in the application developers` community and its pioneering through raw measurements is being assessed.

Several applications stand to profit from increased accuracy and authentication, such as augmented reality, blockchain, location-based advertising, mobile health and asset management.

Don’t miss this opportunity to get more insights on this and exchange ideas with the major experts in the sector!

Join the Task Force

The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force is dedicated to promoting a better and wider use of GNSS raw measurements. Task Force members have access to a dedicated discussion forum, and to the raw measurement database, where they can upload data logs and relevant documents.

Since its launch in 2017, the Task Force has expanded from a handful of experts to a community of over 100 agencies, universities, research institutes and companies. Membership is open to anybody interested in GNSS raw measurements. To join the Task Force contact: market@gsa.europa.eu.

You can check the agenda here and register to the workshop here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop provides a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.

Third GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop - Register now!

15.5.2019 12:56  
The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop provides a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.
Published: 
15 May 2019

Registration is now open for the third GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop, which will take place on 26 June 2019 at the GSA Headquarters in Prague. Participants in the workshop will gain access to the Task Force’s wealth of experience and learn about progress around the use of raw measurements in Android devices, so register now!

In 2017, the European GNSS agency published a White Paper on Using GNSS Raw Measurements on Android devices and launched the Raw Measurements Task Force to bridge the existing knowledge gap among potential raw measurement users. The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshops play a major role in these efforts by providing a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.

Proposed agenda

The workshop agenda is not yet finalised, however you can already look forward to a keynote presentation from Google`s Frank Van Diggelen, focusing on innovations expected soon from Android. 

Furthermore, selected Task Force members will present summaries of their activities, be it in the testing, education, authentication, high accuracy or other domains using Android raw measurements and already delivering clear benefits or with promising results anticipated in the near future.

Finally, the GSA will present how two Galileo differentiators, Open Service Navigation Message Authentication (OS-NMA) and Integrity Navigation Message (I/NAV) improvements, can be exploited thanks to raw measurements, in addition to other interesting presentations.

Numerous advantages

There are several advantages to using GNSS raw measurements in smartphones and IoT devices. Use of these measurements can lead to increased GNSS performance, as they open the door to more advanced GNSS processing techniques that were previously restricted to more professional receivers.

Read this: FLAMINGO unveils high-accuracy solution for smartphones

What’s more, dual-frequency smartphones are starting to come on the market following the launch of the first dual-frequency phone, the Xiaomi Mi8, in June last year. Combined with access to raw measurements, dual frequency capability is delivering significant benefits in terms of ubiquity and accuracy. 

Several applications stand to profit from this increased accuracy, such as augmented reality, location-based advertising, mobile health and asset management. The raw measurements also make it possible to optimise multi-GNSS solutions and to select satellites or constellations based on their performances or differentiators.

Join the Task Force

The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force is dedicated to promoting the wider use of GNSS raw measurements. Task Force members have access to a dedicated discussion forum, and to the raw measurement database, where they can upload data logs and relevant documents.

Since its launch in 2017, the Task Force has expanded from a handful of experts to a community of over 100 agencies, universities, research institutes and companies. Membership is open to anybody interested in GNSS raw measurements. To join the Task Force contact: market@gsa.europa.eu.

To register to take part in the workshop, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop provides a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.

Third GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop - Register now!

15.5.2019 12:56  
The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop provides a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.
Published: 
15 May 2019

Registration is now open for the third GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop, which will take place on 26 June 2019 at the GSA Headquarters in Prague. Participants in the workshop will gain access to the Task Force’s wealth of experience and learn about progress around the use of raw measurements in Android devices, so register now!

In 2017, the European GNSS agency published a White Paper on Using GNSS Raw Measurements on Android devices and launched the Raw Measurements Task Force to bridge the existing knowledge gap among potential raw measurement users. The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshops play a major role in these efforts by providing a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.

Workshop agenda

The workshop agenda is being finalised, however you can already look forward to a keynote presentation from Google`s Frank Van Diggelen, focusing on upcoming disrupting innovations soon available for Android users.
Furthermore, selected Task Force members will present summaries of their activities around analyses and development trends that are driving the interest of the community, be it in the high accuracy, authentication, testing, education and other domains benefitting from Android raw measurements.

Finally, a discussion will be held on how to make good use of the Android raw measurements to best leverage the latest announced services and enhancements, focusing on Open Service Navigation Message Authentication (OS-NMA) that will be offered for free to all users worldwide.

Users` benefits

There are several advantages to using GNSS raw measurements in smartphones and IoT devices. Use of these measurements can lead to greater flexibility when building multi-GNSS solutions (e.g. selection of the satellites or constellations based on their performances or differentiators) and increased GNSS performance, as they open the door to more advanced GNSS processing techniques that were previously restricted to more professional receivers.

Read this: FLAMINGO unveils high-accuracy solution for smartphones

What’s more, dual-frequency smartphones are starting to come on the market following the launch of the first dual-frequency phone, the Xiaomi Mi8, in June last year. Combined with access to raw measurements, dual frequency capability is delivering significant benefits in terms of ubiquity and accuracy.

In addition, the recent announcement of the upcoming Open Service Navigation Message Authentication service is generating great interest in the application developers` community and its pioneering through raw measurements is being assessed.

Several applications stand to profit from increased accuracy and authentication, such as augmented reality, blockchain, location-based advertising, mobile health and asset management.

Don’t miss this opportunity to get more insights on this and exchange ideas with the major experts in the sector!

Join the Task Force

The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force is dedicated to promoting a better and wider use of GNSS raw measurements. Task Force members have access to a dedicated discussion forum, and to the raw measurement database, where they can upload data logs and relevant documents.

Since its launch in 2017, the Task Force has expanded from a handful of experts to a community of over 100 agencies, universities, research institutes and companies. Membership is open to anybody interested in GNSS raw measurements. To join the Task Force contact: market@gsa.europa.eu.

To register to take part in the workshop, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop provides a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.

Third GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop - Register now!

15.5.2019 12:56  
The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop provides a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.
Published: 
15 May 2019

Registration is now open for the third GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop, which will take place on 26 June 2019 at the GSA Headquarters in Prague. Participants in the workshop will gain access to the Task Force’s wealth of experience and learn about progress around the use of raw measurements in Android devices, so register now!

In 2017, the European GNSS agency published a White Paper on Using GNSS Raw Measurements on Android devices and launched the Raw Measurements Task Force to bridge the existing knowledge gap among potential raw measurement users. The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshops play a major role in these efforts by providing a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.

Workshop agenda

The workshop agenda is being finalised, however you can already look forward to a keynote presentation from Google`s Frank Van Diggelen, focusing on upcoming disrupting innovations soon available for Android users.
Furthermore, selected Task Force members will present summaries of their activities around analyses and development trends that are driving the interest of the community, be it in the high accuracy, authentication, testing, education and other domains benefitting from Android raw measurements.

Finally, a discussion will be held on how to make good use of the Android raw measurements to best leverage the latest announced services and enhancements, focusing on Open Service Navigation Message Authentication (OS-NMA) that will be offered for free to all users worldwide.

Users` benefits

There are several advantages to using GNSS raw measurements in smartphones and IoT devices. Use of these measurements can lead to greater flexibility when building multi-GNSS solutions (e.g. selection of the satellites or constellations based on their performances or differentiators) and increased GNSS performance, as they open the door to more advanced GNSS processing techniques that were previously restricted to more professional receivers.

Read this: FLAMINGO unveils high-accuracy solution for smartphones

What’s more, dual-frequency smartphones are starting to come on the market following the launch of the first dual-frequency phone, the Xiaomi Mi8, in June last year. Combined with access to raw measurements, dual frequency capability is delivering significant benefits in terms of ubiquity and accuracy.

In addition, the recent announcement of the upcoming Open Service Navigation Message Authentication service is generating great interest in the application developers` community and its pioneering through raw measurements is being assessed.

Several applications stand to profit from increased accuracy and authentication, such as augmented reality, blockchain, location-based advertising, mobile health and asset management.

Don’t miss this opportunity to get more insights on this and exchange ideas with the major experts in the sector!

Join the Task Force

The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force is dedicated to promoting a better and wider use of GNSS raw measurements. Task Force members have access to a dedicated discussion forum, and to the raw measurement database, where they can upload data logs and relevant documents.

Since its launch in 2017, the Task Force has expanded from a handful of experts to a community of over 100 agencies, universities, research institutes and companies. Membership is open to anybody interested in GNSS raw measurements. To join the Task Force contact: market@gsa.europa.eu.

To register to the workshop, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop provides a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.

Third GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop - Register now!

15.5.2019 12:56  
The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop provides a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.
Published: 
15 May 2019

Registration is now open for the third GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop, which will take place on 26 June 2019 at the GSA Headquarters in Prague. Participants in the workshop will gain access to the Task Force’s wealth of experience and learn about progress around the use of raw measurements in Android devices, so register now!

In 2017, the European GNSS agency published a White Paper on Using GNSS Raw Measurements on Android devices and launched the Raw Measurements Task Force to bridge the existing knowledge gap among potential raw measurement users. The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshops play a major role in these efforts by providing a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.

Workshop agenda

The workshop agenda is being finalised, however you can already look forward to a keynote presentation from Google`s Frank Van Diggelen, focusing on upcoming disrupting innovations soon available for Android users.
Furthermore, selected Task Force members will present summaries of their activities around analyses and development trends that are driving the interest of the community, be it in the high accuracy, authentication, testing, education and other domains benefitting from Android raw measurements.

Finally, a discussion will be held on how to make good use of the Android raw measurements to best leverage the latest announced services and enhancements, focusing on Open Service Navigation Message Authentication (OS-NMA) that will be offered for free to all users worldwide.

Users` benefits

There are several advantages to using GNSS raw measurements in smartphones and IoT devices. Use of these measurements can lead to greater flexibility when building multi-GNSS solutions (e.g. selection of the satellites or constellations based on their performances or differentiators) and increased GNSS performance, as they open the door to more advanced GNSS processing techniques that were previously restricted to more professional receivers.

Read this: FLAMINGO unveils high-accuracy solution for smartphones

What’s more, dual-frequency smartphones are starting to come on the market following the launch of the first dual-frequency phone, the Xiaomi Mi8, in June last year. Combined with access to raw measurements, dual frequency capability is delivering significant benefits in terms of ubiquity and accuracy.

In addition, the recent announcement of the upcoming Open Service Navigation Message Authentication service is generating great interest in the application developers` community and its pioneering through raw measurements is being assessed.

Several applications stand to profit from increased accuracy and authentication, such as augmented reality, blockchain, location-based advertising, mobile health and asset management.

Don’t miss this opportunity to get more insights on this and exchange ideas with the major experts in the sector!

Join the Task Force

The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force is dedicated to promoting a better and wider use of GNSS raw measurements. Task Force members have access to a dedicated discussion forum, and to the raw measurement database, where they can upload data logs and relevant documents.

Since its launch in 2017, the Task Force has expanded from a handful of experts to a community of over 100 agencies, universities, research institutes and companies. Membership is open to anybody interested in GNSS raw measurements. To join the Task Force contact: market@gsa.europa.eu.

You can check the agenda here and register to the workshop here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop provides a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.

Third GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop - Register now!

15.5.2019 12:56  
The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop provides a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.
Published: 
15 May 2019

Registration is now open for the third GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop, which will take place on 26 June 2019 at the GSA Headquarters in Prague. Participants in the workshop will gain access to the Task Force’s wealth of experience and learn about progress around the use of raw measurements in Android devices, so register now!

In 2017, the European GNSS agency published a White Paper on Using GNSS Raw Measurements on Android devices and launched the Raw Measurements Task Force to bridge the existing knowledge gap among potential raw measurement users. The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshops play a major role in these efforts by providing a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.

Workshop agenda

The workshop agenda can be found here. You can already look forward to a keynote presentation from Google`s Frank Van Diggelen, focusing on upcoming disrupting innovations soon available for Android users.
Furthermore, selected Task Force members will present summaries of their activities around analyses and development trends that are driving the interest of the community, be it in the high accuracy, authentication, testing, education and other domains benefitting from Android raw measurements.

Finally, a discussion will be held on how to make good use of the Android raw measurements to best leverage the latest announced services and enhancements, focusing on Open Service Navigation Message Authentication (OS-NMA) that will be offered for free to all users worldwide.

Users` benefits

There are several advantages to using GNSS raw measurements in smartphones and IoT devices. Use of these measurements can lead to greater flexibility when building multi-GNSS solutions (e.g. selection of the satellites or constellations based on their performances or differentiators) and increased GNSS performance, as they open the door to more advanced GNSS processing techniques that were previously restricted to more professional receivers.

Read this: FLAMINGO unveils high-accuracy solution for smartphones

What’s more, dual-frequency smartphones are starting to come on the market following the launch of the first dual-frequency phone, the Xiaomi Mi8, in June last year. Combined with access to raw measurements, dual frequency capability is delivering significant benefits in terms of ubiquity and accuracy.

In addition, the recent announcement of the upcoming Open Service Navigation Message Authentication service is generating great interest in the application developers` community and its pioneering through raw measurements is being assessed.

Several applications stand to profit from increased accuracy and authentication, such as augmented reality, blockchain, location-based advertising, mobile health and asset management.

Don’t miss this opportunity to get more insights on this and exchange ideas with the major experts in the sector!

Join the Task Force

The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force is dedicated to promoting a better and wider use of GNSS raw measurements. Task Force members have access to a dedicated discussion forum, and to the raw measurement database, where they can upload data logs and relevant documents.

Since its launch in 2017, the Task Force has expanded from a handful of experts to a community of over 100 agencies, universities, research institutes and companies. Membership is open to anybody interested in GNSS raw measurements. To join the Task Force contact: market@gsa.europa.eu.

Workshop agenda

The workshop agenda is being finalised, however you can already look forward to a keynote presentation from Google`s Frank Van Diggelen, focusing on upcoming disrupting innovations soon available for Android users.

Furthermore, selected Task Force members will present summaries of their activities around analyses and development trends that are driving the interest of the community, be it in the high accuracy, authentication, testing, education and other domains benefitting from Android raw measurements.

Finally, a discussion will be held on how to make good use of the Android raw measurements to best leverage the latest announced services and enhancements, focusing on Open Service Navigation Message Authentication (OS-NMA) that will be offered for free to all users worldwide.

You can check the agenda here and register to the workshop here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop provides a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.

Third GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop – Register now!

15.5.2019 12:52  
The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop provides a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.
Published: 
15 May 2019

Registration is now open for the third GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop, which will take place on 26 June 2019 at the GSA Headquarters in Prague. Participants in the workshop will gain access to the Task Force’s wealth of experience and learn about progress around the use of raw measurements in Android devices, so register now.

In 2017, the European GNSS agency published a White Paper on Using GNSS Raw Measurements on Android devices and launched the Raw Measurements Task Force to bridge the existing knowledge gap among potential raw measurement users. The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshops play a major role in these efforts by providing a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.

Proposed agenda

The workshop agenda is not yet finalised, however you can already look forward to a keynote presentation from Google`s Frank Van Diggelen, focusing on innovations expected soon from Android. 

Furthermore, selected Task Force members will present summaries of their activities, be it in the testing, education, authentication, high accuracy or other domains using Android raw measurements and already delivering clear benefits or with promising results anticipated in the near future.

Finally, the GSA will present how two Galileo differentiators, Open Service Navigation Message Authentication (OS-NMA) and Integrity Navigation Message (I/NAV) improvements, can be exploited thanks to raw measurements, in addition to other interesting presentations.

Numerous advantages

There are several advantages to using GNSS raw measurements in smartphones and IoT devices. Use of these measurements can lead to increased GNSS performance, as they open the door to more advanced GNSS processing techniques that were previously restricted to more professional receivers.

Read this: FLAMINGO unveils high-accuracy solution for smartphones

What’s more, dual-frequency smartphones are starting to come on the market following the launch of the first dual-frequency phone, the Xiaomi Mi8, in June last year. Combined with access to raw measurements, dual frequency capability is delivering significant benefits in terms of ubiquity and accuracy. 

Several applications stand to profit from this increased accuracy, such as augmented reality, location-based advertising, mobile health and asset management. The raw measurements also make it possible to optimise multi-GNSS solutions and to select satellites or constellations based on their performances or differentiators.

Join the Task Force

The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force is dedicated to promoting the wider use of GNSS raw measurements. Task Force members have access to a dedicated discussion forum, and to the raw measurement database, where they can upload data logs and relevant documents.

Since its launch in 2017, the Task Force has expanded from a handful of experts to a community of over 100 agencies, universities, research institutes and companies. Membership is open to anybody interested in GNSS raw measurements. To join the Task Force contact: market@gsa.europa.eu.

To register to take part in the workshop, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop provides a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.

Do eCall devices conform?

13.5.2019 15:13  
The report summarises the results of a GSA-JRC testing campaign for eCall devices, in which device manufacturers provided samples for conformity assessment.
Published: 
13 May 2019

Since 31 March 2018, all new car and light vehicle models sold in the EU must be fitted with an eCall device that can automatically alert emergency services in the event of an accident and transmit the position of the vehicle. In parallel with the launch of this life-saving service, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) launched a testing campaign for eCall devices, inviting all device manufacturers to provide samples for conformity assessment by the European Commission’s science service: the Joint Research Centre (JRC). A summary report of the results has just been published.

The GSA received a large number of positive expressions of interest from the main manufacturers of eCall On-Board Units from Europe, USA, and Asia and devices were delivered to the EU Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) testing facilities at the JRC site at Ispra in Italy, where the testing campaign was carried out.

"We set up a dedicated GNSS laboratory test-bed for the eCall testing. It includes a suite of test scenarios to evaluate the performance of the eCall devices. For instance, we looked at their positioning accuracy in different types of conditions as well as the receiver sensitivity", explains JRC researcher Joaquim Fortuny. 

The test scenarios corresponded to those outlined in the eCall Implementation Guidelines Report and were designed to assess the eCall Devices Under Test (DUT) compatibility with EGNOS (European Geostationary Navigation Overlay System) and Galileo.

The assessment campaign started in March 2017 and was concluded in September 2018, and covered 15 DUTs from a range of manufacturers. The performance of the DUT receivers was thoroughly assessed with respect to a number of key performance indicators (KPIs) including their use of SBAS/ EGNOS corrections; their positioning accuracy under static, dynamic and dynamic with shadow areas (i.e. ‘urban canyon’ type) conditions, the Cold Start Time-To-First-Fix (CSTTFF) at two different signal power levels, the re-acquisition time of tracking signals after a block out of 60 seconds, and the receiver sensitivity in cold start mode, tracking mode and re-acquisition scenario.

Reports generated

Two sets of reports were generated by the campaign. 

Firstly, an individual test report for each DUT was produced which includes the full-set of detailed results for the specific unit. These reports have been provided only to the relevant DUT manufacturer and are subject to confidentiality agreements between the manufacturer, GSA and JRC.

Secondly, an overall eCall DUT assessment report has just been published, which describes the test campaign and details the main and significant results obtained on the 15 DUTs. Both the aggregate and individual results are provided, but given the sensitive commercial nature of the results, they are presented without disclosing the identity of the individual device manufacturers.

Overall, all DUTs performed well within specification in terms of positioning in all test scenarios.

Only four of the test units were found to be not compliant in terms of the use of SBAS/ EGNOS corrections and it was concluded that SBAS corrections were not used in these cases because of the high latitude of the geographical location used for the tests.

The sensitivity test was perhaps the most demanding test cases for the eCall units, but the majority of them successfully passed. 

“This first of its kind testing campaign has strengthened mutual trust and cooperation with the on-board unit manufacturers and the test/simulator solution vendors and has opened a direct communication channel with the manufacturers. This can provide a deeper insight into their products’ maturity and help them to address issues before devices are submitted for type-approval” said GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides.

eCall: life saver

Over 25 500 people were killed and 135 000 people seriously injured in road accidents across the EU in 2016. In addition to the tragedy of loss of life and injury, this also represents an annual economic burden of around EUR 130 billion to society.

It is estimated that eCall can speed up emergency response times by 40% in urban areas and 50% in the countryside and could reduce the number of fatalities in road traffic accidents by at least 4% and the number of severe injuries by 6%.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The report summarises the results of a GSA-JRC testing campaign for eCall devices, in which device manufacturers provided samples for conformity assessment.

2019 CLGE Students’ Contest is scouting for ideas

9.5.2019 14:05  
Students of topography, GIS, geodesy, mapping and related studies are invited to submit unique and innovative ideas.
Published: 
09 May 2019

The eighth edition of the CLGE Students’ Contest, organised by the Council of European Geodetic Surveyors (CLGE) in partnership with the European GNSS Agency (GSA), is now open for submissions. The deadline for applications is 23:00 on 29 July 2019.

For the eighth consecutive year, the CLGE Students’ Contest is inviting students of topography, GIS, geodesy, mapping and related studies to submit their innovative ideas. Each winner or winning team stands to win a prize of EUR 1000.

There are five categories in the competition: 

Geodesy, topography,

Galileo, EGNOS, Copernicus,

GIS, mapping,

Cadastre and property surveying,

Student and youngster engagement.

The first four are open to all Bachelor and Masters students in the surveying sector or a related field from all European countries. PhD students are not currently allowed to participate with their PhD thesis, but this may change in the future. However, they can participate with their Bachelor or Master’s thesis, if it meets other requirements. The fifth category is open to surveyors under the age of 35 or those who have been registered as surveyors for less than 10 years.

Read this: Galileo high accuracy in focus at INTERGEO 2018

Proposals in the final category should include a paper describing how CLGE can motivate young surveyors to be more active and engaged in the association; how CLGE can provide increased added value to its members; or what CLGE can do to motivate youngsters to study surveying and enter the surveying profession.

GSA Special Prize

As in previous years, the GSA is sponsoring the Galileo, EGNOS, Copernicus category. Applicants for the GSA special prize should submit a paper describing how their project leverages Galileo, EGNOS or Copernicus for use in professional receivers, mobile phones, drones, etc. All applications using Copernicus should also include at least one EGNSS service (Galileo, EGNOS or both).

Last year’s prize in the Galileo section went to Iuliana Constantinov, from the Technical University of Moldova, who won with the paper "Adjustment of GNSS permanent stations network MOLDPOS". Iuliana was awarded her prize at the INTERGEO exhibition in Frankfurt last October.

What should you do?

Applicants should submit a paper, written in English, of not more than 4000 words, including an abstract of 300 words. The paper should describe the student’s or young surveyor’s work, findings and conclusions and should be submitted before 23.00 CET on 29 July 2019, to the following address: contest@clge.eu (please CC Mairolt.Kakko@clge.eu and Jean-Yves.Pirlot@clge.eu). 

The award ceremony for the 2019 edition of the competition will also take place during the INTERGEO exhibition, which this year will take place in Stuttgart on 18 September 2019. Participants should save this date in case they win. For more details, please click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Students of topography, GIS, geodesy, mapping and related studies are invited to submit unique and innovative ideas.

2019 CLGE Students’ Contest is scouting for ideas

9.5.2019 14:05  
Students of topography, GIS, geodesy, mapping and related studies are invited to submit unique and innovative ideas.
Published: 
09 May 2019

The eighth edition of the CLGE Students’ Contest, organised by the Council of European Geodetic Surveyors (CLGE) in partnership with the European GNSS Agency (GSA), is now open for submissions. The deadline for applications is 23:00 on 29 July 2019.

For the eighth consecutive year, the CLGE Students’ Contest is inviting students of topography, GIS, geodesy, mapping and related studies to submit their innovative ideas. Each winner or winning team stands to win a prize of EUR 1000.

There are five categories in the competition: 

Geodesy, topography,

Galileo, EGNOS, Copernicus,

GIS, mapping,

Cadastre and property surveying,

Student and youngster engagement.

The first four are open to all Bachelor and Masters students in the surveying sector or a related field from all European countries. PhD students are not currently allowed to participate with their PhD thesis, but this may change in the future. However, they can participate with their Bachelor or Master’s thesis, if it meets other requirements. The fifth category is open to surveyors under the age of 35 or those who have been registered as surveyors for less than 10 years.

Read this: Galileo high accuracy in focus at INTERGEO 2018

Proposals in the final category should include a paper describing how CLGE can motivate young surveyors to be more active and engaged in the association; how CLGE can provide increased added value to its members; or what CLGE can do to motivate youngsters to study surveying and enter the surveying profession.

GSA Special Prize

As in previous years, the GSA is sponsoring the Galileo, EGNOS, Copernicus category. Applicants for the GSA special prize should submit a paper describing how their project leverages Galileo, EGNOS or Copernicus for use in professional receivers, mobile phones, drones, etc. All applications using Copernicus should also include at least one EGNSS service (Galileo, EGNOS or both).

Last year’s prize in the Galileo section went to Iuliana Constantinov, from the Technical University of Moldova, who won with the paper "Adjustment of GNSS permanent stations network MOLDPOS". Iuliana was awarded her prize at the INTERGEO exhibition in Frankfurt last October.

What should you do?

Applicants should submit a paper, written in English, of not more than 4000 words, including an abstract of 300 words. The paper should describe the student’s or young surveyor’s work, findings and conclusions and should be submitted before 23.00 CET on 29 July 2019, to the following address: contest@clge.eu (please CC Mairolt.Kakko@clge.eu and Jean-Yves.Pirlot@clge.eu). 

The award ceremony for the 2019 edition of the competition will also take place during the INTERGEO exhibition, which this year will take place in Stuttgart on 18 September 2019. Participants should save this date in case they win. For more details, please click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Students of topography, GIS, geodesy, mapping and related studies are invited to submit unique and innovative ideas.

Have your say on Horizon Europe

8.5.2019 11:38  
The GSA workshop will review Horizon Europe EGNSS Downstream R&D priorities.
Published: 
08 May 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is to host a workshop at its Prague headquarters on 4 June 2019 to consult with industry and academia on Horizon Europe EGNSS Downstream R&D. At the workshop, participants will discuss priorities for EGNSS downstream applications, receivers, and market uptake in Horizon Europe – the European Commission’s ambitious €100 billion research and innovation programme that will succeed Horizon 2020.

In June 2018 the Commission published its proposal for the Horizon Europe programme, which is currently being negotiated in the European Council and the European Parliament, after which it should be launched on 1 January 2021. In the programme, EGNSS related activities are currently covered within the Digital Industry cluster, Pillar 2: Global Challenges and Industrial Competitiveness, but there is a proposal from the Parliament and Council to have a dedicated Digital-Industry-Space cluster.

Fostering adoption, underpinning competitiveness

Within the Digital Industry pillar, EGNSS activities are structured as follows: innovative applications; global uptake; solutions improving robustness; authentication; integrity of services; and development of fundamental elements such as chipsets, receivers and antennas. Other activities focus on sustainability of supply chains, new technologies, work targeted at sustained exploitation of services to tackle societal challenges, and the development of next generation systems for new challenges such as security or autonomous driving. EGNSS related activities could also be covered in other Horizon Europe clusters and pillars.

Read thisInnovation procurement opportunities explored at Prague workshop

As the programme is currently being negotiated, now is the time to consult with stakeholders and agree on the EGNSS downstream R&D priorities for the next framework programme and to exploit new funding tools to increase the business impact of EGNSS. Moreover, the budget for EGNSS downstream applications in Horizon Europe needs to be secured in order to foster wide-scale EGNSS adoption and underpin the competitiveness of EU industry.

Review of requirements

The upcoming GSA workshop will provide a forum for this consultation, offering representatives from industry and academia the opportunity to discuss high-level EGNSS downstream R&D priorities. The workshop will kick off by taking a look at the status quo of the Horizon 2020 and Fundamental Elements funding mechanisms and then present how EGNSS downstream R&D is reflected in Horizon Europe. This will be followed by a discussion of EGNSS R&D User Requirements, with a review of inputs from the 2018 EGNSS User Consultation Platform by market segment. Finally, there will be an open discussion on high-level priorities for Horizon Europe.

You can now register to the workshop here. To help participants to prepare for the workshop, the GSA has prepared a questionnaire, which you can access here, along with the agenda for the workshop. For more information contact: com@gsa.europa.eu

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GSA workshop will review Horizon Europe EGNSS Downstream R&D priorities.

Have your say on Horizon Europe

8.5.2019 11:38  
The GSA workshop will review Horizon Europe EGNSS Downstream R&D priorities.
Published: 
08 May 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is to host a workshop at its Prague headquarters on 4 June 2019 to consult with industry and academia on Horizon Europe EGNSS Downstream R&D. At the workshop, participants will discuss priorities for EGNSS downstream applications, receivers, and market uptake in Horizon Europe – the European Commission’s ambitious €100 billion research and innovation programme that will succeed Horizon 2020.

In June 2018 the Commission published its proposal for the Horizon Europe programme, which is currently being negotiated in the European Council and the European Parliament, after which it should be launched on 1 January 2021. In the programme, EGNSS related activities are currently covered within the Digital Industry cluster, Pillar 2: Global Challenges and Industrial Competitiveness, but there is a proposal from the Parliament and Council to have a dedicated Digital-Industry-Space cluster.

Fostering adoption, underpinning competitiveness

EGNSS activities such as innovative applications; global uptake; solutions improving robustness; authentication; integrity of services; and development of fundamental elements such as chipsets, receivers and antennas, are covered under the Digital Industry pillar. Other EGNSS activities in the area of sustainability of supply chains, new technologies, work targeting solutions for societal challenges, and the development of next generation systems for emerging security threats or applications such as autonomous driving, can also be addressed in other Horizon Europe clusters and pillars.

Read this Innovation procurement opportunities explored at Prague workshop

As the programme is currently being negotiated, now is the time to consult with stakeholders and agree on the EGNSS downstream R&D priorities for the next framework programme and to exploit new funding tools to increase the business impact of EGNSS. Moreover, the budget for EGNSS downstream applications in Horizon Europe needs to be secured in order to foster wide-scale EGNSS adoption and underpin the competitiveness of EU industry.

Review of requirements

The upcoming GSA workshop will provide a forum for this consultation, offering representatives from industry and academia the opportunity to discuss high-level EGNSS downstream R&D priorities. The workshop will kick off by taking a look at the status quo of the Horizon 2020 and Fundamental Elements funding mechanisms and then present how EGNSS downstream R&D is reflected in Horizon Europe. This will be followed by a discussion of EGNSS R&D User Requirements, with a review of inputs from the 2018 EGNSS User Consultation Platform by market segment. Finally, there will be an open discussion on high-level priorities for Horizon Europe.

You can now register to the workshop here. To help participants to prepare for the workshop, the GSA has prepared a questionnaire, which you can access here, along with the agenda for the workshop. For more information contact: com@gsa.europa.eu

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GSA workshop will review Horizon Europe EGNSS Downstream R&D priorities.

Have your say on Horizon Europe

8.5.2019 11:38  
The GSA workshop will review Horizon Europe EGNSS Downstream R&D priorities.
Published: 
08 May 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is to host a workshop at its Prague headquarters on 4 June 2019 to consult with industry and academia on Horizon Europe EGNSS Downstream R&D. At the workshop, participants will discuss priorities for EGNSS downstream applications, receivers, and market uptake in Horizon Europe – the European Commission’s ambitious €100 billion research and innovation programme that will succeed Horizon 2020.

In June 2018 the Commission published its proposal for the Horizon Europe programme, which is currently being negotiated in the European Council and the European Parliament, after which it should be launched on 1 January 2021. In the programme, EGNSS related activities are currently covered within the Digital Industry cluster, Pillar 2: Global Challenges and Industrial Competitiveness, but there is a proposal from the Parliament and Council to have a dedicated Digital-Industry-Space cluster.

Fostering adoption, underpinning competitiveness

Within the Digital Industry pillar, EGNSS activities are structured as follows: innovative applications; global uptake; solutions improving robustness; authentication; integrity of services; and development of fundamental elements such as chipsets, receivers and antennas. Other activities focus on sustainability of supply chains, new technologies, work targeted at sustained exploitation of services to tackle societal challenges, and the development of next generation systems for new challenges such as security or autonomous driving. EGNSS related activities could also be covered in other Horizon Europe clusters and pillars.

Read this: Innovation procurement opportunities explored at Prague workshop 

As the programme is currently being negotiated, now is the time to consult with stakeholders and agree on the EGNSS downstream R&D priorities for the next framework programme and to exploit new funding tools to increase the business impact of EGNSS. Moreover, the budget for EGNSS downstream applications in Horizon Europe needs to be secured in order to foster wide-scale EGNSS adoption and underpin the competitiveness of EU industry.

Review of requirements

The upcoming GSA workshop will provide a forum for this consultation, offering representatives from industry and academia the opportunity to discuss high-level EGNSS downstream R&D priorities. The workshop will kick off by taking a look at the status quo of the Horizon 2020 and Fundamental Elements funding mechanisms and then present how EGNSS downstream R&D is reflected in Horizon Europe. This will be followed by a discussion of EGNSS R&D User Requirements, with a review of inputs from the 2018 EGNSS User Consultation Platform by market segment. Finally, there will be an open discussion on high-level priorities for Horizon Europe.

To help participants to prepare for the workshop, the GSA has prepared a questionnaire, which you can access here, along with the agenda for the workshop. For more information contact: com@gsa.europa.eu 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GSA workshop will review Horizon Europe EGNSS Downstream R&D priorities.

Galileo Masters 2019 open for submissions!

7.5.2019 10:26  
Published: 
07 May 2019

 

The 2019 edition of the Galileo Masters opened for submissions on May 1. Since it began in 2004, the Galileo Masters has scouted for the most forward‐thinking applications based on Galileo and EGNOS. Innovators and entrepreneurs are now invited to submit their innovative solutions to the competition by 31 July.

The Galileo Masters seeks to award applications, services and new ideas that use Galileo and EGNOS to respond to pressing challenges facing business and society. The most innovative solutions will be able to share in more than EUR 1 million worth of cash prizes. Sounds interesting? Then why not apply for this year’s competition? To register, click here.

In addition to the cash prizes, the winners will be able to take advantage of business development opportunities, tailored E-GNSS Accelerator business support packages worth EUR 62,000, a crowd funding campaign worth EUR 35,000, and much more.

Powered by GSA

New in the 2019 edition is a synergy challenge by the European GNSS Agency (GSA) and the European Commission, targeting solutions using Earth observation data combined with Galileo/EGNOS georeferenced data. In another new development, this year the competition is structured in two class categories– ‘Start-up of the Year’ and ‘Idea of the Year’ - both of which are sponsored by the GSA. The start-up category aims to identify the year’s best GNSS-enabled prototype, product or product idea by start-ups from around the world and help them to scale up; while the ideas class will encourage innovative solutions and help turn their ideas into reality.

“The GSA has been a partner of the Galileo Masters for 11 years already, and during this time the competition has consistently generated exciting ideas that leverage European GNSS to create economic opportunities and improve people’s lives. I am very interested to see what this year’s competition delivers, not only in terms of innovative EGNSS-based solutions, but also ideas that exploit the synergies between Galileo and Copernicus,” said GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides.

Special Prizes

In addition to the two general categories, participants also submit their solutions to be eligible for one of six special prizes:

  • Galileo-Copernicus Synergy Challenge;
  • Galileo 5G IoT Challenge;
  • DLR Artificial Intelligence Navigation Challenge;
  • University Challenge;
  • BMVI Special Prize; and
  • GNSS Living Lab Prize.

There is also a Regional Challenge, where participants can choose a challenge set by a regional partner from around the world that best matches their business case. The regional partner organisations include national space agencies, ministries, space clusters, universities, and incubators.

Make sure to register now, even if your idea is not fully formed - that way you can receive information about all the great support activities and additional opportunities that arise throughout the submission phase. Registration is free and available to participants all around the world. To find out more, click here.

  

Check out some previous winners of the Galileo Masters GSA Special Prize:

  

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Innovation procurement opportunities explored at Prague workshop

3.5.2019 12:06  
Innovation procurement offers interesting opportunities for EGNSS applications.
Published: 
03 May 2019

Innovation procurement can deliver solutions to public interest challenges and may be an interesting new instrument for European GNSS (EGNSS). To explore these opportunities, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) hosted the “EGNSS Innovation procurement opportunities within Horizon 2020 and Horizon Europe” workshop at its Prague headquarters on 11 April 2019.

The workshop was held as part of the European Commission project “Analysis to define the potential use of Innovation Procurement (PCP/PPI) within Horizon 2020 and Horizon Europe EGNSS market uptake calls”. It gave the participants an opportunity to learn about innovation procurement instruments; share their views on EGNSS R&D and the pilot pre-commercial procurement call for EGNSS planned for October 2019; and learn about the rules and conditions for participation in European Commission-funded projects to resolve public challenges.

Integrated approach

Welcoming the participants, GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani said that to support EGNSS market uptake, the GSA adopts an integrated approach built on market and user knowledge, support for market demand, and the creation of offers through new products and services.

She said that research and development programmes currently address needs all along the value chain, from navigation service provision to the end user, but that new downstream R&D funding tools would be needed after 2020 as the market and Galileo will change.

Read this: GSA presents EGNSS opportunities in aviation

“It will be necessary to significantly increase the budget of Horizon Europe compared to Horizon 2020 in order to complete market uptake in longer-term regulated segments. An increased budget will also be needed to position Galileo as a leader in market segments where its differentiators make an impact, and to support the export potential of EU industry,” Diani said.

She added that new funding tools would be required to cope with new needs. “A lot has been achieved thanks to current R&D initiatives, but now it is time to move forward and prepare the background for Horizon Europe and the EU Space Programme.”

Solutions adapted to public sector needs

Tina Mede, from the European Commission’s Directorate General for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs (DG GROW) highlighted some of the reasons why innovation procurement is important. She explained that Pre-Commercial Procurement (PCP) is used when there are no near-to-market solutions available and more R&D is required, while Public Procurement of Innovative solutions (PPI) is used when these solutions are almost ready or partially available on the market.

Mede stressed that the public sector is an important user of EGNSS applications and that, through pre-commercial procurement, EGNSS applications can be adapted to the specific needs of public authorities. She said that suppliers are also interested in the public sector as a ‘first customer’ for innovative EGNSS products.

Mede cited recommendations from the last Galileo User Consultation Platform, held during European Space Week in Marseille in December, which called for the use of innovative procurement schemes to be strengthened in order to stimulate the demand-side of innovation.

Regarding the 5th EGNSS call - Pilot on Pre-commercial Procurement of EGNSS applications for public authorities, planned for October this year, Mede said that this call aimed to launch demand-driven innovation actions by public authorities. Among promising applications, she mentioned Mobility as a Service (MaaS), cooperative Intelligent Transport Systems, helicopter emergency medical services, EGNSS to support port operations, among other applications.

Solutions addressing concrete needs

Marco Bolschi, Principal Consultant at VVA, highlighted some of the main results of the European Commission’s PCP/PPI analysis. He said that procurers should be innovation-oriented and enthusiastic about cross-border cooperation. Furthermore, they should have a concrete need and the investment should be worthwhile in terms of operational and public benefits.

And this: GSA opens new GSMC invitation to tenders

Bolschi highlighted some examples of promising applications for a potential PCP project, as revealed by the analysis. These include public safety applications, such as civil drones for emergency response; GNSS-based earthquake early warning systems; and the modernisation of Professional Mobile Radio (PMR) with improved performance in terms of position refresh rate, accuracy and battery life.

In the maritime and inland waterways sector, PCP can be used to improve port management through smart port systems and to secure the use of EGNOS corrections in IALA beacons and Automatic Identification System base stations.

Selected recommendations

The analysis also generated some recommendations for public procurers, who should start with defining a shared EGNSS-related need and inform themselves of any relevant legislation, standards, IPR and certification in the particular EGNSS area of application. Focusing the scope of the application will also help shape a manageable project.

Procurers should inform themselves – the more they learn about the state-of-the-art of the offer, the more effective the procurement will be. Finally, communication is particularly important – both with other procurers and with potential suppliers.

Meade noted some of the work still to be concluded as part of the PCP/PPI analysis, including a review of the impact of PCP/PPI implementation in other R&D activities, an analysis of interesting EGNSS applications for the introduction of PCP/PPI, and mapping the needs of relevant public institutions.

It is also planned to draft recommendations for an EGNSS innovation procurement implementation strategy using a number of pilot cases, and to organise a workshop with interested stakeholders to raise awareness.

To learn more and view the sessions' presentations, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Innovation procurement offers interesting opportunities for EGNSS applications.

GSA launches testing campaign for agriculture receivers

30.4.2019 13:35  
The GSA testing campaign will look at the implementation of Galileo in agriculture receivers
Published: 
30 April 2019

The GSA is launching a new testing campaign for receiver manufacturers: The machine guidance testing campaign for agriculture receivers.

Within this testing campaign, receivers usually used for machine guidance tasks will be thoroughly tested for their performance in various test cases, looking at multi-constellation and multi-frequency combinations and using several augmenting techniques.

Given the accuracy requirement differential between machine guidance and automatic steering applications, less demanding applications from the point of view of accuracy will be the primary focus. However, independently from the application accuracy requirement, the relative (so called ‘pass-to-pass’) and more importantly absolute accuracy of the receiver will also be evaluated.

In order to enable a fair comparison between the receivers and to prevent another error source from machine guidance subsystems, the campaign will only focus on the GNSS accuracy part and not on the machine guidance systems as a whole.

Added value for manufacturers

The testing campaign is targeting agriculture receiver manufacturers looking for an independent assessment of Galileo implementation into their products, and assistance with any issues linked to this implementation.

Manufacturers stand to benefit from the independent testing – the GSA will conduct neutral test cases and provide objective results. The campaign is also completely free to the manufacturers. It aims to support the industry in implementing Galileo in their receivers. Based on the testing, the manufacturer will receive a confidential comparative analysis of the results with anonymised partial results of the others.

Requirements for the receivers

In order to assess the correct implementation of Galileo, the receivers under testing should have the capacity to enable and disable specific GNSS constellations and frequencies, be able to function in Galileo-only mode and, ideally, support SBAS, RTK and PPP positioning modes. During the tests the receivers should also be able to provide information on position, the number of tracked satellites and DOP values, as NMEA output.

Timeframe

The testing campaign is planned to start in June 2019 and will run at least until the end of the year. However, as the receivers will all be tested at the same time, it is necessary to have them shipped by 17 May 2019.

How to apply

Interested receiver manufacturers are invited to send an email to market@gsa.europa.eu, with the subject Galileo testing campaign of machine guidance receivers, indicating their interest in participating.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GSA testing campaign will look at the implementation of Galileo in agriculture receivers

Galileo Satellite Metadata updated!

25.4.2019 10:45  
Galileo satellites metadata is used to implement advanced algorithms for precise orbit determination or Precise Point Positioning (PPP).
Published: 
25 April 2019

The European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) is pleased to announce the publication of updated Galileo Satellite Metadata on the GSC web portal. In particular, the update includes metadata for Galileo satellites L9 and L10 and the update of the Mass, Centre of Mass and ANTEX Reference Frame coordinates for all the other satellites.

The Galileo Satellite Metadata section, which can be found under the Support to Developers tab on the GSC site, contains information on satellite properties. This information is necessary in order to properly implement advanced processing algorithms for precise orbit determination or Precise Point Positioning (PPP). This includes physical characteristics, the attitude law and antenna parameters.

As of April 2019, the following Galileo satellite metadata for L9 and L10 (see Satellite Launch Information section) has been added:

  • Mass and Centre of Mass (COM);
  • Antenna Reference Point (ARP);
  • Phase Centre Offsets (PCO) for E1, E5a, E6 and E5b signals; and
  • Laser Retro Reflector Location.

In addition, the Mass, the Centre of Mass (COM) and the ANTEX Reference Frame coordinates for all the other satellites (both IOV and FOC) have been updated as of April 2019.

For further up-to-date information on the Galileo system and its services, visit the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) website. Should you have any comment or question with regard to Galileo, please contact our Helpdesk.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Galileo satellites metadata is used to implement advanced algorithms for precise orbit determination or Precise Point Positioning (PPP).

MyGalileoApp rocks the app development world

24.4.2019 12:42  
The GSA has selected 30 teams to advance to the development phase of the competition.
Published: 
24 April 2019

The European GNSS Agency’s (GSA) MyGalileoApp competition has sparked significant interest among the app development community, with the high number of entries in the competition underlining the value that app developers place on Galileo’s precise positioning. The GSA has now selected the 30 most innovative projects to advance to the next phase of the competition.

In total, 148 ideas were submitted for initial consideration, covering a broad range of applications providing solutions to social and environmental challenges. Reflecting the fact that Galileo is a truly global system, the ideas came from a wide geographical area – from Belgium to Bangladesh – with a total of 35 different nationalities represented.

In addition to challenging developers to design, develop, test and launch mobile applications that take advantage of Galileo’s increased accuracy and availability, the competition also aims to gain insight into the latest trends and hot topics in the app development community.

Top trends

Ideas were submitted in 10 of the 11 innovation areas open to submissions, and ‘smart navigation and infotainment’ was the most popular area, with 37 ideas submitted. Apps in this area help reduce congestion while offering faster, greener and more efficient transport options based on real-time data.

Read this: GNSS raw measurements delivering greater accuracy

Also among the top trends were ‘augmented reality and games’, where Galileo’s dual-frequency capability has a lot to offer, as does access to Galileo raw measurements, which enables developers to use advanced positioning techniques to develop solutions that are generally only available in professional receivers.

Other app ideas submitted offer solutions to real life problems such as public assets management and navigation support for people with low autonomy, in addition to solutions and services that support environmental sustainability, the local economy, and so on. From these, GSA experts selected the 30 most innovative projects leveraging Galileo’s added value, to advance to the first development phase of the competition.

“The number of applications and the breadth of brilliant ideas clearly indicate the significant role that Galileo will play in the next generation of mobile applications,” said GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. “Thanks to this competition we are strengthening our relationship with the app development community, a community that is key to generating a high return on the EU’s investment in space, by delivering concrete solutions that address societal challenges and improve people’s lives. Service provision and related apps engines: this is where the highest value is” he said.

What next

The first development phase of the competition will take place until the 15th of July 2019, after which the beta versions of the apps will be reviewed. Then, on the 31st of July, the 30 teams will be narrowed down further, with a maximum of 10 teams being selected to advance to the second development phase, at which stage the projects should deliver a finalised version of their app with 100% functionality.

Those that succeed will be invited to the finals, to be held in October 2019, where they will present their application to the GSA evaluation board. Following the presentations, the judges will announce the winners, with the first-place winner receiving a EUR 100,000 prize. The runner up and third place finishers will receive EUR 50,000 and EUR 30,000 respectively.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GSA has selected 30 teams to advance to the development phase of the competition.

PRS – the future is bright!

23.4.2019 13:58  
The PRS ensures continuity of service to authorised users when access to other navigation services is denied.
Published: 
23 April 2019

One of the four Galileo services, along with the Open Service, High Accuracy Service, and the Safety of Life Service, the Public Regulated Service (PRS) is an encrypted navigation service designed to be resistant to involuntary interference and spoofing. With increased user involvement, new procurements to support the PRS user segment, and enhanced services all in the pipeline, the future of the PRS looks bright.

Speaking at the Munich Satellite Navigation Conference at the end of March, Dr Friedrich Teichmann, Director of the Geospatial Institute of the Austrian Armed Forces noted that, thanks to Galileo, accuracy is no longer an issue. “Now the key issues are robustness and security,” he said.

These are precisely the issues that the Public Regulated Service aims to address. A key difference between the PRS and the other Galileo services is that the PRS ensures continuity of service to authorised users when access to other navigation services is denied, PRS Service

Manager at the European GNSS Agency (GSA) Charles Villie explained at the Munich summit. “In the event of malicious interference, the PRS increases the likelihood of the availability of the signal in space, in this way it provides a solution that is more robust to spoofing,” he said.

Meeting PRS user needs

Villie noted that the GSA is actively contributing to the development of all areas of the PRS user segment, ensuring that user needs are met and supporting the widespread and secure use of the PRS. This support is already delivering results. Villie highlighted in particular the development of the P3RS2 pre-operational PRS receiver - one of the first such receivers approved by the European Council. “This is one of the main successes of the year,” he said.

Read this: GSA opens new GSMC invitation to tenders

“This approval means that the receiver can be operated in the field. Based on this, we have started to launch joint test activities covering 90% of PRS participants in Europe, grouped in three independent consortia. This will improve the provision of PRS service to users,” he said.

Supporting ‘blue light’ operations

Speaking from the point of view of a PRS user, Ronald Nippold from the Institute of Transportation Systems, German Aerospace Centre (DLR) said that DLR is not only developing PRS algorithms, but also applying them to the real world. One such real-world use case is the HALI project, which targets traffic signal control for emergency vehicles. The project came about due to the fact that the risk of accidents for ‘blue light’ operations involving emergency vehicles is eight to 10 times higher than for regular vehicles, Nippold said.

“Using accurate positioning information for emergency vehicles, the project is able to activate traffic lights in such a way as to facilitate travel for these vehicles, making it safer and allowing them to reach an emergency faster,” he said, adding that the project is examining the impact that the system has on traffic and is generating knowledge related to security procedures when handling PRS hardware in the real world.

Looking to the future

Nippold said that field tests with three police vehicles and three fire engines would start in the coming months and that it was planned to start field tests using PRS signals over the summer, with evaluation and publication of the final results scheduled for the autumn.

Looking to the year ahead, Villie said that the GSA would continue to support the execution of the joint test activities and coordinate the distribution of PRS hardware, including the P3RS2 receiver. He also said that new PRS invitations to tender would be published, supporting the manufacture of PRS devices.

“The next generation PRS – the PRS Enhanced Service – will also be prepared, and all of this work will be supported by awareness raising activities, particularly regarding the pre-operational receivers,” Villie said, adding: “The future of PRS is looking bright.”

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The PRS ensures continuity of service to authorised users when access to other navigation services is denied.

PRS – the future is bright!

23.4.2019 13:58  
The PRS ensures continuity of service to authorised users when access to other navigation services is denied.
Published: 
23 April 2019

One of the four Galileo services, along with the Open Service, High Accuracy Service, and the Safety of Life Service, the Public Regulated Service (PRS) is an encrypted navigation service designed to be resistant to involuntary interference and spoofing. With increased user involvement, new procurements to support the PRS user segment, and enhanced services all in the pipeline, the future of the PRS looks bright.

Speaking at the Munich Satellite Navigation Conference at the end of March, Dr Friedrich Teichmann, Director of the Geospatial Institute of the Austrian Armed Forces noted that, thanks to Galileo, accuracy is no longer an issue. “Now the key issues are robustness and security,” he said.

These are precisely the issues that the Public Regulated Service aims to address. A key difference between the PRS and the other Galileo services is that the PRS ensures continuity of service to authorised users when access to other navigation services is denied, PRS Service

Manager at the European GNSS Agency (GSA) Charles Villie explained at the Munich summit. “In the event of malicious interference, the PRS increases the likelihood of the availability of the signal in space, in this way it provides a solution that is more robust to spoofing,” he said.

Meeting PRS user needs

Villie noted that the GSA is actively contributing to the development of all areas of the PRS user segment, ensuring that user needs are met and supporting the widespread and secure use of the PRS. This support is already delivering results. Villie highlighted in particular the development of the P3RS2 pre-operational PRS receiver - one of the first such receivers approved by the European Council. “This is one of the main successes of the year,” he said.

Read this: GSA opens new GSMC invitation to tenders

“This approval means that the receiver can be operated in the field. Based on this, we have started to launch joint test activities covering 90% of PRS participants in Europe, grouped in three independent consortia. This will improve the provision of PRS service to users,” he said.

Supporting ‘blue light’ operations

Speaking from the point of view of a PRS user, Ronald Nippold from the Institute of Transportation Systems, German Aerospace Centre (DLR) said that DLR is not only developing PRS algorithms, but also applying them to the real world. One such real-world use case is the HALI project, which targets traffic signal control for emergency vehicles. The project came about due to the fact that the risk of accidents for ‘blue light’ operations involving emergency vehicles is eight to 10 times higher than for regular vehicles, Nippold said.

“Using accurate positioning information for emergency vehicles, the project is able to activate traffic lights in such a way as to facilitate travel for these vehicles, making it safer and allowing them to reach an emergency faster,” he said, adding that the project is examining the impact that the system has on traffic and is generating knowledge related to security procedures when handling PRS hardware in the real world.

Looking to the future

Nippold said that field tests with three police vehicles and three fire engines would start in the coming months and that it was planned to start field tests using PRS signals over the summer, with evaluation and publication of the final results scheduled for the autumn.

Looking to the year ahead, Villie said that the GSA would continue to support the execution of the joint test activities and coordinate the distribution of PRS hardware, including the P3RS2 receiver. He also said that new PRS invitations to tender would be published, supporting the manufacture of PRS devices.

“The next generation PRS – the PRS Enhanced Service – will also be prepared, and all of this work will be supported by awareness raising activities, particularly regarding the pre-operational receivers,” Villie said, adding: “The future of PRS is looking bright.”

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The PRS ensures continuity of service to authorised users when access to other navigation services is denied.

PRS – the future is bright!

23.4.2019 13:58  
The PRS ensures continuity of service to authorised users when access to other navigation services is denied.
Published: 
23 April 2019

One of the four Galileo services, along with the Open Service, High Accuracy Service, and the Safety of Life Service, the Public Regulated Service (PRS) is an encrypted navigation service designed to be resistant to involuntary interference and spoofing. With increased user involvement, new procurements to support the PRS user segment, and enhanced services all in the pipeline, the future of the PRS looks bright.

Speaking at the Munich Satellite Navigation Conference at the end of March, Dr Friedrich Teichmann, Director of the Geospatial Institute of the Austrian Armed Forces noted that, thanks to Galileo, accuracy is no longer an issue. “Now the key issues are robustness and security,” he said.

These are precisely the issues that the Public Regulated Service aims to address. A key difference between the PRS and the other Galileo services is that the PRS ensures continuity of service to authorised users when access to other navigation services is denied, PRS ServiceManager at the European GNSS Agency (GSA) Charles Villie explained at the Munich summit. “In the event of malicious interference, the PRS increases the likelihood of the availability of the signal in space, in this way it provides a solution that is more robust to spoofing,” he said.

Meeting PRS user needs

Villie noted that the GSA is actively contributing to the development of all areas of the PRS user segment, ensuring that user needs are met and supporting the widespread and secure use of the PRS. This support is already delivering results. Villie highlighted in particular the development of the P3RS2 pre-operational PRS receiver - one of the first such receivers approved by the European Council. “This is one of the main successes of the year,” he said.

Read this: GSA opens new GSMC invitation to tenders

“This approval means that the receiver can be operated in the field. Based on this, we have started to launch joint test activities covering 90% of PRS participants in Europe, grouped in three independent consortia. This will improve the provision of PRS service to users,” he said.

Supporting ‘blue light’ operations

Speaking from the point of view of a PRS user, Ronald Nippold from the Institute of Transportation Systems, German Aerospace Centre (DLR) said that DLR is not only developing PRS algorithms, but also applying them to the real world. One such real-world use case is the HALI project, which targets traffic signal control for emergency vehicles. The project came about due to the fact that the risk of accidents for ‘blue light’ operations involving emergency vehicles is eight to 10 times higher than for regular vehicles, Nippold said.

“Using accurate positioning information for emergency vehicles, the project is able to activate traffic lights in such a way as to facilitate travel for these vehicles, making it safer and allowing them to reach an emergency faster,” he said, adding that the project is examining the impact that the system has on traffic and is generating knowledge related to security procedures when handling PRS hardware in the real world.

Looking to the future

Nippold said that field tests with three police vehicles and three fire engines would start in the coming months and that it was planned to start field tests using PRS signals over the summer, with evaluation and publication of the final results scheduled for the autumn.

Looking to the year ahead, Villie said that the GSA would continue to support the execution of the joint test activities and coordinate the distribution of PRS hardware, including the P3RS2 receiver. He also said that new PRS invitations to tender would be published, supporting the manufacture of PRS devices.

“The next generation PRS – the PRS Enhanced Service – will also be prepared, and all of this work will be supported by awareness raising activities, particularly regarding the pre-operational receivers,” Villie said, adding: “The future of PRS is looking bright.”

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The PRS ensures continuity of service to authorised users when access to other navigation services is denied.

PRS – the future is bright!

23.4.2019 13:58  
The PRS ensures continuity of service to authorised users when access to other navigation services is denied.
Published: 
23 April 2019

One of the four Galileo services, along with the Open Service, High Accuracy Service, and the Safety of Life Service, the Public Regulated Service (PRS) is an encrypted navigation service designed to be resistant to involuntary interference and spoofing. With increased user involvement, new procurements to support the PRS user segment, and enhanced services all in the pipeline, the future of the PRS looks bright.

Speaking at the Munich Satellite Navigation Conference at the end of March, Dr Friedrich Teichmann, Director of the Geospatial Institute of the Austrian Armed Forces noted that, thanks to Galileo, accuracy is no longer an issue. “Now the key issues are robustness and security,” he said.

These are precisely the issues that the Public Regulated Service aims to address. A key difference between the PRS and the other Galileo services is that the PRS ensures continuity of service to authorised users when access to other navigation services is denied, PRS Service Manager at the European GNSS Agency (GSA) Charles Villie explained at the Munich summit. “In the event of malicious interference, the PRS increases the likelihood of the availability of the signal in space, in this way it provides a solution that is more robust to spoofing,” he said.

Meeting PRS user needs

Villie noted that the GSA is actively contributing to the development of all areas of the PRS user segment, ensuring that user needs are met and supporting the widespread and secure use of the PRS. This support is already delivering results. Villie highlighted in particular the development of the P3RS2 pre-operational PRS receiver - one of the first such receivers approved by the European Council. “This is one of the main successes of the year,” he said.

Read this: GSA opens new GSMC invitation to tenders

“This approval means that the receiver can be operated in the field. Based on this, we have started to launch joint test activities covering 90% of PRS participants in Europe, grouped in three independent consortia. This will improve the provision of PRS service to users,” he said.

Supporting ‘blue light’ operations

Speaking from the point of view of a PRS user, Ronald Nippold from the Institute of Transportation Systems, German Aerospace Centre (DLR) said that DLR is not only developing PRS algorithms, but also applying them to the real world. One such real-world use case is the HALI project, which targets traffic signal control for emergency vehicles. The project came about due to the fact that the risk of accidents for ‘blue light’ operations involving emergency vehicles is eight to 10 times higher than for regular vehicles, Nippold said.

“Using accurate positioning information for emergency vehicles, the project is able to activate traffic lights in such a way as to facilitate travel for these vehicles, making it safer and allowing them to reach an emergency faster,” he said, adding that the project is examining the impact that the system has on traffic and is generating knowledge related to security procedures when handling PRS hardware in the real world.

Looking to the future

Nippold said that field tests with three police vehicles and three fire engines would start in the coming months and that it was planned to start field tests using PRS signals over the summer, with evaluation and publication of the final results scheduled for the autumn.

Looking to the year ahead, Villie said that the GSA would continue to support the execution of the joint test activities and coordinate the distribution of PRS hardware, including the P3RS2 receiver. He also said that new PRS invitations to tender would be published, supporting the manufacture of PRS devices.

“The next generation PRS – the PRS Enhanced Service – will also be prepared, and all of this work will be supported by awareness raising activities, particularly regarding the pre-operational receivers,” Villie said, adding: “The future of PRS is looking bright.”

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The PRS ensures continuity of service to authorised users when access to other navigation services is denied.

EMT Madrid announces readiness to Galileo in all the metropolitan bus fleet

19.4.2019 9:31  
Galileo accuracy is helping EMT Madrid to improve their services.
Published: 
19 April 2019

The city of Madrid is one of the first utilising Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) in conjunction with enhanced positioning services, in order to improve public transport services in the Spanish capital.

Recent innovations and improvements include updating the positioning on-board units in public buses, which allows for the communication of the exact position of buses, thus enabling commuters to plan their journeys and for public transport timings to be more accurate. Amongst others, these receivers use signals from EGNOS and Galileo, the European Global Navigation Satellite System, which has allowed the “Empresa Municipal de Transportes de Madrid” (EMT Madrid) to improve their bus positioning services.

EMT is a public limited company owned by Madrid City Council, and is responsible for the network of buses and bicycle sharing service available in the Spanish capital. The company forms part of the Madrid Regional Transport Consortium, the commissioned authority that undertakes the planning of public transport in Madrid.

Improved positioning

EMT fleet has been undergoing the biggest historic renovation of its bus fleet since 2016. Improved positioning information on the 2,050 buses in the EMT Madrid network is invaluable, and forms part of the innovative use of ITS employed by the company, which is recognised and respected on an international level. The addition of improved positioning has elevated the fleet, one of the most modern in Europe and that boasts universal accessibility for both wheelchair using passengers and those with reduced mobility, to a new level. From now on, Galileo will serve to 420 million users per year.

“It is encouraging to see major public transport operators starting to use Galileo services and for European citizens to be able to benefit directly from improved positioning on their daily commutes” said Daniel Lopour, Market Development Officer from the GSA

Public mobility pioneer

The company has already been pioneering the use of other technologies within transport including operational support systems, driving simulations, CCTV, WiFi, information systems, Open Data, eco driving and more. As part of its pioneering attitude, the entire fleet will go ‘eco’ (both zero and low emission) by the end of 2020.

Read this: Satellite positioning is changing how we move

All of these ITS systems rely on positioning data, which has now become much more precise thanks to Galileo services. With the help of Galileo, advanced implementation of ITS is now becoming a reality for transport and mobility companies.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Galileo accuracy is helping EMT Madrid to improve their services.

EP endorses provisional agreement on EU Space Programme

18.4.2019 11:54  
The new EU Space Programme will foster a strong and innovative space industry in Europe.
Published: 
18 April 2019

In a vote on 17 April 2019, the European Parliament endorsed a provisional agreement reached by co-legislators on the EU Space Programme for the 2021-2027 budget period. The agreement passed by a large majority, with 560 votes in favour, 63 against and 32 abstentions.

In June 2018, the European Commission proposed the new EUR 16-billion EU Space Programme to help maintain and further enhance the EU's leadership in space. The Commission's proposal brings all existing and new space activities under the umbrella of a single programme and will foster a strong and innovative space industry in Europe.

Elżbieta Bieńkowska, Commissioner for the Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs, welcomed the vote. “Space technology, data and services have become indispensable in the daily lives of Europeans and for Europe to pursue its strategic interests. We therefore need to ensure continuity and financial stability in our space activities,” she said.

Watch this: European Space Programmes: Supporting European Jobs

“The new EU Space Programme will not only do that, but also address global challenges, such as fighting climate change, a transition to a low-carbon economy, smart mobility and digital economy,” the Commissioner said, adding that more would be invested in space activities to adapt to new needs and technologies, while reinforcing Europe's autonomous and secure access to space.

Benefitting Europe’s economy and citizens

European GNSS Agency (GSA) Executive Director Carlo des Dorides also welcomed the European Parliament vote. “With this vote the European Parliament has given a clear message about the importance of the space sector for the European economy and a sign of trust towards the GSA. The Space Programme for the next budget period will provide continuity of investment in space, ensuring that the EU continues to lead the way in space-based innovation,” he said.

“At the GSA we remain committed to ensuring that every euro invested in space delivers the greatest possible return in terms of benefits for Europe’s economy and its citizens. We are ready to make available the invaluable experience gained over the years with EGNOS and Galileo to other new EU space programmes,” des Dorides said.

Commissioner Bieńkowska also highlighted the importance of space for the European economy. “Europe's space industry is the second largest in the world, and its space-enabled services fuel a steadily increasing 6-9% of our economy. The EU Space Programme will be key to keep this trend going,” she said.

The Commissioner cited Copernicus and Galileo as “two successful EU space programmes that already improve the lives of citizens and business in Europe and beyond,” adding that, with its vote, the European Parliament had sent a clear signal to the space sector that these flagship projects would continue to prosper and evolve towards new services.

And this: European Space Programmes: Increasing EU Influence

“With the new Space Programme we also introduce new security-related space initiatives: space and situational awareness (SSA) and Governmental Satellite Communication (GOVSATCOM). We will also put the European space sector in a better position to react to the ongoing changes the space sector is undergoing worldwide,” she said, adding: “In particular, we will support a European ‘New Space' approach with innovative start-ups, reliable and cost-effective European launch solutions and increased European technological autonomy.”

“Space matters for Europe,” the Commissioner said.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The new EU Space Programme will foster a strong and innovative space industry in Europe.

Satellites and the City

17.4.2019 14:29  
GNSS underpins many smart city applications in its own right and enables other smart city technologies
Published: 
17 April 2019

As urban populations grow, cities will have to become smarter to provide the same level of services to their residents, while tackling growing environmental and logistical challenges. A dedicated session at the recent Munich Satellite Navigation Summit discussed the future needs of smart cities and how synergies between GNSS and other emerging technologies support the applications that will meet these needs.

Modern society is already totally dependent on GNSS, and this dependence is set to increase as the world’s cities strive to become smarter to meet the demands of their growing populations. In his presentation at the Munich summit, Dr Igancio Fernandez-Hernandez, Galileo Authentication and High Accuracy Service Manager at the European Commission, highlighted some of the challenges ahead.

“According to some estimates, in the coming decades 75% of the world’s population will live in cities, so cities will need to become smarter,” he said, adding that, with smart technology targeting IT connectivity, water and waste management, electricity grids, transport and mobility, and citizen participation, cities will be able to improve people’s lives and the urban environment. “GNSS contributes to all of these solutions,” he said.

Underpinning smart city networks

“GNSS timing is essential for the synchronisation of communications networks and smart power grids and positioning is essential for the geolocation of transmitters. Essentially, all of the networks that underpin the smart city depend to one extent or another on GNSS,” Fernandez-Hernandez said.

Read this: Galileo provides boost to smart transport systems

However, GNSS will not have to bear this burden alone. Miguel Mantiega Bautista, GNSS Evolutions Programme Manager at the European Space Agency, who moderated the session, said that interoperability between systems will be crucial to meet the future requirements of smart cities.

Likewise, Fernandez-Hernandez described GNSS as one technology among many. “But it is nevertheless an essential element of the smart city, as the location of physical assets and the synchronisation of signals in various smart applications are all underpinned by GNSS,” he said.

Fernandez-Hernandez stressed that, as our dependence on GNSS increases, it becomes more important to have redundancy and regional independence and better signal availability in cities. “Galileo brings this. It brings more independence, redundancy, accuracy and security to smart cities,” he said.

Roberto Prieto Cerderia, GNSS Evolutions R&D Principal Engineer at the European Space Agency in Noordwijk, the Netherlands noted that GNSS in combination with 5G will provide the synergy that urban areas need. He said that GNSS will not only complement 5G in supporting smart city applications, GNSS is also an enabler of 5G, supporting network synchronisation and, in particular, meeting the stringent timing requirements for aspects such as massive mining.

Three technology pillars

European GNSS Agency (GSA) Market Development Officer Reinhard Blasi noted that that the vast majority of data supporting smart applications contains a location component. He said that smart cities are built on three technology pillars – ubiquitous location, ubiquitous sensing and ubiquitous communications.

“The role of GNSS is different for each pillar – for location it obviously plays a key role, but GNSS also provides critical services for the sensing and communications pillars, with timestamping of sensor data and synchronization of communications networks,” he said.

And this: European GNSS and the environment

Likewise, GNSS plays a role in all the major technology trends and emerging apps within the smart city, from the Internet of Things and augmented reality, to autonomous cars, drones and Mobility as a Service (MaaS). “The reality today is multi-constellation, multi-frequency, high accuracy,” he said, adding that Galileo brings all of these to the table.

Looking to the future, Blasi outlined some of the things on the table for the next generation of Galileo that can support the smart cities of 2030 and later. These include features such as new signals, high accuracy services including real integrity, an Emergency Warning System, increased robustness supported by ARAIM deployment beyond aviation, chipsets with very low energy per fix, and hybrid 5G-GNSS PNT.

Dr Bruno Bougard, R&D Director at Septentrio said that 5G and high accuracy GNSS complement each other perfectly and bring the assured and accurate positioning needed for smart mobility. “The challenge is to make them work together seamlessly,” he said.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

GNSS underpins many smart city applications in its own right and enables other smart city technologies

KAUST wins GSA Special Prize at ERL Emergency Local Tournament 2019

16.4.2019 11:53  
The winning KAUST team at the ERL Emergency Local Tournament in Seville.
Published: 
16 April 2019

A team from the Robotics, Intelligent Systems, and Control (RISC) lab at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia were the lucky winners of the GSA Special Prize at this year’s ERL Emergency Local Tournament, which took place in the fields surrounding the ‘Hacienda de Oran’ in Seville on 18-23 February.

The ERL Emergency Service Robots is a Horizon 2020-funded civilian robotics competition that promotes the development of multi-domain robotic systems for emergency response within the robotics community. The competition requires international teams to survey a scene, collect data, search for specific elements and identify critical hazards, all in a race against the clock.

On February 18-23, teams from international universities and research centres met in Seville to participate in the second ERL Local Tournament, hosted by the Advanced Centre for Aerospace Technologies (CATEC). At the competition, teams of engineers and scientists linked to robotics and unmanned systems presented their latest innovations in the application of these technologies in emergency situations, such as rescue operations, firefighting or natural disasters.

“CATEC was responsible for hosting and organizing this international competition, which was held for the first time in Spain, thanks to its leadership and experience in the development of new technological applications in this field,” said Dr Francisco Javier Pérez Grau, Head of the CATEC Perception & Software Unit. “This event has once again made Andalusia a benchmark for applied research and new innovative developments in robotics and unmanned systems, with a view to their real application in the market.”

A rewarding experience

The GSA special prize targeted robots that make use of solutions based on Galileo and EGNOS. For air robots, the challenge involved both horizontal accuracy in landings and vertical accuracy while hovering at specific geographic coordinates. Land robots were judged on horizontal accuracy during waypoint-based navigation.

The KAUST team, with principal investigator Prof. Jeff Shamma, participated in the air robot challenge and found the experience to be very rewarding. “I am very happy that we made the effort to take part in the tournament. On a personal level it was a very enjoyable experience. But it was also extremely rewarding on a technical level, as the team gained valuable experience in quickly resolving complex problems in the field,” said team leader Kuat Telegenov. “Even preparations for the event were rewarding – as we had to think outside the box to deal with all the issues that arose.”

He said that, initially, the team wasn’t sure if they would participate, because they didn’t have a Galileo-enabled receiver. “But we checked on the UseGalileo.eu website to see which receivers we could use and, in the end, went with a u-blox MAX-M8.”

The team acknowledged the edge that they received from Galileo in terms of accuracy. “We hit our waypoints with an accuracy of around 2.2 meters. We believe that, with GPS alone the accuracy would be about 2.5-3 meters, so we had a significant accuracy gain from Galileo,” Telegenov said.

Prize partnership

For its Special Prize, the GSA partnered with GNSS receiver manufacturer Septentrio, which offered an AsteRx-i S receiver to the winning team. With its size, weight and power consumption, the AsteRx-i S is ideal for applications such as inspection with UAV's, UAS photogrammetry, automation, robotics and logistics.

“Septentrio is proud to support the ERL emergency 2019 competition,” said Septentrio Product Manager Francesca Clemente. “We are driven by a strong customer focus and deep understanding of applications and use cases. Our professional products are not only able to provide reliable and precise positioning but are also easy to integrate and utilise thanks to intuitive web UI, tools and interfaces,” she said, adding: “This makes it ideal for young university teams where performance and ease of use are key to develop new solution in a short time.”

“We congratulate the winning team and we are eager to see the AsteRx-i S integrated their innovative robotics and unmanned solutions!”

About the tournament

The European Robotics League (ERL) is an innovative robot competition that stems from its predecessors - the euRathlon and RoCKIn competitions - and focuses on tasks that robots must execute in realistic emergency situations. The competition is composed of multiple local tournaments, held in different locations across Europe, in addition to a number of major events.

Teams participate in a minimum of two tournaments (local and/or major) per year and get scores based on their performances. Each team’s top two tournament scores are then added together and the teams are ranked based on their cumulative score. Prizes for the top teams are awarded at the following year’s European Robotics Forum (ERF).

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The winning KAUST team at the ERL Emergency Local Tournament in Seville.

KAUST wins GSA Special Prize at ERL Emergency Local Tournament 2019

16.4.2019 11:53  
The winning KAUST team at the ERL Emergency Local Tournament in Seville.
Published: 
16 April 2019

A team from the Robotics, Intelligent Systems, and Control (RISC) lab at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia were the lucky winners of the GSA Special Prize at this year’s ERL Emergency Local Tournament, which took place in the fields surrounding the ‘Hacienda de Oran’ in Seville on 18-23 March.

The ERL Emergency Service Robots is a Horizon 2020-funded civilian robotics competition that promotes the development of multi-domain robotic systems for emergency response within the robotics community. The competition requires international teams to survey a scene, collect data, search for specific elements and identify critical hazards, all in a race against the clock.

On March 18-23, teams from international universities and research centres met in Seville to participate in the second ERL Local Tournament, hosted by the Advanced Centre for Aerospace Technologies (CATEC). At the competition, teams of engineers and scientists linked to robotics and unmanned systems presented their latest innovations in the application of these technologies in emergency situations, such as rescue operations, firefighting or natural disasters.

“CATEC was responsible for hosting and organizing this international competition, which was held for the first time in Spain, thanks to its leadership and experience in the development of new technological applications in this field,” said Dr Francisco Javier Pérez Grau, Head of the CATEC Perception & Software Unit. “This event has once again made Andalusia a benchmark for applied research and new innovative developments in robotics and unmanned systems, with a view to their real application in the market.”

A rewarding experience

The GSA special prize targeted robots that make use of solutions based on Galileo and EGNOS. For air robots, the challenge involved both horizontal accuracy in landings and vertical accuracy while hovering at specific geographic coordinates. Land robots were judged on horizontal accuracy during waypoint-based navigation.

The KAUST team, with principal investigator Prof. Jeff Shamma, participated in the air robot challenge and found the experience to be very rewarding. “I am very happy that we made the effort to take part in the tournament. On a personal level it was a very enjoyable experience. But it was also extremely rewarding on a technical level, as the team gained valuable experience in quickly resolving complex problems in the field,” said team leader Kuat Telegenov. “Even preparations for the event were rewarding – as we had to think outside the box to deal with all the issues that arose.”

He said that, initially, the team wasn’t sure if they would participate, because they didn’t have a Galileo-enabled receiver. “But we checked on the UseGalileo.eu website to see which receivers we could use and, in the end, went with a u-blox MAX-M8.”

The team acknowledged the edge that they received from Galileo in terms of accuracy. “We hit our waypoints with an accuracy of around 2.2 meters. We believe that, with GPS alone the accuracy would be about 2.5-3 meters, so we had a significant accuracy gain from Galileo,” Telegenov said.

Prize partnership

For its Special Prize, the GSA partnered with GNSS receiver manufacturer Septentrio, which offered an AsteRx-i S receiver to the winning team. With its size, weight and power consumption, the AsteRx-i S is ideal for applications such as inspection with UAV's, UAS photogrammetry, automation, robotics and logistics.

“Septentrio is proud to support the ERL emergency 2019 competition,” said Septentrio Product Manager Francesca Clemente. “We are driven by a strong customer focus and deep understanding of applications and use cases. Our professional products are not only able to provide reliable and precise positioning but are also easy to integrate and utilise thanks to intuitive web UI, tools and interfaces,” she said, adding: “This makes it ideal for young university teams where performance and ease of use are key to develop new solution in a short time.”

“We congratulate the winning team and we are eager to see the AsteRx-i S integrated their innovative robotics and unmanned solutions!”

About the tournament

The European Robotics League (ERL) is an innovative robot competition that stems from its predecessors - the euRathlon and RoCKIn competitions - and focuses on tasks that robots must execute in realistic emergency situations. The competition is composed of multiple local tournaments, held in different locations across Europe, in addition to a number of major events.

Teams participate in a minimum of two tournaments (local and/or major) per year and get scores based on their performances. Each team’s top two tournament scores are then added together and the teams are ranked based on their cumulative score. Prizes for the top teams are awarded at the following year’s European Robotics Forum (ERF).

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The winning KAUST team at the ERL Emergency Local Tournament in Seville.

Invitation to tender: EGNOS service for payment and liability-critical applications in the road sector

15.4.2019 10:53  
Published: 
15 April 2019

 

Under what conditions would it be beneficial to implement an EGNOS service for payment and liability critical applications in the road sector in the 2025-2035 timeframe?

EGNOS is the European SBAS and augments GPS L1 C/A civilian signal by providing corrections and integrity information for positioning and navigation applications over Europe. The next generation of EGNOS, EGNOS V3, will augment GPS and Galileo constellations in the L1 and L5 bands and will extend the service area to the entire landmasses of EU member states.

This project aims at assessing under what conditions it would be beneficial to implement an EGNOS V3 service for payment and liability critical applications in the road sector until 2035.

Pay-as-you-drive (PAYD) and pay-how-you-drive (PHYD) insurances are emerging applications in the road sector that rely on how much, where, when and how the road user drives to tailor the premiums paid by the policyholder. Other road applications such as reconstruction of accidents, mobility as a service, traffic infraction monitoring and fine management, traffic congestion monitoring, automatic charging in car parks, etc. may also in the future rely on the vehicle’s position and navigation data to offer services to car drivers.

Liability and payment-critical applications such as the ones described above are highly sensitive to undetected GNSS underperformance, non-availability or large errors since significant legal or economic consequences for the service or application provider may occur. In fact, a mismatch of the vehicle’s current speed together with erroneous position data may impact the user charging associated with the driving paths, skills and habits of the road user. Afterwards, it becomes very difficult for end users to claim that they are being overcharged or for service providers to avoid undercharging their customers.

The analysis shall focus on the identification of user and service requirements, the development of an appropriate integrity concept and the definition of the service provision scheme. The On-Board Unit (OBU) shall integrate the E-GNSS receiver together with other sensors necessary to trust the position in situations where enforcement, payments and related claims are involved.

The study will be fully financed by the European Commission under the H2020 framework programme for research and innovation, within the budget allocated to the evolution of EGNOS mission. The European GNSS Agency (GSA) will be in charge of the technical supervision of the project on behalf of the European Commission.

More information about the Invitation to tender can be found here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Last Galileo IS OS & SAR Performance Reports of 2018 available!

11.4.2019 16:16  
Both the Initial Open Service and the SAR Service performance figures generally exceed the MPL targets in Q4-2018.
Published: 
11 April 2019

OS and SAR Service Performance Reports for the last quarter of 2018 (covering October, November and December) have been published on the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) web portal.

The Galileo Open Service (OS) and Search and Rescue (SAR) Service Quarterly Performance Reports for the last quarter of 2018 are available in the Electronic Library, under the Performance Reports section, providing the status of the Galileo constellation and the achieved performance over the reporting period (October, November and December 2018).

These quarterly reports provide the public with the latest information on the Galileo OS and SAR/Galileo Initial Services measured performance statistics with respect to their Minimum Performance Levels (MPLs), as declared in their respective Galileo Service Definition Documents (OS - SDD and SAR - SDD) in particular, on parameters such as:

  • For Open Service: Initial Ranging Performance, Galileo to GPS Time Offset (GGTO) determination performance, Galileo Positioning Performance, the Timely Publication of NAGUs;
  • For SAR Service: Detection and Location Performance and Infrastructure Availability Performance.

Highlights from Q4-2018 on Galileo Open Service and SAR Service:

As in previous periods, the measured Galileo OS and SAR Service performance figures comfortably exceeded their MPL thresholds.

Some highlights from the Q4-2018 performance reports:

Open Service (see Performance Report)

  • The Availability of both the Galileo Ranging Service at the Worst User Location (WUL) and the Healthy Signal were significantly better than the MPLs (all above the MPL target of 87%). In particular, in the fourth quarter the first of these reached a monthly value of 100% during October and December.
  • The Galileo UTC Determination Service Availability reached a monthly value of 100% during October and December, and 98.92% in November, comfortably exceeding the MPL target of 87% (despite the event covered in NAGU #2018027). Moreover, the GGTO Determination Availability comfortably exceeded the MPL target over the three months (98.59% in October and 98.24% in both November and December; all values were well above the MPL target of 80%).
  • The target MPLs for Publishing NAGUs were met both for Planned (publication at least 24 hours before the start of a scheduled event) and Unplanned (publication no more than 72 hours after an unscheduled event starts) events. A total of 11 NAGUs were published on the GSC web portal in the reporting period.

SAR Service (see Performance Report)

  • Detection Service Probability for each of the Reference Beacons (REFBE) every month was above the MPL target (which is 99%).
  • Both the single and multi-burst Location Probabilities for each REFBE were, in all cases, well above the MPLs (which are 75% and 98%, respectively).
  • SAR Service Infrastructure Performance is measured by the following figures: Availability of the SAR/Galileo Ground Segment, SAR/Galileo Space Segment and SAR/Galileo Server. In the particular case of the Ground Segment availability, all EU MEOLUT Local Facilities show long-term normalised “Nominal” mode availability performance better than the MPL target (specified at 95%), achieving in December 2018 the values: 96.8%, 98.6% and 98.3%, for Larnaca, Maspalomas and Spitsbergen respectively.

For the most up-to-date information on the Galileo system and constellation, visit the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) website, in particular, the Galileo constellation status section. For an exhaustive description of the Minimum Performance Levels (MPLs), refer to the Galileo OS SDD.

For more details on Galileo performance and its Services, do not hesitate to contact the Galileo Help Desk. Moreover, if you wish to receive NAGUs automatically, please, register on the GSC web portal.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Both the Initial Open Service and the SAR Service performance figures generally exceed the MPL targets in Q4-2018.

Invitation to tender: EGNOS service for payment and liability-critical applications in the road sector

11.4.2019 15:53  
Published: 
15 April 2019

Under what conditions would it be beneficial to implement an EGNOS service for payment and liability critical applications in the road sector in the 2025-2035 timeframe?

EGNOS is the European SBAS and augments GPS L1 C/A civilian signal by providing corrections and integrity information for positioning and navigation applications over Europe. The next generation of EGNOS, EGNOS V3, will augment GPS and Galileo constellations in the L1 and L5 bands and will extend the service area to the entire landmasses of EU member states.

This project aims at assessing under what conditions it would be beneficial to implement an EGNOS V3 service for payment and liability critical applications in the road sector until 2035.

Pay-as-you-drive (PAYD) and pay-how-you-drive (PHYD) insurances are emerging applications in the road sector that rely on how much, where, when and how the road user drives to tailor the premiums paid by the policyholder. Other road applications such as reconstruction of accidents, mobility as a service, traffic infraction monitoring and fine management, traffic congestion monitoring, automatic charging in car parks, etc. may also in the future rely on the vehicle’s position and navigation data to offer services to car drivers.

Liability and payment-critical applications such as the ones described above are highly sensitive to undetected GNSS underperformance, non-availability or large errors since significant legal or economic consequences for the service or application provider may occur. In fact, a mismatch of the vehicle’s current speed together with erroneous position data may impact the user charging associated with the driving paths, skills and habits of the road user. Afterwards, it becomes very difficult for end users to claim that they are being overcharged or for service providers to avoid undercharging their customers.

The analysis shall focus on the identification of user and service requirements, the development of an appropriate integrity concept and the definition of the service provision scheme. The On-Board Unit (OBU) shall integrate the E-GNSS receiver together with other sensors necessary to trust the position in situations where enforcement, payments and related claims are involved.

The study will be fully financed by the European Commission under the H2020 framework programme for research and innovation, within the budget allocated to the evolution of EGNOS mission. The European GNSS Agency (GSA) will be in charge of the technical supervision of the project on behalf of the European Commission.

More information about the Invitation to tender can be found here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Galileo and EGNOS easing road toll interoperability

9.4.2019 13:14  
EGNOS and Galileo are already activated in the majority of GNSS-enabled on-board units for tolling of HGVs in Europe today.
Published: 
09 April 2019

Lack of interoperability is a significant issue in electronic road tolling systems. These systems need to be reliable, user friendly, and cost-efficient to enable the development and implementation of fair road-charging policies and to cope with future technical developments. A significant step forward for interoperability at EU level has been made with the publication in March of a new European Directive on the interoperability of electronic road tolling systems and the European GNSS (Galileo and EGNOS) is slated to play a major role.

Lower costs for European Electronic Toll Service (EETS) operators mean that charges can be lower, more traffic will flow on toll roads and/or more fees can be raised to improve road infrastructure; bringing benefits for operators, users and the public economy.
Interoperability of tolling systems also makes sense in terms of usability, with drivers able to seamlessly switch from one road-pricing scheme to another as easily as they ‘roam’ across borders on mobile phone networks.

Read this: Satellite positioning is changing how we move

The new EU Directive 2019/520 lays down the conditions necessary to ensure the interoperability of electronic road toll systems across the entire European Union road network, including urban and interurban motorways, major and minor roads, and other road infrastructure such as tunnels or bridges, and ferries. It will also facilitate the cross-border exchange of vehicle registration data to ensure collection of any road tolls due.

Toll technology choices

For all new electronic road toll systems that require the installation or use of an on-board unit (OBU) to carry out electronic toll transactions, the Directive stipulates the use of one or more specified technologies: satellite positioning, mobile communications, or 5.8 GHz microwave technology.

Any existing electronic road toll system that requires the installation or use of an OBU will also need to adopt one or more of these technologies if substantial technological improvements are carried out to the system.

In addition, any OBU using satellite positioning technology and placed on the market after 19 October 2021 will need to be compatible with the European GNSS positioning services provided by Galileo and EGNOS.

Watch this: European Space Programmes - Strengthening Internal Markets

In fact, EGNOS and Galileo are already activated in over 70% and 60%, respectively, of GNSS-enabled on-board units for tolling of heavy goods vehicles (HGVs) in Europe today.

Powerful solution

GNSS represents a powerful solution to many of the challenges of today’s road tolling operators, who need to know who is on a given road, for how long and over what distance – all with a very high degree of accuracy and reliability.

In terms of the total cost of implementation, GNSS-based solutions are much more flexible and cheaper in the long term, allowing operators to modify virtually instantaneously which road segments are covered. This way they can easily enlarge or reduce charging schemes, if and when needed, ultimately optimizing traffic and improving the efficiency of road transport.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

EGNOS and Galileo are already activated in the majority of GNSS-enabled on-board units for tolling of HGVs in Europe today.

Augment your reality with GNSS

9.4.2019 11:39  
The GSA’s Fiammetta Diani (centre) told the conference that GNSS is ready to meet augmented reality’s needs in terms of ubiquity, accuracy and security.
Published: 
09 April 2019

Augmented reality is becoming increasingly widespread, with a variety of professional and leisure applications using digital content to complement and augment the physical world, and many augmented reality software developers are taking advantage of GNSS high-accuracy for their localisation needs. A session at the Munich Satellite Navigation Summit at the end of March discussed the challenges of combining these two technologies.

Augmented reality is a major emerging trend, the societal impact of which will be increasingly felt in the coming years. “When we look at the forecasts for augmented reality, we expect 50% growth over the next two to three years,” said Dr Philipp Rauschnabel, Professor for Digital Marketing and Media Innovation at the Bundeswehr University Munich.

Rauschnabel noted that augmented reality can create significant value for companies in a number of ways, through new AR-enabled business models, in the marketing sphere, and in industrial production, maintenance and training, where AR solutions can make processes more efficient.

Scan the world with GNSS

In his presentation, Darius Pajouh, Managing Director of computer vision company Visualix, stressed the essential contribution of positioning to augmented reality applications. “Visual mapping and localisation are the key technologies that original equipment manufacturers use to create shared experiences,” he said.

Read this: Helping the visually impaired explore the outdoors

Pajouh noted that, as the technology is still relatively new, not all the use cases are totally clear yet. One thing that is clear, however, is the size of the potential market. “The market is about to explode,” he said.

Visualix uses the tracking capabilities of mobile phones, like ARCore and ARKit, as well as Google glasses and other hardware, to generate a 3D model of an indoor space as a base for AR deployment in an area of up to 10,000 square meters.

The aim is that, by incorporating satellite technology, it will be possible to remove the size constraints, Pajouh said. “I am very excited about the possibility of also doing outdoor localisation and combining visual and satellite tracking to see how satellite navigation can reduce our computational load.”

Tracking user requirements

Fiammetta Diani, Head of Market Development at the European GNSS Agency (GSA), looked at the ways that GNSS can support augmented reality and how augmented reality can be an opportunity for GNSS innovators.

Diani said that the GSA met with augmented reality users last December, in the frame of the European GNSS User Consultation Platform, to discuss their requirements. At the meeting, users categorised use cases in two streams - leisure and professional, with applications targeting travel and tourism, live sporting events, and augmented navigation for assisted driving. Professional use cases included industrial design and architecture.

“These augmented reality applications have three main requirements - ubiquity, accuracy and security,” Diani said, adding that accuracy requirements vary – for some applications, accuracy of one to two metres is sufficient, while others require decimetre or even centimetre accuracy, in addition to protection against spoofing.

And this: LBS user requirements highlighted in GSA special report

GNSS can meet these requirements, Diani said. “Firstly, the second E5/L5 frequency is already providing metre-level accuracy and many chipmakers in the professional and consumer domains are investing in dual-frequency,” she said.

GNSS driving innovation

Diani noted that in 2020 Galileo would also offer a precise point positioning (PPP) service that will give global decimetre-level accuracy free of charge. “So you will have dual-frequency accuracy to which you can add correction services. In the same timeframe we will also offer authentication, which will provide protection against spoofing. What’s more, the E5 signal also offers better multipath protection,” she said.

In this way, GNSS is ready to meet the needs of the burgeoning augmented reality segment, which is set to see record growth. “Recent market research shows that augmented reality may be the fastest growing GNSS segment, worth up to EUR 40 billion,” Diani said.

Other participants noted that GNSS not only supports augmented reality applications, but is driving innovation in the augmented reality segment. “The more accurately you can track, the more use cases there will be,” said Wolfgang Stelzle, CEO of RE’FLEKT GmbH.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GSA’s Fiammetta Diani (centre) told the conference that GNSS is ready to meet augmented reality’s needs in terms of ubiquity, accuracy and security.

Augment your reality with GNSS

9.4.2019 11:39  
The GSA’s Fiammetta Diani (centre) told the conference that GNSS is ready to meet augmented reality’s needs in terms of ubiquity, accuracy and security.
Published: 
11 April 2019

Augmented reality is becoming increasingly widespread, with a variety of professional and leisure applications using digital content to complement and augment the physical world, and many augmented reality software developers are taking advantage of GNSS high-accuracy for their localisation needs. A session at the Munich Satellite Navigation Summit at the end of March discussed the challenges of combining these two technologies.

Augmented reality is a major emerging trend, the societal impact of which will be increasingly felt in the coming years. “When we look at the forecasts for augmented reality, we expect 50% growth over the next two to three years,” said Dr Philipp Rauschnabel, Professor for Digital Marketing and Media Innovation at the Bundeswehr University Munich.

Rauschnabel noted that augmented reality can create significant value for companies in a number of ways, through new AR-enabled business models, in the marketing sphere, and in industrial production, maintenance and training, where AR solutions can make processes more efficient.

Scan the world with GNSS

In his presentation, Darius Pajouh, Managing Director of computer vision company Visualix, stressed the essential contribution of positioning to augmented reality applications. “Visual mapping and localisation are the key technologies that original equipment manufacturers use to create shared experiences,” he said.

Read this: Helping the visually impaired explore the outdoors

Pajouh noted that, as the technology is still relatively new, not all the use cases are totally clear yet. One thing that is clear, however, is the size of the potential market. “The market is about to explode,” he said.

Visualix uses the tracking capabilities of mobile phones, like ARCore and ARKit, as well as Google glasses and other hardware, to generate a 3D model of an indoor space as a base for AR deployment in an area of up to 10,000 square meters.

The aim is that, by incorporating satellite technology, it will be possible to remove the size constraints, Pajouh said. “I am very excited about the possibility of also doing outdoor localisation and combining visual and satellite tracking to see how satellite navigation can reduce our computational load.”

Tracking user requirements

Fiammetta Diani, Head of Market Development at the European GNSS Agency (GSA), looked at the ways that GNSS can support augmented reality and how augmented reality can be an opportunity for GNSS innovators.

Diani said that the GSA met with augmented reality users last December, in the frame of the European GNSS User Consultation Platform, to discuss their requirements. At the meeting, users categorised use cases in two streams - leisure and professional, with applications targeting travel and tourism, live sporting events, and augmented navigation for assisted driving. Professional use cases included industrial design and architecture.

“These augmented reality applications have three main requirements - ubiquity, accuracy and security,” Diani said, adding that accuracy requirements vary – for some applications, accuracy of one to two metres is sufficient, while others require decimetre or even centimetre accuracy, in addition to protection against spoofing.

And this: LBS user requirements highlighted in GSA special report

GNSS can meet these requirements, Diani said. “Firstly, the second E5/L5 frequency is already providing metre-level accuracy and many chipmakers in the professional and consumer domains are investing in dual-frequency,” she said.

GNSS driving innovation

Diani noted that in 2020 Galileo would also offer a precise point positioning (PPP) service that will give global decimetre-level accuracy free of charge. “So you will have dual-frequency accuracy to which you can add correction services. In the same timeframe we will also offer authentication, which will provide protection against spoofing. What’s more, the E5 signal also offers better multipath protection,” she said.

In this way, GNSS is ready to meet the needs of the burgeoning augmented reality segment, which is set to see record growth. “Recent market research shows that augmented reality may be the fastest growing GNSS segment, worth up to EUR 40 billion,” Diani said.

Other participants noted that GNSS not only supports augmented reality applications, but is driving innovation in the augmented reality segment. “The more accurately you can track, the more use cases there will be,” said Wolfgang Stelzle, CEO of RE’FLEKT GmbH.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GSA’s Fiammetta Diani (centre) told the conference that GNSS is ready to meet augmented reality’s needs in terms of ubiquity, accuracy and security.

Space4Rail: From innovation to implementation

5.4.2019 11:19  
Satellite technologies can provide scalable positioning solutions to increase rail safety, and boost capacity and efficiency.
Published: 
05 April 2019

The first Space for Innovation in Rail conference in Vienna on 18 and 19 March brought together stakeholders from the rail and space sector in a unique event to discuss the important role of satellite-based positioning technology for the future of the European rail sector. The event highlighted a portfolio of research, innovation and deployment projects being funded by the GSA and the Shift2Rail Joint Undertaking that demonstrate how satellite technologies can provide scalable positioning solutions to increase rail safety, boost capacity and efficiency, and deliver global success for advanced European technologies.

In an increasingly digitalised world, the European Global Navigation Satellite Systems Agency (GSA), the European Union Agency for Railways (ERA), and the Shift2Rail Joint Undertaking (S2R JU) are working together to explore the role of satellite technology in future railway systems. Both GSA and S2R JU have a key role in leading innovation and engaging with stakeholders, while ERA orchestrates the process from a regulatory point of view within the framework of the European Railway Traffic Management System (ERTMS).

Over the two days of the Space for Innovation in Rail event in Austria a range of projects looking to integrate satellite technologies with the rail system were presented.

Leading EU rail innovation

The STARS project (Satellite technology for Advanced Railway Signalling) was described by Peter Gurnik of AZD Praha, who was the project coordinator at the start of the project and Jose Bertolin from UNIFE who took over for the later stages. The positioning performance of GNSS is directly affected by environmental conditions that impact on the localisation function and, therefore, the overall performance of a train control system. STARS’ major objective is to fill the technology gap to allow a full implementation of GNSS in safety critical rail applications.

The project has developed a universal method for field measurement and characterisation of the rail environment including a yearlong measurement campaign. “A set of open tools has been developed that can assist rail companies to evaluate identified environmental factors,” said Bertolin. The project also links with economic aspects of GNSS within an enhanced ERTMS.

Massimiliano Ciaffi from Italian rail infrastructure manager RFI said that Italy, a pioneer in adopting ERTMS for high speed lines, has a plan to extend the ERTMS over all lines (about 16 800 km) including regional and local lines for which the ERTMS will likely be the first application in Europe.

The ERSAT (ERTMS on Satellite) initiative started in 2012 is targeting a solution to integrate GNSS positioning and public telecommunications over the ERTMS platform and consists of a portfolio of projects as the pillars of a roadmap to allow RFI a step-wise operational deployment.

The core ERSAT deployment is on the Pinerolo – Sangone line close to Turin that is representative of operational scenarios on regional lines in Italy. “The ERSAT architecture being developed is designed to be upgradable and also backward compatible to allow a fast deployment without prejudging the adoption of the latest satellite technologies,” said Ciaffi. The programme had effectively developed and verified in field satellite technology for ERTMS on a test bed in Sardinia and the objective now is to activate a first commercial line by the end of 2020. Further developments are ongoing to reduce the total cost of ownership and to use the virtual balise concept to achieve a Zero Staff Responsible Time, which will improve safety and efficiency.

Not only signalling

GNSS can also contribute to rail asset management as was demonstrated by the SIA project (System for vehicle- infrastructure Interaction Assets health status monitoring) presented by Wolfgang Zottl of ÖBB-Infrastruktur AG. The initiative is developing four ready-to-use services to provide information about the health status of four of rail’s most demanding assets in terms of maintenance: the wheels, the rails, the overhead pantograph and catenary (power wires). These new services could help to substantially reduce overall railway maintenance costs, unscheduled maintenance and derailments. Location and positioning are important data components for the system.

All four services have some common features being web-based applications using real-time information to make the ‘health assessments’ and able to integrate with current and future operational systems. “Full testing will commence in June this year,” said Zottl. “And will be based on the use of low-cost sensors to provide a cheap system that could be used on all trains.”

EGNOS leverage

A European Space Agency (ESA) funded project STEMS (System Suitability Study for Train Positioning using GNSS in ERTMS) was described by Mike Hutchinson of NSL. The project will examine how to leverage EGNOS for use in the rail sector.

“We will assess the suitability of Satellite-Based Augmentation Systems (SBAS), such as EGNOS, for acceptance by railway authorities,” said Hutchinson. “And propose a methodology for building the safety case for use in ERTMS applications.“

The project will leverage the existing investment and vast experience from the aviation sector and is based on the legacy SBAS configuration of augmenting GPS L1 signals (EGNOS V2 and V3.1).

The X2RAIL2 project aims to refine and develop four selected key technologies in the field of railway signalling and automation systems to the level of technology demonstrators. The four technologies are: Fail-Safe Train Positioning using a multi-sensor concept, where GNSS is one of the preferred technology; On-Board Train Integrity to allow the application of new signalling train separation concepts based on the train self-localisation rather than on traditional train detection systems such as balises; Formal Methods to innovate and standardise processes and interfaces as signalling systems evolve to reduce time-to-market costs; and Traffic Management Evolution that will improve standardisation and integration of Traffic Management processes to achieve flexibility and scalability.

“The project will provide new technical capabilities by combining innovative technologies,” explained Salvatore Sabina of Ansaldo STS. “We are looking to move signal intelligence from trackside to on board the train.”

Next steps

Summing up the project presentations, Daniel Lopour, Market Development Officer at GSA said that “European R&D on GNSS for rail signalling is fully synchronised between GSA, Shift2Rail and ESA.”

Lea Paties, Programme Manager for the Shift2Rail JU agreed that the key element is a high level of coordination to achieve inclusion of GNSS in ERTMS. “We aim at satisfying all the market needs,” she said. “The final system should be stable, fully interoperable, and overall offer reductions in both capital expenditure and operating expenditure for implementation of advanced ERTMS, while improving the flexibility and attractiveness of ERTMS for users in Europe and beyond.”

Lopour outlined some of the next steps to potential wider implementation of a GNSS-based ERTMS. “An analysis of European GNSS performance in the rail segment is available and will feed into a definition of a system architecture within Shift2Rail X2RAIIL2 project,” he said.

There is ongoing work on the cost-benefit of GNSS and further work is required to confirm how appropriate certification for system components might be achieved working with ERA.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Satellite technologies can provide scalable positioning solutions to increase rail safety, and boost capacity and efficiency.

GNSS year in review at the Munich Satellite Navigation Summit

4.4.2019 11:48  
Panel members (l-r) Mattias Petschke, Jan Woerner, Pascale Ehrenfreund, Jia Peng, Carlo des Dorides, David Comby and Oleg Kem, with moderator Claus Kruesken at the opening plenary.
Published: 
04 April 2019

The opening plenary of the Munich Satellite Navigation Summit, on March 25, provided an opportunity for representatives from the GNSS industry in Europe and around the world to look back on what has been achieved in the year since the last summit, and to look to the future, where the challenge is to maintain current high levels of performance.

The theme of this year’s summit was ‘Augment yourself with GNSS’ and the opening session looked at how innovations in GNSS, combined with international cooperation, are bringing benefits to society. While highlighting the critical value of Galileo accuracy, Dr Thomas Pany from the Institute of Space Technology and Space Applications at Bundeswehr University Munich said that all the global and regional satellite navigation systems would have to work closely together to reap the maximum innovative benefits of GNSS.

Matthias Petschke, Director for the EU Satellite Navigation Programmes at the European Commission’s Directorate-General for the Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs, noted significant achievements over the past year, with more satellites launched and brought into operation, and important contracts signed, particularly for the ground segment. 

Galileo market uptake

Petschke said, however, that these major achievements sometimes overshadow more ‘minor’ achievements that deserve to be put in the spotlight. Among these, he listed a waiver, in November 2018, from the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) for the use of Galileo signals in the U.S., and the publication of the E112 Delegated Regulation in December, requiring all smartphones sold in the EU to be ‘at least Galileo-enabled’ by March 2022, as two achievements that would promote the increased uptake of Galileo both in Europe and internationally.

Read this: GNSS chip manufacturers gear up for Galileo roll-out in U.S.

“Galileo is vital for Europe’s critical infrastructure,” said Dr Pascale Ehrenfreund, Chair of the Executive Board of DLR, adding that as the system nears full operational capability there has been a shift in focus from infrastructure to service delivery to end users. 

In his address at the Summit, European GNSS Agency (GSA) Executive Director Carlo des Dorides also highlighted the major success in terms of service delivery and market uptake over the past 12 months, with almost 700 million Galileo users worldwide. “This is a remarkable result, which is being reinforced by the introduction to the market of dual frequency chipsets and the first smartphones exploiting this double frequency capability, bringing better accuracy and a more robust signal,” he said, reminding that the Galileo constellation has the highest number of dual-frequency satellites of any GNSS system.

Excellent performance

Des Dorides also referenced the recent launch of a Galileo-enabled chip with very low power consumption. “This is ideally suited for the IoT and we expect to see Galileo reaching very high uptake in this interesting domain also,” he said.

Participants in the panel highlighted the excellent level of Galileo’s performance. “A report published by the Galileo Reference Centre, working closely with relevant entities at the level of Member States, shows that we are surpassing by far all of our commitments in terms of performance,” Petschke said.

Des Dorides concurred, noting that Galileo’s performance had been excellent, with horizontal positioning accuracy well below 1.5 metres and per slot availability approaching 99.5%. “The challenge ahead is to maintain this level of excellence,” he said.

Huge steps for EGNOS 

EGNOS too has seen some major developments. In particular, Petschke noted the adoption last year of a performance-based navigation implementing rule, which makes compulsory the publication of EGNOS-based procedures in all EU airports before January 2024. “This is a huge step for the uptake of EGNOS in aviation,” he said. 

And this: Galileo is key to Europe's digital economy

What’s more, in March 2019 the EGNOS Service Definition Document was updated with Safety of Life coverage extended to 72° N, providing full coverage in northern Scandinavia, and a new EGNOS transponder is set to be launched in May or June this year. “This will ensure continuity of EGNOS service provision over the next decade, at least,” Petschke said.

Des Dorides noted that EGNOS was well deployed over Europe, with more than 300 airports or helipads served. “Other domains, such as the maritime and rail sectors, are also coming on-board,” he said.

Summing up, des Dorides cited the State of the Union address by Jean-Claude Junker, in which the European Commission president highlighted that Galileo’s success is Europe’s success. “Galileo is finding its place as one of the most important achievements of the European Union,” des Dorides said.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).
Panel members (l-r) Mattias Petschke, Jan Woerner, Pascale Ehrenfreund, Jia Peng, Carlo des Dorides, David Comby and Oleg Kem, with moderator Claus Kruesken at the opening plenary.

GNSS year in review at the Munich Satellite Navigation Summit

4.4.2019 11:48  
Panel members (l-r) Mattias Petschke, Jan Woerner, Pascale Ehrenfreund, Jia Peng, Carlo des Dorides, David Comby and Oleg Kem, with moderator Claus Kruesken at the opening plenary.
Published: 
04 April 2019

The opening plenary of the Munich Satellite Navigation Summit, on March 25, provided an opportunity for representatives from the GNSS industry in Europe and around the world to look back on what has been achieved in the year since the last summit, and to look to the future, where the challenge is to maintain current high levels of performance.

The theme of this year’s summit was ‘Augment yourself with GNSS’ and the opening session looked at how innovations in GNSS, combined with international cooperation, are bringing benefits to society. While highlighting the critical value of Galileo accuracy, Dr Thomas Pany from the Institute of Space Technology and Space Applications at Bundeswehr University Munich said that all the global and regional satellite navigation systems would have to work closely together to reap the maximum innovative benefits of GNSS.

Matthias Petschke, Director for the EU Satellite Navigation Programmes at the European Commission’s Directorate-General for the Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs, noted significant achievements over the past year, with more satellites launched and brought into operation, and important contracts signed, particularly for the ground segment. 

Galileo market uptake

Petschke said, however, that these major achievements sometimes overshadow more ‘minor’ achievements that deserve to be put in the spotlight. Among these, he listed a waiver, in November 2018, from the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) for the use of Galileo signals in the U.S., and the publication of the E112 Delegated Regulation in December, requiring all smartphones sold in the EU to be ‘at least Galileo-enabled’ by March 2022, as two achievements that would promote the increased uptake of Galileo both in Europe and internationally.

Read this: GNSS chip manufacturers gear up for Galileo roll-out in U.S.

“Galileo is vital for Europe’s critical infrastructure,” said Dr Pascale Ehrenfreund, Chair of the Executive Board of DLR, adding that as the system nears full operational capability there has been a shift in focus from infrastructure to service delivery to end users. 

In his address at the Summit, European GNSS Agency (GSA) Executive Director Carlo des Dorides also highlighted the major success in terms of service delivery and market uptake over the past 12 months, with almost 700 million Galileo users worldwide. “This is a remarkable result, which is being reinforced by the introduction to the market of dual frequency chipsets and the first smartphones exploiting this double frequency capability, bringing better accuracy and a more robust signal,” he said, reminding that the Galileo constellation has the highest number of dual-frequency satellites of any GNSS system.

Excellent performance

Des Dorides also referenced the recent launch of a Galileo-enabled chip with very low power consumption. “This is ideally suited for the IoT and we expect to see Galileo reaching very high uptake in this interesting domain also,” he said.

Participants in the panel highlighted the excellent level of Galileo’s performance. “A report published by the Galileo Reference Centre, working closely with relevant entities at the level of Member States, shows that we are surpassing by far all of our commitments in terms of performance,” Petschke said.

Des Dorides concurred, noting that Galileo’s performance had been excellent, with horizontal positioning accuracy well below 1.5 metres and per slot availability approaching 99.5%. “The challenge ahead is to maintain this level of excellence,” he said.

Huge steps for EGNOS 

EGNOS too has seen some major developments. In particular, Petschke noted the adoption last year of a performance-based navigation implementing rule, which makes compulsory the publication of EGNOS-based procedures in all EU airports before January 2024. “This is a huge step for the uptake of EGNOS in aviation,” he said. 

And this: Galileo is key to Europe's digital economy

What’s more, in March 2019 the EGNOS Service Definition Document was updated with Safety of Life coverage extended to 72° N, providing full coverage in northern Scandinavia, and a new EGNOS transponder is set to be launched in May or June this year. “This will ensure continuity of EGNOS service provision over the next decade, at least,” Petschke said.

Des Dorides noted that EGNOS was well deployed over Europe, with more than 300 airports or helipads served. “Other domains, such as the maritime and rail sectors, are also coming on-board,” he said.

Summing up, des Dorides cited the State of the Union address by Jean-Claude Junker, in which the European Commission president highlighted that Galileo’s success is Europe’s success. “Galileo is finding its place as one of the most important achievements of the European Union,” des Dorides said.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).
Panel members (l-r) Mattias Petschke, Jan Woerner, Pascale Ehrenfreund, Jia Peng, Carlo des Dorides, David Comby and Oleg Kem, with moderator Claus Kruesken at the opening plenary.

NavPro takes top prize @ Galileo Hackathon by GNSS.asia

3.4.2019 9:49  
Hackathon teams used Galileo in applications to support smart cities, smart mobility, health or vulnerable citizens.
Published: 
03 April 2019

The NavPro team took the top prize at the Galileo Hackathon by H2020 project GNSS.asia, with their Rail Unfail solution, a GNSS-based maintenance system that geotags potential fault locations on railway tracks.

Over 80 programmers from universities and enterprises all over India came together at PES University, Bangalore on 16-17 March to form 20 teams in the Galileo Hackathon by GNSS.asia. Following an intensive morning of technical and business-focused training sessions, the teams worked through the night, leveraging Galileo in applications to support smart cities, smart mobility, health or vulnerable citizens.

Read this: Bavaria rings to the sound of BELS+

The challenge was to develop either a user-friendly, fast and cost-efficient turnkey transport solution for Bangalore; a smart city solution for citizens who are disadvantaged and/or have health issues, or that increases the safety of vulnerable population groups; or other smart solutions for Bangalore, India or globally, using Galileo.

Worthy winners

NavPro’s winning idea won over the jury with its innovative application to tackle India’s railway safety challenges, using Galileo to accurately and proactively geotag potential fault locations on railway tracks. Second prize went to the Phoenix team from Vignan Institute of Information and Technology for their Farm Along project, an online market place that offers farmers and buyers accurate tracking and a secure supply chain.

Finally, third prize went to the Hex-GNSS team from Hexagon/Novatel, who developed the Perk for Park app, which identifies imbalances in parking supply and demand, making it possible to offer and avail of public and private parking spaces in big cities.

And this: Exporting Galileo – developing EGNSS markets outside Europe

Throughout the challenge, the participants received mentorship and support from experts from the private sector (Volvo Trucks, Citrix, IBM, Magnasoft), the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO), the European GNSS Agency (GSA), PES University and Burdwan University.

The solutions were evaluated by a jury based on a number of criteria, including innovation, market potential and social relevance, optimal use of Galileo, level of completion and the progress made during the hackathon.

GNSS.asia

GNSS.asia is a H2020 project of the European GNSS Agency (GSA) that aims to stimulate the creation of partnerships between GNSS industries in Europe and Asia, while supporting institutional cooperation and encouraging Galileo adoption. It offers several services, including industry matchmaking and international cooperation events. GNSS.asia has permanent teams in Europe, India, China, Taiwan, South Korea and Japan.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Hackathon teams used Galileo in applications to support smart cities, smart mobility, health or vulnerable citizens.

E-GNSS key to increasing capacity, efficiency and sustainability in European rail networks

2.4.2019 11:13  
Space for Innovation in Rail highlighted the important role of satellite-based positioning technology for the future of the rail sector.
Published: 
02 April 2019

Stakeholders from the space and rail sectors joined with regulators and government representatives to review the benefits and make a point on the way forward for European Global Navigation Satellite Systems (EGNSS), Galileo and EGNOS within railway applications in Europe. The two-day Space for Innovation in Rail event on 18 – 19 March 2019 in Vienna was jointly organised by the Austrian Ministry of Transport, Innovation and Technology, the European GNSS Agency (GSA), the European Union Agency for Railways (ERA), and the Shift2Rail Joint Undertaking (S2R JU) and highlighted the important role of satellite-based positioning technology for the future of the rail sector.

This first of a kind event was designed for participants to learn from a unique line up of speakers and experts, be inspired by space solutions for a safer, more efficient and sustainable rail in Europe, connect with the entire rail community, and share challenges and success stories.

Opening the meeting on behalf of Norbert Hofer, Minister of Transport, Innovation and Technology, Ingolf Schädler, Deputy Director General for Innovation and Telecommunication at the Ministry emphasised the importance of the rail system and rail industry to Austria and praised Galileo describing it as “a true European success story!”

Elisabeth Werner of European Commission DG MOVE said that “It was high time for a rail space conference.” She thought GNSS has the potential to make rail systems less complex, cheaper, safer and more responsive. But the big question is how to implement? There was a need to define future system architecture and accelerate the move from laboratory to track. A sound business case was required, and the right incentives put in place. “We can really reshape the railway system with Galileo and EGNOS and enhance the added value,” she concluded.

“You can count on GNSS in Europe to provide concrete global opportunities for products and services,” said Matthias Petschke from European Commission DG GROW. He reassured the listening rail community that both EGNOS and Galileo systems were here to stay for the long term saying: “With the ICAO (the international civil aviation organisation), we committed to at least 20 years, as these technologies become an essential part of our industrial and economic structure.”

He was also clear on governance with respect to EGNSS. “EGNOS & Galileo are and will stay 100% in public hands: the EU funds them, the Commission is responsible, and we delegate tasks to the European Space Agency and the GSA to upgrade the infrastructure and make sure we meet the user needs,” he stated. “Space technology reduces cost and enhances performance.”

Agency viewpoint

These themes were continued by the agencies that had organised the event. Josef Doppelbauer, Executive Director, ERA stressed the need to decarbonise the transport system and saw the adoption of space-based technologies as a “unique opportunity to take cost out of the industry and simplify infrastructure.” He also noted that innovation was more quickly absorbed in other transport sectors such as automotive. He saw interoperability and standardisation as the preconditions for true pan-European innovation in the sector.

Carlo des Dorides, Executive Director, GSA said that the questions was “not if GNSS will provide a solution, but rather ‘how’?” He noted that over 50% of road tolls in Europe were now enabled by GNSS and that the European GNSS Galileo was increasingly becoming the benchmark system with its promise of multi-frequency services enabling one metre or better accuracy.

EGNOS is already a global success providing services for aviation and could deliver the same for rail. However, questions such as who will certify the services needed to be answered. Des Dorides thought that bringing the experience from other sectors could ease adoption in rail. “The commitment of the GSA to supporting the rail sector is clear and it is reassuring to see all stakeholders eager to discuss how to leverage the potential of Galileo and EGNOS for the future of rail transport in Europe. Like space, the next generation of rail operations will know no borders!” he stated.

Carlo Borghini, Executive Director of the Shift2Rail JU praised the ongoing collaboration with the GSA. He mentioned that the key to increasing capacity and efficiency is boosting the quality of train localisation. He emphasised the need to look forward and accelerate results and implementation, while ensuring safety.

Over the two days of the Space for Innovation in Rail event participants learnt about the EGNSS experience in the aviation sector, the experience with GNSS use for the Positive Train Control system being deployed in the USA where some 20,000 locomotives are being equipped with GNSS receivers, and how GNSS can be integrated in other safety critical transport modes. Two panel discussions examined the business challenges for GNSS railway positioning and how to accelerate the move from development to deployment for satellite technology in the rail sector.

Results and prospects from a range of research, innovation and demonstration projects were also presented.

Challenges and next steps

While GNSS could be a game changer for rail in terms of connectivity, cost efficiency and safety, any implementation has to also ensure interoperability of national networks. In addition, all new rail systems must be certified and there was a question about who would do this and how the new electronic systems might be financed. Carlo des Dorides noted that the GSA has supported projects that co-financed avionics updates.

Opening the second day, Mark Topal, Chief Technical Officer of ÖBB Holding AG though that the “key success factors for successful and rapid implementation would be willingness to pioneer, global collaboration, passion, enthusiasm, and optimism.” He saw the challenges as reducing rail system costs by a factor of ten, increasing system capacity with smart technology and meeting the mixed traffic challenge where slow freight and higher speed passenger services shared tracks. A particular issue was to solve the train integrity challenge. If all the challenges could be solved, he concluded: “That’s one small step for rail, and one giant leap for mobility!”

Josef Doppelbauer gave the regulators perspective. He saw the integration of GNSS technologies as a major part of rail’s contribution to saving the planet by providing sustainable mobility and transport essential for our society and economy. He noted that in terms of CO2 emissions per passenger kilometre train travel was already ten times better than air travel.

“Satellite based technology can contribute a massive saving for rail signalling systems, GNSS can remove the need for track side infrastructure, while delivering massive data redundancy, which will influence the safety case,” he said. “GNSS has the potential to revolutionise the European Railway Traffic Management System (ERTMS).

Taking the global perspective on GNSS adoption for safety critical railway applications, Jean-Pierre Loubinoux, Director General of the International Union of Railways (UIC) welcomed the event initiative and the developments outlined, while emphasising the need to the keep elements of cybersecurity and standardisation.

A wide-ranging panel discussion on the second day sought solutions to accelerate deployment of GNSS technologies and included contributions from rail operators, equipment suppliers and GNSS experts. Thomas Petraschek from OBB noted that his company is testing GNSS solutions for multiple non-safety critical applications with a main focus on asset management and predictive maintenance and confirmed that this future solution will benefit also from Galileo signals.

Within the discussion, Michel Ruesen of EEIG EUG, a group of large railway companies working to deploy ERTMS, pointed out the reference Command Control and Signalling (CCS) architecture as one of the main tools for future development and inclusion of new technologies into the European Train Control System (ETCS).

An ongoing debate within the rail community relates to solutions based on the virtual balise concept or a multi-sensor positioning platform approach. The panellists agreed that the focus should be on including the virtual balise concept in ETCS as a non-intrusive solution that can facilitate interoperability as a first step. The more advanced multi-sensor positioning platform should be further developed to potentially gain greater benefits from GNSS in the future than with only emulation of the current physical balise system through GNSS.

Closing the event Josef Doppelbauer reiterated the case for space-based systems in the rail sector saying: “We have a massive opportunity. Let’s grab it and ensure that rail is the sustainable backbone of our future transport system.”
Carlo des Dorides fully agreed and hoped the event would become “the first of a series enabling greater sharing of experience.”

Carlo Borghini supported this view saying: “Space technology is about collaboration across sectors.” He looks forward to the development along the joint GNSS in Rail Signalling roadmap over the next 18 months and a second SpaceInRail event to review progress.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Space for Innovation in Rail highlighted the important role of satellite-based positioning technology for the future of the rail sector.

AESA recognised for pioneering efforts to make EGNSS use in drones a reality

29.3.2019 13:42  
AESA is ensuring that national advances towards the use of Galileo and EGNOS in drones serves as an inspiration to other Member States
Published: 
29 March 2019

AESA (Agencia Estatal de Seguridad Aérea/ State Agency for Aviation Security) has taken on board the use of EGNOS and Galileo in drones.

The Spanish civil aviation authority has pushed for the use of EGNOS in drone operations at national level. The new Spanish regulation on drone operations (Real Decreto 1036/2017) describes the systems that drones measure and systems that operators need to put in place in order to ensure safety of the operations. AESA, in their position as a regulatory supervisor, has published guidance material that explains the requirements to be met by these systems. In particular, the regulation proposes EGNOS as a suitable sensor to enable the pilot to know the position of the drone during the flight, also in operations with medium and high risk and including flights beyond visual line of sight (BVLOS).

National level experience for the benefit of Europe

Notably, all of these documents are produced in both English and Spanish, and as one of the only Member States to make all of the documentation public and in English, the Spanish authorities and AESA are ensuring the accessibility of these national advances. “By making this documentation public, and in English, we hope that our national advances towards the use of Galileo and EGNOS can serve as an inspiration to other Member States,” said Juan Jose Sola from AESA.

Building on this experience, the newly created group EUROCAE WG-105 SG-62 "GNSS for UAS" is developing guidelines to use GNSS for Unmanned Aerial Systems to ensure safe operations. The group is chaired by the H2020 GAUSS project, funded by GSA and coordinated by Everis Aeroespacial y Defensa.

Read this: Getting ready for the evolution of EGNOS

It is the first time that AESA has been recognised for such an award and demonstrates that work towards the use of Galileo and EGNOS in drones should continue and grow. The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is currently working to expand upon this work and is collaborating with EUROCAE (The European Organisation for Civil Aviation Equipment) to develop the guidelines for using GNSS to meet SORA (Specific Operations Risk Assessment) requirements. 

About AESA

AESA is the Spanish state body that ensures the observation and implementation of civil aviation standards. The body works across different segments and competencies in the aviation sphere, including Air Transport, Aviation Safety, Air Navigation and Airport Security.

And this: GSA, SDM sign MoU on EGNSS support for Air Traffic Management

About SORA

Specific Operation Risk Assessment (SORA) exists to perform multi-stage risk analysis of certain unmanned aircraft operations. The SORA requirements also help to define mitigations and robustness levels. For more information read the SORA paper from JARUS (Joint Authorities for Rulemaking on Unmanned Systems).

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

AESA is ensuring that national advances towards the use of Galileo and EGNOS in drones serves as an inspiration to other Member States

AESA recognised for pioneering efforts to make EGNSS use in drones a reality

29.3.2019 13:42  
AESA is ensuring that national advances towards the use of Galileo and EGNOS in drones serves as an inspiration to other Member States
Published: 
29 March 2019

AESA (Agencia Estatal de Seguridad Aérea/ State Agency for Aviation Security) has taken on board the use of EGNOS and Galileo in drones.

The Spanish civil aviation authority has pushed for the use of EGNOS in drone operations at national level. The new Spanish regulation on drone operations (Real Decreto 1036/2017) describes the systems and measures that operators need to put in place to ensure safety. AESA, in their position as a regulatory supervisor, has published guidance material that explains the requirements to be met by these systems. In particular, the regulation proposes EGNOS as a suitable sensor to enable the pilot to know the position of the drone during the flight, also in operations with medium and high risk and including flights beyond visual line of sight (BVLOS).

National level experience for the benefit of Europe

Notably, all of these documents are produced in both English and Spanish, and as one of the only Member States to make all of the documentation public and in English, the Spanish authorities and AESA are ensuring the accessibility of these national advances. “By making this documentation public, and in English, we hope that our national advances towards the use of Galileo and EGNOS can serve as an inspiration to other Member States,” said Juan Jose Sola from AESA.

Building on this experience, the newly created group EUROCAE WG-105 SG-62 "GNSS for UAS" is developing guidelines to use GNSS for Unmanned Aerial Systems to ensure safe operations. The group is chaired by the H2020 GAUSS project, funded by GSA and coordinated by Everis Aeroespacial y Defensa.

Read this: Getting ready for the evolution of EGNOS

It is the first time that AESA has been recognised for such an award and demonstrates that work towards the use of Galileo and EGNOS in drones should continue and grow. The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is currently working to expand upon this work and is collaborating with EUROCAE (The European Organisation for Civil Aviation Equipment) to develop the guidelines for using GNSS to meet SORA (Specific Operations Risk Assessment) requirements. 

About AESA

AESA is the Spanish state body that ensures the observation and implementation of civil aviation standards. The body works across different segments and competencies in the aviation sphere, including Air Transport, Aviation Safety, Air Navigation and Airport Security.

And this: GSA, SDM sign MoU on EGNSS support for Air Traffic Management

About SORA

Specific Operation Risk Assessment (SORA) exists to perform multi-stage risk analysis of certain unmanned aircraft operations. The SORA requirements also help to define mitigations and robustness levels. For more information read the SORA paper from JARUS (Joint Authorities for Rulemaking on Unmanned Systems).

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

AESA is ensuring that national advances towards the use of Galileo and EGNOS in drones serves as an inspiration to other Member States

NaviSoC: leveraging Galileo’s dual-frequency precision for the mass market

27.3.2019 14:11  
NaviSoC leverages Galileo's dual-frequency in a unique, high-precision receiver for the mass market.
Published: 
27 March 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) had an important message for the recent 2019 Mobile World Congress in Barcelona: When close isn’t enough, use Galileo! The EU-funded NaviSoC project is doing just that, leveraging Galileo's dual-frequency GNSS signal to create a unique, high-precision receiver for mass market applications.

Much has been made of the potential of GNSS to enable new location-based services (LBS) that will profoundly change the lives of mass-market users and businesses. The NaviSoC navigation chip is a very small, multi-frequency GNSS receiver capable of combining Galileo, EGNOS, GPS, GLONASS, BeiDou, and QZSS signals to bring precision positioning to a wide range of devices.

The NaviSoC chip is fully integrated and offers unlimited access to raw GNSS data on any level. It can also be used in combination with an external inertial measurement unit (IMU) to complement its positioning, navigation and timing (PNT) function.

Read this: The GSA and Galileo at MWC Barcelona

"Our NaviSoC GNSS receiver is a semiconductor component meant to be integrated within bigger electronic equipment" said Tomasz Borejko, CEO of Polish company ChipCraft. "It is quite small, at 9mm by 9mm. So if somebody wants to integrate precise navigation in a smartwatch, they can put this chipset inside and they get a very precise position that they can display on a map, for instance."

Galileo first

Borejko's partner is Tomasz Radomski, owner of the INOWATRONIKA company, also based in Poland. Together, the two have created NaviSoC with support from the EU and the Polish government. "We are one of the first in the world to bring out a dual-frequency receiver," Radomski said. "This captures L1/L5 and E1/E5 bands on GPS and Galileo, along with the signals from all other major GNSS constellations."

"This is one of the main differentiators for our chip," said Borejko. "We are using Galileo signals on both frequencies, and that means Galileo is the primary constellation for this chip. Second, we add GPS and then Russian GLONASS and Chinese Beidou. But the chip starts with Galileo as the primary constellation."

"Galileo is our core," said Radomski. "Thanks to this, using our chip, you have better accuracy, below one meter, even down to 10cm, and you have a more robust and reliable position."
Some further details are worth noting; NaviSoC comprises a miniature GNSS receiver equipped with a multi-core 32-bit microcontroller (MPU), and it comes with a software development kit (SDK) that simplifies user application development.

"This feature really separates NaviSoC from other small GNSS receivers, and this can be very interesting for Internet of Things (IoT) applications and even for use in autonomous systems," Radomski said. The NaviSoC team assures us that, to date, no product of this kind has been brought to market. So this chipset offers manufacturers right now the chance to incorporate a genuine high-accuracy GNSS receiver into small, mass-market devices for navigation and positioning.

Ready for action

"We are the second company, after Broadcom, to bring a dual-frequency GNSS chip to market,” said Radomski. "Of course we know that competition is coming, there will be more companies offering dual-frequency, but we are ready and eager to compete with them, with our accuracy and with the lowest price."

And this: Qualcomm launches Snapdragon with dual frequency and 5G

Radomski said the NaviSoC team is now actively looking for customers. "We are in talks with several potential partners right now who want to use our chip. Some are interested in using it to create a module. Others are makers of end devices, end equipment. We are willing to sell to all customers who want our chips, from small companies who might need hundreds or a few thousand chips to bigger companies where we could be talking about millions."

“This kind of product until now has been unachievable on the market," said Borejko. "NaviSoC can be a market enabler for a future GNSS user segment, capable of bringing reliable, high-precision to mass-market users and applications, and taking the automation and autonomy of IoT devices to the next level.”

Galileo Masters winner

Obviously, someone agrees. NaviSoC won the 2018 Galileo Masters – Poland Edition Award, presented last year in Marseilles, in conjunction with the EU Space Week Conference. Borejko said that event went a long way towards stimulating even more interest in the new chipset: "We met many interesting people from the satellite navigation industry in Marseille, with whom we hope to maintain contacts and establish cooperation."

One person who has been following their progress closely is GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. In the run-up to the Barcelona event, where the GSA shared a stand with NaviSoC and other EU-funded projects, Diani said: “According to the latest figures, today over 600 million devices – most of them the latest smartphone models – are now Galileo-enabled. Clearly, the time has come to make people aware that Europe’s investment in Galileo is bringing daily benefits to hundreds of millions!” NaviSoC is one such investment that appears to be poised to pay off in a big way.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

NaviSoC leverages Galileo's dual-frequency in a unique, high-precision receiver for the mass market.

NaviSoC: leveraging Galileo’s dual-frequency precision for the mass market

27.3.2019 14:11  
NaviSoC leverages Galileo's dual-frequency in a unique, high-precision receiver for the mass market.
Published: 
27 March 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) had an important message for the recent 2019 Mobile World Congress in Barcelona: When close isn’t enough, use Galileo! The EU-funded NaviSoC project is doing just that, leveraging Galileo's dual-frequency GNSS signal to create a unique, high-precision receiver for mass market applications.

Much has been made of the potential of GNSS to enable new location-based services (LBS) that will profoundly change the lives of mass-market users and businesses. The NaviSoC navigation chip is a very small, multi-frequency GNSS receiver capable of combining Galileo, EGNOS, GPS, GLONASS, BeiDou, and QZSS signals to bring precision positioning to a wide range of devices.

The NaviSoC chip is fully integrated and offers unlimited access to raw GNSS data on any level. It can also be used in combination with an external inertial measurement unit (IMU) to complement its positioning, navigation and timing (PNT) function.

Read this: The GSA and Galileo at MWC Barcelona

"Our NaviSoC GNSS receiver is a semiconductor component meant to be integrated within bigger electronic equipment" said Tomasz Borejko, CEO of Polish company ChipCraft. "It is quite small, at 9mm by 9mm. So if somebody wants to integrate precise navigation in a smartwatch, they can put this chipset inside and they get a very precise position that they can display on a map, for instance."

Galileo first

Borejko's partner is Tomasz Radomski, owner of the INOWATRONIKA company, also based in Poland. Together, the two have created NaviSoC with support from the EU and the Polish government. "We are one of the first in the world to bring out a dual-frequency receiver," Radomski said. "This captures L1/L5 and E1/E5 bands on GPS and Galileo, along with the signals from all other major GNSS constellations."

"This is one of the main differentiators for our chip," said Borejko. "We are using Galileo signals on both frequencies, and that means Galileo is the primary constellation for this chip. Second, we add GPS and then Russian GLONASS and Chinese Beidou. But the chip starts with Galileo as the primary constellation."

"Galileo is our core," said Radomski. "Thanks to this, using our chip, you have better accuracy, below one meter, even down to 10cm, and you have a more robust and reliable position."
Some further details are worth noting; NaviSoC comprises a miniature GNSS receiver equipped with a multi-core 32-bit microcontroller (MPU), and it comes with a software development kit (SDK) that simplifies user application development.

"This feature really separates NaviSoC from other small GNSS receivers, and this can be very interesting for Internet of Things (IoT) applications and even for use in autonomous systems," Radomski said. The NaviSoC team assures us that, to date, no product of this kind has been brought to market. So this chipset offers manufacturers right now the chance to incorporate a genuine high-accuracy GNSS receiver into small, mass-market devices for navigation and positioning.

Ready for action

"We are the second company, after Broadcom, to bring a dual-frequency GNSS chip to market,” said Radomski. "Of course we know that competition is coming, there will be more companies offering dual-frequency, but we are ready and eager to compete with them, with our accuracy and with the lowest price."

And this: Qualcomm launches Snapdragon with dual frequency and 5G

Radomski said the NaviSoC team is now actively looking for customers. "We are in talks with several potential partners right now who want to use our chip. Some are interested in using it to create a module. Others are makers of end devices, end equipment. We are willing to sell to all customers who want our chips, from small companies who might need hundreds or a few thousand chips to bigger companies where we could be talking about millions."

“This kind of product until now has been unachievable on the market," said Borejko. "NaviSoC can be a market enabler for a future GNSS user segment, capable of bringing reliable, high-precision to mass-market users and applications, and taking the automation and autonomy of IoT devices to the next level.”

Galileo Masters winner

Obviously, someone agrees. NaviSoC won the 2018 Galileo Masters – Poland Edition Award, presented last year in Marseille, in conjunction with the EU Space Week Conference. Borejko said that event went a long way towards stimulating even more interest in the new chipset: "We met many interesting people from the satellite navigation industry in Marseille, with whom we hope to maintain contacts and establish cooperation."

One person who has been following their progress closely is GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. In the run-up to the Barcelona event, where the GSA shared a stand with NaviSoC and other EU-funded projects, Diani said: “According to the latest figures, today over 600 million devices – most of them the latest smartphone models – are now Galileo-enabled. Clearly, the time has come to make people aware that Europe’s investment in Galileo is bringing daily benefits to hundreds of millions!” NaviSoC is one such investment that appears to be poised to pay off in a big way.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

NaviSoC leverages Galileo's dual-frequency in a unique, high-precision receiver for the mass market.

FLAMINGO unveils high-accuracy solution for smartphones

26.3.2019 11:30  
FLAMINGO will deliver high accuracy and reliable positioning and navigation services for the mass market
Published: 
26 March 2019

For the European GNSS Agency (GSA), the success of Galileo is to be gauged in part in terms of its uptake within the location-based services (LBS) market. The EU-funded FLAMINGO project is unleashing the potential of GNSS, leveraging the dual-frequency Galileo signal for improved LBS performance in the urban environment.

The objectives of the FLAMINGO project are to develop and deliver high accuracy and reliable positioning and navigation services for mass market uptake. The project team is demonstrating the power of Galileo's dual-frequency signal by developing and showcasing ready-to-market applications on both smartphone and IoT devices within major European cities, all while fostering a new community of EGNSS consumers and applications.

William Roberts is Operations Manager at the UK's NSL and FLAMINGO project coordinator. Speaking at the 2019 Mobile World Congress (MWC) in Barcelona, he said, "FLAMINGO is showcasing the near future by enabling and demonstrating high-accuracy positioning and navigation.

"What we are doing is using the GNSS raw measurements that Google are providing at their API [application programming interface] level 24 onwards, to provide high-accuracy services directly onto your standard, standalone smartphone. There are data services behind it, but essentially the user of a smartphone can get down to about 50 cm accuracy."

Read this: LBS user requirements highlighted in GSA special report

Roberts describes the service as a hybrid RTK- and PPP-type solution, using survey techniques within a smartphone. "The limiting factor is really the smartphone itself, the electronics in there. The antenna is buried within the phone, for example, and things like that. So it's not exactly an ideal survey instrument, but still you can get down to several decimetres of accuracy, which opens up a host of fairly interesting markets, from survey to augmented reality-type applications."

The Galileo difference

Roberts said the European satellite navigation system, Galileo, is a key enabler for the FLAMINGO solution, "because it gives you more satellites, which means better availability, but also the new second frequency."

Traditionally, mobile, location-based applications have been powered by single-frequency GNSS receivers operating under stringent battery-power and footprint constraints. With dual-frequency GNSS capabilities, any smartphone can benefit from better accuracy, ionosphere error cancellation, improved tracking and better multipath resistance, so important in an urban setting. Indeed, making a big splash at MWC 2019 were some brand-new, dual-frequency-enabled smartphone models from Chinese manufacturer Xiaomi, the Mi8 and the top-of-the-line Mi9.

"With this dual-frequency capability that we see here at MWC, with the Xiaomi devices, for example, it gives you a far, far better tracking on the L1 band," Roberts said.

Joining Roberts at the FLAMINGO display was Joshua Critchley-Marrows, also of coordinating partner NSL. He said, "I think one of the big differentiators for us is we're targeting mass-market app developers. They can simply add FLAMINGO to their application and they are immediately delivering a more accurate positioning service. This allows things like augmented reality.

And this: EU Space enables an interconnected future

"I'll use an example like a 'laser shooter' game," Critchley-Marrows said. "If you've got some kids pointing their phones at each other and shooting, you need that centimetre accuracy to essentially shoot your friends! Or if you've got a smartphone in the street and you need to identify the cafe that you're trying to get to, you need that below-one-metre accuracy. You might not need ten centimetres or five centimetres, but as long as you've got sub-metre you can probably pinpoint where that shop front is."

"So we're basically enabling a whole new range of apps," said Roberts. "Our FLAMINGO is an app plus an API for developers. So they can simply start FLAMINGO and then start slivering positions, with no knowledge of GNSS.
Widening the community of developers

"One of the things we're going to do at some stage over the next year, it's not confirmed exactly when, is to actually run hackathons, but for the non-GNSS community," Roberts said. "So we want to get people who are app developers who have some form of location-enabled application that they are developing, but they are not GNSS people. That's very important to try and reach out to the wider community and get people here using this. We don't want people to just see GNSS location as a finished product, but instead to use is for more and different kinds of services and solutions."

The FLAMINGO project was on display at MWC in Barcelona thanks to the GSA, which was sharing its space with a select group of excellent EU-supported initiatives using Galileo to bring innovative solutions to the marketplace. "The GSA is all about reducing the time to market and the time to develop a product," Roberts said, "so it gives small companies like ourselves the opportunity to develop new products and new solutions."

"Working within an EU framework has also been great in terms of developing collaborations," Critchley-Marrows said. "We are actually working together with companies across Europe, rather than just trying to compete." Indeed, FLAMINGO involves nine leading European organisations, including five SMEs, all specialised in location technology.

The project represents exactly the kind of innovative, market-oriented initiative that the GSA wants to continue to support and to see succeed, bringing 'the Galileo difference' to the widest possible user market.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

FLAMINGO will deliver high accuracy and reliable positioning and navigation services for the mass market

GSA presents EGNSS opportunities in aviation, hosts EGNOS awards

22.3.2019 13:26  
Both EGNOS and Galileo are evolving to meet modern aviation needs.
Published: 
22 March 2019

The opportunities and demand for EGNSS (Galileo and EGNOS) in the domain of aviation continue to grow, and their applications to meet new users needs were the subject of a workshop organised at the 2019 World ATM congress

GSA Operational Market Development Manager Carmen Aguilera opened the workshop by presenting EGNOS and Galileo services and new demand in aviation, as well as upcoming R&D calls and funding opportunities. “EGNOS is providing services in all EU countries, and with new demands for both EGNOS and Galileo services, both are evolving to meet modern aviation needs, including unmanned vehicles” Aguilera said.

Galileo improving search and rescue

The GSA is at the forefront of the development of these services with the funding it provides for users interested in developing solutions that utilise EGNOS and Galileo. “We are opening a new Space EGNSS 2020 call within Horizon 2020, that covers aviation and that will provide 70% of funding to develop applications for aviation that use EGNOS or Galileo,” Aguilera said.

Read this: Getting ready for the evolution of EGNOS

Advances in aviation are mostly driven by safety and the need for improved performance. During the session Christian Belleux, General Manager at Orolia explained the benefits of Galileo positioning and Galileo Search and Rescue service use for aircraft distress tracking, with focus on commercial flights. “Distress tracking mandates now require in-flight detection, not only once the plane has crashed,” said Belleux, explaining that newly improved Galileo-enabled distress beacons automatically send messages every five seconds based on flight diagnostics. This is essential for early rescue. Belleux also highlighted the benefits of activating remotely beacons from the ground, not just automatically during flight. Orolia is working with GSA and Eurocae to define operational concept for remote beacon activation, that could be enabled by Galileo services.

Galileo and EGNOS in drones

Drones offer significant opportunities for EGNSS in aviation, due to the growing demand for more accuracy, precision and manoeuvrability. “Drones operations require accuracy, availability and robust operations,” said Carmen Aguilera, and EGNOS/Galileo improve such operations, especially in urban areas and in operations Beyond Line of Sight. Increased drone operations mean a need for more and better measurements from different sensors and navigation integrity, which according to Pere Molina from Geonumerics, is “currently an underexploited EGNOS feature.” Molina went on to add that “drones cannot afford [integrity] errors and EGNOS is designed to cope with them. Galileo and GPS based integrity monitoring in the receiver also answer this need”

And this: GSA, SDM sign MoU on EGNSS support for Air Traffic Management

Closing the session, Hugo Luengo from ESSP, spoke of the “need to improve accessibility to smaller aerodromes for General Aviation. GSA, ESSP and EASA are working together to facilitate design of instrument flight procedures, with focus on approach, to non instrument runways or aerodromes with limited air traffic control”. This is also a priority of the EASA General Aviation roadmap.

EGNOS Awards

The workshop was followed by the EGNOS Awards which primarily recognised the signing of three EGNOS working agreements - by Islandic air navigation service provider ISAVIA, ORO NAVIGACIJA from Lithuania, and the Serbian and Montenegrin air traffic services provider SMATSA. In addition, the Spanish Civil Aviation Authority AESA was recognised with a special award, for pioneering effort making a reality the use of EGNOS and Galileo in drones. In particular, AESA recognises EGNOS as suitable means to ensure safety of drones navigation in demanding.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Both EGNOS and Galileo are evolving to meet modern aviation needs.

GSA presents EGNSS opportunities in aviation, hosts EGNOS awards

22.3.2019 13:26  
Both EGNOS and Galileo are evolving to meet modern aviation needs.
Published: 
21 March 2019

The opportunities and demand for EGNSS (Galileo and EGNOS) in the domain of aviation continue to grow, and their applications to meet new users needs were the subject of a workshop organised at the 2019 World ATM congress

GSA Operational Market Development Manager Carmen Aguilera opened the workshop by presenting EGNOS and Galileo services and new demand in aviation, as well as upcoming R&D calls and funding opportunities. “EGNOS is providing services in all EU countries, and with new demands for both EGNOS and Galileo services, both are evolving to meet modern aviation needs, including unmanned vehicles” Aguilera said.

Galileo improving search and rescue

The GSA is at the forefront of the development of these services with the funding it provides for users interested in developing solutions that utilise EGNOS and Galileo. “We are opening a new Space EGNSS 2020 call within Horizon 2020, that covers aviation and that will provide 70% of funding to develop applications for aviation that use EGNOS or Galileo,” Aguilera said.

Read this: Getting ready for the evolution of EGNOS

Advances in aviation are mostly driven by safety and the need for improved performance. During the session Christian Belleux, General Manager at Orolia explained the benefits of Galileo positioning and Galileo Search and Rescue service use for aircraft distress tracking, with focus on commercial flights. “Distress tracking mandates now require in-flight detection, not only once the plane has crashed,” said Belleux, explaining that newly improved Galileo-enabled distress beacons automatically send messages every five seconds based on flight diagnostics. This is essential for early rescue. Belleux also highlighted the benefits of activating remotely beacons from the ground, not just automatically during flight. Orolia is working with GSA and Eurocae to define operational concept for remote beacon activation, that could be enabled by Galileo services.

Galileo and EGNOS in drones

Drones offer significant opportunities for EGNSS in aviation, due to the growing demand for more accuracy, precision and manoeuvrability. “Drones operations require accuracy, availability and robust operations,” said Carmen Aguilera, and EGNOS/Galileo improve such operations, especially in urban areas and in operations Beyond Line of Sight. Increased drone operations mean a need for more and better measurements from different sensors and navigation integrity, which according to Pere Molina from Geonumerics, is “currently an underexploited EGNOS feature.” Molina went on to add that “drones cannot afford [integrity] errors and EGNOS is designed to cope with them. Galileo and GPS based integrity monitoring in the receiver also answer this need”

And this: GSA, SDM sign MoU on EGNSS support for Air Traffic Management

Closing the session, Hugo Luengo from ESSP, spoke of the “need to improve accessibility to smaller aerodromes for General Aviation. GSA, ESSP and EASA are working together to facilitate design of instrument flight procedures, with focus on approach, to non instrument runways or aerodromes with limited air traffic control”. This is also a priority of the EASA General Aviation roadmap.

EGNOS Awards

The workshop was followed by the EGNOS Awards which primarily recognised the signing of three EGNOS working agreements - by Islandic air navigation service provider ISAVIA, ORO NAVIGACIJA from Lithuania, and the Serbian and Montenegrin air traffic services provider SMATSA. In addition, the Spanish Civil Aviation Authority AESA was recognised with a special award, for pioneering effort making a reality the use of EGNOS and Galileo in drones. In particular, AESA recognises EGNOS as suitable means to ensure safety of drones navigation in demanding.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Both EGNOS and Galileo are evolving to meet modern aviation needs.

ESCAPE project launches positioning module for autonomous driving

21.3.2019 14:51  
ESCAPE has designed and prototyped the ESCAPE GNSS Engine (EGE), a unique positioning module intended to enable autonomous or semi-autonomous driving functions.
Published: 
21 March 2019

Automated vehicles are on the way, and the European GNSS Agency (GSA) sees satellite navigation as a core technology that will help to ensure their safe operation. At the recent Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, the GSA shared its space with the 'ESCAPE' project, an EU-funded initiative that has developed a unique positioning module for autonomous or semi-autonomous driving.

Autonomous vehicles will feature both sensor-based and connection-based solutions for a variety of vehicle services. Ultimately, the GSA sees a ‘converged solution’ as the best alternative, combining the strengths of both approaches. By integrating sensor data and connectivity-based information, operators can reduce the need for the most expensive sensors and at the same time save money on infrastructure.

The EU Horizon 2020-funded ESCAPE project has designed and prototyped the ESCAPE GNSS Engine. It is a unique positioning module that combines precision GNSS and 4G connectivity, for the highly accurate and reliable positioning capabilities required to make automated driving a reality.

Read this: Satellite positioning is changing how we move

"This is an onboard unit for autonomous vehicles," said Jessica Garcia Soriano, R&D engineer of the Advanced Communications Business Unit at Ficosa. "It is equipped with a very good GNSS receiver made by STMicroelectronics. This was actually the first dual-frequency GNSS receiver made for the automotive market."

Dual-frequency is of course a real differentiator for Galileo, as the world's leading provider of dual-frequency GNSS signals. This means added precision and robustness and it helps enormously with multi-phase errors and other urban canyon issues in city-driving scenarios.

"We also have a very good positioning solution provided by GMV, another Spanish company. They are experts in these kinds of solutions. The outputs from this solution are very accurate. So we have GNSS of course, including Galileo, and apart from this you have a modem inside, a 4G modem that gets GNSS corrections from the internet, so this helps to provide better positioning. And apart from this you have inside the same module an inertial measurement unit [IMU]. This is a sensor, a device that senses acceleration and has a gyroscope, so this information also helps in providing good positioning."

The ESCAPE unit also provides for the integration of other data from the vehicle. "That means vehicle odometry, for instance, you can have camera information, or information from maps that are stored in the vehicle, among others" Garcia said.

The market is ready

"One of our important goals is to provide a low-cost system," Garcia said. "There are other very good positioning systems that are being developed that can be based on some very advanced technologies, such as LiDAR for instance, but this is very expensive. So our target is to develop and build a prototype of a system that could be installed in all vehicles, for the whole market. And so we are combining GNSS, 4G, IMU and all of these other data sources from the vehicle in an intelligent way, in an affordable way."

Indeed, one of the things that make ESCAPE unique is the way it brings together high-end GNSS processing capabilities with an industrialisation process that targets high volumes and comparatively limited cost and size. It also encompasses hardware and software safety procedures required for certification for the automotive market.

And this: Integrity & reliability of digital maps – have your say!

Garcia explained, "At Ficosa, we are a top-tier global provider devoted to the research, development, manufacturing of vision, safety, connectivity and efficiency systems for the automotive sector.  We provide solutions directly to vehicle manufacturers. Based on our expertise and thanks to the work we have done on this project, we understand very well that GNSS is a central focus for a lot of applications. From the moment we started working on this project, at Ficosa we  realised that this is a new and very important market. Right now we are working on a positioning system for autonomous driving based on this unit. This is part of our roadmap at the moment. This is a positioning system that we are ready to offer to the customer."

The unit is ready now, but we have yet to see autonomous cars in large numbers on the road. Is this a problem for the ESCAPE system? Garcia answered, "From the very first moment that you have an autonomous car in the street, you will need high-accuracy positioning, because these vehicles will need this positioning to maintain themselves safely on the road. But we don't have to wait for autonomous cars. The vehicles on the road today can already benefit from this technology."

Garcia pointed to Europe's eCall system, where a call centre automatically receives location information from vehicles in distress, thanks to on-board GNSS. "You already have this emergency call technology in the vehicles," Garcia said, "and it provides a location, so the better the location is, the easier it is to locate the people in an emergency situation. No, we don't have to wait."

Location and more

One thing everyone seems to agree on is that autonomous vehicles will soon be appearing on European road networks, and most driving-related decisions will be based, one way or another, on the location of the vehicle and of other vehicles and objects in its vicinity. So vehicle location and positioning will be a critical component for the effective transportation of people and goods by self-driving road vehicles. That positioning will be enabled mainly by GNSS technologies, including Europe’s Galileo, which is expected to offer significant benefits in terms of accuracy and authentication compared to the other satellite-based navigation systems.

GNSS-based location will have to be complemented by other technologies in order to get to the integrity level needed in all driving situations, but the GSA also believes the combination of dual-frequency GNSS and 4G/5G connectivity can do more than just navigation, enabling as well a diverse range of in-vehicle location-based services (LBS), much like what we see emerging in smartphones. The EU-funded ESCAPE project, with its innovative GNSS engine, represents an important step forward in the pursuit of accurate, reliable and affordable positioning and connectivity for the emerging autonomous and connected cars markets.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

ESCAPE has designed and prototyped the ESCAPE GNSS Engine (EGE), a unique positioning module intended to enable autonomous or semi-autonomous driving functions.

ESCAPE project launches positioning module for autonomous driving

21.3.2019 14:51  
ESCAPE has designed and prototyped the ESCAPE GNSS Engine (EGE), a unique positioning module intended to enable autonomous or semi-autonomous driving functions.
Published: 
21 March 2019

Automated vehicles are on the way, and the European GNSS Agency (GSA) sees satellite navigation as a core technology that will help to ensure their safe operation. At the recent Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, the GSA shared its space with the 'ESCAPE' project, an EU-funded initiative that has developed a unique positioning module for autonomous or semi-autonomous driving.

Autonomous vehicles will feature both sensor-based and connection-based solutions for a variety of vehicle services. Ultimately, the GSA sees a ‘converged solution’ as the best alternative, combining the strengths of both approaches. By integrating sensor data and connectivity-based information, operators can reduce the need for the most expensive sensors and at the same time save money on infrastructure.

The Fundamental Elements-funded ESCAPE project has designed and prototyped the ESCAPE GNSS Engine. It is a unique positioning module that combines precision GNSS and 4G connectivity, for the highly accurate and reliable positioning capabilities required to make automated driving a reality.

Read this: Satellite positioning is changing how we move

"This is an onboard unit for autonomous vehicles," said Jessica Garcia Soriano, R&D engineer of the Advanced Communications Business Unit at Ficosa. "It is equipped with a very good GNSS receiver made by STMicroelectronics. This was actually the first dual-frequency GNSS receiver made for the automotive market."

Dual-frequency is of course a real differentiator for Galileo, as the world's leading provider of dual-frequency GNSS signals. This means added precision and robustness and it helps enormously with multi-phase errors and other urban canyon issues in city-driving scenarios.

"We also have a very good positioning solution provided by GMV, another Spanish company. They are experts in these kinds of solutions. The outputs from this solution are very accurate. So we have GNSS of course, including Galileo, and apart from this you have a modem inside, a 4G modem that gets GNSS corrections from the internet, so this helps to provide better positioning. And apart from this you have inside the same module an inertial measurement unit [IMU]. This is a sensor, a device that senses acceleration and has a gyroscope, so this information also helps in providing good positioning."

The ESCAPE unit also provides for the integration of other data from the vehicle. "That means vehicle odometry, for instance, you can have camera information, or information from maps that are stored in the vehicle, among others" Garcia said.

The market is ready

"One of our important goals is to provide a low-cost system," Garcia said. "There are other very good positioning systems that are being developed that can be based on some very advanced technologies, such as LiDAR for instance, but this is very expensive. So our target is to develop and build a prototype of a system that could be installed in all vehicles, for the whole market. And so we are combining GNSS, 4G, IMU and all of these other data sources from the vehicle in an intelligent way, in an affordable way."

Indeed, one of the things that make ESCAPE unique is the way it brings together high-end GNSS processing capabilities with an industrialisation process that targets high volumes and comparatively limited cost and size. It also encompasses hardware and software safety procedures required for certification for the automotive market.

And this: Integrity & reliability of digital maps – have your say!

Garcia explained, "At Ficosa, we are a top-tier global provider devoted to the research, development, manufacturing of vision, safety, connectivity and efficiency systems for the automotive sector.  We provide solutions directly to vehicle manufacturers. Based on our expertise and thanks to the work we have done on this project, we understand very well that GNSS is a central focus for a lot of applications. From the moment we started working on this project, at Ficosa we  realised that this is a new and very important market. Right now we are working on a positioning system for autonomous driving based on this unit. This is part of our roadmap at the moment. This is a positioning system that we are ready to offer to the customer."

The unit is ready now, but we have yet to see autonomous cars in large numbers on the road. Is this a problem for the ESCAPE system? Garcia answered, "From the very first moment that you have an autonomous car in the street, you will need high-accuracy positioning, because these vehicles will need this positioning to maintain themselves safely on the road. But we don't have to wait for autonomous cars. The vehicles on the road today can already benefit from this technology."

Garcia pointed to Europe's eCall system, where a call centre automatically receives location information from vehicles in distress, thanks to on-board GNSS. "You already have this emergency call technology in the vehicles," Garcia said, "and it provides a location, so the better the location is, the easier it is to locate the people in an emergency situation. No, we don't have to wait."

Location and more

One thing everyone seems to agree on is that autonomous vehicles will soon be appearing on European road networks, and most driving-related decisions will be based, one way or another, on the location of the vehicle and of other vehicles and objects in its vicinity. So vehicle location and positioning will be a critical component for the effective transportation of people and goods by self-driving road vehicles. That positioning will be enabled mainly by GNSS technologies, including Europe’s Galileo, which is expected to offer significant benefits in terms of accuracy and authentication compared to the other satellite-based navigation systems.

GNSS-based location will have to be complemented by other technologies in order to get to the integrity level needed in all driving situations, but the GSA also believes the combination of dual-frequency GNSS and 4G/5G connectivity can do more than just navigation, enabling as well a diverse range of in-vehicle location-based services (LBS), much like what we see emerging in smartphones. The EU-funded ESCAPE project, with its innovative GNSS engine, represents an important step forward in the pursuit of accurate, reliable and affordable positioning and connectivity for the emerging autonomous and connected cars markets.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

ESCAPE has designed and prototyped the ESCAPE GNSS Engine (EGE), a unique positioning module intended to enable autonomous or semi-autonomous driving functions.

GSA highlights added value of EGNSS for drones at WATM 2019

20.3.2019 9:13  
Galileo and EGNOS are increasing the safety and security of drone operations.
Published: 
20 March 2019

The added value of EGNSS (Galileo and EGNOS) for drones was the focus of a special session organised by the European GNSS Agency (GSA) at this year’s World ATM Congress in Madrid on 12 March, at which representatives from several projects spoke about how they are benefitting from the European space programme.

Opening the session, GSA Market Development Officer Carmen Aguilera and European Satellite Services Provider (ESSP) CEO Thierry Racaud talked about advances in EGNOS applications in aviation and the natural spill-over and evolution into drone technologies. “Today we will hear about projects that are demonstrating the benefits of both EGNOS and Galileo for drones operations,” Aguilera said.

At the session, Victor Gordo, Ineco Senior Project Manager presented Terra (Technological European Research for RPAS in ATM), an H2020 project. This project aims to leverage existing and potential new technologies to develop a ground-based U-Space architecture that will accommodate a large base of RPAS in a mixed mode (manned and unmanned) environment.

Read this: GSA Report highlights key user requirements in aviation

Increased integrity and accuracy

Gordo explained how user needs are surveyed and taken into account during drone development, particularly with respect to the integration of EGNOS and Galileo. “We started out with a top down approach, but are now moving towards a bottom up approach,” said Victor Gordo, adding that this ensures that the requirements of end users are met. “Different users will be employing drones in different capacities, some will fly between buildings in large cities, others will have different uses, and thus the different requirements must be identified,” he said.

The GAUSS GSA-H2020 project was represented by Adrian Jimenez-Gonzales from Everis Aerospace & Defence, which is chairing the new EUROCAE subgroup on Multi GNSS for UAS. He said that the integration of Galileo and EGNOS into drone technology is mainly focused on safety and security, thanks to the increased integrity and accuracy that they provide. This is particularly relevant given the growing popularity of drones, Jimenez-Gonzales said. “Due to their growing popularity and usage, in the near future will see hundreds of drones sharing airspace, making the added value of EGNOS and Galileo, specifically improved manoeuvring, and accurate positioning, all the more relevant for public and airspace safety,” he said.

And this: GSA, SDM sign MoU on EGNSS support for Air Traffic Management

Defining EGNSS standardisation for drones

GMV Project Manager Marta Cueto Santamaría presented the EGNSS 4RPAS project, and outlined the European Commission’s strategy to promote the use of EGNOSS and Galileo. “Drones have been identified as a very promising technology,” said Cueto Santamaría. “This makes it all the more necessary to define the EGNSS standards for drone operations and obtain all the benefits that EGNOS and Galileo have to offer,” she said.

Finally, Carmen Aguilera highlighted how “both EGNOS and Galileo provide the accuracy, integrity and security needed for drone operations.” She closed the session with an update on the current ongoing work on creating a digital signature for Galileo to combat the ever growing issue of jamming and hacking, and to continue strengthening the secure image of Galileo-enabled drones.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Galileo and EGNOS are increasing the safety and security of drone operations.

GSA highlights added value of EGNSS for drones at WATM 2019

20.3.2019 9:13  
Published: 
20 March 2019

The added value of EGNSS (Galileo and EGNOS) for drones was the focus of a special session organised by the European GNSS Agency (GSA) at this year’s World ATM Congress in Madrid on 12 March, at which representatives from several projects spoke about how they are benefitting from the European space programme.

Opening the session, GSA Market Development Officer Carmen Aguilera and European Satellite Services Provider (ESSP) CEO Thierry Racaud talked about advances in EGNOS applications in aviation and the natural spill-over and evolution into drone technologies. “Today we will hear about projects that are demonstrating the benefits of both EGNOS and Galileo for drones operations,” Aguilera said.

At the session, Victor Gordo, Ineco Senior Project Manager presented Terra (Technological European Research for RPAS in ATM), an H2020 project. This project aims to leverage existing and potential new technologies to develop a ground-based U-Space architecture that will accommodate a large base of RPAS in a mixed mode (manned and unmanned) environment.

Read this: GSA Report highlights key user requirements in aviation

Increased integrity and accuracy

Gordo explained how user needs are surveyed and taken into account during drone development, particularly with respect to the integration of EGNOS and Galileo. “We started out with a top down approach, but are now moving towards a bottom up approach,” said Victor Gordo, adding that this ensures that the requirements of end users are met. “Different users will be employing drones in different capacities, some will fly between buildings in large cities, others will have different uses, and thus the different requirements must be identified,” he said.

The GAUSS GSA-H2020 project was represented by Adrian Jimenez-Gonzales from Everis Aerospace & Defence, which is chairing the new EUROCAE subgroup on Multi GNSS for UAS. He said that the integration of Galileo and EGNOS into drone technology is mainly focused on safety and security, thanks to the increased integrity and accuracy that they provide. This is particularly relevant given the growing popularity of drones, Jimenez-Gonzales said. “Due to their growing popularity and usage, in the near future will see hundreds of drones sharing airspace, making the added value of EGNOS and Galileo, specifically improved manoeuvring, and accurate positioning, all the more relevant for public and airspace safety,” he said.

And this: GSA, SDM sign MoU on EGNSS support for Air Traffic Management

Defining EGNSS standardisation for drones

GMV Project Manager Marta Cueto Santamaría presented the EGNSS 4RPAS project, and outlined the European Commission’s strategy to promote the use of EGNOSS and Galileo. “Drones have been identified as a very promising technology,” said Cueto Santamaría. “This makes it all the more necessary to define the EGNSS standards for drone operations and obtain all the benefits that EGNOS and Galileo have to offer,” she said.

Finally, Carmen Aguilera highlighted how “both EGNOS and Galileo provide the accuracy, integrity and security needed for drone operations.” She closed the session with an update on the current ongoing work on creating a digital signature for Galileo to combat the ever growing issue of jamming and hacking, and to continue strengthening the secure image of Galileo-enabled drones.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Galileo and EGNOS are increasing the safety and security of drone operations.

GEO++ in Barcelona – High-accuracy positioning for smartphones

19.3.2019 11:12  
GEO++ presented its high-accuracy positioning application for Android smartphones at the GSA stand at MWC Barcelona.
Published: 
19 March 2019

GEO++, a German-based company, with support from the European GNSS Agency (GSA), presented a new high-accuracy positioning application for Android smartphones at this year's Mobile World Congress (MWC).

With over 107,000 visitors attending its 2019 edition, the MWC continues to be the largest mobile event in the world. It was the perfect stage for highlighting some of the most exciting Galileo-driven projects being supported by the GSA.

Everybody can benefit

Readers will know that Galileo is now the world's leading provider of dual-frequency GNSS signals, with more functioning dual-frequency satellites in orbit than any other GNSS constellation. Now, Geo++ GmbH, a geodesy and navigation company based outside Hanover, has developed a precision positioning app for smartphones called 'Geo++ Android Positioning Library', augmenting dual-frequency code and phase GNSS observations with SSR correction data.

"We've been doing precise positioning for 20 years, but typically for survey-grade receivers," said Jannes Wübbena, Managing Director of GEO++. "These can cost up to a couple of thousand euros, and then you can do centimetre-level accuracy. What we wanted to do here is create a new application that can provide precise positioning for smartphones. We wanted to get to a similar level of accuracy but with the limitation that we are using the low-grade, inexpensive GNSS receivers that are in these phones, making it possible for everyone to benefit from the highest accuracy positioning."

Read this: The GSA and Galileo at MWC Barcelona

Geo++ Android Positioning Library tackles the task of precision positioning by utilising GEO++'s network RTK technology in the backend to apply generated GNSS corrections to the smartphone measurements. For the GSA, this is exactly the kind of innovative application, leveraging the advantages of Galileo, that will enable new and more powerful and more value-generating Location-Based Services (LBS) for the mass-market.

Wübbena's company has already gained a lot of experience in this area with its Geo++ RINEX Logger app, which is available free of charge on the Google Play store.

Putting a new tool in your hand

"If you look back ten years ago, people generally had a smartphone for staying connected, but then if they were interested in photography they would also walk around with a digital camera." Wübbena said. "Nowadays it's more common for people just to have a smartphone to do both, because the camera in your phone is just as good as a lot of digital cameras. With our new precision positioning capability, we think this brings your smartphone in a similar way into the realm of high-precision measurement devices." So, as with the digital camera, Wübbena suggested, in the near future, smartphones could also take on the functions of some specialised and expensive measuring equipment.

Wübbena described a scenario in which a person needs to do some work on his or her garden wall. "Let's say you want to measure your wall because you don't know how long it is. We hope that in the future you will be able to just pick up your phone and measure, from one point to the next and down to an accuracy of few centimetres, how long your wall is."

Wübbena said, "The new Geo++ Android Positioning Library doesn't require any special equipment on the part of the user. This works with any off-the-shelf, dual-frequency-capable smartphone, which have been available since 2017." Indeed, MWC attendees will attest to the growing number of dual-frequency GNSS-equipped smartphones coming onto the market, thanks largely to the work of the GSA.

"Everyone will have one of those sooner or later," said Wübbena. "We are approaching smartphone and chipset manufacturers, to work together with us, to actually give an added value to their chips, so that we can sell our dual-frequency-powered apps more readily to the Googles and Apples."

Hottest mobile trends

Working in a highly competitive market is not a problem for GEO++, Wübbena said. "Our main advantage compared to what others are doing is that our service is more reliable, because we take care of all the biases that occur when you process these signals. We have a lot of experience with hardware-independent, high-precision solutions. We have been doing antenna calibration for IGS [International GNSS Service] for example, so we can use this knowledge to calibrate our network devices really accurately, and then deliver the best correction data to our users."

Geo++ Android Positioning Library was one of a number of Galileo-powered solutions being showcased at MWC, sharing space at this year's GSA-Galileo stand. In the run-up to the event, GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani said: "With the goal of exploring the hottest trends influencing the mobile industry, MWC Barcelona is the ideal platform to promote innovative European GNSS-based solutions and applications. As a global event, it’s also the place to show the world how European Union space research enhances Europe's industrial competitiveness and plays a pivotal role in tackling various societal challenges.”

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

GEO++ presented its high-accuracy positioning application for Android smartphones at the GSA stand at MWC Barcelona.

GEO++ in Barcelona – High-accuracy positioning for smartphones

19.3.2019 11:12  
GEO++ presented its high-accuracy positioning application for Android smartphones at the GSA stand at MWC Barcelona.
Published: 
19 March 2019

GEO++, a German-based company, with support from the European GNSS Agency (GSA), presented a new high-accuracy positioning application for Android smartphones at this year's Mobile World Congress (MWC).

With over 107,000 visitors attending its 2019 edition, the MWC continues to be the largest mobile event in the world. It was the perfect stage for highlighting some of the most exciting Galileo-driven projects being supported by the GSA.

Everybody can benefit

Readers will know that Galileo is now the world's leading provider of dual-frequency GNSS signals, with more functioning dual-frequency satellites in orbit than any other GNSS constellation. Now, Geo++ GmbH, a geodesy and navigation company based outside Hanover, has developed a precision positioning app for smartphones called 'Geo++ Android Positioning Library', augmenting dual-frequency code and phase GNSS observations with SSR correction data.

"We've been doing precise positioning for 20 years, but typically for survey-grade receivers," said Jannes Wübbena, Managing Director of GEO++. "These can cost up to a couple of thousand euros, and then you can do centimetre-level accuracy. What we wanted to do here is create a new application that can provide precise positioning for smartphones. We wanted to get to a similar level of accuracy but with the limitation that we are using the low-grade, inexpensive GNSS receivers that are in these phones, making it possible for everyone to benefit from the highest accuracy positioning."

Read this: The GSA and Galileo at MWC Barcelona

Geo++ Android Positioning Library tackles the task of precision positioning by utilising GEO++'s network RTK technology in the backend to apply generated GNSS corrections to the smartphone measurements. For the GSA, this is exactly the kind of innovative application, leveraging the advantages of Galileo, that will enable new and more powerful and more value-generating Location-Based Services (LBS) for the mass-market.

Wübbena's company has already gained a lot of experience in this area with its Geo++ RINEX Logger app, which is available free of charge on the Google Play store.

Putting a new tool in your hand

"If you look back ten years ago, people generally had a smartphone for staying connected, but then if they were interested in photography they would also walk around with a digital camera." Wübbena said. "Nowadays it's more common for people just to have a smartphone to do both, because the camera in your phone is just as good as a lot of digital cameras. With our new precision positioning capability, we think this brings your smartphone in a similar way into the realm of high-precision measurement devices." So, as with the digital camera, Wübbena suggested, in the near future, smartphones could also take on the functions of some specialised and expensive measuring equipment.

Wübbena described a scenario in which a person needs to do some work on his or her garden wall. "Let's say you want to measure your wall because you don't know how long it is. We hope that in the future you will be able to just pick up your phone and measure, from one point to the next and down to an accuracy of few centimetres, how long your wall is."

Wübbena said, "The new Geo++ Android Positioning Library doesn't require any special equipment on the part of the user. This works with any off-the-shelf, dual-frequency-capable smartphone, which have been available since 2017." Indeed, MWC attendees will attest to the growing number of dual-frequency GNSS-equipped smartphones coming onto the market, thanks largely to the work of the GSA.

"Everyone will have one of those sooner or later," said Wübbena. "We are approaching smartphone and chipset manufacturers, to work together with us, to actually give an added value to their chips, so that we can sell our dual-frequency-powered apps more readily to the Googles and Apples."

Hottest mobile trends

Working in a highly competitive market is not a problem for GEO++, Wübbena said. "Our main advantage compared to what others are doing is that our service is more reliable, because we take care of all the biases that occur when you process these signals. We have a lot of experience with hardware-independent, high-precision solutions. We have been doing antenna calibration for IGS [International GNSS Service] for example, so we can use this knowledge to calibrate our network devices really accurately, and then deliver the best correction data to our users."

Geo++ Android Positioning Library was one of a number of Galileo-powered solutions being showcased at MWC, sharing space at this year's GSA-Galileo stand. In the run-up to the event, GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani said: "With the goal of exploring the hottest trends influencing the mobile industry, MWC Barcelona is the ideal platform to promote innovative European GNSS-based solutions and applications. As a global event, it’s also the place to show the world how European Union space research enhances Europe's industrial competitiveness and plays a pivotal role in tackling various societal challenges.”

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

GEO++ presented its high-accuracy positioning application for Android smartphones at the GSA stand at MWC Barcelona.

New Regulation mandates Galileo capability for all smartphones sold in the EU

14.3.2019 13:58  
Galileo-supported E112 will result in faster response times and more lives saved.
Published: 
14 March 2019

A recently published Commission Delegated Regulation sets out measures to introduce Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) capability, particularly Galileo capability, in advanced computing capability mobile telephones (or ‘’smartphones’’) placed on the European Union market from 17 March 2022, so that they can support the transfer of caller location information from GNSS (at least Galileo) in the event of 112 emergency calls (E112).

A large majority of phone calls to the 112 emergency number are placed from mobile phones. These calls already support the sending of location information to emergency services. However, this information is not based on GNSS.

E112 makes use of Galileo to establish location for emergency calls to the 112 emergency number. Mandating the use of Galileo in smartphones will improve the accuracy of the caller location, which will allow emergency responders to get to the scene of an accident faster. The Regulation will apply in all EU Member States from 17 March 2022.

Enhanced positioning saving lives

There is already a solution in place that uses GNSS technology in emergency calls made from smartphones. Advanced Mobile Location, or AML, transmits the GNSS, Wi-Fi or cell-ID information available on the caller's smartphone via a message to a dedicated end-point, usually a Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP), which makes the caller location available to emergency responders in real time.

AML has been deployed in several EU Member States thanks to the EU-funded Help 112 project, which was set up to evaluate the merits of handset-based technologies in improving the location of emergency callers, and which is now in its second phase.

The E112 concept is similar to the eCall system, mandated for use in all new car and light van models that receive type-approval in the EU from 31 March 2018, which automatically dials the 112 emergency number in the event of a serious accident and sends the position information of the car.

Read this: Volvo presents on stage the first eCall-enabled car

“The ability to precisely locate the site of an emergency enables first responders to arrive on the scene faster which, in turn, results in more lives saved. Galileo is already supporting a faster emergency response in the eCall system and now, with the new Regulation, all Europeans making an 112 emergency call from a smartphone will be able to benefit from the same precision,” said GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides.

Accuracy of a few metres

Location information is currently established through identification technology based on the coverage area of the cellular network tower (cell-ID). The average accuracy of this information varies from 2 km to 10 km, which can lead to significant search errors following emergency calls, resulting is time wasted and lives lost. In contrast, location information based on GNSS provides an average accuracy between 6 and 28 meters. This level of accuracy will have a major impact in terms of emergency response times.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Galileo-supported E112 will result in faster response times and more lives saved.

New Regulation mandates Galileo capability for all smartphones sold in the EU

14.3.2019 13:58  
Galileo-supported E112 will result in faster response times and more lives saved.
Published: 
14 March 2019

A recently published Commission Delegated Regulation sets out measures to introduce Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) capability, particularly Galileo capability, in advanced computing capability mobile telephones (or ‘’smartphones’’) placed on the European Union market from 17 March 2022, so that they can support the transfer of caller location information from GNSS (at least Galileo) in the event of 112 emergency calls (E112).

A large majority of phone calls to the 112 emergency number are placed from mobile phones. These calls already support the sending of location information to emergency services. However, this information is not based on GNSS.

E112 makes use of Galileo to establish location for emergency calls to the 112 emergency number. Mandating the use of Galileo in smartphones will improve the accuracy of the caller location, which will allow emergency responders to get to the scene of an accident faster. The Regulation will apply in all EU Member States from 17 March 2022.

Enhanced positioning saving lives

There is already a solution in place that uses GNSS technology in emergency calls made from smartphones. Advanced Mobile Location, or AML, transmits the GNSS, Wi-Fi or cell-ID information available on the caller's smartphone via a message to a dedicated end-point, usually a Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP), which makes the caller location available to emergency responders in real time.

AML has been deployed in several EU Member States thanks to the EU-funded Help 112 project, which was set up to evaluate the merits of handset-based technologies in improving the location of emergency callers, and which is now in its second phase.

The E112 concept is similar to the eCall system, mandated for use in all new car and light van models that receive type-approval in the EU from 31 March 2018, which automatically dials the 112 emergency number in the event of a serious accident and sends the position information of the car.

Read this: Volvo presents on stage the first eCall-enabled car

“The ability to precisely locate the site of an emergency enables first responders to arrive on the scene faster which, in turn, results in more lives saved. Galileo is already supporting a faster emergency response in the eCall system and now, with the new Regulation, all Europeans making an 112 emergency call from a smartphone will be able to benefit from the same precision,” said GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides.

Accuracy of a few metres

Location information is currently established through identification technology based on the coverage area of the cellular network tower (cell-ID). The average accuracy of this information varies from 2 km to 10 km, which can lead to significant search errors following emergency calls, resulting is time wasted and lives lost. In contrast, location information based on GNSS provides an average accuracy between 6 and 28 meters. This level of accuracy will have a major impact in terms of emergency response times.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Galileo-supported E112 will result in faster response times and more lives saved.

GSA, SESAR Deployment Manager sign MoU on EGNSS support for Air Traffic Management

13.3.2019 14:10  
The GSA-SESAR Deployment Manager MoU will support the implementation of Galileo and EGNOS applications in aviation.
Published: 
13 March 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) and the SESAR Deployment Manager (SDM) signed a Memorandum of Understanding at the World ATM Congress in Madrid on 13 March on future cooperation to modernise EU Air Traffic Management by leveraging Galileo and EGNOS.

Both EGNOS and Galileo can support the modernisation of EU Air Traffic Management, particularly in the areas of air navigation and surveillance. SESAR Deployment Manager (SDM) has been tasked by the European Commission to synchronise and coordinate the deployment of the Pilot Common Project as specified in the SESAR Deployment Programme. Within this programme, Performance Based Navigation and Surveillance, which rely on GNSS, are one of the six ATM functionalities. The MoU signed in Madrid details how GSA and SDM will work together to bring this about.

Important milestone

“This is an important milestone in cooperation between the GSA and SDM and one that will ensure that all aviation stakeholders reap the benefits of Europe’s investment in space,” said GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides.

“The GSA is looking forward to cooperating with SDM to reinforce relations with ANSPs and airlines and help them to benefit from EGNOS and Galileo,” confirmed Pascal Claudel, GSA Chief Operating Officer, who signed the MoU on behalf of the GSA.

“I am happy that today, at the World ATM Congress, the GSA and the SESAR Deployment Manager signed this cooperation agreement. This new agreement will reinforce the SDM connection with space-based technologies for ATM and CNS. Indeed, there is growing proximity between ATM and space, as space-based enablers would certainly bring an essential contribution, enabling the most critical Pilot Common Project ATM functionalities as well as CNS modernisation. This agreement materialises the fact that GSA and SDM share common objectives and have mutual interests in successful E-GNSS and SESAR deployment,” said Nicolas Warinsko, General Manager, SESAR Deployment Manager.

The first of the applications covered by the MoU is Performance Based Navigation (PBN), which aims to ensure global standardisation of Area Navigation (RNAV) and Required Navigation Performance (RNP) specifications, in an effort to limit the proliferation of navigation specifications used around the world.

The European Commission’s PBN Regulation, published in 2018, mandates the implementation of EGNOS approaches at all Europe’s runways by 2024. In suitably equipped aircraft, EGNOS enables aircraft approach procedures that are operationally equivalent to instrument landing system (ILS) ILS Cat-I procedures. The regulation also envisages a full PBN environment by 2030, leading to rationalisation of conventional procedures. For Cat II/III, work is ongoing to make Europe benefit from Ground Based Augmentation System (GBAS) Cat-II/III based on GPS and Galileo dual frequency. Going further, Europe is also investing in the next version of EGNOS, which will also augment Galileo, and the Advanced RAIM concept, also relying on both GPS and Galileo.

This is recognised as a major step in the evolution of the European navigation infrastructure by ANSP organisations.

EGNOS unlocking capacity improvements

The second area of cooperation between the GSA and SDM deals with Automatic Dependent Surveillance – Broadcast (ADS-B) Out, which is a surveillance technique that relies on aircraft broadcasting their identity, position, and other information derived from on board systems. This signal can then be received for surveillance purposes on the ground.

The current regulation mandates airspace users to be equipped by 2020, including with a GNSS receiver. While SBAS is not mandated, it is widely recognised that SBAS can unlock capacity improvements and support enhanced surveillance operations, as well as support the business case, when synchronised with navigation.

Airspace users require an integrated and synchronised strategy for navigation and surveillance, to optimise their investments, and the GSA will work together with SDM to that end. The GSA and SDM will also work together to assist air navigation service providers (ANSPs) and airlines in using EGNOS and Galileo.

Background

In 2004 the European Union adopted the first Single European Sky (SES) legislative package meant to reform the architecture of European air traffic management (ATM) in order to meet future capacity and safety needs at European level. Updated in 2009, the SES regulatory framework consists of four pillars: regulating performance; a single safety framework; new technologies; and managing capacity on the ground.

The Single European Sky ATM Research and Development (SESAR) project represents the technological pillar of the SES. It aims to provide the EU with a high performing ATM infrastructure by 2030 that will enable the safe and environmentally friendly operation and development of air transport.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GSA-SESAR Deployment Manager MoU will support the implementation of Galileo and EGNOS applications in aviation.

GSA, SESAR Deployment Manager sign MoU on EGNSS support for Air Traffic Management

13.3.2019 14:10  
GSA, SESAR Deployment Manager sign MoU on EGNSS support for Air Traffic Management
Published: 
13 March 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) and the SESAR Deployment Manager (SDM) signed a Memorandum of Understanding at the World ATM Congress in Madrid on 13 March on future cooperation to modernise EU Air Traffic Management by leveraging Galileo and EGNOS.

Both EGNOS and Galileo can support the modernisation of EU Air Traffic Management, particularly in the areas of air navigation and surveillance. SESAR Deployment Manager (SDM) has been tasked by the European Commission to synchronise and coordinate the deployment of the Pilot Common Project as specified in the SESAR Deployment Programme. Within this programme, Performance Based Navigation and Surveillance, which rely on GNSS, are one of the six ATM functionalities. The MoU signed in Madrid details how GSA and SDM will work together to bring this about.

Important milestone

“This is an important milestone in cooperation between the GSA and SDM and one that will ensure that all aviation stakeholders reap the benefits of Europe’s investment in space,” said GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides.

“The GSA is looking forward to cooperating with SDM to reinforce relations with ANSPs and airlines and help them to benefit from EGNOS and Galileo,” confirmed Pascal Claudel, GSA Chief Operating Officer, who signed the MoU on behalf of the GSA.

“I am happy that today, at the World ATM Congress, the GSA and the SESAR Deployment Manager signed this cooperation agreement. This new agreement will reinforce the SDM connection with space-based technologies for ATM and CNS. Indeed, there is growing proximity between ATM and space, as space-based enablers would certainly bring an essential contribution, enabling the most critical Pilot Common Project ATM functionalities as well as CNS modernisation. This agreement materialises the fact that GSA and SDM share common objectives and have mutual interests in successful E-GNSS and SESAR deployment,” said Nicolas Warinsko, General Manager, SESAR Deployment Manager.

The first of the applications covered by the MoU is Performance Based Navigation (PBN), which aims to ensure global standardisation of Area Navigation (RNAV) and Required Navigation Performance (RNP) specifications, in an effort to limit the proliferation of navigation specifications used around the world.

The European Commission’s PBN Regulation, published in 2018, mandates the implementation of EGNOS approaches at all Europe’s runways by 2024. In suitably equipped aircraft, EGNOS enables aircraft approach procedures that are operationally equivalent to instrument landing system (ILS) ILS Cat-I procedures. The regulation also envisages a full PBN environment by 2030, leading to rationalisation of conventional procedures. For Cat II/III, work is ongoing to make Europe benefit from Ground Based Augmentation System (GBAS) Cat-II/III based on GPS and Galileo dual frequency. Going further, Europe is also investing in the next version of EGNOS, which will also augment Galileo, and the Advanced RAIM concept, also relying on both GPS and Galileo.

This is recognised as a major step in the evolution of the European navigation infrastructure by ANSP organisations.

EGNOS unlocking capacity improvements

The second area of cooperation between the GSA and SDM deals with Automatic Dependent Surveillance – Broadcast (ADS-B) Out, which is a surveillance technique that relies on aircraft broadcasting their identity, position, and other information derived from on board systems. This signal can then be received for surveillance purposes on the ground.

The current regulation mandates airspace users to be equipped by 2020, including with a GNSS receiver. While SBAS is not mandated, it is widely recognised that SBAS can unlock capacity improvements and support enhanced surveillance operations, as well as support the business case, when synchronised with navigation.

Airspace users require an integrated and synchronised strategy for navigation and surveillance, to optimise their investments, and the GSA will work together with SDM to that end. The GSA and SDM will also work together to assist air navigation service providers (ANSPs) and airlines in using EGNOS and Galileo.

Background

In 2004 the European Union adopted the first Single European Sky (SES) legislative package meant to reform the architecture of European air traffic management (ATM) in order to meet future capacity and safety needs at European level. Updated in 2009, the SES regulatory framework consists of four pillars: regulating performance; a single safety framework; new technologies; and managing capacity on the ground.

The Single European Sky ATM Research and Development (SESAR) project represents the technological pillar of the SES. It aims to provide the EU with a high performing ATM infrastructure by 2030 that will enable the safe and environmentally friendly operation and development of air transport.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GSA-SESAR Deployment Manager MoU will support the implementation of Galileo and EGNOS applications in aviation.

GSA, SESAR Deployment Manager sign MoU on EGNSS support for Air Traffic Management

13.3.2019 14:10  
The GSA-SESAR Deployment Manager MoU will support the implementation of Galileo and EGNOS applications in aviation.
Published: 
13 March 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) and the SESAR Deployment Manager (SDM) signed a Memorandum of Understanding at the World ATM Congress in Madrid on 13 March on future cooperation to modernise EU Air Traffic Management by leveraging Galileo and EGNOS.

Both EGNOS and Galileo can support the modernisation of EU Air Traffic Management, particularly in the areas of air navigation and surveillance. SESAR Deployment Manager (SDM) has been tasked by the European Commission to synchronise and coordinate the deployment of the Pilot Common Project as specified in the SESAR Deployment Programme. Within this programme, Performance Based Navigation and Surveillance, which rely on GNSS, are one of the six ATM functionalities. The MoU signed in Madrid details how GSA and SDM will work together to bring this about.

Important milestone

“This is an important milestone in cooperation between the GSA and SDM and one that will ensure that all aviation stakeholders reap the benefits of Europe’s investment in space,” said GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides.

“The GSA is looking forward to cooperating with SDM to reinforce relations with ANSPs and airlines and help them to benefit from EGNOS and Galileo,” confirmed Pascal Claudel, GSA Chief Operating Officer, who signed the MoU on behalf of the GSA.

“I am happy that today, at the World ATM Congress, the GSA and the SESAR Deployment Manager signed this cooperation agreement. This new agreement will reinforce the SDM connection with space-based technologies for ATM and CNS. Indeed, there is growing proximity between ATM and space, as space-based enablers would certainly bring an essential contribution, enabling the most critical Pilot Common Project ATM functionalities as well as CNS modernisation. This agreement materialises the fact that GSA and SDM share common objectives and have mutual interests in successful E-GNSS and SESAR deployment,” said Nicolas Warinsko, General Manager, SESAR Deployment Manager.

The first of the applications covered by the MoU is Performance Based Navigation (PBN), which aims to ensure global standardisation of Area Navigation (RNAV) and Required Navigation Performance (RNP) specifications, in an effort to limit the proliferation of navigation specifications used around the world.

The European Commission’s PBN Regulation, published in 2018, mandates the implementation of EGNOS approaches at all Europe’s runways by 2024. In suitably equipped aircraft, EGNOS enables aircraft approach procedures that are operationally equivalent to instrument landing system (ILS) ILS Cat-I procedures. The regulation also envisages a full PBN environment by 2030, leading to rationalisation of conventional procedures. For Cat II/III, work is ongoing to make Europe benefit from Ground Based Augmentation System (GBAS) Cat-II/III based on GPS and Galileo dual frequency. Going further, Europe is also investing in the next version of EGNOS, which will also augment Galileo, and the Advanced RAIM concept, also relying on both GPS and Galileo.

This is recognised as a major step in the evolution of the European navigation infrastructure by ANSP organisations.

EGNOS unlocking capacity improvements

The second area of cooperation between the GSA and SDM deals with Automatic Dependent Surveillance – Broadcast (ADS-B) Out, which is a surveillance technique that relies on aircraft broadcasting their identity, position, and other information derived from on board systems. This signal can then be received for surveillance purposes on the ground.

The current regulation mandates airspace users to be equipped by 2020, including with a GNSS receiver. While SBAS is not mandated, it is widely recognised that SBAS can unlock capacity improvements and support enhanced surveillance operations, as well as support the business case, when synchronised with navigation.

Airspace users require an integrated and synchronised strategy for navigation and surveillance, to optimise their investments, and the GSA will work together with SDM to that end. The GSA and SDM will also work together to assist air navigation service providers (ANSPs) and airlines in using EGNOS and Galileo.

Background

In 2004 the European Union adopted the first Single European Sky (SES) legislative package meant to reform the architecture of European air traffic management (ATM) in order to meet future capacity and safety needs at European level. Updated in 2009, the SES regulatory framework consists of four pillars: regulating performance; a single safety framework; new technologies; and managing capacity on the ground.

The Single European Sky ATM Research and Development (SESAR) project represents the technological pillar of the SES. It aims to provide the EU with a high performing ATM infrastructure by 2030 that will enable the safe and environmentally friendly operation and development of air transport.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GSA-SESAR Deployment Manager MoU will support the implementation of Galileo and EGNOS applications in aviation.

GNSS chip manufacturers gear up for Galileo roll-out in U.S.

12.3.2019 14:57  
U.S. manufacturers are eager to take advantage of the added accuracy that Galileo offers.
Published: 
12 March 2019

Following a waiver by the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) of its rules in November last year, in which it allowed devices in the United States to access signals transmitted by the Galileo Global Navigation System, leading U.S. manufacturers are preparing to roll-out Galileo on U.S. territory.

At a meeting on November 15 last year, the US FCC granted in part a request from the European Commission for a waiver of the FCC rules so that devices in the United States may access specific signals transmitted by Galileo.

This decision means that consumers and industry in the U.S. are now able to access certain satellite signals from the Galileo system, which can be used in combination with the U.S. Global Positioning System (GPS). The improved availability, reliability, and resiliency offered by incorporating Galileo capability into devices is something that U.S. chip manufacturers are eager to pass on to their customers.

“This is an important market development opportunity for manufacturers in the U.S. The FCC ruling means that industry can now benefit from the use of Galileo signals. The added accuracy and robustness offered by multi-constellation and multi-frequency capability will be a key differentiator on the market,” said Carlo des Dorides, Executive Director of the European GNSS Agency (GSA).

“We are glad to see FCC supporting Broadcom's dual frequency GNSS vision, for which the GPS and Galileo combination is key,” said Vijay Nagarajan, VP Marketing Wireless Connectivity and Communication Division at Broadcom. “We enabled the world’s first dual frequency GNSS phone in 2018 with the simple goal of providing accurate location to the consumer even amidst the skyscrapers in a busy downtown. We are certain that consumers will benefit from this FCC ruling that will further drive the adoption of dual frequency GNSS.” 

“As a leader in developing cellular technology—today, as the world launches 5G and dating back to Qualcomm’s legacy in 4G, 3G, & 2G—including work to incorporate robust navigation solutions for smartphones, Qualcomm Technologies integrated Galileo across its chipset portfolio because we understand the importance and benefits of accurate, reliable, and rapid position location for consumers,” said Dean Brenner, Senior Vice President of Spectrum Strategy and Tech Policy, Qualcomm Incorporated. “We’re excited about the FCC allowing access to Galileo signals in the U.S. for commercial Location Based Services because it is a big step forward in improving the user experience, particularly in dense urban environments.”

Activating Galileo in the U.S.

Both Broadcom and Qualcomm Technologies, Inc. already have dual-frequency solutions that support Galileo E1/E5a signals: the world’s first dual frequency GNSS smartphone, the Xiaomi Mi-8, was fitted with a Broadcom BCM47755 chip and, in December, Qualcomm Technologies launched the newest generation in its 8 Mobile Platform Series - the dual-frequency Qualcomm® Snapdragon™ 855 Mobile Platform.

“Approximately 100 smartphone models are already fitted with chipsets from these two manufacturers. Following the FCC ruling, we are expecting to see a significant increase in Galileo users coming from the U.S.,” said Justyna Redelkiewicz Musial, in charge of LBS and IoT market development at the GSA.

Better positioning and navigation

The FCC ruling permits access to two Galileo signals – the E1 signal that is transmitted in the 1559-1591 MHz portion of the 1559-1610 MHz Radio-navigation-Satellite Service (RNSS) frequency band and the E5 signal that is transmitted in the 1164-1219 MHz portion of the 1164-1215 MHz and 1215-1240 MHz RNSS bands.

Access to multi-constellation and multi-frequency capability means that users in the U.S. will be able to benefit from a better positioning and navigation experience particularly in urban environments where the unique shape of the E5/L5 signal makes it easier to distinguish real signals from the ones reflected by buildings, reducing the multipath effect. The simultaneous use of E5/L5 frequencies also mitigates other sources of error, such as ionospheric distortions, and makes the signal more robust against interference and jamming.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

U.S. manufacturers are eager to take advantage of the added accuracy that Galileo offers.

International Women’s Day: learning from successful women in tech

8.3.2019 10:50  
Women in tech share their experience with the GSA on the occasion of International Women’s Day 2019.
Published: 
08 March 2019

International Women’s Day is an opportunity to share success stories from successful women and become inspired by what they have achieved in their respective workplaces. As such, GSA has gathered testimonials from successful professionals working with European Satellite Navigation technologies to inspire others both in the field and beyond.

Each of these inspiring women was first asked, what has been essential in their careers. Their answers covered the need for perseverance, hard work and not being afraid to take chances and risks.

“I've never refused an opportunity if it appeared or doubted a new career decision…it's important to understand that being a little scared is a part of the game, and hence if you're never scared, you just might not be challenging yourself enough,” said, Ewa Kadziolka, CEO & Founder, Centrip.  

Gabriella Povero, Emanuela Falletti, Beatrice Motella,  Micaela Troglia Gamba researchers at the Links Foundation                                                                                                                                                                                         

Unique set of challenges

A career is not without its own unique set of challenges, and each of these women has experienced their own throughout their professional lives. From learning to just keep going, to being in the minority, from balancing motherhood with full time work, to learning to be adaptable and think on your feet, each challenge is unique and has provided many a lesson that these women have drawn upon.

Read this: Help shape the future of Galileo and EGNOS

“Being female engineers is a challenge and a great opportunity at the same time. When we started at university we as women were always a minority, and today we represent 40% of the people in our research group and two of us are responsible for a research unit. However, this situation is far from standard; to say it in engineering language: we are on the queue of the Gaussian distribution! To add a challenge to a challenge, most of us are also mothers,” said Gabriella Povero, Emanuela Falletti, Beatrice Motella, Micaela Troglia Gamba, Navigation Technologies at Fondazione LINKS.

Having gone through these unique challenges, it is also important for these established female professionals to pass on their wisdom to other young women in their respective professional domains. All of these inspiring women agreed that it is important for fellow females to recognise their capacities, fight for what they want and surround themselves with the right people.

“Nowadays, to think that we cannot become what we want to be simply because we are women is not correct. Both legally and culturally there are no obstacles to achieve our goals”, said Isabel GONZALEZ, End User Support Manager from CNH Industrial.

Ewa Kądziołka

Determination and passion

“Never stop fighting and never let anyone tell you who you should be or what you can or can’t do,” said Oihana Otaegui, Head of ITS and Engineering at Vicomtech.

Finally, these women acknowledged that they would not be where they are today without inspiration from their families, the people around them and others that they look up to in their fields.

“Out of all the determined and passionate people I have met so far, my mother is definitely my symbol of emancipation, tenacity and courage,” said Micaela Troglia Gamba from Navigation Technologies at Fondazione LINKS.

Thank you to these inspiring women for sharing their experiences and insights and Happy International Women’s Day!

If you want to be a part of the EU GNSS community, have a look at our open vacancies and apply.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Women in tech share their experience with the GSA on the occasion of International Women’s Day 2019.

International Women’s Day: learning from successful women in tech

8.3.2019 10:50  
Women in tech share their experience with the GSA on the occasion of International Women’s Day 2019.
Published: 
08 March 2019

International Women’s Day is an opportunity to share success stories from successful women and become inspired by what they have achieved in their respective workplaces. As such, GSA has gathered testimonials from successful professionals working with European Satellite Navigation technologies to inspire others both in the field and beyond.

Each of these inspiring women was first asked, what has been essential in their careers. Their answers covered the need for perseverance, hard work and not being afraid to take chances and risks.

“I've never refused an opportunity if it appeared or doubted a new career decision…it's important to understand that being a little scared is a part of the game, and hence if you're never scared, you just might not be challenging yourself enough,” said, Ewa Kadziolka, CEO & Founder, Centrip.

Unique set of challenges

A career is not without its own unique set of challenges, and each of these women has experienced their own throughout their professional lives. From learning to just keep going, to being in the minority, from balancing motherhood with full time work, to learning to be adaptable and think on your feet, each challenge is unique and has provided many a lesson that these women have drawn upon.

Read this: Help shape the future of Galileo and EGNOS

“Being female engineers is a challenge and a great opportunity at the same time. When we started at university we as women were always a minority, and today we represent 40% of the people in our research group and two of us are responsible for a research unit. However, this situation is far from standard; to say it in engineering language: we are on the queue of the Gaussian distribution! To add a challenge to a challenge, most of us are also mothers,” said Gabriella Povero, Emanuela Falletti, Beatrice Motella, Micaela Troglia Gamba, Navigation Technologies at Fondazione LINKS.

Having gone through these unique challenges, it is also important for these established female professionals to pass on their wisdom to other young women in their respective professional domains. All of these inspiring women agreed that it is important for fellow females to recognise their capacities, fight for what they want and surround themselves with the right people.

“Nowadays, to think that we cannot become what we want to be simply because we are women is not correct. Both legally and culturally there are no obstacles to achieve our goals”, said Isabel GONZALEZ, End User Support Manager from CNH Industrial.

Determination and passion

“Never stop fighting and never let anyone tell you who you should be or what you can or can’t do,” said Oihana Otaegui, Head of ITS and Engineering at Vicomtech.

Finally, these women acknowledged that they would not be where they are today without inspiration from their families, the people around them and others that they look up to in their fields.

“Out of all the determined and passionate people I have met so far, my mother is definitely my symbol of emancipation, tenacity and courage,” said Micaela Troglia Gamba from Navigation Technologies at Fondazione LINKS.

Thank you to these inspiring women for sharing their experiences and insights and Happy International Women’s Day!

If you want to be a part of the EU GNSS community, have a look at our open vacancies and apply.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Women in tech share their experience with the GSA on the occasion of International Women’s Day 2019.

International Women’s Day: learning from successful women in tech

8.3.2019 10:50  
Women in tech share their experience with the GSA on the occasion of International Women’s Day 2019.
Published: 
08 March 2019

International Women’s Day is an opportunity to share success stories from successful women and become inspired by what they have achieved in their respective workplaces. As such, GSA has gathered testimonials from successful professionals working with European Satellite Navigation technologies to inspire others both in the field and beyond.

Each of these inspiring women was first asked, what has been essential in their careers. Their answers covered the need for perseverance, hard work and not being afraid to take chances and risks.

“I've never refused an opportunity if it appeared or doubted a new career decision…it's important to understand that being a little scared is a part of the game, and hence if you're never scared, you just might not be challenging yourself enough,” said, Ewa Kadziolka, CEO & Founder, Centrip.  

Gabriella Povero, Emanuela Falletti, Beatrice Motella,  Micaela Troglia Gamba researchers at the Links Foundation                                                                                                                                                                                         

Unique set of challenges

A career is not without its own unique set of challenges, and each of these women has experienced their own throughout their professional lives. From learning to just keep going, to being in the minority, from balancing motherhood with full time work, to learning to be adaptable and think on your feet, each challenge is unique and has provided many a lesson that these women have drawn upon.

Read this: Help shape the future of Galileo and EGNOS

“Being female engineers is a challenge and a great opportunity at the same time. When we started at university we as women were always a minority, and today we represent 40% of the people in our research group and two of us are responsible for a research unit. However, this situation is far from standard; to say it in engineering language: we are on the queue of the Gaussian distribution! To add a challenge to a challenge, most of us are also mothers,” said Gabriella Povero, Emanuela Falletti, Beatrice Motella, Micaela Troglia Gamba, Navigation Technologies at Fondazione LINKS.

Having gone through these unique challenges, it is also important for these established female professionals to pass on their wisdom to other young women in their respective professional domains. All of these inspiring women agreed that it is important for fellow females to recognise their capacities, fight for what they want and surround themselves with the right people.

“Nowadays, to think that we cannot become what we want to be simply because we are women is not correct. Both legally and culturally there are no obstacles to achieve our goals”, said Isabel GONZALEZ, End User Support Manager from CNH Industrial.

Determination and passion

“Never stop fighting and never let anyone tell you who you should be or what you can or can’t do,” said Oihana Otaegui, Head of ITS and Engineering at Vicomtech.

Finally, these women acknowledged that they would not be where they are today without inspiration from their families, the people around them and others that they look up to in their fields.

“Out of all the determined and passionate people I have met so far, my mother is definitely my symbol of emancipation, tenacity and courage,” said Micaela Troglia Gamba from Navigation Technologies at Fondazione LINKS.

Thank you to these inspiring women for sharing their experiences and insights and Happy International Women’s Day!

If you want to be a part of the EU GNSS community, have a look at our open vacancies and apply.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Women in tech share their experience with the GSA on the occasion of International Women’s Day 2019.

The GSA and Galileo at MWC Barcelona

7.3.2019 11:57  
The Ooredoo 5G pilot-less flying taxi at MWC Barcelona
Published: 
07 March 2019

Whether smartphones, drones, robots or autonomous vehicles, many of the innovations making headlines at this year's MWC in Barcelona absolutely depend on GNSS. Advanced positioning services like those being delivered by Galileo are helping to transform the latest technologies into functional mass market solutions.

Mobile World Congress (MWC) is the largest mobile connectivity event in the world. The 2019 edition in Barcelona brought together futuristic and pioneering technologies from more than 2400 companies. The European GNSS Agency (GSA) was there as well, promoting Galileo, Europe's flagship satellite navigation programme.

One catchphrase seemingly on everyone's lips in Barcelona was 'the future is now'. For the GSA, the future is 'here and now'. The 'here' of course refers to location, without which many of today's leading-edge mobile and connected systems simply wouldn't work.

A case in point is the new Ooredoo pilot-less flying taxi, the world’s first self-driving, 5G-connected, aerial passenger vehicle. Recently unveiled and test-flown in Qatar, it can transport two people for up to 20 minutes at 130 km per hour. Essentially a massive multi-rotor drone with a very comfortable passenger compartment, the vehicle made a big splash at MWC Barcelona, where Congress attendees were queuing up for a chance just to sit in it. Of course the flying taxi relies on state-of-the-art, satellite-based navigation technologies like Galileo to ensure precise and reliable positioning.

Ooredoo, a Doha-based company, highlighted 5G connectivity as a key enabling feature of the new flying taxi. Indeed, 5G was a sort of recurring theme throughout the Barcelona event. 5G represents the latest generation of cellular mobile communications, delivering ultra-wide bandwidth and massive input and output capabilities. This means increased speed and flexibility, enabling vastly improved performance and making possible a variety of new services.

GNSS and 5G come together

"What we are seeing right now is the convergence of 5G and GNSS," said GSA officer Alberto Fernández-Wyttenbach. "Together you get the combination of precision location from GNSS, and then with 5G you get the speed for real-time reactivity and control, so fast 5G connectivity is a perfect partner for GNSS. We know, for example, in the automotive industry, you have an important association that is working to bring 5G into automotive, an industry where GNSS is already a requisite feature."

The 5G Automotive Association (5GAA) is a global, cross-industry organisation that includes companies from the automotive, technology, and telecommunications industries, working to develop complete solutions for future road mobility and transport. 5GAA sees 5G as a vital platform for enabling Cooperative Intelligent Transportation Systems (C-ITS). With its exceptional bandwidth, 5G can easily handle safety-critical connectivity while supporting enhanced 'Vehicle-to-Everything' (V2X) communications and other connected mobility needs.

"We know that some 5GAA members are looking at 5G as the way to send real-time GNSS corrections to cars," said Fernández-Wyttenbach, "because it gives you this very quick reaction time."

Korea Telecom's new 5G-based road emergency response system, also on display at MWC, is a clear example of the synergy that is possible by combining 5G connectivity and GNSS-based navigation. Europe already has in place its eCall system, where a call centre automatically receives location information from vehicles in distress, thanks to on-board GNSS. The Korea Telecom´s 5G Remote Cockpit system goes a step further. In the event of an emergency where a driver is incapacitated, a human operator at a call centre actually takes over control of the car remotely, driving it to a location where emergency services are available.

"The technology is ready," said Fernández-Wyttenbach. "5G gives you very fast communication, which allows actual control of the car. Without that capability of near-instant transmission of the control signal, you cannot drive a car remotely; if you tried to turn the car around a curve in the road, you would be too late and you would crash. With 5G this is now possible." Complementarity is the key thing, he said, "because of course, without the GNSS positioning as a starting point, 5G cannot accomplish this kind of thing by itself."

There are limitations to 5G; the connection is faster and broader, but a certain density of transmitting stations is needed, even more so than with a 4G connection, so there will likely be some areas with imperfect coverage.

Nevertheless, said Fernández-Wyttenbach, "This year everybody is speaking about 5G. Before, 5G was mostly about consumer electronics, but now we have these transverse markets that are moving all the time." One of these is automotive, as mentioned above. Another is healthcare, where a number of companies are now demonstrating the delivery of medical services to remote locations supported by fast 5G connectivity.

Putting Galileo in your hands

The one thing you'd expect to see at an event with 'Mobile' in the name is smartphones, and there were indeed a number of remarkable new models to be admired at MWC. Of particular note were the new folding phones. The Samsung Galaxy Fold and the Huawei Mate X both feature displays that fold open into a small tablet-like format. The Mate X also features a 5G modem, and of course all are Galileo-ready.

Since 2016, when the first Galileo-enabled smartphone was launched, more and more manufacturers have been choosing to include Galileo-capable GNSS receivers in their premium handsets, in order to provide users with better accuracy and availability, especially in difficult environments.

The success of Galileo in terms of its uptake by smartphone manufacturers is something the GSA likes to talk about, and there could be no better place to do so than at MWC 2019. A range of Galileo-enabled mobile devices were on display in the GSA's exhibition space, highlighting European GNSS's increasing presence in smartphones. At last count, there were about 80 smartphone models equipped with Galileo, and all of that is thanks to the work of the GSA, which has made downstream market uptake a priority.

Also getting noticed at MWC 2019 were two recent dual-frequency GNSS models from Chinese manufacturer Xiaomi, the Mi8 and the top-of-the-line Mi9. Traditionally, mobile, location-based applications have been powered by single-frequency GNSS receivers operating under stringent battery-power and footprint constraints. With a dual-frequency chipset, these devices now benefit from better accuracy, ionosphere error cancellation, improved tracking and better multipath resistance.

Dual-frequency GNSS chipsets are of course also appearing in the automotive sector. With connected cars and autonomous vehicles soon to hit the roads, there is a clear need for accurate and reliable positioning information. And in case anyone missed it, Galileo is now the world's leading provider of dual-frequency GNSS, with more operational dual-frequency satellites in orbit than any other global system.

The GSA's Market Development Officer in charge of LBS Justyna Redelkievicz said, "We're seeing the new smartphones, the autonomous cars, drones and robotics – it's all here and it all needs location. At the GSA, we believe accuracy matters and we are here to say it, loud and clear. We are happy with how things are going with Galileo. It's going very well, it's growing, we have more users, and it's dual!"

Plainly, vehicle positioning and navigation remain key areas of innovation for GNSS technologies. In parallel, the GSA has been working hard to get these same technologies into people's hands. Based on what attendees could see at MWC 2019, this effort would seem to be paying off.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The Ooredoo 5G pilot-less flying taxi at MWC Barcelona

World’s first Galileo-enabled PLB launched

28.2.2019 14:04  
H2020 HELIOS and its coordinator Orolia, a global leader in emergency readiness and response, have announced the launch in Europe and the United States of an upgrade to its McMurdo FastFind 220 and Kannad SafeLink Solo personal location beacons (PLB) to include the Galileo Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS).
Published: 
28 February 2019

H2020 HELIOS and its coordinator Orolia, a global leader in emergency readiness and response, have announced the launch in Europe and the United States of an upgrade to its McMurdo FastFind 220 and Kannad SafeLink Solo personal location beacons (PLB) to include the Galileo Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS).

The PLBs are the world’s first to utilise Galileo’s capabilities and are the first in a series of new solutions coming from the EU-funded Helios project, led by Orolia, which was set up to leverage the power of Galileo. The launch follows approval from the U.S. Federal Communications Commission and continues Orolia’s innovation and leadership role in safety electronics.

Double achievement

“We are doubly proud of this achievement. The fact that this is the world’s first Galileo-enabled personal location beacon is in itself a significant milestone. That it comes as a result of a Horizon 2020 project managed by the GSA makes it even more satisfying. The GSA actively supports beacon manufacturers in implementing Galileo differentiators into their products and we are delighted to see these efforts deliver tangible results,” said European GNSS Agency (GSA) Executive Director Carlo des Dorides.

Watch this: What do you think about Galileo SAR?

Orolia multi-constellation capable beacons work with a wider range of satellites, offering increased global coverage and supporting accelerated rescue. Location detection is more precise because the beacons receive coordinates from both Galileo and the GPS constellations, and signals can even be detected in difficult locations, such as canyons.

Pole to Pole coverage

Galileo satellites make up part of the MEOSAR system, the next generation of the Cospas-Sarsat international Search and Rescue satellite system that has helped to save over 43,000 lives since 1982. With the launch of four new satellites in July 2018, the Galileo constellation now consists of 26 satellites (22 with SAR payload), from a planned 30, with a target of 2020 for completion of the network. The system launched in December 2016, allowing technology with Galileo-enabled receivers to use signals provided by the constellation for positioning, navigation and timing.

“We are thrilled to be launching our upgraded PLBs in the European and U.S. markets,” said Chris Loizou, Vice President of Maritime at Orolia. “The combination of both Galileo and GPS GNSS capability means that our customers will benefit from coverage that spans from the North to the South Pole. We work tirelessly to push the boundaries of product innovation and, ultimately, to give people the best chance of being rescued in an emergency situation.”

The McMurdo FastFind and Kannad SafeLink PLBs are part of Orolia’s comprehensive search and rescue ecosystem and join the McMurdo SmartFind G8 and Kannad SafePro series emergency position-indicating radio beacons (EPIRBs) as the first Galileo capable rescue beacons. Orolia’s McMurdo brand builds, integrates and tests products as part of a live search and rescue system. This ensures greater cohesion between distress signal transmission and reception so that beacon owners can feel confident that their signals will get to search and rescue authorities quickly.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

H2020 HELIOS and its coordinator Orolia, a global leader in emergency readiness and response, have announced the launch in Europe and the United States of an upgrade to its McMurdo FastFind 220 and Kannad SafeLink Solo personal location beacons (PLB) to i

World’s first Galileo-enabled PLB launched

28.2.2019 14:04  
The upgraded McMurdo FastFind 220 and Kannad SafeLink Solo Personal Location Beacons help save lives.
Published: 
28 February 2019

H2020 HELIOS and its coordinator Orolia, a global leader in emergency readiness and response, have announced the launch in Europe and the United States of an upgrade to its McMurdo FastFind 220 and Kannad SafeLink Solo personal location beacons (PLB) to include the Galileo Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS).

The PLBs are the world’s first to utilise Galileo’s capabilities and are the first in a series of new solutions coming from the EU-funded Helios project, led by Orolia, which was set up to leverage the power of Galileo. The launch follows approval from the U.S. Federal Communications Commission and continues Orolia’s innovation and leadership role in safety electronics.

Double achievement

“We are doubly proud of this achievement. The fact that this is the world’s first Galileo-enabled personal location beacon is in itself a significant milestone. That it comes as a result of a Horizon 2020 project managed by the GSA makes it even more satisfying. The GSA actively supports beacon manufacturers in implementing Galileo differentiators into their products and we are delighted to see these efforts deliver tangible results,” said European GNSS Agency (GSA) Executive Director Carlo des Dorides.

Watch this: What do you think about Galileo SAR?

Orolia multi-constellation capable beacons work with a wider range of satellites, offering increased global coverage and supporting accelerated rescue. Location detection is more precise because the beacons receive coordinates from both Galileo and the GPS constellations, and signals can even be detected in difficult locations, such as canyons.

Pole to Pole coverage

Galileo satellites make up part of the MEOSAR system, the next generation of the Cospas-Sarsat international Search and Rescue satellite system that has helped to save over 43,000 lives since 1982. With the launch of four new satellites in July 2018, the Galileo constellation now consists of 26 satellites (22 with SAR payload), from a planned 30, with a target of 2020 for completion of the network. The system launched in December 2016, allowing technology with Galileo-enabled receivers to use signals provided by the constellation for positioning, navigation and timing.

“We are thrilled to be launching our upgraded PLBs in the European and U.S. markets,” said Chris Loizou, Vice President of Maritime at Orolia. “The combination of both Galileo and GPS GNSS capability means that our customers will benefit from coverage that spans from the North to the South Pole. We work tirelessly to push the boundaries of product innovation and, ultimately, to give people the best chance of being rescued in an emergency situation.”

The McMurdo FastFind and Kannad SafeLink PLBs are part of Orolia’s comprehensive search and rescue ecosystem and join the McMurdo SmartFind G8 and Kannad SafePro series emergency position-indicating radio beacons (EPIRBs) as the first Galileo capable rescue beacons. Orolia’s McMurdo brand builds, integrates and tests products as part of a live search and rescue system. This ensures greater cohesion between distress signal transmission and reception so that beacon owners can feel confident that their signals will get to search and rescue authorities quickly.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The upgraded McMurdo FastFind 220 and Kannad SafeLink Solo Personal Location Beacons help save lives.

World’s first Galileo-enabled PLB launched

28.2.2019 14:04  
The upgraded McMurdo FastFind 220 and Kannad SafeLink Solo Personal Location Beacons help save lives.
Published: 
27 February 2019

H2020 HELIOS and its coordinator Orolia, a global leader in emergency readiness and response, have announced the launch in Europe and the United States of an upgrade to its McMurdo FastFind 220 and Kannad SafeLink Solo personal location beacons (PLB) to include the Galileo Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS).

The PLBs are the world’s first to utilise Galileo’s capabilities and are the first in a series of new solutions coming from the EU-funded Helios project, led by Orolia, which was set up to leverage the power of Galileo. The launch follows approval from the U.S. Federal Communications Commission and continues Orolia’s innovation and leadership role in safety electronics.

Double achievement

“We are doubly proud of this achievement. The fact that this is the world’s first Galileo-enabled personal location beacon is in itself a significant milestone. That it comes as a result of a Horizon 2020 project managed by the GSA makes it even more satisfying. The GSA actively supports beacon manufacturers in implementing Galileo differentiators into their products and we are delighted to see these efforts deliver tangible results,” said European GNSS Agency (GSA) Executive Director Carlo des Dorides.

Watch this: What do you think about Galileo SAR?

Orolia multi-constellation capable beacons work with a wider range of satellites, offering increased global coverage and supporting accelerated rescue. Location detection is more precise because the beacons receive coordinates from both Galileo and the GPS constellations, and signals can even be detected in difficult locations, such as canyons.

Pole to Pole coverage

Galileo satellites make up part of the MEOSAR system, the next generation of the Cospas-Sarsat international Search and Rescue satellite system that has helped to save over 43,000 lives since 1982. With the launch of four new satellites in July 2018, the Galileo constellation now consists of 26 satellites (24 with SAR payload), from a planned 30, with a target of 2020 for completion of the network. The system launched in December 2016, allowing technology with Galileo-enabled receivers to use signals provided by the constellation for positioning, navigation and timing.

“We are thrilled to be launching our upgraded PLBs in the European and U.S. markets,” said Chris Loizou, Vice President of Maritime at Orolia. “The combination of both Galileo and GPS GNSS capability means that our customers will benefit from coverage that spans from the North to the South Pole. We work tirelessly to push the boundaries of product innovation and, ultimately, to give people the best chance of being rescued in an emergency situation.”

The McMurdo FastFind and Kannad SafeLink PLBs are part of Orolia’s comprehensive search and rescue ecosystem and join the McMurdo SmartFind G8 and Kannad SafePro series emergency position-indicating radio beacons (EPIRBs) as the first Galileo capable rescue beacons. Orolia’s McMurdo brand builds, integrates and tests products as part of a live search and rescue system. This ensures greater cohesion between distress signal transmission and reception so that beacon owners can feel confident that their signals will get to search and rescue authorities quickly.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The upgraded McMurdo FastFind 220 and Kannad SafeLink Solo Personal Location Beacons help save lives.

World’s first Galileo-enabled PLB launched

28.2.2019 14:04  
Published: 
27 February 2019

H2020 HELIOS and its coordinator Orolia, a global leader in emergency readiness and response, have announced the launch in Europe and the United States of an upgrade to its McMurdo FastFind 220 and Kannad SafeLink Solo personal location beacons (PLB) to include the Galileo Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS).

The PLBs are the world’s first to utilise Galileo’s capabilities and are the first in a series of new solutions coming from the EU-funded Helios project, led by Orolia, which was set up to leverage the power of Galileo. The launch follows approval from the U.S. Federal Communications Commission and continues Orolia’s innovation and leadership role in safety electronics.

Double achievement

“We are doubly proud of this achievement. The fact that this is the world’s first Galileo-enabled personal location beacon is in itself a significant milestone. That it comes as a result of a Horizon 2020 project managed by the GSA makes it even more satisfying. The GSA actively supports beacon manufacturers in implementing Galileo differentiators into their products and we are delighted to see these efforts deliver tangible results,” said European GNSS Agency (GSA) Executive Director Carlo des Dorides.

Watch this: What do you think about Galileo SAR?

Orolia multi-constellation capable beacons work with a wider range of satellites, offering increased global coverage and supporting accelerated rescue. Location detection is more precise because the beacons receive coordinates from both Galileo and the GPS constellations, and signals can even be detected in difficult locations, such as canyons.

Pole to Pole coverage

Galileo satellites make up part of the MEOSAR system, the next generation of the Cospas-Sarsat international Search and Rescue satellite system that has helped to save over 43,000 lives since 1982. With the launch of four new satellites in July 2018, the Galileo constellation now consists of 26 satellites (24 with SAR payload), from a planned 30, with a target of 2020 for completion of the network. The system launched in December 2016, allowing technology with Galileo-enabled receivers to use signals provided by the constellation for positioning, navigation and timing.

“We are thrilled to be launching our upgraded PLBs in the European and U.S. markets,” said Chris Loizou, Vice President of Maritime at Orolia. “The combination of both Galileo and GPS GNSS capability means that our customers will benefit from coverage that spans from the North to the South Pole. We work tirelessly to push the boundaries of product innovation and, ultimately, to give people the best chance of being rescued in an emergency situation.”

The McMurdo FastFind and Kannad SafeLink PLBs are part of Orolia’s comprehensive search and rescue ecosystem and join the McMurdo SmartFind G8 and Kannad SafePro series emergency position-indicating radio beacons (EPIRBs) as the first Galileo capable rescue beacons. Orolia’s McMurdo brand builds, integrates and tests products as part of a live search and rescue system. This ensures greater cohesion between distress signal transmission and reception so that beacon owners can feel confident that their signals will get to search and rescue authorities quickly.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The upgraded McMurdo FastFind 220 and Kannad SafeLink Solo Personal Location Beacons help save lives.

EGNOS and Galileo for aviation at World ATM Congress

19.2.2019 11:02  
The workshop will address the current status of EGNSS implementation in aviation, along with priorities for the future and R&D funding opportunities.
Published: 
19 February 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is organising a workshop on EGNOS and Galileo services for aviation on March 13 as part of the World ATM Congress in Madrid. At the session, a number of speakers will discuss the current status of EGNOS and Galileo implementation in the sector, potential new services and will gather priorities for research and development funding from the sector.

EGNOS currently enables localizer performance with vertical guidance (LPV), the performance-based navigation (PBN) alternative to ILS Cat I, supporting advanced arrival procedures and facilitating Point in Space (PinS) for helicopters. EGNOS positioning also increases the availability of ADS-B (Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast). Meanwhile, Galileo receivers are included in Search and Rescue beacons and new Galileo services for the aviation community are being explored.

At the workshop, which will take place at 10.10 – 11.10 in the FABEC Conference Room, GSA Market Development Officer and Horizon 2020 Coordinator Carmen Aguilera will provide an update on these and other EGNOS and Galileo services supporting aviation operations now and in the future. The session will also be an opportunity to discuss R&D priorities and new funding opportunities.

Supporting compliance

Christian Belleux, Director at PNT solution provider Orolia will talk at the workshop about how Galileo can help airlines comply with the upcoming European mandate on aircraft distress tracking and the new Standards and Recommended Practices (SARPs) from the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) relating to the location of an aeroplane in distress.

Read this: Help shape the future of Galileo and EGNOS

These new SARPs relate to Autonomous Distress Tracking (ADT), which is part of the Global Aeronautical Distress and Safety System (GADSS) initiative launched by ICAO, which became effective on 11 July 2016 and will be applicable from 1 January 2021. In Europe, the Rule on ‘location of an aircraft in distress’ – CAT.GEN.MPA.210 covers this ICAO provision and is applicable to large aeroplane manufacturers from Jan 2021 onwards.

Robustness and accuracy

In his presentation at the workshop, Pere Molina, Advanced Applications Programme Manager at GeoNumerics, will highlight how EGNSS (Galileo and EGNOS) can help smooth out drone integration into current and future ATM and UAV traffic management (UTM) concepts.

Drone technology is serving all kinds of professional applications related to the air segment - from inspection, surveillance and surveying, to package delivery and ultimately even passenger transport. These applications are safety- and/or liability-critical and the robustness and accuracy provided by EGNOS and Galileo has a lot to offer in this regard. However, the potential of EGNOS and Galileo are currently underexploited, which is a big missed opportunity, according to Molina.

And this: March 5 deadline approaching for 4th Horizon 2020 EGNSS Call

A representative from the European Satellite Services Provider (ESSP), which specialises in the operation and provision of satellite-based services for aviation, will discuss working with new EGNOS users to enable flying Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) in Visual Flight Rule (VFR) environments. To support the European Aviation Safety Agency’s (EASA) goal of enabling IFR for general aviation, all stakeholders will work together to identify topics that need further assessment and propose solutions where EGNOS can help increase safety levels.

World ATM Congress

Now in its seventh year, this year’s World ATM Congress will take place in IFEMA, Feria de Madrid, on 12-14 March and will bring together the world’s leading product developers, experts, stakeholders, and air navigation service providers (ANSPs) for three days of conference sessions, product demonstrations and launches, and educational and networking opportunities.

For more information, visit the WATM website.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The workshop will address the current status of EGNSS implementation in aviation, along with priorities for the future and R&D funding opportunities.

The March 5 deadline approaching for 4th Horizon 2020 EGNSS Call

13.2.2019 13:55  
The 4th Horizon 2020 EGNSS Call aims to leverage EGNSS innovation in support of economic growth, digitisation and environmental sustainability.
Published: 
13 February 2019

If you have an idea for an EGNSS solution addressing one or more of these challenges, be sure to submit your proposal before March 5, deadline for submissions in the 4th Horizon 2020 EGNSS Call. The call was opened last October with four topics aiming to tap into EGNSS-based innovation in support of economic growth, digitisation and environmental sustainability.

The 4th EGNSS-related Call aims to support the development of innovative downstream applications that use Galileo and/or EGNOS to address a range of societal challenges and is targeted at the EU GNSS industry, SMEs, universities, research organisations and public bodies.

Four topics, four challenges

The four topics in the call each address a specific challenge. The first targets EGNSS applications fostering green, safe and smart mobility and the development of EGNSS-based applications to lower emissions and make mobility safer and more cost-effective. The challenge of the second topic is to develop EGNSS applications fostering digitisation, helping to digitise products and services that address major societal challenges in areas such as health, citizen safety, smart cities, and other areas.

Read this: GSA opens new GSMC invitation to tenders

The third topic, on EGNSS applications fostering societal resilience and protecting the environment, aims to develop EGNSS applications that support societal resilience, safeguard the wellbeing of EU citizens, improve emergency and disaster management, and promote green growth. Finally, the last topic of Awareness raising and capacity building aims to create networks of industrial relationships in Europe and globally that leverage EGNSS excellence and facilitate EGNSS investments.

Information at your fingertips

Detailed information on all of these calls is available on the Horizon 2020 web portal. Furthermore, ahead of the call, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) together with the European Commission and COSMOS2020, the network of National Contact Points for Space, co-organised a Horizon 2020 International Space Information Day and Brokerage Event at the GSA’s Prague headquarters. You can find presentations from this event here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The 4th Horizon 2020 EGNSS Call aims to leverage EGNSS innovation in support of economic growth, digitisation and environmental sustainability.

The March 5 deadline approaching for 4th Horizon 2020 EGNSS Call

13.2.2019 13:55  
The 4th Horizon 2020 EGNSS Call aims to leverage EGNSS innovation in support of economic growth, digitisation and environmental sustainability.
Published: 
13 February 2019

If you have an idea for an EGNSS solution addressing one or more of these challenges, be sure to submit your proposal before March 5, deadline for submissions in the 4th Horizon 2020 EGNSS Call. The call was opened last October with four topics aiming to tap into EGNSS-based innovation in support of economic growth, digitisation and environmental sustainability.

The 4th EGNSS-related Call aims to support the development of innovative downstream applications that use Galileo and/or EGNOS to address a range of societal challenges and is targeted at the EU GNSS industry, SMEs, universities, research organisations and public bodies.

Four topics, four challenges

The four topics in the call each address a specific challenge. The first targets EGNSS applications fostering green, safe and smart mobility and the development of EGNSS-based applications to lower emissions and make mobility safer and more cost-effective. The challenge of the second topic is to develop EGNSS applications fostering digitisation, helping to digitise products and services that address major societal challenges in areas such as health, citizen safety, smart cities, and other areas.

Read this: GSA opens new GSMC invitation to tenders

The third topic, on EGNSS applications fostering societal resilience and protecting the environment, aims to develop EGNSS applications that support societal resilience, safeguard the wellbeing of EU citizens, improve emergency and disaster management, and promote green growth. Finally, the last topic of Awareness raising and capacity building aims to create networks of industrial relationships in Europe and globally that leverage EGNSS excellence and facilitate EGNSS investments.

Information at your fingertips

Detailed information on all of these calls is available on the Horizon 2020 web portal. Furthermore, ahead of the call, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) together with the European Commission and COSMOS2020, the network of National Contact Points for Space, co-organised a Horizon 2020 International Space Information Day and Brokerage Event at the GSA’s Prague headquarters. You can find presentations from this event here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The 4th Horizon 2020 EGNSS Call aims to leverage EGNSS innovation in support of economic growth, digitisation and environmental sustainability.

Latest batch of Galileo satellites enters service

12.2.2019 14:54  
The commissioning of the four latest Galileo satellites will result in better services to end users
Published: 
12 February 2019

The latest batch of four Galileo satellites - GSAT0219, GSAT0220, GSAT0221, and GSAT0222 - has been commissioned for operational use.

On 11 February 2019, the four satellites launched from the European spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana, on July 25 2018, were put into service following the completion of the relevant commissioning activities. This means that the Galileo constellation is now providing services with 22 satellites.

“This is another important milestone for Galileo and the European Union. Each satellite that is commissioned brings us closer to our full operating capacity. More satellites in operation mean better coverage and more availability, which translates into increased accuracy and better services for users,” European GNSS Agency (GSA) Executive Director Carlo des Dorides said. “The entry into service of the latest four satellites will boost Galileo service provision around the world.”

Thanks to the addition of four more satellites to the Galileo constellation, users will be able to reap the high accuracy benefits of multi-constellation capacity, but it goes further than that, according to Rodrigo da Costa, Galileo Services Programme Manager at the GSA.

“Today we finished the testing characterization of the satellites that were launched last July,” da Costa said. “The satellites are now ready to provide services to users, and with 22 satellites now in operation users will not only be able to benefit from Galileo signals in combination with other constellations, but the possibility of using Galileo as a stand-alone service also increases.”

GSA at the helm

The 10th Galileo launch was the second for which the GSA was responsible for the mission’s Early Orbit Phase (EOP) and In-Orbit Testing (IOT) phase, overseeing Spaceopal - a joint venture between Telespazio and DLR-GfR - in its role as Galileo Service Operator (GSOp).

The EOP and IOT are one of the most important phases of a space mission during which the satellite is launched, put into the correct orbit and the satellite platform and payload elements are gradually switched on and tested.

Galileo – because Accuracy Matters!

A huge number of end users stand to benefit from the improved coverage offered by the latest satellites. It is only just over two years since Galileo Initial Services were declared in December 2016, but already over 600 million devices around the world are using Galileo. To make Europeans more aware of how they are already benefitting from Galileo services, the European Union has launched the Accuracy Matters campaign.

The new campaign includes a series of short video clips that give an entertaining glimpse of everyday situations where ‘Accuracy Matters’ to anyone using location data on their smartphones. The videos can be viewed on a dedicated YouTube channel.

You can keep track of Galileo-enabled devices serving a variety of needs as they become available, by checking out: usegalileo.eu

Galileo status information

To stay up to date on the status of the Galileo constellation, you can also check the Constellation Status section of European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) website. What’s more, you can register on the GSC web portal to receive Notice Advisory to Galileo Users (NAGUs) automatically and, if you have any questions about Galileo, you are invited to contact the GSC Helpdesk.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The commissioning of the four latest Galileo satellites will result in better services to end users

Latest batch of Galileo satellites enters service

12.2.2019 14:54  
The commissioning of the four latest Galileo satellites will result in better services to end users
Published: 
12 February 2019

The latest batch of four Galileo satellites - GSAT0219, GSAT0220, GSAT0221, and GSAT0222 - has been commissioned for operational use.

On 11 February 2019, the four satellites launched from the European spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana, on July 25 2018, were put into service following the completion of the relevant commissioning activities. This means that the Galileo constellation is now providing services with 22 satellites.

“This is another important milestone for Galileo and the European Union. Each satellite that is commissioned brings us closer to our full operating capacity. More satellites in operation mean better coverage and more availability, which translates into increased accuracy and better services for users,” European GNSS Agency (GSA) Executive Director Carlo des Dorides said. “The entry into service of the latest four satellites will boost Galileo service provision around the world.”

Thanks to the addition of four more satellites to the Galileo constellation, users will be able to reap the high accuracy benefits of multi-constellation capacity, but it goes further than that, according to Rodrigo da Costa, Galileo Services Programme Manager at the GSA.

“Today we finished the testing characterization of the satellites that were launched last July,” da Costa said. “The satellites are now ready to provide services to users, and with 22 satellites now in operation users will not only be able to benefit from Galileo signals in combination with other constellations, but the possibility of using Galileo as a stand-alone service also increases.”

GSA at the helm

The 10th Galileo launch was the second for which the GSA was responsible for the mission’s Early Orbit Phase (EOP) and In-Orbit Testing (IOT) phase, overseeing Spaceopal - a joint venture between Telespazio and DLR-GfR - in its role as Galileo Service Operator (GSOp).

The EOP and IOT are one of the most important phases of a space mission during which the satellite is launched, put into the correct orbit and the satellite platform and payload elements are gradually switched on and tested.

Galileo – because Accuracy Matters!

A huge number of end users stand to benefit from the improved coverage offered by the latest satellites. It is only just over two years since Galileo Initial Services were declared in December 2016, but already over 600 million devices around the world are using Galileo. To make Europeans more aware of how they are already benefitting from Galileo services, the European Union has launched the Accuracy Matters campaign.

The new campaign includes a series of short video clips that give an entertaining glimpse of everyday situations where ‘Accuracy Matters’ to anyone using location data on their smartphones. The videos can be viewed on a dedicated YouTube channel.

You can keep track of Galileo-enabled devices serving a variety of needs as they become available, by checking out: usegalileo.eu

Galileo status information

To stay up to date on the status of the Galileo constellation, you can also check the Constellation Status section of European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) website. What’s more, you can register on the GSC web portal to receive Notice Advisory to Galileo Users (NAGUs) automatically and, if you have any questions about Galileo, you are invited to contact the GSC Helpdesk.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The commissioning of the four latest Galileo satellites will result in better services to end users

Satellite positioning is changing how we move

5.2.2019 14:56  
Satellite navigation is underpinning a revolution in mobility.
Published: 
05 February 2019

Mobility is changing. The way people and goods move on our roads is going through its biggest transformation in decades, driven by technology, connectivity and satellite positioning. A new video from the GSA - European GNSS for Smart Mobility - explores how Europe’s flagship satellite navigation programmes EGNOS and Galileo are at the heart of this transformation, making positioning more accurate, available and reliable.

Thanks to satellite navigation, cars, busses, trucks and even bicycles can communicate exactly where they are, and people with mobile phones are able to pinpoint their precise location and communicate with their preferred mode of transport. These advances are opening up new possibilities in road transport and changing the face of mobility.

The power of positioning

“We see that connectivity of people and connectivity of vehicles is so important when it comes to the efficiency of transport. Therefore the more accurate the positioning, the better services you can give to the users. That is why positioning is becoming more and more important,” said Jacob Bangsgaard, CEO of ERTICO-ITS Europe, a public-private partnership that develops, promotes and deploys Intelligent Transport Systems and Services (ITS).

Read this: Galileo is critical for autonomous driving

New mobile apps that match supply and demand and offer different transport modes are increasingly commonplace in urban life and Mobility as a Service (MaaS) provides access to a variety of transport services using a single front-end app. What’s more, the Internet of Things, where freight is equipped with location devices, allows for more efficient and innovative multi-modal transport, optimised routes and shared resources.

“Increasingly businesses and users want direct connection to the Internet and location. It is necessary to have devices mounted on many things, so whether this is bicycles or trailers on trucks, you need a very robust, low-power approach,” said Steve Beck, General Manager, Telecommunications R&D Group at Sony Europe.

Safer roads

The eCall emergency response system, mandated for all new car and light van models sold in the EU since 31 March 2018, leverages Galileo signals to alert emergency services in the event of an accident and provide them with an accurate location.

“Satellite positioning is already standard for today’s car navigation systems, and enables safety systems such as eCall in the case of an emergency or an accident and allows car-to-car or car-to-infrastructure communication,” said Steffi Lang from engineering and electronics multinational Bosch. “Looking to the future – for highly automated driving we need to have a robust, safe and precise localisation, and satellite navigation is a main contributor to this.”

And this: Introducing the MyGalileoApp Competition

The high level of integrity offered by Galileo also powers a range of innovative solutions, including pay-as-you-drive schemes for insurance premiums or road taxes. Public transport is also leveraging location information to further improve its services.

“For us as a semiconductor company, having Galileo and other signals really allows us to open markets that were not really possible before,” said Luis Serrano, Technical Marketing Manager ADAS & GNSS at STMicroelectronics.

As technology evolves and positioning becomes more robust, vehicles will become ever more autonomous and connected. This will increase safety and fundamentally change the way we move. Fully personalised unique journey planning and management models will identify the best transport option for users through a smart combination of public transport and vehicle renting or sharing, based on their travel needs. Accurate and reliable location is at the core of this new transport paradigm.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Satellite navigation is underpinning a revolution in mobility.

Satellite positioning is changing how we move

5.2.2019 14:56  
Satellite navigation is underpinning a revolution in mobility.
Published: 
05 February 2019

Mobility is changing. The way people and goods move on our roads is going through its biggest transformation in decades, driven by technology, connectivity and satellite positioning. A new video from the GSA - European GNSS for Smart Mobility - explores how Europe’s flagship satellite navigation programmes EGNOS and Galileo are at the heart of this transformation, making positioning more accurate, available and reliable.

Thanks to satellite navigation, cars, busses, trucks and even bicycles can communicate exactly where they are, and people with mobile phones are able to pinpoint their precise location and communicate with their preferred mode of transport. These advances are opening up new possibilities in road transport and changing the face of mobility.

The power of positioning

“We see that connectivity of people and connectivity of vehicles is so important when it comes to the efficiency of transport. Therefore the more accurate the positioning, the better services you can give to the users. That is why positioning is becoming more and more important,” said Jacob Bangsgaard, CEO of ERTICO-ITS Europe, a public-private partnership that develops, promotes and deploys Intelligent Transport Systems and Services (ITS).

Read this: Galileo is critical for autonomous driving

New mobile apps that match supply and demand and offer different transport modes are increasingly commonplace in urban life and Mobility as a Service (MaaS) provides access to a variety of transport services using a single front-end app. What’s more, the Internet of Things, where freight is equipped with location devices, allows for more efficient and innovative multi-modal transport, optimised routes and shared resources.

“Increasingly businesses and users want direct connection to the Internet and location. It is necessary to have devices mounted on many things, so whether this is bicycles or trailers on trucks, you need a very robust, low-power approach,” said Steve Beck, General Manager, Telecommunications R&D Group at Sony Europe.

Safer roads

The eCall emergency response system, mandated for all new car and light van models sold in the EU since 31 March 2018, leverages Galileo signals to alert emergency services in the event of an accident and provide them with an accurate location.

“Satellite positioning is already standard for today’s car navigation systems, and enables safety systems such as eCall in the case of an emergency or an accident and allows car-to-car or car-to-infrastructure communication,” said Steffi Lang from engineering and electronics multinational Bosch. “Looking to the future – for highly automated driving we need to have a robust, safe and precise localisation, and satellite navigation is a main contributor to this.”

And this: Introducing the MyGalileoApp Competition

The high level of integrity offered by Galileo also powers a range of innovative solutions, including pay-as-you-drive schemes for insurance premiums or road taxes. Public transport is also leveraging location information to further improve its services.

“For us as a semiconductor company, having Galileo and other signals really allows us to open markets that were not really possible before,” said Luis Serrano, Technical Marketing Manager ADAS & GNSS at STMicroelectronics.

As technology evolves and positioning becomes more robust, vehicles will become ever more autonomous and connected. This will increase safety and fundamentally change the way we move. Fully personalised unique journey planning and management models will identify the best transport option for users through a smart combination of public transport and vehicle renting or sharing, based on their travel needs. Accurate and reliable location is at the core of this new transport paradigm.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Satellite navigation is underpinning a revolution in mobility.

Satellite positioning is changing how we move

5.2.2019 14:56  
Satellite navigation is underpinning a revolution in mobility.
Published: 
05 February 2019

Mobility is changing. The way people and goods move on our roads is going through its biggest transformation in decades, driven by technology, connectivity and satellite positioning. A new video from the GSA - European GNSS for Smart Mobility - explores how Europe’s flagship satellite navigation programmes EGNOS and Galileo are at the heart of this transformation, making positioning more accurate, available and reliable.

Thanks to satellite navigation, cars, busses, trucks and even bicycles can communicate exactly where they are, and people with mobile phones are able to pinpoint their precise location and communicate with their preferred mode of transport. These advances are opening up new possibilities in road transport and changing the face of mobility.

The power of positioning

“We see that connectivity of people and connectivity of vehicles is so important when it comes to the efficiency of transport. Therefore the more accurate the positioning, the better services you can give to the users. That is why positioning is becoming more and more important,” said Jacob Bangsgaard, CEO of ERTICO-ITS Europe, a public-private partnership that develops, promotes and deploys Intelligent Transport Systems and Services (ITS).

Read this: Galileo is critical for autonomous driving

New mobile apps that match supply and demand and offer different transport modes are increasingly commonplace in urban life and Mobility as a Service (MaaS) provides access to a variety of transport services using a single front-end app. What’s more, the Internet of Things, where freight is equipped with location devices, allows for more efficient and innovative multi-modal transport, optimised routes and shared resources.

“Increasingly businesses and users want direct connection to the Internet and location. It is necessary to have devices mounted on many things, so whether this is bicycles or trailers on trucks, you need a very robust, low-power approach,” said Steve Beck, General Manager, Telecommunications R&D Group at Sony Europe.

Safer roads

The eCall emergency response system, mandated for all new car and light van models sold in the EU since 31 March 2018, leverages Galileo signals to alert emergency services in the event of an accident and provide them with an accurate location.

“Satellite positioning is already standard for today’s car navigation systems, and enables safety systems such as eCall in the case of an emergency or an accident and allows car-to-car or car-to-infrastructure communication,” said Steffi Lang from engineering and electronics multinational Bosch. “Looking to the future – for highly automated driving we need to have a robust, safe and precise localisation, and satellite navigation is a main contributor to this.”

And this: Introducing the MyGalileoApp Competition

The high level of integrity offered by Galileo also powers a range of innovative solutions, including pay-as-you-drive schemes for insurance premiums or road taxes. Public transport is also leveraging location information to further improve its services.

“For us as a semiconductor company, having Galileo and other signals really allows us to open markets that were not really possible before,” said Luis Serrano, Technical Marketing Manager ADAS & GNSS at STMicroelectronics.

As technology evolves and positioning becomes more robust, vehicles will become ever more autonomous and connected. This will increase safety and fundamentally change the way we move. Fully personalised unique journey planning and management models will identify the best transport option for users through a smart combination of public transport and vehicle renting or sharing, based on their travel needs. Accurate and reliable location is at the core of this new transport paradigm.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Satellite navigation is underpinning a revolution in mobility.

GSA opens new GSMC invitation to tenders

4.2.2019 14:35  
The operational interface system will allow operators to work more efficiently from a single workplace
Published: 
04 February 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) has just opened an invitation to tenders targeting the development of an “Operational Interface System for the GSMC”.

The Galileo Security Monitoring Centre (GSMC) has space constraints in the TEMPEST secure area which, in turn, is putting a damper on the deployment of the system. These constraints are primarily due to the fact that dedicated terminals and desktops are physically attached to each system in the GSMC sites. As a result, when the number of systems grows, the required number of terminals also increases.

Scope of the Call

To address this situation, the GSA aims to procure a security accredited operational interface system (OIS) that connects each of the GSA systems and their instances to every workstation in the appropriate operational area. The OIS/KVM switch will allow multiple users to access any of the interconnected systems’ instances via any of the workstations.

The baseline for this Contract is to have a minimum of eight workstations with OIS accessibility designed, developed and deployed at the GSMC site in Saint-Germain-en-Laye, France (GSMC-FR).

The OIS design shall allow:

  • Management of physical space constraints,
  • Operators to work more efficiently from a single workplace instead of moving between the current standalone workplaces,
  • Improvements of work flexibility, and
  • Improvements of scalability for the future deployment of the systems.

If you would like to find out more on how to prepare a successful bid, register to take part in a dedicated webinar to be held on 19 February 2019, from 11.00 am to 12.00 pm CET. At the webinar, GSA staff will present the technical and administrative requirements, as well as the optional functionalities and cyber requirements necessary to prepare a successful bid. You can register for the webinar here.

  

The Call at a Glance

     
   Deadline for submission of bids:   2 May 2019   
   Expected signature of contract:   July 2019   
   EU budget:   EUR 950,000 (100 % funding)   
   Webinar date:   19 February 2019, 11.00 CET   
   To apply, click here.      

Role of GSMC in the Galileo Programme

The Galileo Security Monitoring Centre (GSMC) is an operational centre of the GSA and an integral part of the Galileo infrastructure. Its mission is to provide an EU facility that offers a secure way for Public Regulated Service (PRS) users to interact with the Galileo System Operator.

This will simplify the operation of the Galileo system and provide assurance to PRS users that sensitive information related to their use of Galileo is properly managed and protected. The GSMC also coordinates the implementation of Joint Action instructions received from the EU SitCen (Situation Centre).

The GSA is responsible for the operation of the GSMCs within the Galileo system, undertaking the following specific missions:

  • Management of PRS access,
  • Galileo security monitoring,
  • Response to European GNSS crisis and security events,
  • Provision of European GNSS security expertise and analysis.

Webinar details

When: 19 February 2019, from 11.00 am to 12.00 pm CET.

Register to the webinar here. To find how to register and participate in the dedicated webinar, please read all the instructions here

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The operational interface system will allow operators to work more efficiently from a single workplace

GSA opens new GSMC invitation to tenders

4.2.2019 14:35  
The operational interface system will allow operators to work more efficiently from a single workplace
Published: 
04 February 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) has just opened an invitation to tenders targeting the development of an “Operational Interface System for the GSMC”.

The Galileo Security Monitoring Centre (GSMC) has space constraints in the TEMPEST secure area which, in turn, is putting a damper on the deployment of the system. These constraints are primarily due to the fact that dedicated terminals and desktops are physically attached to each system in the GSMC sites. As a result, when the number of systems grows, the required number of terminals also increases.

Scope of the Call

To address this situation, the GSA aims to procure a security accredited operational interface system (OIS) that connects each of the GSA systems and their instances to every workstation in the appropriate operational area. The OIS/KVM switch will allow multiple users to access any of the interconnected systems’ instances via any of the workstations.

The baseline for this Contract is to have a minimum of eight workstations with OIS accessibility designed, developed and deployed at the GSMC site in Saint-Germain-en-Laye, France (GSMC-FR).

The OIS design shall allow:

  • Management of physical space constraints,
  • Operators to work more efficiently from a single workplace instead of moving between the current standalone workplaces,
  • Improvements of work flexibility, and
  • Improvements of scalability for the future deployment of the systems.

If you would like to find out more on how to prepare a successful bid, register to take part in a dedicated webinar to be held on 19 February 2019, from 11.00 am to 12.00 pm CET. At the webinar, GSA staff will present the technical and administrative requirements, as well as the optional functionalities and cyber requirements necessary to prepare a successful bid. You can join the webinar here.

  

The Call at a Glance

     
   Deadline for submission of bids:   2 May 2019   
   Expected signature of contract:   July 2019   
   EU budget:   EUR 950,000 (100 % funding)   
   Webinar date:   19 February 2019, 11.00 CET   
   To apply, click here.      

Role of GSMC in the Galileo Programme

The Galileo Security Monitoring Centre (GSMC) is an operational centre of the GSA and an integral part of the Galileo infrastructure. Its mission is to provide an EU facility that offers a secure way for Public Regulated Service (PRS) users to interact with the Galileo System Operator.

This will simplify the operation of the Galileo system and provide assurance to PRS users that sensitive information related to their use of Galileo is properly managed and protected. The GSMC also coordinates the implementation of Joint Action instructions received from the EU SitCen (Situation Centre).

The GSA is responsible for the operation of the GSMCs within the Galileo system, undertaking the following specific missions:

  • Management of PRS access,
  • Galileo security monitoring,
  • Response to European GNSS crisis and security events,
  • Provision of European GNSS security expertise and analysis.

Webinar details

When: 19 February 2019, from 11.00 am to 12.00 pm CET.

Join the webinar here. To find how to register and participate in the dedicated webinar, please read all the instructions here

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The operational interface system will allow operators to work more efficiently from a single workplace

GSA opens new GSMC invitation to tenders

4.2.2019 14:35  
The operational interface system will allow operators to work more efficiently from a single workplace
Published: 
04 February 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) has just opened an invitation to tenders targeting the development of an “Operational Interface System for the GSMC”.

The Galileo Security Monitoring Centre (GSMC) has space constraints in the TEMPEST secure area which, in turn, is putting a damper on the deployment of the system. These constraints are primarily due to the fact that dedicated terminals and desktops are physically attached to each system in the GSMC sites. As a result, when the number of systems grows, the required number of terminals also increases.

Scope of the Call

To address this situation, the GSA aims to procure a security accredited operational interface system (OIS) that connects each of the GSA systems and their instances to every workstation in the appropriate operational area. The OIS/KVM switch will allow multiple users to access any of the interconnected systems’ instances via any of the workstations.

The baseline for this Contract is to have a minimum of eight workstations with OIS accessibility designed, developed and deployed at the GSMC site in Saint-Germain-en-Laye, France (GSMC-FR).

The OIS design shall allow:

  • Management of physical space constraints,
  • Operators to work more efficiently from a single workplace instead of moving between the current standalone workplaces,
  • Improvements of work flexibility, and
  • Improvements of scalability for the future deployment of the systems.

If you would like to find out more on how to prepare a successful bid, register to take part in a dedicated webinar to be held on 19 February 2019. At the webinar, GSA staff will present the technical and administrative requirements, as well as the optional functionalities and cyber requirements necessary to prepare a successful bid.

  

The Call at a Glance

     
   Deadline for submission of bids:   2 May 2019   
   Expected signature of contract:   July 2019   
   EU budget:   EUR 950,000 (100 % funding)   
   Webinar date:   19 February 2019 (registration to open soon)   
   To apply, click here.      

Role of GSMC in the Galileo Programme

The Galileo Security Monitoring Centre (GSMC) is an operational centre of the GSA and an integral part of the Galileo infrastructure. Its mission is to provide an EU facility that offers a secure way for Public Regulated Service (PRS) users to interact with the Galileo System Operator.

This will simplify the operation of the Galileo system and provide assurance to PRS users that sensitive information related to their use of Galileo is properly managed and protected. The GSMC also coordinates the implementation of Joint Action instructions received from the EU SitCen (Situation Centre).

The GSA is responsible for the operation of the GSMCs within the Galileo system, undertaking the following specific missions:

  • Management of PRS access,
  • Galileo security monitoring,
  • Response to European GNSS crisis and security events,
  • Provision of European GNSS security expertise and analysis.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The operational interface system will allow operators to work more efficiently from a single workplace

GSA opens new GSMC invitation to tenders

4.2.2019 14:35  
The operational interface system will allow operators to work more efficiently from a single workplace
Published: 
04 February 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) has just opened an invitation to tenders targeting the development of an “Operational Interface System for the GSMC”.

The Galileo Security Monitoring Centre (GSMC) has space constraints in the TEMPEST secure area which, in turn, is putting a damper on the deployment of the system. These constraints are primarily due to the fact that dedicated terminals and desktops are physically attached to each system in the GSMC sites. As a result, when the number of systems grows, the required number of terminals also increases.

Scope of the Call

To address this situation, the GSA aims to procure a security accredited operational interface system (OIS) that connects each of the GSA systems and their instances to every workstation in the appropriate operational area. The OIS/KVM switch will allow multiple users to access any of the interconnected systems’ instances via any of the workstations.

The baseline for this Contract is to have a minimum of eight workstations with OIS accessibility designed, developed and deployed at the GSMC site in Saint-Germain-en-Laye, France (GSMC-FR).

The OIS design shall allow:

  • Management of physical space constraints,
  • Operators to work more efficiently from a single workplace instead of moving between the current standalone workplaces,
  • Improvements of work flexibility, and
  • Improvements of scalability for the future deployment of the systems.

If you would like to find out more on how to prepare a successful bid, register to take part in a dedicated webinar to be held on 19 February 2019, from 11.00 am to 12.00 pm CET. At the webinar, GSA staff will present the technical and administrative requirements, as well as the optional functionalities and cyber requirements necessary to prepare a successful bid. You can join the webinar here.

  

The Call at a Glance

     
   Deadline for submission of bids:   2 May 2019   
   Expected signature of contract:   July 2019   
   EU budget:   EUR 950,000 (100 % funding)   
   Webinar date:   19 February 2019, 11.00 CET   
   To apply, click here.      

Role of GSMC in the Galileo Programme

The Galileo Security Monitoring Centre (GSMC) is an operational centre of the GSA and an integral part of the Galileo infrastructure. Its mission is to provide an EU facility that offers a secure way for Public Regulated Service (PRS) users to interact with the Galileo System Operator.

This will simplify the operation of the Galileo system and provide assurance to PRS users that sensitive information related to their use of Galileo is properly managed and protected. The GSMC also coordinates the implementation of Joint Action instructions received from the EU SitCen (Situation Centre).

The GSA is responsible for the operation of the GSMCs within the Galileo system, undertaking the following specific missions:

  • Management of PRS access,
  • Galileo security monitoring,
  • Response to European GNSS crisis and security events,
  • Provision of European GNSS security expertise and analysis.

Webinar details

When: 19 February 2019, from 11.00 am to 12.00 pm CET.

Join the webinar here. To find how to register and participate in the dedicated webinar, please read all the instructions here

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The operational interface system will allow operators to work more efficiently from a single workplace

GSA opens new GSMC invitation to tenders

4.2.2019 14:35  
The operational interface system will allow operators to work more efficiently from a single workplace
Published: 
04 February 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) has just opened an invitation to tenders targeting the development of an “Operational Interface System for the GSMC”.

The Galileo Security Monitoring Centre (GSMC) has space constraints in the TEMPEST secure area which, in turn, is putting a damper on the deployment of the system. These constraints are primarily due to the fact that dedicated terminals and desktops are physically attached to each system in the GSMC sites. As a result, when the number of systems grows, the required number of terminals also increases.

Scope of the Call

To address this situation, the GSA aims to procure a security accredited operational interface system (OIS) that connects each of the GSA systems and their instances to every workstation in the appropriate operational area. The OIS/KVM switch will allow multiple users to access any of the interconnected systems’ instances via any of the workstations.

The baseline for this Contract is to have a minimum of eight workstations with OIS accessibility designed, developed and deployed at the GSMC site in Saint-Germain-en-Laye, France (GSMC-FR).

The OIS design shall allow:

  • Management of physical space constraints,
  • Operators to work more efficiently from a single workplace instead of moving between the current standalone workplaces,
  • Improvements of work flexibility, and
  • Improvements of scalability for the future deployment of the systems.

If you would like to find out more on how to prepare a successful bid, register to take part in a dedicated webinar to be held on 19 February 2019, from 11.00 am to 12.00 pm CET. At the webinar, GSA staff will present the technical and administrative requirements, as well as the optional functionalities and cyber requirements necessary to prepare a successful bid. You can join the webinar here.

  

The Call at a Glance

     
   Deadline for submission of bids:   2 May 2019   
   Expected signature of contract:   July 2019   
   EU budget:   EUR 950,000 (100 % funding)   
   Webinar date:   19 February 2019, 11.00 CET   
   To apply, click here.      

Role of GSMC in the Galileo Programme

The Galileo Security Monitoring Centre (GSMC) is an operational centre of the GSA and an integral part of the Galileo infrastructure. Its mission is to provide an EU facility that offers a secure way for Public Regulated Service (PRS) users to interact with the Galileo System Operator.

This will simplify the operation of the Galileo system and provide assurance to PRS users that sensitive information related to their use of Galileo is properly managed and protected. The GSMC also coordinates the implementation of Joint Action instructions received from the EU SitCen (Situation Centre).

The GSA is responsible for the operation of the GSMCs within the Galileo system, undertaking the following specific missions:

  • Management of PRS access,
  • Galileo security monitoring,
  • Response to European GNSS crisis and security events,
  • Provision of European GNSS security expertise and analysis.

Webinar details

When: 19 February 2019, from 11.00 am to 12.00 pm CET.

Join the webinar here. To find how to register and participate in the dedicated webinar, please read all the instructions here

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The operational interface system will allow operators to work more efficiently from a single workplace

GSA opens new GSMC invitation to tenders

4.2.2019 14:35  
The operational interface system will allow operators to work more efficiently from a single workplace
Published: 
04 February 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) has just opened an invitation to tenders targeting the development of an “Operational Interface System for the GSMC”.

The Galileo Security Monitoring Centre (GSMC) has space constraints in the TEMPEST secure area which, in turn, is putting a damper on the deployment of the system. These constraints are primarily due to the fact that dedicated terminals and desktops are physically attached to each system in the GSMC sites. As a result, when the number of systems grows, the required number of terminals also increases.

Scope of the Call

To address this situation, the GSA aims to procure a security accredited operational interface system (OIS) that connects each of the GSA systems and their instances to every workstation in the appropriate operational area. The OIS/KVM switch will allow multiple users to access any of the interconnected systems’ instances via any of the workstations.

The baseline for this Contract is to have a minimum of eight workstations with OIS accessibility designed, developed and deployed at the GSMC site in Saint-Germain-en-Laye, France (GSMC-FR).

The OIS design shall allow:

  • Management of physical space constraints,
  • Operators to work more efficiently from a single workplace instead of moving between the current standalone workplaces,
  • Improvements of work flexibility, and
  • Improvements of scalability for the future deployment of the systems.

If you would like to find out more on how to prepare a successful bid, register to take part in a dedicated webinar to be held on 19 February 2019, from 11.00 am to 12.00 pm CET. At the webinar, GSA staff will present the technical and administrative requirements, as well as the optional functionalities and cyber requirements necessary to prepare a successful bid. You can join the webinar here.

  

The Call at a Glance

     
   Deadline for submission of bids:   2 May 2019   
   Expected signature of contract:   July 2019   
   EU budget:   EUR 950,000 (100 % funding)   
   Webinar date:   19 February 2019, 11.00 CET   
   To apply, click here.      

Role of GSMC in the Galileo Programme

The Galileo Security Monitoring Centre (GSMC) is an operational centre of the GSA and an integral part of the Galileo infrastructure. Its mission is to provide an EU facility that offers a secure way for Public Regulated Service (PRS) users to interact with the Galileo System Operator.

This will simplify the operation of the Galileo system and provide assurance to PRS users that sensitive information related to their use of Galileo is properly managed and protected. The GSMC also coordinates the implementation of Joint Action instructions received from the EU SitCen (Situation Centre).

The GSA is responsible for the operation of the GSMCs within the Galileo system, undertaking the following specific missions:

  • Management of PRS access,
  • Galileo security monitoring,
  • Response to European GNSS crisis and security events,
  • Provision of European GNSS security expertise and analysis.

Webinar details

When: 19 February 2019, from 11.00 am to 12.00 pm CET.

Join the webinar here. To find how to register and participate in the dedicated webinar, please read all the instructions here

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The operational interface system will allow operators to work more efficiently from a single workplace

GSA opens new GSMC invitation to tenders

4.2.2019 14:35  
The operational interface system will allow operators to work more efficiently from a single workplace
Published: 
04 February 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) has just opened an invitation to tenders targeting the development of an “Operational Interface System for the GSMC”.

The Galileo Security Monitoring Centre (GSMC) has space constraints in the TEMPEST secure area which, in turn, is putting a damper on the deployment of the system. These constraints are primarily due to the fact that dedicated terminals and desktops are physically attached to each system in the GSMC sites. As a result, when the number of systems grows, the required number of terminals also increases.

Scope of the Call

To address this situation, the GSA aims to procure a security accredited operational interface system (OIS) that connects each of the GSA systems and their instances to every workstation in the appropriate operational area. The OIS/KVM switch will allow multiple users to access any of the interconnected systems’ instances via any of the workstations.

The baseline for this Contract is to have a minimum of eight workstations with OIS accessibility designed, developed and deployed at the GSMC site in Saint-Germain-en-Laye, France (GSMC-FR).

The OIS design shall allow:

  • Management of physical space constraints,
  • Operators to work more efficiently from a single workplace instead of moving between the current standalone workplaces,
  • Improvements of work flexibility, and
  • Improvements of scalability for the future deployment of the systems.

If you would like to find out more on how to prepare a successful bid, register to take part in a dedicated webinar to be held on 19 February 2019. At the webinar, GSA staff will present the technical and administrative requirements, as well as the optional functionalities and cyber requirements necessary to prepare a successful bid.

  

The Call at a Glance

     
   Deadline for submission of bids:   1 May 2019   
   Expected signature of contract:   July 2019   
   EU budget:   EUR 950,000 (100 % funding)   
   Webinar date:   19 February 2019 (registration to open soon)   
   To apply, click here.      

Role of GSMC in the Galileo Programme

The Galileo Security Monitoring Centre (GSMC) is an operational centre of the GSA and an integral part of the Galileo infrastructure. Its mission is to provide an EU facility that offers a secure way for Public Regulated Service (PRS) users to interact with the Galileo System Operator.

This will simplify the operation of the Galileo system and provide assurance to PRS users that sensitive information related to their use of Galileo is properly managed and protected. The GSMC also coordinates the implementation of Joint Action instructions received from the EU SitCen (Situation Centre).

The GSA is responsible for the operation of the GSMCs within the Galileo system, undertaking the following specific missions:

  • Management of PRS access,
  • Galileo security monitoring,
  • Response to European GNSS crisis and security events,
  • Provision of European GNSS security expertise and analysis.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The operational interface system will allow operators to work more efficiently from a single workplace

GSA opens new GSMC invitation to tenders

4.2.2019 14:35  
The operational interface system will allow operators to work more efficiently from a single workplace
Published: 
04 February 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) has just opened an invitation to tenders targeting the development of an “Operational Interface System for the GSMC”.

The Galileo Security Monitoring Centre (GSMC) has space constraints in the TEMPEST secure area which, in turn, is putting a damper on the deployment of the system. These constraints are primarily due to the fact that dedicated terminals and desktops are physically attached to each system in the GSMC sites. As a result, when the number of systems grows, the required number of terminals also increases.

Scope of the Call

To address this situation, the GSA aims to procure a security accredited operational interface system (OIS) that connects each of the GSA systems and their instances to every workstation in the appropriate operational area. The OIS/KVM switch will allow multiple users to access any of the interconnected systems’ instances via any of the workstations.

The baseline for this Contract is to have a minimum of eight workstations with OIS accessibility designed, developed and deployed at the GSMC site in Saint-Germain-en-Laye, France (GSMC-FR).

The OIS design shall allow:

  • Management of physical space constraints,
  • Operators to work more efficiently from a single workplace instead of moving between the current standalone workplaces,
  • Improvements of work flexibility, and
  • Improvements of scalability for the future deployment of the systems.

If you would like to find out more on how to prepare a successful bid, register to take part in a dedicated webinar to be held on 19 February 2019, from 11 am to 12 pm CET. At the webinar, GSA staff will present the technical and administrative requirements, as well as the optional functionalities and cyber requirements necessary to prepare a successful bid. You can register in the webinar here.

  

The Call at a Glance

     
   Deadline for submission of bids:   2 May 2019   
   Expected signature of contract:   July 2019   
   EU budget:   EUR 950,000 (100 % funding)   
   Webinar date:   19 February 2019 (registration to open soon)   
   To apply, click here.      

Role of GSMC in the Galileo Programme

The Galileo Security Monitoring Centre (GSMC) is an operational centre of the GSA and an integral part of the Galileo infrastructure. Its mission is to provide an EU facility that offers a secure way for Public Regulated Service (PRS) users to interact with the Galileo System Operator.

This will simplify the operation of the Galileo system and provide assurance to PRS users that sensitive information related to their use of Galileo is properly managed and protected. The GSMC also coordinates the implementation of Joint Action instructions received from the EU SitCen (Situation Centre).

The GSA is responsible for the operation of the GSMCs within the Galileo system, undertaking the following specific missions:

  • Management of PRS access,
  • Galileo security monitoring,
  • Response to European GNSS crisis and security events,
  • Provision of European GNSS security expertise and analysis.

Webinar details

When: 19 February 2019, from 11 am to 12 pm CET

Register to the webinar here

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The operational interface system will allow operators to work more efficiently from a single workplace

GSA opens new GSMC invitation to tenders

4.2.2019 14:35  
The operational interface system will allow operators to work more efficiently from a single workplace
Published: 
04 February 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) has just opened an invitation to tenders targeting the development of an “Operational Interface System for the GSMC”.

The Galileo Security Monitoring Centre (GSMC) has space constraints in the TEMPEST secure area which, in turn, is putting a damper on the deployment of the system. These constraints are primarily due to the fact that dedicated terminals and desktops are physically attached to each system in the GSMC sites. As a result, when the number of systems grows, the required number of terminals also increases.

Scope of the Call

To address this situation, the GSA aims to procure a security accredited operational interface system (OIS) that connects each of the GSA systems and their instances to every workstation in the appropriate operational area. The OIS/KVM switch will allow multiple users to access any of the interconnected systems’ instances via any of the workstations.

The baseline for this Contract is to have a minimum of eight workstations with OIS accessibility designed, developed and deployed at the GSMC site in Saint-Germain-en-Laye, France (GSMC-FR).

The OIS design shall allow:

  • Management of physical space constraints,
  • Operators to work more efficiently from a single workplace instead of moving between the current standalone workplaces,
  • Improvements of work flexibility, and
  • Improvements of scalability for the future deployment of the systems.

If you would like to find out more on how to prepare a successful bid, take part in a dedicated webinar to be held on 19 February 2019, from 11.00 am to 12.00 pm CET. At the webinar, GSA staff will present the technical and administrative requirements, as well as the optional functionalities and cyber requirements necessary to prepare a successful bid. You can join the webinar here.

  

The Call at a Glance

     
   Deadline for submission of bids:   2 May 2019   
   Expected signature of contract:   July 2019   
   EU budget:   EUR 950,000 (100 % funding)   
   Webinar date:   19 February 2019, 11.00 CET   
   To apply, click here.      

Role of GSMC in the Galileo Programme

The Galileo Security Monitoring Centre (GSMC) is an operational centre of the GSA and an integral part of the Galileo infrastructure. Its mission is to provide an EU facility that offers a secure way for Public Regulated Service (PRS) users to interact with the Galileo System Operator.

This will simplify the operation of the Galileo system and provide assurance to PRS users that sensitive information related to their use of Galileo is properly managed and protected. The GSMC also coordinates the implementation of Joint Action instructions received from the EU SitCen (Situation Centre).

The GSA is responsible for the operation of the GSMCs within the Galileo system, undertaking the following specific missions:

  • Management of PRS access,
  • Galileo security monitoring,
  • Response to European GNSS crisis and security events,
  • Provision of European GNSS security expertise and analysis.

Webinar details

When: 19 February 2019, from 11.00 am to 12.00 pm CET.

Join the webinar here. To find how to register and participate in the dedicated webinar, please read all the instructions here

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The operational interface system will allow operators to work more efficiently from a single workplace

Getting ready for the evolution of EGNOS

1.2.2019 11:48  
Published: 
01 February 2019

The EGNOS Service Provision (ESP) consists in delivering three types of services: the Open Service (OS), the Safety of Life service (SoL) and EGNOS Data Access Services (EDAS). The current EGNOS System was developed in early 2000’s, and is to be replaced by a new generation “EGNOS V 3”. 

This latter will augment both GPS and Galileo, provide additional SBAS service capabilities through a new SBAS channel on L5 and will benefit from a reinforced security to increase the robustness of EGNOS services to potential threats.

Presently, the provision of EGNOS Services is ensured via the current ESP contract, which continues until the end of 2021, as a baseline.

The next EGNOS Service Provider is expected to be in charge of the delivery of EGNOS services based on EGNOS Version 2 infrastructure first, then on EGNOS Version 3 infrastructure.

The contract is expected to be signed before end-2020, with a duration of 6 to 8 years. 

The GSA has published a Prior Information Notice OJ/S S22 31/01/2019 47118-2019-EN in the Official Journal of the European Union, containing the above and further information for the contemplated procurement. 

The full Prior Information Notice may be found here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Getting ready for the evolution of EGNOS

1.2.2019 11:48  
Published: 
31 January 2019

The EGNOS Service Provision (ESP) consists in delivering three types of services: the Open Service (OS), the Safety of Life service (SoL) and EGNOS Data Access Services (EDAS). The current EGNOS System was developed in early 2000’s, and is to be replaced by a new generation “EGNOS V3”. 

This latter will augment both GPS and Galileo, provide additional SBAS service capabilities through a new SBAS channel on L5 and will benefit from a reinforced security to increase the robustness of EGNOS services to potential threats.

Presently, the provision of EGNOS Services is ensured via the current ESP contract, which continues until the end of 2021, as a baseline.

The next EGNOS Service Provider is expected to be in charge of the delivery of EGNOS services based on EGNOS V2 infrastructure first, then on EGNOS V3 infrastructure.

The contract is expected to be signed before end-2020, with a duration of 6 to 8 years. 

The GSA has published a Prior Information Notice OJ/S S22 31/01/2019 47118-2019-EN in the Official Journal of the European Union, containing the above and further information for the contemplated procurement. 

The full Prior Information Notice may be found here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Galileo is key to Europe's digital economy

31.1.2019 16:28  
Participants in the European Space Policy Conference heard how Galileo is a cornerstone of the strategy for a European Single Digital Economy
Published: 
31 January 2019

At the 11th European Space Policy Conference in Brussels, GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides explained why Europe's flagship satellite navigation system, Galileo, is a cornerstone of the strategy for a European Single Digital Economy.

The global economy is rapidly being digitised. Information and communications technologies are no longer confined to a specific sector but constitute the foundation of all modern innovative economic systems. Connectivity, in particular, is now seen as a key enabler of a multitude of new services that are transforming the global scene.

"The future of intelligent connectivity is going hand-in-hand with the future of GNSS," said GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides, speaking at the 11th European Space Policy Conference in Brussels.

Important milestone

The term ‘intelligent connectivity’ describes the powerful combination of flexible, high-speed 5G networks, the Internet of Things (IoT), artificial intelligence (AI) and big data. Today, location plays a major role in all of these developments, with navigation and Earth observation data combining to provide the needed geographical framework to deliver personalised services.

"Just last month, in December 2018, we achieved a very important milestone," said des Dorides, "namely that more than fifty percent of the worldwide population is now connected to the digital world, to the Internet."

Read this: EU Space enables an interconnected future

It also means that the other fifty percent will be getting connected in the coming years, and this will revolutionise the way individuals think and societies operate. People today and people tomorrow will be connected in new and different ways. They will have different needs and will use their connectivity for as yet unimagined purposes.

"We can see that this expansion is continuing and the growth rate is really amazing," des Dorides said. "So we are in the age of what some people are describing as a 'silent revolution'. Every day we are seeing more and more new users and new ways to connect to the growing digital world."

Hard work rewarded

The GSA has been working ceaselessly to ensure the widespread uptake of European GNSS technologies, including Galileo and EGNOS, and the efforts have been paying off. An important element is the incorporation of Galileo-enabled GNSS receivers in handheld devices, such as smartphones.

"We have some other very important figures to mention," said des Dorides. "Today we have more subscriptions worldwide for mobile phones than inhabitants in the world, and with all that, around seventy percent of these digital devices are broadband-enabled. So this is the connection with the digital world."

Des Dorides talked about the closing gap between the physical world and the digital world: "There is a clear convergence, and the catalyst, the enabler, is the Internet of Things, the ubiquitous things, and the best example of ubiquitous things are our smartphones – this is the context we are living in. We also know that at the basis of the ubiquitous things is geo-positioning, and in particular GNSS. Fifty percent of our apps in our smartphones require geo-positioning and ninety percent of those require GNSS, so here is the link with GNSS."

It should also be noted that in addition to location information, accurate timing delivered by GNSS is providing an indispensable tool for precisely synchronising transactions, including those operated by Digitally Autonomous Organisations in a distributed ledger. Apart from accurate timing, there is also a critical role for GNSS in the authentication of smart contracts, which is an important way to increase security of transactions. Galileo will provide a unique authentication feature with its service.

"In all of these areas, there is a GNSS-based silent revolution happening right now," said des Dorides. "In 2011 an important new feature was multi-constellation, which is now in all our phones. This means a more reliable performance, with more available positioning and timing.”

Watch this: European Space Programmes: Empowering Digital Markets

"Then last year we also had a very important new milestone with the introduction of dual frequency, which will guarantee better accuracy on the mass market. GNSS, and Galileo in particular, is granting a flexible connection with the Internet of Things, the digital world, and big data."

GNSS and Europe's Digital Strategy

The rapid digitisation being seen in so many areas and at such a scale and speed bring immense opportunities for innovation, growth and jobs. It also raises challenging policy issues for public authorities that require coordinated EU action. All Member States are wrestling with similar problems, but on a national basis, which is too limited to allow them to seize all the opportunities and deal with all the issues raised by these profoundly transformational developments. That is why the European Commission has set the creation of a Digital Single Market for Europe as one of its key priorities, with digital autonomy in particular as a strategic goal.

Also speaking at the event in Brussels was Mariya Gabriel, EU Commissioner for Digital Economy and Society. She said the European space programmes have a key role to play in support of the European Digital Single Market: "We need to be moving to digital autonomy and sovereignty in Europe. The space sector can help us get there, from satellites for 5G coverage to important Earth Observation services of Copernicus and of course the critical geo-localisation capacity enabled by Galileo."

Indeed, at a time of increasing geopolitical uncertainty, Galileo is now inarguably a critical infrastructure. Today, European GNSS is used to synchronise mobile networks, energy grids and financial transactions. It is used in emergency services, in safety-critical operations and, with the advent of AI and automation, driverless cars, drones and other autonomous systems will need GNSS for navigation.

In any number of vital application areas, including all that concerns the digital economy, Galileo is a key enabler of European independence and sovereignty, at the same time built to be interoperable with all the other GNSS systems in the world and able to provide a fully autonomous European solution.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Participants in the European Space Policy Conference heard how Galileo is a cornerstone of the strategy for a European Single Digital Economy

GSA takes the Galileo ‘Accuracy Matters’ message to the 2019 Mobile World Congress

30.1.2019 14:16  
The Galileo Booth at MWC 2019 will showcase several Horizon 2020 funded, Galileo-based innovations.
Published: 
30 January 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) comes to the 2019 Mobile World Congress (MWC) with an important message: When close isn’t enough, use Galileo!

It’s only been two years since the launch of Galileo Initial Services, but already over half-a-billion users are benefiting from the increased accuracy and precision it brings. “According to the latest figures, today over 600 million devices – most of them the latest smartphone models – are now Galileo-enabled,” said Fiammetta Diani, Deputy Head of Market Development at the GSA. “Clearly, the time has come to make people aware that Europe’s investment in Galileo is bringing daily benefits to hundreds of millions!”

And what better place to drive this message home than at the largest mobile event in the world? 

With over 107,000 visitors expected to attend, MWC 2019 is the perfect stage to showcase the Galileo ‘Accuracy Matters’ message. The new awareness-building campaign, which includes a number of entertaining videos showing how a little extra accuracy can go a long way, will be one of the highlights at this year’s Galileo stand (Hall 8.0, Stand 8.0H15).

Read this: Introducing the MyGalileoApp prize contest

The Galileo stand will showcase several Horizon 2020 funded, Galileo-powered innovations. “With the goal of exploring the hottest trends influencing the mobile industry, MWC Barcelona is the ideal platform to promote innovative EGNSS-based solutions and applications,” adds Diani. “As a global event, it’s also the place to show the world how European Union (EU) space research enhances EU industrial competitiveness and plays a pivotal role in tackling various societal challenges.”

Galileo as a game changer

One solution being showcased at MWC is Lycie, a mobile application that actively prevents traffic accidents. “By simply mounting your phone to the dashboard of your car, Lycie’s machine learning algorithm learns from your driving patterns and notifies you in real-time whenever a dangerous situation is detected,” explains Lycie’s Jean Galinowski. “The safer your drive, the lower your insurance costs.”

Unlike similar monitoring applications, Lycie offers unmatchable accuracy, thanks to its use of Galileo. “Having Galileo is not only a game-changer compared to our competitors, whose lack of precision prevents a reliable driving assessment, but also brings significantly more safety,” adds Lycie’s Jeremy Maisse.

The FLAMINGO solution will also be on display at the Galileo stand where its high-accuracy positioning service for mass-market applications within smart city environments with be highlighted. “FLAMINGO is showcasing the near future by enabling and demonstrating high-accuracy positioning and navigation using Smartphones and Internet of Things devices,” says William Roberts, the project coordinator.

Mobility as a Service (MaaS) with Galileo

The GALILEO FOR MOBILITY project aims at supporting the introduction of GALILEO technology within the Mobility as a Service context. “The potential MaaS market will be mostly concentrated on the urban environment, whereas Galileo, within a multi-constellation context, can bring benefits in terms of availability, accuracy and integrity in other areas too,” explains Dr. Josep Maria Salanova Grau.

At MWC, GALILEO FOR MOBILITY will be discussing the various services it is currently testing, including an on-demand public transportation system in Barcelona, a vehicle sharing initiative in Paris, and a ride sharing programme in Thessaloniki – among others. “The project as a whole tackles all modes of transport, both private and public, as well as various services that will support MaaS in the near future, emphasising the advantages of using EGNSS with regards to the performance of these services,” explains the project’s Coordinator Martí Jofre.

High-precision, high-accuracy at MWC

Also on display will be the NaviSoC single chip all-in-one solution – a miniature multi-frequency GNSS receiver that offers high-precision and reliability to mass-market users and applications. “This kind of product could be a market enabler for a future GNSS user segment, taking the automation and autonomy of IoT devices to the next level,” says ChipCraft's CEO Dr Tomasz Borejko.

Last but not least, Geo++ GmbH will be using the MWC stage to announce its high-accuracy positioning framework for Android smartphones, which routinely achieves sub-metre accurate smartphone positions. “We believe this technology is of interest to a large number of MWC visitors and we are looking forward to sharing it at the Galileo stand” adds Geo++ Managing Director Dr. Jannes Wübbena.

MWC Barcelona runs from 25 – 28 February at Barcelona’s Fira Gran Via. Come and meet the GSA team at the Galileo stand is located at Hall 8.0, Stand 8.0H15.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The Galileo Booth at MWC 2019 will showcase several Horizon 2020 funded, Galileo-based innovations.

GSA takes the Galileo ‘Accuracy Matters’ message to the 2019 Mobile World Congress

30.1.2019 14:16  
The Galileo Booth at MWC 2019 will showcase several Horizon 2020 funded, Galileo-based innovations.
Published: 
30 January 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) comes to the 2019 Mobile World Congress (MWC) with an important message: When close isn’t enough, use Galileo!

It’s only been two years since the launch of Galileo Initial Services, but already over half-a-billion users are benefiting from the increased accuracy and precision it brings. “According to the latest figures, today over 600 million devices – most of them the latest smartphone models – are now Galileo-enabled,” said Fiammetta Diani, Deputy Head of Market Development at the GSA. “Clearly, the time has come to make people aware that Europe’s investment in Galileo is bringing daily benefits to hundreds of millions!”

And what better place to drive this message home than at the largest mobile event in the world? 

With over 107,000 visitors expected to attend, MWC 2019 is the perfect stage to showcase the Galileo ‘Accuracy Matters’ message. The new awareness-building campaign, which includes a number of entertaining videos showing how a little extra accuracy can go a long way, will be one of the highlights at this year’s Galileo stand (Hall 8.0, Stand 8.0H15).

Read this: Introducing the MyGalileoApp prize contest

The Galileo stand will showcase several Horizon 2020 funded, Galileo-powered innovations. “With the goal of exploring the hottest trends influencing the mobile industry, MWC Barcelona is the ideal platform to promote innovative EGNSS-based solutions and applications,” adds Diani. “As a global event, it’s also the place to show the world how European Union (EU) space research enhances EU industrial competitiveness and plays a pivotal role in tackling various societal challenges.”

Galileo as a game changer

One solution being showcased at MWC is Lycie, a mobile application that actively prevents traffic accidents. “By simply mounting your phone to the dashboard of your car, Lycie’s machine learning algorithm learns from your driving patterns and notifies you in real-time whenever a dangerous situation is detected,” explains Lycie’s Jean Galinowski. “The safer your drive, the lower your insurance costs.”

Unlike similar monitoring applications, Lycie offers unmatchable accuracy, thanks to its use of Galileo. “Having Galileo is not only a game-changer compared to our competitors, whose lack of precision prevents a reliable driving assessment, but also brings significantly more safety,” adds Lycie’s Jeremy Maisse.

The FLAMINGO solution will also be on display at the Galileo stand where its high-accuracy positioning service for mass-market applications within smart city environments with be highlighted. “FLAMINGO is showcasing the near future by enabling and demonstrating high-accuracy positioning and navigation using Smartphones and Internet of Things devices,” says William Roberts, the project coordinator.

Mobility as a Service (MaaS) with Galileo

The GALILEO FOR MOBILITY project aims at supporting the introduction of GALILEO technology within the Mobility as a Service context. “The potential MaaS market will be mostly concentrated on the urban environment, whereas Galileo, within a multi-constellation context, can bring benefits in terms of availability, accuracy and integrity in other areas too,” explains Dr. Josep Maria Salanova Grau.

At MWC, GALILEO FOR MOBILITY will be discussing the various services it is currently testing, including an on-demand public transportation system in Barcelona, a vehicle sharing initiative in Paris, and a ride sharing programme in Thessaloniki – among others. “The project as a whole tackles all modes of transport, both private and public, as well as various services that will support MaaS in the near future, emphasising the advantages of using EGNSS with regards to the performance of these services,” explains the project’s Coordinator Martí Jofre.

High-precision, high-accuracy at MWC

Also on display will be the NaviSoC single chip all-in-one solution – a miniature multi-frequency GNSS receiver that offers high-precision and reliability to mass-market users and applications. “This kind of product could be a market enabler for a future GNSS user segment, taking the automation and autonomy of IoT devices to the next level,” says ChipCraft's CEO Dr Tomasz Borejko.

Last but not least, Geo++ GmbH will be using the MWC stage to announce its high-accuracy positioning framework for Android smartphones, which routinely achieves sub-metre accurate smartphone positions. “We believe this technology is of interest to a large number of MWC visitors and we are looking forward to sharing it at the Galileo stand” adds Geo++ Managing Director Dr. Jannes Wübbena.

MWC Barcelona runs from 25 – 28 February at Barcelona’s Fira Gran Via. Come and meet the GSA team at the Galileo stand is located at Hall 8.0, Stand 8.0H15.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The Galileo Booth at MWC 2019 will showcase several Horizon 2020 funded, Galileo-based innovations.

Paving the way to new Galileo accuracy and authentication services: Galileo E6-B/C codes now available!

24.1.2019 10:26  
Galileo E6-B/C Codes specifications now available!
Published: 
24 January 2019

The main specifications of the Galileo E6-B and E6-C codes are now available to the User Community. These codes can be used for accessing the future Galileo High Accuracy Service (HAS) and Galileo Commercial Authentication Service (CAS) and can be downloaded from the Galileo Service Centre (GSC) website under the “Programme Reference Documents” section. 

The main specifications of the Galileo E6-B/C codes have been published in a Technical Note - Galileo E6-B/C Codes Technical Note – which is now available to users via the Galileo Service Centre (GSC) website:  https://www.gsc-europa.eu/

The description of the primary E6-B/C and secondary E6-C codes and their assignment to specific satellites will provide receiver manufacturers the information they need to develop Galileo E6-B/C enabled receivers. The Technical Note also provides a hexadecimal representation of the E6-B/C primary and secondary codes.

Value-added services

The Galileo User Community will be able to benefit from the added-value services, offered through the E6 signal, namely the Galileo High Accuracy Service and the Galileo Commercial Authentication Service: 

  • The Galileo High Accuracy Service (HAS) will allow users to obtain a positioning error below two decimetres in nominal conditions of use. The Galileo HAS will be based on the free transmission of Precise Point Positioning (PPP) corrections through the Galileo E6 signal data component (E6-B) by the Galileo satellites.
  • The Galileo Commercial Authentication Service (CAS) will make it possible to authenticate signals, by giving access to the E6 signal pilot component (E6-C) codes, which will be encrypted.

Cost-effective solution

The Galileo high accuracy and authentication services will provide cost-effective solutions with very good performance and much needed redundancy that are essential for safety-critical applications, such as autonomous driving, for example.

To ensure that Galileo services continue to meet your needs, we encourage users to help us shape the future of Galileo! You can do this by completing the Galileo User Satisfaction Survey 2018, - it will only take you a few minutes!

For further up-to-date information on the Galileo system and its services, visit the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) website or contact the Galileo Helpdesk.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Galileo E6-B/C Codes specifications now available!

Paving the way to new Galileo accuracy and authentication services: Galileo E6-B/C codes now available!

24.1.2019 10:26  
Galileo E6-B/C Codes specifications now available!
Published: 
24 January 2019

The main specifications of the Galileo E6-B and E6-C codes are now available to the User Community. These codes can be used for accessing the future Galileo High Accuracy Service (HAS) and Galileo Commercial Authentication Service (CAS) and can be downloaded from the Galileo Service Centre (GSC) website under the “Programme Reference Documents” section. 

The main specifications of the Galileo E6-B/C codes have been published in a Technical Note - Galileo E6-B/C Codes Technical Note – which is now available to users via the Galileo Service Centre (GSC) website:  https://www.gsc-europa.eu/

The description of the primary E6-B/C and secondary E6-C codes and their assignment to specific satellites will provide receiver manufacturers the information they need to develop Galileo E6-B/C enabled receivers. The Technical Note also provides a hexadecimal representation of the E6-B/C primary and secondary codes.

Value-added services

The Galileo User Community will be able to benefit from the added-value services, offered through the E6 signal, namely the Galileo High Accuracy Service and the Galileo Commercial Authentication Service: 

The Galileo High Accuracy Service (HAS) will allow users to obtain a positioning error below two decimetres in nominal conditions of use. The Galileo HAS will be based on the free transmission of Precise Point Positioning (PPP) corrections through the Galileo E6 signal data component (E6-B) by the Galileo satellites. 

The Galileo Commercial Authentication Service (CAS) will make it possible to authenticate signals, by giving access to the E6 signal pilot component (E6-C) codes, which will be encrypted.

Cost-effective solution

The Galileo high accuracy and authentication services will provide cost-effective solutions with very good performance and much needed redundancy that are essential for safety-critical applications, such as autonomous driving, for example.

To ensure that Galileo services continue to meet your needs, we encourage users to help us shape the future of Galileo! You can do this by completing the Galileo User Satisfaction Survey 2018, - it will only take you a few minutes!

For further up-to-date information on the Galileo system and its services, visit the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) website or contact the Galileo Helpdesk.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Galileo E6-B/C Codes specifications now available!

User Consultation Platform helps shape the future of European GNSS

23.1.2019 12:33  
The UCP enables direct interaction between users of positioning, navigation and timing solutions and the organisations and institutions that oversee Galileo and EGNOS.
Published: 
23 January 2019

The European GNSS User Consultation Platform was hard at work in Marseille during this year's EU Space Week. Parallel panel sessions brought together users from different market segments. Each session had specific objectives aiming at profiting from the valuable contributions of users. The UCP ended with a plenary session in which the elected chairperson of each panel presented the results of their discussions to the wider community.

The User Consultation Platform (UCP) is a forum enabling direct interaction between users of positioning, navigation and time solutions and the organisations and institutions that oversee Galileo and EGNOS.

The UCP took place for the first time in 2017. The participants are actual users of the solutions, comprising representatives of associations such as standardisation bodies and industry groups, regulatory bodies and other members of the user community.

Watch this: EU Space Week in Marseille, 3 - 6 December 2018

The 2018 meeting of the UCP took place at the elegant Pharo Palace with spectacular views overlooking Marseille's old port. The platform was divided, on the first day, into subgroups representing the professional, transport and mass markets. A plenary to bring them together took place on the second day. Tasks undertaken by each group included discussing and validation of user needs and requirements on positioning, navigation and time technologies that can later be evaluated and, for those relevant to GNSS, implemented in the EGNOS and Galileo programmes. The ones that cannot be implemented in the current technology baselines will be taken into consideration for future evolutions of the systems. Feedback on current Galileo Service Centre user support was also elicited among other topics of the upmost importance such as R&D priorities, PNT backup solutions, high accuracy services, etc.

What the users said

The Platform's plenary session was open to all participants in European Space Week. Members of the plenary audience were encouraged to comment and to ask questions as the chairpersons of each of the eight individual sectors reported the results of their discussions. A panel of representatives of the European Commission and the European GNSS Agency listened attentively to the messages delivered by the presenters, asking their own questions whenever necessary.

  

Key insights from the working sessions

Mass Market

As an outcome of the mass-market users’ consultation session, the fastest growing mass market applications identified were robotics, people and asset tracking, safety and emergency, and m-health. In the area of robotics Philip Mattos, Positioning and Technology expert at GNSS module manufacturer U-Blox and chair of the mass-market platform, highlighted how spoofing-proof solutions are currently of particular interest, especially for robots that carry valuable loads.

Road Transport

Reporting for the road transport session was François Fischer, Senior Manager Connected and Automated Driving at ERTICO. He said that in the key application area of automated driving, no single existing technology can equal the navigation and location performance currently being delivered by GNSS. Complementary technologies, however, such as cameras, HD maps and motion sensors can help to reach minimum performance requirements.

Aviation

Russell Dudley, from the European Regions Airlines Association, reported on discussions on user requirements for different applications, including for aircraft distress tracking. Remote activation is a new functionality under analysis to be offered by Galileo via its return link, to prevent cases such as MH370 or other 'non-cooperative aircraft'. Airlines confirmed interest in the service and support activities to validate the end-to-end concept, including all actors such as air traffic control.

Rail Transport

According to chairperson Salvatore Sabina of Ansaldo STS, the rail sector recommends continuing work on defining the rail-related service to be provided by EGNOS, including all service provision aspects. The sector would also like to see what alternatives are possible for the transmission of EGNOS corrections enabling future use in rail safety relevant applications, based on the conclusions of the STARS project.

Maritime and Inland Waterways

Reporting for the maritime sector, Jean-Pierre Barboux of FDC pointed out the high dependency on GNSS in that area. He said back-ups for positioning, timing and synchronisation all need to be further analysed. There is also current interest in high-accuracy positioning, especially for port navigation.

Agriculture

Aerovision CEO Tamme Van Der Wal discussed research innovation priorities. He said there was a key interest in exploiting synergies with other initiatives, including existing public-private partnerships, the Partnership for Research and Innovation in the Mediterranean Area, and especially with Copernicus, the EU's flagship Earth Observation programme.

Surveying and Mapping

Roberto Capua, Responsible for GNSS R&D at Sogei, said the surveying and mapping industries are eagerly anticipating upcoming European GNSS services. Of special interest here are: the high-accuracy service; the authentication function, especially for drones and institutional applications; dual-frequency signals; and the Ionospheric Prediction Service.

Timing and Synchronisation

Ilaria Sesia, Responsible for Galileo Timing Activities at the Italian National Metrology Institute, said the most relevant European GNSS service for timing and synchronisation is Galileo Open Service Navigation Message Authentication. The sector has great expectations for this Galileo differentiator and would like to see this service deployed as quickly as possible. New and emerging applications of particular interest were analysed, such as Digital Video Broadcasting, autonomous cars, data management centres and scientific applications as well as upcoming 5G.

  

Positive reception

Considering the depth and breadth of the presentations, as well as the response from gathered EU Space Week delegates, the 2018 UCP exercise was very productive. Fiammetta Diani, Head of Market Development at the GSA, said all the comments, suggestions and requests were important and would be properly assessed to determine how they can influence the evolution of European GNSS services.

GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides thanked all the UCP participants for their engagement and said: “The GSA works very hard to maintain close relationships with our GNSS users, and that means all stakeholders in the downstream markets. An important part of the value of the GSA is built on these relationships.”

Matthias Petschke, European Commission Director of EU Satellite Navigation Programmes, said: “What this User Consultation shows is that we are listening to you. Unlike other GNSS around the world, Galileo is a demand-driven programme. We want to hear your ideas and we want to know what you need, to bring your ideas to the market and create businesses.”

The event in Marseille was the second full UCP meeting. The first meeting took place in November 2017 in Madrid.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The UCP enables direct interaction between users of positioning, navigation and timing solutions and the organisations and institutions that oversee Galileo and EGNOS.

Introducing the MyGalileoApp prize contest

21.1.2019 14:16  
Do you have an innovative idea for an application that could benefit from the precise positioning offered by Galileo? Then apply today for the GSA’s MyGalileoApp competition!
Published: 
21 January 2019

The European GNSS Agency’s (GSA) new MyGalileoApp prize contest challenges developers to design, develop, test and launch a mobile application that takes advantage of the increased accuracy and availability provided by Galileo. The winner stands to win up to EUR 100,000.

Do you have an innovative idea for an application that could benefit from the precise positioning offered by Galileo? Whether it be in the area of augmented reality, geo-marketing, smart navigation, social networking or otherwise – the GSA wants to help you take your idea from concept to reality.

The GSA’s MyGalileoApp Prize Contest challenges developers to design, develop, test and commercially launch a mobile application that provides a position and/or time fix using a Galileo-enabled smartphone equipped with Android /IOS operating system. It must also demonstrate how the increased accuracy/availability provided by Galileo within a multi-constellation/multi-frequency solution adds value to the application.

Each proposed application should target one of the following areas:

  • Smart navigation and infotainment
  • Augmented reality and games
  • Geo marketing and advertising
  • Fitness, sport and mHealth
  • Enterprise applications
  • Social networking
  • Mapping, GIS and agriculture
  • Automated mobility (all transport modes)
  • Aviation
  • Drones
  • Finance

“The MyGalileoApp Prize will help application developers embrace Galileo’s full potential to create new tools and services,” says Carlo des Dorides, GSA Executive Director. “Through this contest, the GSA is encouraging market adoption of Galileo by supporting the development of mobile applications that address end user needs.”

And did we mention that the winner will receive EUR 100,000?

Interested?

Now that we have your attention, it’s time to get started. To compete, all you have to do is submit a proposal describing how your application addresses one of the 11 development areas, and how it will use Galileo to do so. The deadline for submissions is 28 March 2019.  Proposals can be submitted here.

All proposals will be reviewed by GSA experts, who will select a maximum of 30 projects to proceed to the development phase. During this phase, contestants are required to develop a beta version of their app and be able to demonstrate at least 50% functionality. To help, the GSA will provide a dedicated API and online mentoring.

After careful evaluation, the judges will select a maximum of 10 projects to continue to the next phase of the contest. Here, projects must deliver a finalised version of the application with 100% functionality. Those that succeed will be invited to the Finals, where they will present their application to the GSA evaluation board.

Following the presentations, the judges will announce the winners, with the first-place winner receiving a EUR 100,000 prize. The runner up and third place finishers will receive EUR 50,000 and EUR 30,000 respectively.   

Let’s talk details…

The MyGalileoApp contest is open to all mobile application developers, entrepreneurs, students, researchers and anybody else who’s up for the challenge (so long as you are at least 18 years of age). You can compete as an individual or a team. All teams are required to appoint a team coordinator, who must be an EU citizen, while other team members can also be from outside the EU. Team members may also represent legal entities as long as this entity has its central administration or registered office in the EU.

At all stages of the contest, projects will be evaluated using the following criteria:

  • Innovation: is this kind of solution not yet available on the market? Is the application technologically advanced (e.g. using multi-frequency, innovating algorithms)?
  • Market potential: is this solution sellable after repackaging it into a real product? Is there a potential market demand/customer base for this product?
  • Galileo-relevance: is the application making use of Galileo? Is the increased accuracy/availability offered by Galileo relevant to the application?
  • Technical feasibility: What is the level of progress since the start of the contest? Has the required level of completion for the phase been fully achieved? Is the plan presented for the future of the application (i.e. the scalability and an ensured 18 months of technical support) credible?

More information on the contest will be provided in the course of two webinars, the first of which will be organised on 11 February 2019.

For more details and to register for updates, click here.

Good luck – and we hope to see you at the Finals!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Do you have an innovative idea for an application that could benefit from the precise positioning offered by Galileo? Then apply today for the GSA’s MyGalileoApp competition!

Introducing the MyGalileoApp Competition

21.1.2019 14:16  
Do you have an innovative idea for an application that could benefit from the precise positioning offered by Galileo? Then apply today for the GSA’s MyGalileoApp competition!
Published: 
21 January 2019

The European GNSS Agency’s (GSA) new MyGalileoApp competition challenges developers to design, develop, test and launch a mobile application that takes advantage of the increased accuracy and availability provided by Galileo. The winner stands to win up to EUR 100,000.

Do you have an innovative idea for an application that could benefit from the precise positioning offered by Galileo? Whether it be in the area of augmented reality, geo-marketing, smart navigation, social networking or otherwise – the GSA wants to help you take your idea from concept to reality.

The GSA’s MyGalileoApp Competition challenges developers to design, develop, test and commercially launch a mobile application that provides a position and/or time fix using a Galileo-enabled smartphone equipped with Android /IOS operating system. It must also demonstrate how the increased accuracy/availability provided by Galileo within a multi-constellation/multi-frequency solution adds value to the application.

Each proposed application should target one of the following areas:

  • Smart navigation and infotainment
  • Augmented reality and games
  • Geo marketing and advertising
  • Fitness, sport and mHealth
  • Enterprise applications
  • Social networking
  • Mapping, GIS and agriculture
  • Automated mobility (all transport modes)
  • Aviation
  • Drones
  • Finance

“The MyGalileoApp Prize will help application developers embrace Galileo’s full potential to create new tools and services,” says Carlo des Dorides, GSA Executive Director. “Through this competition, the GSA is encouraging market adoption of Galileo by supporting the development of mobile applications that address end user needs.”

And did we mention that the winner will receive EUR 100,000?

Interested?

Now that we have your attention, it’s time to get started. To compete, all you have to do is submit a proposal describing how your application addresses one of the 11 development areas, and how it will use Galileo to do so. The deadline for submissions is 28 March 2019.  Proposals can be submitted here.

All proposals will be reviewed by GSA experts, who will select a maximum of 30 projects to proceed to the development phase. During this phase, contestants are required to develop a beta version of their app and be able to demonstrate at least 50% functionality. To help, the GSA will provide a dedicated API and online mentoring.

After careful evaluation, the judges will select a maximum of 10 projects to continue to the next phase of the contest. Here, projects must deliver a finalised version of the application with 100% functionality. Those that succeed will be invited to the Finals, where they will present their application to the GSA evaluation board.

Following the presentations, the judges will announce the winners, with the first-place winner receiving a EUR 100,000 prize. The runner up and third place finishers will receive EUR 50,000 and EUR 30,000 respectively.   

Let’s talk details…

The MyGalileoApp competition is open to all mobile application developers, entrepreneurs, students, researchers and anybody else who’s up for the challenge (so long as you are at least 18 years of age). You can compete as an individual or a team. All teams are required to appoint a team coordinator, who must be an EU citizen, while other team members can also be from outside the EU. Team members may also represent legal entities as long as this entity has its central administration or registered office in the EU.

At all stages of the contest, projects will be evaluated using the following criteria:

  • Innovation: is this kind of solution not yet available on the market? Is the application technologically advanced (e.g. using multi-frequency, innovating algorithms)?
  • Market potential: is this solution sellable after repackaging it into a real product? Is there a potential market demand/customer base for this product?
  • Galileo-relevance: is the application making use of Galileo? Is the increased accuracy/availability offered by Galileo relevant to the application?
  • Technical feasibility: What is the level of progress since the start of the contest? Has the required level of completion for the phase been fully achieved? Is the plan presented for the future of the application (i.e. the scalability and an ensured 18 months of technical support) credible?

More information on the competition will be provided in the course of two webinars, the first of which will be organised on 11 February 2019.

For more details and to register for updates, click here.

Good luck – and we hope to see you at the Finals!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Do you have an innovative idea for an application that could benefit from the precise positioning offered by Galileo? Then apply today for the GSA’s MyGalileoApp competition!

Introducing the MyGalileoApp prize contest

21.1.2019 14:16  
Do you have an innovative idea for an application that could benefit from the precise positioning offered by Galileo? Then apply today for the GSA’s MyGalileoApp competition!
Published: 
22 January 2019

The European GNSS Agency’s (GSA) new MyGalileoApp prize contest challenges developers to design, develop, test and launch a mobile application that takes advantage of the increased accuracy and availability provided by Galileo. The winner stands to win up to EUR 100,000.00.

Do you have an innovative idea for an application that could benefit from the precise positioning offered by Galileo? Whether it be in the area of augmented reality, geo-marketing, smart navigation, social networking or otherwise – the GSA wants to help you take your idea from concept to reality.

The GSA’s MyGalileoApp Prize Contest challenges developers to design, develop, test and commercially launch a mobile application that provides a position and/or time fix using a Galileo-enabled smartphone equipped with Android /IOS operating system. It must also demonstrate how the increased accuracy/availability provided by Galileo within a multi-constellation/multi-frequency solution adds value to the application.

Each proposed application should target one of the following areas:

  • Smart navigation and infotainment
  • Augmented reality and games
  • Geo marketing and advertising
  • Fitness, sport and mHealth
  • Enterprise applications
  • Social networking
  • Mapping, GIS and agriculture
  • Automated mobility (all transport modes)
  • Aviation
  • Drones
  • Finance

“The MyGalileoApp Prize will help application developers embrace Galileo’s full potential to create new tools and services,” says Carlo des Dorides, GSA Executive Director. “Through this contest, the GSA is encouraging market adoption of Galileo by supporting the development of mobile applications that address end user needs.”

And did we mention that the winner will receive EUR 100,000.00?

Interested?

Now that we have your attention, it’s time to get started. To compete, all you have to do is submit a proposal describing how your application addresses one of the 11 development areas, and how it will use Galileo to do so. The deadline for submissions is 28 March 2019.  Proposals can be submitted here.

All proposals will be reviewed by GSA experts, who will select a maximum of 30 projects to proceed to the development phase. During this phase, contestants are required to develop a beta version of their app and be able to demonstrate at least 50% functionality. To help, the GSA will provide a dedicated API and online mentoring.

After careful evaluation, the judges will select a maximum of 10 projects to continue to the next phase of the contest. Here, projects must deliver a finalised version of the application with 100% functionality. Those that succeed will be invited to the Finals, where they will present their application to the GSA evaluation board.

Following the presentations, the judges will announce the winners, with the first-place winner receiving a EUR 100,000.00 prize. The runner up and third place finishers will receive EUR 50,000.00 and EUR 30,000.00 respectively.   

Let’s talk details…

The MyGalileoApp contest is open to all mobile application developers, entrepreneurs, students, researchers and anybody else who’s up for the challenge (so long as you are at least 18 years of age). You can compete as an individual or a team. All teams are required to appoint a team coordinator, who must be an EU citizen, while other team members can also be from outside the EU. Team members may also represent legal entities as long as this entity has its central administration or registered office in the EU.

At all stages of the contest, projects will be evaluated using the following criteria:

  • Innovation: is this kind of solution not yet available on the market? Is the application technologically advanced (e.g. using multi-frequency, innovating algorithms)?
  • Market potential: is this solution sellable after repackaging it into a real product? Is there a potential market demand/customer base for this product?
  • Galileo-relevance: is the application making use of Galileo? Is the increased accuracy/availability offered by Galileo relevant to the application?
  • Technical feasibility: What is the level of progress since the start of the contest? Has the required level of completion for the phase been fully achieved? Is the plan presented for the future of the application (i.e. the scalability and an ensured 18 months of technical support) credible?

More information on the contest will be provided in the course of two webinars, the first of which will be organised on 11 February 2019. For more details and to register for updates, click here.

Good luck – and we hope to see you at the Finals!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Do you have an innovative idea for an application that could benefit from the precise positioning offered by Galileo? Then apply today for the GSA’s MyGalileoApp competition!

Introducing the MyGalileoApp prize contest

21.1.2019 14:16  
Do you have an innovative idea for an application that could benefit from the precise positioning offered by Galileo? Then apply today for the GSA’s MyGalileoApp competition!
Published: 
21 January 2019

The European GNSS Agency’s (GSA) new MyGalileoApp prize contest challenges developers to design, develop, test and launch a mobile application that takes advantage of the increased accuracy and availability provided by Galileo. The winner stands to win up to EUR 100,000.00.

Do you have an innovative idea for an application that could benefit from the precise positioning offered by Galileo? Whether it be in the area of augmented reality, geo-marketing, smart navigation, social networking or otherwise – the GSA wants to help you take your idea from concept to reality.

The GSA’s MyGalileoApp Prize Contest challenges developers to design, develop, test and commercially launch a mobile application that provides a position and/or time fix using a Galileo-enabled smartphone equipped with Android /IOS operating system. It must also demonstrate how the increased accuracy/availability provided by Galileo within a multi-constellation/multi-frequency solution adds value to the application.

Each proposed application should target one of the following areas:

  • Smart navigation and infotainment
  • Augmented reality and games
  • Geo marketing and advertising
  • Fitness, sport and mHealth
  • Enterprise applications
  • Social networking
  • Mapping, GIS and agriculture
  • Automated mobility (all transport modes)
  • Aviation
  • Drones
  • Finance

“The MyGalileoApp Prize will help application developers embrace Galileo’s full potential to create new tools and services,” says Carlo des Dorides, GSA Executive Director. “Through this contest, the GSA is encouraging market adoption of Galileo by supporting the development of mobile applications that address end user needs.”

And did we mention that the winner will receive EUR 100,000.00?

Interested?

Now that we have your attention, it’s time to get started. To compete, all you have to do is submit a proposal describing how your application addresses one of the 11 development areas, and how it will use Galileo to do so. The deadline for submissions is 28 March 2019.  Proposals can be submitted here.

All proposals will be reviewed by GSA experts, who will select a maximum of 30 projects to proceed to the development phase. During this phase, contestants are required to develop a beta version of their app and be able to demonstrate at least 50% functionality. To help, the GSA will provide a dedicated API and online mentoring.

After careful evaluation, the judges will select a maximum of 10 projects to continue to the next phase of the contest. Here, projects must deliver a finalised version of the application with 100% functionality. Those that succeed will be invited to the Finals, where they will present their application to the GSA evaluation board.

Following the presentations, the judges will announce the winners, with the first-place winner receiving a EUR 100,000.00 prize. The runner up and third place finishers will receive EUR 50,000.00 and EUR 30,000.00 respectively.   

Let’s talk details…

The MyGalileoApp contest is open to all mobile application developers, entrepreneurs, students, researchers and anybody else who’s up for the challenge (so long as you are at least 18 years of age). You can compete as an individual or a team. All teams are required to appoint a team coordinator, who must be an EU citizen, while other team members can also be from outside the EU. Team members may also represent legal entities as long as this entity has its central administration or registered office in the EU.

At all stages of the contest, projects will be evaluated using the following criteria:

  • Innovation: is this kind of solution not yet available on the market? Is the application technologically advanced (e.g. using multi-frequency, innovating algorithms)?
  • Market potential: is this solution sellable after repackaging it into a real product? Is there a potential market demand/customer base for this product?
  • Galileo-relevance: is the application making use of Galileo? Is the increased accuracy/availability offered by Galileo relevant to the application?
  • Technical feasibility: What is the level of progress since the start of the contest? Has the required level of completion for the phase been fully achieved? Is the plan presented for the future of the application (i.e. the scalability and an ensured 18 months of technical support) credible?

More information on the contest will be provided in the course of two webinars, the first of which will be organised on 11 February 2019.

For more details and to register for updates, click here.

Good luck – and we hope to see you at the Finals!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Do you have an innovative idea for an application that could benefit from the precise positioning offered by Galileo? Then apply today for the GSA’s MyGalileoApp competition!

Developers are in luck: GSC simulation tools database refreshed

17.1.2019 14:04  
GSTI provides a broad range of GNSS simulator and testing platforms.
Published: 
17 January 2019

The GNSS Simulation and Testing Tools Infrastructure (GSTI) database has been recently updated to offer to the developer community the most comprehensive catalogue of commercial tools available for professional use.

The GNSS Simulation and Testing Tools Infrastructure (GSTI), a GSC database containing the most extensive public catalogue of commercial testing and simulation tools for professional use, has been recently updated. In terms of numbers, this update has seen the database increase 52% thanks to the new tools added.

With this revamped resource, GSC intends to bring renewed support to application developers. This update, performed by the GSC team with invaluable support from manufacturers, has resulted in two main actions: the removal of tools previously published but no longer commercially available, and the introduction of the newest tools offered in the market for professional purposes.

The GSTI is a collaborative platform intended to support both developers of GNSS applications and equipment and providers of GNSS testing and simulation tools or testbeds. It is an initiative launched by the European Commission (EC) and transferred to the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC).

All GSC users, and especially the GNSS developer community, are invited to visit the GSTI section to check the upgraded catalogue and access the new information included in the list.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

GSTI provides a broad range of GNSS simulator and testing platforms.

European space community steps up to Security and Defence

16.1.2019 14:31  
"One of the major focuses of the GSA is security" - Stefano Iannitti, Head of Security at the European GNSS Agency.
Published: 
15 January 2019

A special session at the European Space Week conference in Marseille featured representatives of key EU space bodies addressing challenges and implications in the area of Security and Defence.

In an evolving global security context, it becomes increasingly critical to ensure the independent capabilities and freedom of action of the European Union and its Member States. "Security and defence is becoming more and more a priority field for the EU," said European Space Week session chair Jean-Pierre Diris, Head of Telecommunications and Navigation Projects at the French Space Agency. "The list of recent terrorist attacks is long and terrible, from Paris to Brussels to Berlin, Barcelona and Madrid, and many others. We have the migration crisis coming from the south, and Russia has made clear its intentions at the EU's eastern borders."

Geopolitics is evolving, Diris said, with the USA seeking to reduce its burden and asking its allies to bear more of the cost of defence. "We in Europe must master our own security and defence," he said. "Moreover, by increasing synergies between civilian and security activities, we could reduce costs and improve efficiency." Among the central priorities as the Union looks forward, Diris said, is a credible European defence fund, with a figure of around 1.5 billion per year now having been proposed.

While the EU flagship space programmes, Galileo and Copernicus, are essentially civil and commercial in nature, both have the potential for military use, making them possible assets as Europe moves towards a more independent stance. Evi Papantoniou, European Commission Head of Unit for Galileo and EGNOS legal and institutional aspects, said: "Strategic autonomy has become a buzzword for Europe. But we want to be sure we understand what that means. We don't want to create additional tension with our external allies."

In the area of security and defence, said Papantoniou, Europe is proposing the creation of a European Defence Fund to support the European defence industry, promoting cooperation between Member States. This is not about creating a "European army", as President Juncker said, but working together with Member States, addressing the new security challenges. 

Protecting the programme

Given the importance of space-related activities for the European economy and for the lives of its citizens, achieving and maintaining a high degree of security is a key priority. This priority applies to the protection of the EU Space Programme itself, which encompasses Galileo, EGNOS, Copernicus, the GovSatCom initiative and Space Situational Awareness (SSA).

Stefano Iannitti, Head of Security at the European GNSS Agency (GSA), discussed the role of the Agency in this context. "One of the major focuses of the GSA is security - security of the European GNSS systems and of their operations, of the services," he said. Ensuring that Galileo and EGNOS services are secure involves a number of elements, Iannitti said, including the implementation of security governance, policies, requirements and standards.

"A specific team at the GSA is in charge of security engineering for operations and services. This team is also responsible for cyber security," Iannitti said. "And indeed this area is growing because of the increasing threats of this type. Another team is in charge of handling the cryptographic items in use in the EU GNSS."

Finally, the GSA is focused on the Galileo Public Regulated Service (PRS) and the implementation of its requirements. "Here we work on PRS engineering and evolution, PRS operations and service provision, and finally we focus on the PRS user segment and access," Iannitti said. “This includes user equipment development under GSA-funded projects and support to the Competent PRS Authority (CPA) set-up. And we have ongoing operational demos and validation work. We also have ongoing projects for testing the full operational PRS chain."

Another key role is played by the Galileo Security Monitoring Centre (GSMC), which is an integral part of the Galileo infrastructure. It monitors and takes action regarding security threats, security alerts and the operational status of systems components.

Philippe Rosius, Head of the GSMC explained, "The GSMC is a GSA entity, independent from the operator. It has direct reporting connections with the EC, the European External Action Service (EEAS) and the Members States. We have two sites, one master in France and one back-up, currently being relocated from the UK to Spain."

The GSMC comprises a crew of highly motivated people dedicated to security, he said. Since 1 July 2016, the Centre has been monitoring the safety and security of Galileo operations, providing an interface for Member States and access to the PRS, distributing the cryptographic keys.

With regards to PRS, "we are in the ramp-up phase” he said. “The GSMC will eventually become the single access point for the Member States to the PRS. And we also provide other services, when requested by the European Council, providing GNSS expertise and analysis to a variety of parties”.

"On the question of why we do this work," Rosius said, "it is because our world is not as secure as we would like it to be. We need to be secure against physical and cyber threats, and we need to be able to mitigate the risks. We need to protect our networks, our centres and stations all around the world. And we have a solid European regulatory framework that gives us the authority to carry out our missions within clear boundaries."

Another body with a key role to play is the EU GNSS Security Accreditation Board (SAB), represented at the session by SAB Chair Bruno Vermeire. The Board is the sole Security Accreditation Authority of the European GNSS systems and acts independently, composed of representatives of Member States, the European Commission and the High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy.

In his conclusions, Stefano Iannitti reminded participants that security is a transversal activity. "The GSA can be considered as a security hub, supporting all aspects of EU GNSS security. And we at the GSA are ready to share our experience, our competencies, with other EU Space Programmes, because we are confident that we are paving the way towards European space security for European citizens and the European Union."

Other EU Space Programmes

Europe's other flagship space programme, Copernicus, also came centre stage during the Security and Defence session in Marseille. Distinguished speakers such as Darek Saunders, Senior Research officer at Frontex, the European Border and Coast Guard Agency, Ricardo Vicente of the European Maritime Safety Agency, and Denis Bruckert, Head of the Copernicus Unit at the European Union Satellite Centre (SatCen) all delivered important presentations on how Copernicus is contributing to security- and defence-related Earth Observation missions in virtually every part of the world.

The session also included a roundtable on the GOVSATCOM initiative. Its objective is to ensure in both the civil and military environment reliable, secure and cost-effective satellite communication services for EU and national public authorities managing security-critical missions and operations. The goal is also to enhance European autonomy and overcome fragmentation of demand by making use of affordable and innovative solutions in concert with industrial players.

GOVSATCOM actions are currently taken jointly by the European Commission, the European Defence Agency (EDA) and the European Space Agency (ESA). The first two communication platforms, the Pacis projects, based on a partnership between a group of private providers and satellite operators, are being set up through a cooperative scheme involving ESA and the EDA.

A new European mind-set

Pablo Gonzalez of Indra, speaking on behalf of the Aerospace and Defence Industry Association (ASD), returned in his presentation to the broader geopolitical perspective. He talked about the recent announcement by the US President about the creation of a new US Space Force.

"In order to reflect on the future in defence it is mandatory to take into account what is going on the other side of the Atlantic," Gonzalez said. "Because usually, the Americans, we need to recognise, especially in the area of defence, are a step ahead of us.

"We currently have an enormous amount of assets in space, tens of billions of Euros in infrastructure, and we need to defend it. Up to now, the ability to attack in space was limited to one, two, three countries. But today, with current technologies, traditional and non-traditional threats, it is possible for much smaller countries or even terrorist organisations to attack these assets. So we need to be able to defend and to counterattack."

This means, Gonzalez argued, "Europe needs to adopt a different mind-set when it comes to the military use of space. We need to work towards the medium term, we need to think about a strategic view," he said. "And here I would say that we need to talk about operational but also technical capabilities, so this is closely linked to industry. Industry is key to developing new capabilities in Europe with the necessary degree of strategic autonomy."

You can access presentations from the Security and Defence session at European Space Week here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

"One of the major focuses of the GSA is security" - Stefano Iannitti, Head of Security at the European GNSS Agency.

EU Space enables an interconnected future

15.1.2019 16:10  
The Interconnectivity session during the 2018 European Space Week was packed with informative presentations from a range of stakeholders, projects and companies.
Published: 
15 January 2019

As was highlighted at the 2018 European Space Week special session on Interconnectivity, European space technology is providing smart, new applications that deliver the information we need to make faster, easier and more efficient decisions.

According to a study conducted by CISCO, by as early as next year, there will be more than 30 billion connected objects in the world. From connected watches to cars and even houses, this unprecedented shift towards interconnectivity will transform the global economy.

Driving this revolution in interconnectivity are space technologies, including GNSS and Earth observation. “Everything from logistics to agriculture, outdoor recreation and the Internet of Things, depend on such space technologies as EGNOS and Galileo,” said Justyna Redelkiewicz, Head of Section LBS & IoT at GSA, who chaired a special session on Interconnectivity during the 2018 European Space Week. “Space technologies are also at the centre of many of the latest consumer applications – and their use will only increase in the near future.”

Everyone, everywhere, and everything

On the topic of How to Connect and Locate Things, the Alliance of Internet of Things Innovation’s Francois Fisher discussed both the challenges that European industry currently faces and how IoT can help overcome these challenges. The European Commission’s Christoph Kautz provided an overview of areas relevant to interconnectivity, with a focus on the areas where the European Commission is playing an active role (i.e., artificial intelligence, IoT standardisation, E112 pilots, and digital maps). David Fernandez of Sigfox noted that by 2020 his company’s terrestrial network would be complemented by a global capability, thanks to a satellite communication service.

Satellites in the scrum

Speaking of satellites and sports, Frederic Valois of Thales Services took the European Space Week stage to introduce the Thales GEONAV service. The seamless indoor/outdoor location solution is currently being used to provide critical information to rugby teams in France. Via a hybridisation of ultra-wideband and GNSS, GEONAV provides teams with real-time measurements and monitoring of a player’s position, speed and even heart rate.

“Because this technology can provide precise and secured location both inside and outside, its use goes beyond sports and can include helping to locate people and assets,” explained Valois. “It is innovation like this that will position European industry as a major actor in the LBS market.”

Accurate and affordable positioning

Another key market trend highlighted during the session was the shift towards accurate and affordable positioning. “We are witnessing exciting times, as low-cost, high-precision GNSS receivers are coming onto the market and challenging the dominance of the older and expensive models,” said Xavier Banqué-Casanovas, CEO of Rokubun.

Rokubun is the company behind ARGONAUT, a fully-integrated GNSS receiver designed to meet the need for high-precision geo-location data. The receiver combines an advanced, multi-constellation GNSS receiver and a powerful navigation processing cloud service to provide users with more accurate and affordable geolocation.

Rokubun is now part of consortium developing FLAMINGO – a high accuracy positioning service for use by mass market applications.

A packed agenda

The Interconnectivity session was packed with informative presentations from a range of stakeholders, projects and companies. You will be able to access the presentations here, as soon as they are available.

Thanks to initiatives like the Kinéis constellation, in the coming years, interconnectivity will be available to everyone, everywhere and for all devices. “Kinéis IoT devices will integrate seamlessly, need little power and be fully compatible with other systems,” said Marc Leminh, Director of Development at CLS. “It will also be robust, reliable and inexpensive.”

Specifically designed for IoT, the Kinéis nanosatellite satcom constellation will provide connectivity for a whole host of activities, all having in common one feature: all being away from the reach of terrestrial networks. 

Talking about new IoT chipsets and trends in digital mapping, Sony’s Rajni Agarval introduced the company’s low power, multi-constellation GNSS chipsets for wearables, trackers and telematics. On the mapping side, David Barbier from TomTom presented high definition maps created via professional methods (i.e., survey vehicles) and crowdsourcing. “Open source data has proved to be a highly reliable source of information for TomTom,” he said. “Currently, 400,000 kilometres of roads covered with high definition maps are being utilised by many OEMs.”

The session also put the spotlight on a number of innovative start-ups, including Centrip, a tracking system for children; OPT/NET BV, a classification service for Earth observation data; TensorScience, a geocaching smartphone application that recently won the GSA’s Geekie Award; and +39, an app for guiding children with autism that won the Galileo Hackathon in Padua.  

“What each of these presentations make abundantly clear is that the not-so-distant future will be defined by interconnectivity – and enabled by European space technology,” concluded Redelkiewicz.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The Interconnectivity session during the 2018 European Space Week was packed with informative presentations from a range of stakeholders, projects and companies.

Space serving our blue planet

11.1.2019 9:19  
A dedicated session at EU Space Week highlighted how Galileo and Copernicus contribute to the sustainable management of our oceans and provide support for maritime operations.
Published: 
11 January 2019

The oceans represent 90% of the Earth’s biosphere and are essential to a range of economic activities with over 90% of world trade travelling via maritime routes. The oceans also play a central role in regulating the Earth’s climate. Global observation and monitoring systems are therefore essential to better manage the oceans and to achieve a sustainable blue economy. A dedicated session at EU Space Week on 6 December highlighted how the Galileo and Copernicus programmes contribute to the sustainable management of our oceans and provide support for maritime operations.

The half-day session addressed a wide range of aspects including safety at sea, search and rescue, optimised maritime transport, sustainable fisheries, renewable energies, security and society’s response to pollution.
EU seas – safe & clean

The 6 December session was chaired by Fabienne Jacq from the European Commission and the initial speakers outlined the overall context in which the EU space programmes operate. Helena Ramon Jarraud from the European Maritime Safety Agency (EMSA) described their mission “to ensure that EU’s seas were safe and clean.” The agency faces many challenges from people trafficking to illegal fishing and ensuring safety of navigation. All aspects were aided and new services enabled by the support provided from EGNSS and Copernicus systems.

This view was supported by Pierre Bahurel, Director General of Mercator Ocean International that operates the Copernicus Marine Environment Monitoring Service (CMEMS). His talk focused on the ocean challenges relating to the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) in particular SDG 14 to conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources. CMEMS delivered “a complete ocean information portfolio that is free, open and assessed” that both helped protect the oceans and enabled the sustainable realisation of marine and maritime jobs and growth.

The policy context of the EU space programmes was further developed by Elisabeth Hamdouch of DG GROW. “The marine environmental and maritime challenges are beautiful examples of how EU space programmes could add value by making useful tools available on an open and free basis for many different users,” she said.

Space as a tool supporting the EU’s energy package was praised by Adam Candy from Delft Technical University. He described the BlueRise project developing Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion technology as an appropriate renewable energy source for coastal and island communities. Space-based systems provided “the information to both understand the resource potential for the system – i.e. where to locate it - and also its local environmental impact,” he said.

Maritime safety

The opportunity for EGNOS to provide safer and cost-effective navigation safety in French coastal regions was described by Etienne Leroy of CEREMA, which has developed and tested an EGNOS-based solution for the French Differential GPS (DGPS) network. This is part of the International Association of Lighthouse Authorities - World Wide Radio Navigation Plan.

The French network of seven coastal stations needs to be modernised – could EGNOS provide a cost-effective solution? CEREMA made some initial tests and found that EGNOS augmenting GPS could provide the necessary availability, continuity and accuracy levels, without impacting the independent integrity scheme. In addition, cost analysis showed that the EGNOS solution offered a greatly reduced capital requirement and reduced maintenance costs.

An official commission for the establishment of the first operational French station is now anticipated in early 2019 with more stations to be equipped during the year.

The ability of the Galileo Search and Rescue (SAR) service to accelerate the detection of an incident and give more precise, life-saving positioning data was highlighted by Alain Bouhet from OROLIA Maritime. His company had led the GSA-funded HELIOS project to commercialise Galileo SAR enabled maritime and aviation distress beacons. The project had enabled certification for one aviation and two marine distress beacons and the first Galileo-enabled Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon (EPIRB), launched in March 2018.

The use of the Galileo SAR service within the global SAR satellite system is already significantly improving the speed of response and the accuracy and reliability of SAR operations. “Galileo offers global coverage with near instantaneous detection and location,” said Bouhet.

“Response times are up to ten times faster.” And the unique Galileo return communications link from the SAR operator to the beacon ensures that victims know that the distress alarm has been received- and enables better survival decisions to be made.

Tethered drone

A further example of the potential of EGNSS and Earth Observation systems to combine to boost safety at sea was exemplified by Ricardo Rossi of Gruppo Sistematica who described the SARA project. This used a fusion of sensors and space technologies to improve surveillance operations at sea using a tethered drone acting as a ‘virtual pylon’ on the ship.

The drone is a semi-autonomous platform to aid search and rescue and surveillance using high EGNSS accuracy. The system enables cost-effective and extended surveillance that is reliable and fast to deploy. A proof of concept exercise has been undertaken with the Italian coastguard in the Bay of Naples using a low-resolution thermal camera to detect people in the water.

“Using a tether has a number of advantages,” claimed Rossi. “Including the ability to provide power for a continuous service and a continuous high-speed data link.” It is also a mechanical aid for landing the drone and ensures that the flight envelope of the drone is physically constrained, which eases issues around authorisation.

As well as SAR services a number of additional markets were foreseen for the device including border control, law enforcement, military applications and event or traffic management.

SAR demo

Earlier in EU Space Week, a press event introduced the media to the capabilities of EU space technologies in the maritime arena. On the morning of Tuesday 4 December, the GSA joined forces with the European Commission, the French Space Agency CNES, and the French naval authorities to highlight the various distress situations that can occur at sea and how Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus are helping.

Demonstrations included briefings on the new Galileo SAR distress beacons and the SAR service itself as well as the Copernicus Maritime Security Service. An actual demonstration of the system at sea had to be cancelled at the last moment as the naval vessel and aircraft to be used were called away to a real-life emergency off the coast of Corsica, demonstrating that the Galileo SAR is fully operational and ready for action!

"This Search and Rescue operation demonstrated how beacons using the Galileo SAR service help to provide a faster and more efficient response for those in distress,” said Carlo des Dorides, GSA Executive Director. “With Galileo, a person in trouble can now be detected in less than 10 minutes. Today more than 500 million users are benefiting from a wide range Galileo services – and helping to save lives is one of them.”

Commenting on the event, European Commissioner Elżbieta Bieńkowska said: “The EU invests in space activities to protect its citizens. Thanks to our space programmes, we can provide help to those who need it faster and in a more efficient way. EU space programmes are helping to save lives.”

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

A dedicated session at EU Space Week highlighted how Galileo and Copernicus contribute to the sustainable management of our oceans and provide support for maritime operations.

Space serving our blue planet

11.1.2019 9:19  
A dedicated session at EU Space Week highlighted how Galileo and Copernicus contribute to the sustainable management of our oceans and provide support for maritime operations.
Published: 
11 January 2019

The oceans represent 90% of the Earth’s biosphere and are essential to a range of economic activities with over 90% of world trade travelling via maritime routes. The oceans also play a central role in regulating the Earth’s climate. Global observation and monitoring systems are therefore essential to better manage the oceans and to achieve a sustainable blue economy. A dedicated session at EU Space Week on 6 December highlighted how the Galileo and Copernicus programmes contribute to the sustainable management of our oceans and provide support for maritime operations.

The half-day session addressed a wide range of aspects including safety at sea, search and rescue, optimised maritime transport, sustainable fisheries, renewable energies, security and society’s response to pollution.
EU seas – safe & clean

The 6 December session was chaired by Fabienne Jacq from the European Commission and the initial speakers outlined the overall context in which the EU space programmes operate. Helena Ramon Jarraud from the European Maritime Safety Agency (EMSA) described their mission “to ensure that EU’s seas were safe and clean.” The agency faces many challenges from people trafficking to illegal fishing and ensuring safety of navigation. All aspects were aided and new services enabled by the support provided from EGNSS and Copernicus systems.

This view was supported by Pierre Bahurel, Director General of Mercator Ocean International that operates the Copernicus Marine Service (CMS). His talk focused on the ocean challenges relating to the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) in particular SDG 14 to conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources. CMS delivered “a complete ocean information portfolio that is free, open and assessed” that both helped protect the oceans and enabled the sustainable realisation of marine and maritime jobs and growth.

The policy context of the EU space programmes was further developed by Elisabeth Hamdouch of DG GROW. “The marine environmental and maritime challenges are beautiful examples of how EU space programmes could add value by making useful tools available on an open and free basis for many different users,” she said.

Space as a tool supporting the EU’s energy package was praised by Adam Candy from Delft Technical University. He described the BlueRise project developing Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion technology as an appropriate renewable energy source for coastal and island communities. Space-based systems provided “the information to both understand the resource potential for the system – i.e. where to locate it - and also its local environmental impact,” he said.

Maritime safety

The opportunity for EGNOS to provide safer and cost-effective navigation safety in French coastal regions was described by Etienne Leroy of CEREMA, which has developed and tested an EGNOS-based solution for the French Differential GPS (DGPS) network. This is part of the International Association of Lighthouse Authorities - World Wide Radio Navigation Plan.

The French network of seven coastal stations needs to be modernised – could EGNOS provide a cost-effective solution? CEREMA made some initial tests and found that EGNOS augmenting GPS could provide the necessary availability, continuity and accuracy levels, without impacting the independent integrity scheme. In addition, cost analysis showed that the EGNOS solution offered a greatly reduced capital requirement and reduced maintenance costs.

An official commission for the establishment of the first operational French station is now anticipated in early 2019 with more stations to be equipped during the year.

The ability of the Galileo Search and Rescue (SAR) service to accelerate the detection of an incident and give more precise, life-saving positioning data was highlighted by Alain Bouhet from OROLIA Maritime. His company had led the GSA-funded HELIOS project to commercialise Galileo SAR enabled maritime and aviation distress beacons. The project had enabled certification for one aviation and two marine distress beacons and the first Galileo-enabled Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon (EPIRB), launched in March 2018.

The use of the Galileo SAR service within the global SAR satellite system is already significantly improving the speed of response and the accuracy and reliability of SAR operations. “Galileo offers global coverage with near instantaneous detection and location,” said Bouhet.

“Response times are up to ten times faster.” And the unique Galileo return communications link from the SAR operator to the beacon ensures that victims know that the distress alarm has been received- and enables better survival decisions to be made.

Tethered drone

A further example of the potential of EGNSS and Earth Observation systems to combine to boost safety at sea was exemplified by Ricardo Rossi of Gruppo Sistematica who described the SARA project. This used a fusion of sensors and space technologies to improve surveillance operations at sea using a tethered drone acting as a ‘virtual pylon’ on the ship.

The drone is a semi-autonomous platform to aid search and rescue and surveillance using high EGNSS accuracy. The system enables cost-effective and extended surveillance that is reliable and fast to deploy. A proof of concept exercise has been undertaken with the Italian coastguard in the Bay of Naples using a low-resolution thermal camera to detect people in the water.

“Using a tether has a number of advantages,” claimed Rossi. “Including the ability to provide power for a continuous service and a continuous high-speed data link.” It is also a mechanical aid for landing the drone and ensures that the flight envelope of the drone is physically constrained, which eases issues around authorisation.

As well as SAR services a number of additional markets were foreseen for the device including border control, law enforcement, military applications and event or traffic management.

SAR demo

Earlier in EU Space Week, a press event introduced the media to the capabilities of EU space technologies in the maritime arena. On the morning of Tuesday 4 December, the GSA joined forces with the European Commission, the French Space Agency CNES, and the French naval authorities to highlight the various distress situations that can occur at sea and how Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus are helping.

Demonstrations included briefings on the new Galileo SAR distress beacons and the SAR service itself as well as the Copernicus Maritime Security Service. An actual demonstration of the system at sea had to be cancelled at the last moment as the naval vessel and aircraft to be used were called away to a real-life emergency off the coast of Corsica, demonstrating that the Galileo SAR is fully operational and ready for action!

"This Search and Rescue operation demonstrated how beacons using the Galileo SAR service help to provide a faster and more efficient response for those in distress,” said Carlo des Dorides, GSA Executive Director. “With Galileo, a person in trouble can now be detected in less than 10 minutes. Today more than 500 million users are benefiting from a wide range Galileo services – and helping to save lives is one of them.”

Commenting on the event, European Commissioner Elżbieta Bieńkowska said: “The EU invests in space activities to protect its citizens. Thanks to our space programmes, we can provide help to those who need it faster and in a more efficient way. EU space programmes are helping to save lives.”

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

A dedicated session at EU Space Week highlighted how Galileo and Copernicus contribute to the sustainable management of our oceans and provide support for maritime operations.

Space serving our blue planet

11.1.2019 9:19  
A dedicated session at EU Space Week highlighted how Galileo and Copernicus contribute to the sustainable management of our oceans and provide support for maritime operations.
Published: 
11 January 2019

The oceans represent 90% of the Earth’s biosphere and are essential to a range of economic activities with over 90% of world trade travelling via maritime routes. The oceans also play a central role in regulating the Earth’s climate. Global observation and monitoring systems are therefore essential to better manage the oceans and to achieve a sustainable blue economy. A dedicated session at EU Space Week on 6 December highlighted how the Galileo and Copernicus programmes contribute to the sustainable management of our oceans and provide support for maritime operations.

The half-day session addressed a wide range of aspects including safety at sea, search and rescue, optimised maritime transport, sustainable fisheries, renewable energies, security and society’s response to pollution.
EU seas – safe & clean

The 6 December session was chaired by Fabienne Jacq from the European Commission and the initial speakers outlined the overall context in which the EU space programmes operate. Helena Ramon Jarraud from the European Maritime Safety Agency (EMSA) described their mission “to ensure that EU’s seas were safe and clean.” The agency faces many challenges from people trafficking to illegal fishing and ensuring safety of navigation. All aspects were aided and new services enabled by the support provided from EGNSS and Copernicus systems.

This view was supported by Pierre Bahurel, Director General of Mercator Ocean International that operates the Copernicus Marine Service (CMS). His talk focused on the ocean challenges relating to the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) in particular SDG 14 to conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources. CMS delivered “a complete ocean information portfolio that is free, open and assessed” that both helped protect the oceans and enabled the sustainable realisation of marine and maritime jobs and growth.

The policy context of the EU space programmes was further developed by Elisabeth Hamdouch of DG GROW. “The marine environmental and maritime challenges are beautiful examples of how EU space programmes could add value by making useful tools available on an open and free basis for many different users,” she said.

Space as a tool supporting the EU’s energy package was praised by Adam Candy from Delft Technical University. He described the BlueRise project developing Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion technology as an appropriate renewable energy source for coastal and island communities. Space-based systems provided “the information to both understand the resource potential for the system – i.e. where to locate it - and also its local environmental impact,” he said.

Maritime safety

The opportunity for EGNOS to provide safer and cost-effective navigation safety in French coastal regions was described by Etienne Leroy of CEREMA, which has developed and tested an EGNOS-based solution for the French Differential GPS (DGPS) network. This is part of the International Association of Lighthouse Authorities - World Wide Radio Navigation Plan.

The French network of seven coastal stations needs to be modernised – could EGNOS provide a cost-effective solution? CEREMA made some initial tests and found that EGNOS augmenting GPS could provide the necessary availability, continuity and accuracy levels, without impacting the independent integrity scheme. In addition, cost analysis showed that the EGNOS solution offered a greatly reduced capital requirement and reduced maintenance costs.

An official commission for the establishment of the first operational French station is now anticipated in early 2019 with more stations to be equipped during the year.

The ability of the Galileo Search and Rescue (SAR) service to accelerate the detection of an incident and give more precise, life-saving positioning data was highlighted by Alain Bouhet from OROLIA Maritime. His company had led the GSA-funded HELIOS project to commercialise Galileo SAR enabled maritime and aviation distress beacons. The project had enabled certification for one aviation and two marine distress beacons and the first Galileo-enabled Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon (EPIRB), launched in March 2018.

The use of the Galileo SAR service within the global SAR satellite system is already significantly improving the speed of response and the accuracy and reliability of SAR operations. “Galileo offers global coverage with near instantaneous detection and location,” said Bouhet.

“Response times are up to ten times faster.” And the unique Galileo return communications link from the SAR operator to the beacon ensures that victims know that the distress alarm has been received- and enables better survival decisions to be made.

Tethered drone

A further example of the potential of EGNSS and Earth Observation systems to combine to boost safety at sea was exemplified by Ricardo Rossi of Gruppo Sistematica who described the SARA project. This used a fusion of sensors and space technologies to improve surveillance operations at sea using a tethered drone acting as a ‘virtual pylon’ on the ship.

The drone is a semi-autonomous platform to aid search and rescue and surveillance using high EGNSS accuracy. The system enables cost-effective and extended surveillance that is reliable and fast to deploy. A proof of concept exercise has been undertaken with the Italian coastguard in the Bay of Naples using a low-resolution thermal camera to detect people in the water.

“Using a tether has a number of advantages,” claimed Rossi. “Including the ability to provide power for a continuous service and a continuous high-speed data link.” It is also a mechanical aid for landing the drone and ensures that the flight envelope of the drone is physically constrained, which eases issues around authorisation.

As well as SAR services a number of additional markets were foreseen for the device including border control, law enforcement, military applications and event or traffic management.

SAR demo

Earlier in EU Space Week, a press event introduced the media to the capabilities of EU space technologies in the maritime arena. On the morning of Tuesday 4 December, the GSA joined forces with the European Commission, the French Space Agency CNES, and the French naval authorities to highlight the various distress situations that can occur at sea and how Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus are helping.

Demonstrations included briefings on the new Galileo SAR distress beacons and the SAR service itself as well as the Copernicus Maritime Security Service. An actual demonstration of the system at sea had to be cancelled at the last moment as the naval vessel and aircraft to be used were called away to a real-life emergency off the coast of Corsica, demonstrating that the Galileo SAR is fully operational and ready for action!

"This Search and Rescue operation demonstrated how beacons using the Galileo SAR service help to provide a faster and more efficient response for those in distress,” said Carlo des Dorides, GSA Executive Director. “With Galileo, a person in trouble can now be detected in less than 10 minutes. Today more than 500 million users are benefiting from a wide range Galileo services – and helping to save lives is one of them.”

Commenting on the event, European Commissioner Elżbieta Bieńkowska said: “The EU invests in space activities to protect its citizens. Thanks to our space programmes, we can provide help to those who need it faster and in a more efficient way. EU space programmes are helping to save lives.”

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

A dedicated session at EU Space Week highlighted how Galileo and Copernicus contribute to the sustainable management of our oceans and provide support for maritime operations.

Helping the visually impaired explore the outdoors

10.1.2019 13:41  
Blind Explorer provides an accurate and reliable, personal navigation solution to guide people with visual impairments along unknown paths.
Published: 
10 January 2019

On 3 December, as part of the International Day of Persons with Disabilities, Geko Navsat inaugurated the first accessible urban park using its Blind Explorer sensorial guidance solution.

With one in 30 people in Europe experiencing vision loss, innovator Rafael Olmedo had an idea: pair sound cues with augmented satellite navigation signals to help the visually impaired navigate along a predefined track. He called it 3SOUND.

“The idea behind the 3SOUND system was to provide an acoustic track perception based on the integration of an augmented acoustic reality application developed for a smartphone and an accurate and reliable navigation solution based on the use of GNSS signals augmented with EGNOS,” explains Olmedo. “The system would accurately identify the position and orientation of the user and, using binaural sounds, provide an innovative acoustic guidance solution for track navigation instead of the classical waypoint or route navigation.”

As the winner of the GSA Special Prize at the 2012 European Satellite Navigation Competition, the idea was first promoted at a special event organised by the GSA, ‘Space Solutions for Assisted Living’ held in London on the International Day of Persons with Disabilities, 3 December 2012. Thanks to GSA support, Olmedo was able to further develop the 3SOUND idea at a business incubation centre in Madrid. Here, he founded Geko Navsat, a start-up dedicated to transforming the 3SOUND concept into a market-ready solution.

The great outdoors

Out of this work came Blind Explorer, an application that provides an accurate and reliable, personal navigation solution to guide people with visual impairments along unknown paths. To do this, it uses sensory interfaces that improve the user’s autonomy, safety and experience. “This is the first guidance system based on binaural, or 3D, sounds and advanced satellite navigation technologies, including Galileo,” explains Olmedo. “Used together, these technologies provide the user with an intuitive perception of a course’s orientation and the ability to move in the right direction.”

Available on the Google Play and Apple App store, the Blind Explorer application is geared towards helping the visually impaired explore the outdoors by themselves. All the user has to do is a select a destination or route, which Blind Explorer refers to as ‘tracks’. From here, the app automatically generates 3D sound cues to enable the acoustic perception of the right direction. All sounds and guidance indications can be customised in accordance with the user’s specific needs.

Another feature allows users to record their own tracks or points of interests with just the press of a button. These routes can then be shared with other users, thus growing the network of available routes. For those needing higher accuracy than what is provided by the smartphone, Blind Explorer can be enhanced using an external GNSS Bluetooth.

First tracks launched – more to come

In celebration of the International Day of Persons with Disabilities on 3 December, Geko Navsat launched its first batch of accessible urban park routes for the Blind Explorer solution. The initial rollout includes 15 routes in five urban parks located in the Madrid region. “Blind Explorer provides all the information about these reliable and quality routes,” says Olmedo. “You can consult route details, select the preferred one and activate the navigation to walk the route and discover its points of interests – even when outside of cellular coverage.”

These initial routes are just the beginning – as Olmedo and his team plan to add more parks and routes from across Europe. “Historically, the visually impaired have had limited options for outdoor activities and tourism,” he adds.  “Blind Explorer is changing that by providing both tourism providers and visually impaired tourists with an accurate navigation system for discovering the outdoors independently.”  

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Blind Explorer provides an accurate and reliable, personal navigation solution to guide people with visual impairments along unknown paths.
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