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GIVS 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Intersucho.cz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

European GNSS Agency European GNSS Agency

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A “Cerealist’s Diary”, the testimony of a farmer working in his wheat harvest

29.6.2020 14:52  
97% of new tractors in Europe using GNSS are equipped with EGNOS, the preferred low-cost entry technology for precision farming in Europe
Published: 
29 June 2020

A European cereal farmer in Salamanca, Spain, is explaining how satellite navigation systems help farmers to reduce CO2 emissions, as well as save time and money, demonstrating how EGNOS today plays an important role in European agriculture, helping farmers to increase their productivity while being more sustainable for the environment.

Meeting Fernando Benito, a cereal farmer in Spain, we have listened to him presenting how EGNOS supports him during a crop harvest by facilitating various tasks such as ploughing, fertilizing, sowing and spraying.

EGNOS, the preferred entry technology for precision farming

EGNOS, with its sub-metre level accuracy (20-30 cm pass-to-pass), offers an affordable solution for some of the field works required today by precision agriculture. EGNOS allows farmers to better monitor their harvest yields, perform effective in-field data collection, use guidance in cultivation, increase efficiency (allowing to work in poor visibility/weather conditions), increase productiveness, lower costs and minimise environmental impact - all with minimal investment. 

As Fernando Benito, the cereal producer and protagonist of our video stated: “EGNOS allows me to save time and money during all the tasks carried out as it is very precise in the guidance, therefore it allows a correct dissemination of fertilizer and phytosanitary products, thus avoiding overlaps and faults. It is very easy to use and to configure, therefore it helps me save time” 

To benefit from EGNOS service, all you need is an SBAS-enabled antenna and a receiver properly configured to receive the signal. For those interested in equipment configuration details, guidelines can be downloaded through this link. You can also download GEAR, an interactive (and free) virtual demonstrator which, in a friendly way, allows you to experience in an entertaining way some farming tasks under different weather conditions while showcasing the benefits of EGNOS for machinery guidance. If you want to calculate how much money you save thanks to using EGNOS in your farm, try the “EASE tool“. This software provides cost-benefit analysis by comparing the results achieved through an EGNOS+GPS guidance versus a “GPS alone” one.

That is why Fernando Benito, the cereal producer, also added: “I can say that EGNOS is the tool that meets the requirements of my crops at low cost. It provides me with the precision I need at all times throughout the season, so I would recommend it to other cereal farmers.”

The agriculture sector has been one of the fastest to use satellite navigation services in recent years. This is confirmed by the fact the vast majority of agricultural GNSS devices, on board farming machinery on the market today, are EGNOS enabled and it is becoming the preferred entry level technology for a sustainable precision agriculture in Europe.

Watch the video here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).
97% of new tractors in Europe using GNSS are equipped with EGNOS, the preferred low-cost entry technology for precision farming in Europe

A “Cerealist’s Diary”, the testimony of a wheat farmer

29.6.2020 14:52  
97% of new tractors in Europe using GNSS are equipped with EGNOS, the preferred low-cost entry technology for precision farming in Europe
Published: 
29 June 2020

A cereal farmer in Salamanca, Spain, explains how satellite navigation systems help farmers to reduce CO2 emissions and save time and money, and demonstrates how EGNOS currently plays an important role in European agriculture, helping farms to improve crop yields while reducing their environmental footprint.

We met with Fernando Benito, a cereal farmer in Spain, who spoke to us about how EGNOS supports the entire wheat production cycle by facilitating various tasks such as ploughing, fertilizing, sowing and spraying.

EGNOS, the preferred entry technology for precision farming

EGNOS, with its sub-metre level accuracy (20-30 cm pass-to-pass), offers an affordable solution for some of the field work required by precision agriculture. EGNOS allows farmers to better monitor their harvest yields, perform effective in-field data collection and use guidance in cultivation. It also increases their efficiency, allowing them to work in poor visibility or bad weather conditions, while increasing productivity, lowering costs and minimising environmental impact - all with minimal investment. 

In the words of Fernando: “EGNOS allows me to save time and money across all my tasks. Thanks to its precision guidance it enables the correct dissemination of fertilizer and phytosanitary products, thus avoiding overlaps and errors. EGNOS is very easy to use and to configure, it saves me resources and time.” 

To benefit from the EGNOS service, all you need is an SBAS-enabled antenna and a receiver properly configured to receive the signal. For those interested in equipment configuration details, guidelines can be downloaded through this link. You can also download GEAR, an interactive (and free) virtual demonstrator that allows you to have fun experiencing various farming tasks under different weather conditions, while showcasing the benefits of EGNOS for machinery guidance. If you want to calculate how much money you can save by using EGNOS on your farm, try the EASE tool. This software provides a cost-benefit analysis by comparing the results achieved through EGNOS+GPS guidance versus GPS alone.

Fernando added: “I can say that EGNOS is a tool that meets the requirements of my crops at low cost. It provides me with the precision I need at all times throughout the season, so I would recommend it to other cereal farmers.”

The agriculture sector has been one of the fastest to adopt satellite navigation services. This is confirmed by the fact the vast majority of agricultural GNSS devices on board farming machinery today are EGNOS-enabled and EGNOS is fast becoming the preferred entry-level technology for sustainable precision agriculture in Europe.

Watch the video here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).
97% of new tractors in Europe using GNSS are equipped with EGNOS, the preferred low-cost entry technology for precision farming in Europe

First Galileo Performance Reports of 2020 now available

26.6.2020 10:49  
Both the Open Service and the SAR/Galileo Service performance figures generally exceed the MPL targets in Q1-2020.
Published: 
26 June 2020

Galileo Initial Services Open Service and SAR/Galileo Enhanced Services Performance Reports covering the first quarter of 2020 are available in the Electronic Library of the European GNSS Service Centre web portal.

The Galileo Open Service (OS) and SAR/Galileo Service Public Performance Reports for the first quarter of 2020 are available in the Performance Reports section of the Electronic Library, providing the status of the Galileo constellation and the achieved performance over the reported period (January, February and March 2020).

These quarterly reports provide the public with the latest information on the Galileo OS and SAR/Galileo Services measured performance statistics with respect to their Minimum Performance Levels (MPLs) (as declared in their respective Galileo Service Definition Documents: OS-SDD and SAR-SDD). Both SDDs can be found in the Programme Reference Documents section of the GSC web portal. It should be noted that this SAR/Galileo Service Performance Report is the first one following the declaration of the SAR/Galileo Enhanced Services and the publication of the updated SDD last January.

Quarterly reports provide information to users on parameters such as:

  • For Galileo Initial Services Open Service (IS OS): Initial ranging performance, Galileo to GPS Time Offset (GGTO) determination performance, Galileo positioning performance, the timely publication of NAGUs, etc.;
  • For SAR/Galileo Enhanced Services: Availability of FLS and RLS, performance of location probability and accuracy, RLS service latency etc.

Highlights from Q1-2020 Public Performance Reports

As in previous periods, Galileo measured OS and SAR Service performance figures comfortably exceed their MPL thresholds, specified in the OS-SDD and SAR-SDD (except for the SAR transponder availability for GSAT-214 and GSAT-103 during February and March respectively).

Some highlights from the Q1-2020 performance reports:

Initial Service OS:

  • Galileo Initial Open Service Ranging Performance: This is measured based on the Availability of the Galileo SF/DF Ranging Service [between 96.29% (all signals, March) and 96.42% (SIS E5a and Dual Frequency combination E1-E5a, February)], Per-slot Availability of Healthy Signal in Space for each Galileo operational satellite [low values were observed for GSAT-209 (86.71% in February) and GSAT-103 (with F/NAV and I/NAV SIS availability of respectively 45.34% and 51.52% during March)] and the Galileo Signal in Space Ranging Accuracy [for individual space vehicles: worst case value of 0.41 [m] for DF in February and 0.68 [m] for SF in February and March; best case values of 0.15 [m] for DF in January and 0.22 [m] for SF in February and March].
  • Galileo UTC and GGTO Dissemination and Determination Performance: The Galileo UTC Determination Service Availability reached a monthly value of 100% during the entire quarter, exceeding the MPL target of 87%. Moreover, the GGTO Determination Availability exceeds the MPL target of 80% over the reported months, reaching 100% in January and March.
  • Galileo Positioning Performance: This is measured based on the Availability of the Galileo Position Dilution of Precision and the Positioning Service, and the Galileo measured Positioning Performance.
  • Timely Publication of NAGUs (Notice Advisory to Galileo Users): The timeliness requirements for NAGU publication were met both for Planned and Unplanned events (NAGUs related to planned events need to be published at least 24 hours before the event starts, and those related to unplanned events with a delay of up to 72 hours from the detection of the unplanned event). A total number of 8 NAGUs have been published on the GSC web portal in the reported period.

Enhanced SAR/GALILEO Service:

  • Availability of SAR/Galileo:
    • Forward Link Service: 99.9% for the reported period (above defined MPLs of 99%). 
    • MEOLUT facilities in “Nominal” and “Nominal + Degraded” modes: remain at excellent levels, always above the MPL targets of 95% in “Nominal” and 97.5% in “Nominal + Degraded” modes. 
    • Return Link Service: 100% all over the period (MPL set to 95%).
    • SAR Transponders: achieved excellent levels of performance reaching monthly satellite transponder availability of 100% for almost all space vehicles (except for GSAT-214 in February, and for GSAT-103 in March).
  • Performance of: 
    • Detection Service: monthly values of a valid message detection probability after a single transmitted burst over 99.7%, where the MPL target is 99%. 
    • Location Probability: excellent values were achieved, with monthly values higher than 99.3% for a single burst, where the MPL target is 90%, and 99.7% after 12 transmitted bursts (multi-burst), where the MPL target is 98%. 
    • Location Accuracy: surpassed the targets with monthly values higher than 98.6% for a single burst and 99.1% for multi-burst transmissions with accuracy better than 5 km, while the MPLs are 90% and 95% respectively. 
  • Return Link Service:
    • Delivery Latency within 15 min: 99.94% on average over the reported period for an MPL set to 99%. 
    • Reception Probability: 99.76% in average over the reported period for an MPL set to 99%. 

For the most up-to-date information on the Galileo system and constellation, visit the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) website, in particular, the Galileo constellation status section. For an exhaustive description of the Minimum Performance Levels (MPLs), refer to the SDDs (Programme Reference documents).

For more details on Galileo performance and its Services, do not hesitate to contact the Galileo Help Desk. Moreover, if you wish to receive NAGUs automatically, please register to the GSC web portal.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Both the Open Service and the SAR/Galileo Service performance figures generally exceed the MPL targets in Q1-2020.

Satellite positioning a game changer for the European Railway Traffic Management System

23.6.2020 9:29  
GNSS is a key technology underpinning future evolutions of the ERTMS
Published: 
23 June 2020

A Work Plan for the European Railway Traffic Management System (ERTMS), published by the European Commission in May this year, lists satellite positioning as one of the game changing technologies underpinning future evolutions of the system and a key element to be included in future Technological Specifications for Interoperability (TSI).

The ERTMS is a major industrial project that aims to make rail transport in Europe safer and more competitive. As a safety system, the ERTMS enforces train compliance with speed restrictions and signalling and consists of equipment installed both on trains and along the railway tracks.

According to the latest Work Plan, the ERTMS will become the backbone of railway digitalisation in Europe, allowing for the introduction of new technologies, including but not limited to automatic train operation, satellite positioning and other technologies capable of optimising rail performance and capacity. 

Positive cost benefits

“In light of the important role that GNSS positioning will play in the system, the GSA recently conducted a cost-benefit analysis for virtual balises, one of the possible technical solutions for the ERTMS,” said Daniel Lopour, Market Development manager for rail. “This analysis showed that there is a positive cost/benefit ratio, both for railway infrastructure managers and for the industry as a whole,” he said. 

Read this: ITT: EGNSS-based rail safety service analysis

The GSA report found that, to make a good economic case, a rail line must be in a location that enables the deployment of a large number of virtual balises, when physical balises have not yet been deployed. The cost of balise maintenance also has an impact on the attractiveness of the project: the maintenance cost per physical balise should be high to allow for more cost savings.

One of the guiding principles for the future evolution of the ERTMS, including the revision of the Control Command and Signalling (CCS) Technological Specifications for Interoperability (TSI) planned for 2022, is to ensure that the TSI will deliver significant business case improvements for the railway sector. For this to happen, and to achieve higher capacity and better performance, the ERTMS game changers should be included in the TSI revision.

Investing in the future

Within the framework of Horizon 2020, the GSA and the Shift2Rail Joint Undertaking have been investing to ensure that Galileo and EGNOS can support localisation objectives within the ERTMS. R&D projects such as ERSAT, STARS and X2RAIL2, for example, have helped to analyse the rail environment, define the necessary architecture of the train positioning subsystem and provide the first operational pilots, transferring early results to European tracks. 

Watch this: EGNOS and Galileo for Rail

To support the ERTMS Work Plan the GSA, together with European Space Agency (ESA), is also actively supporting railway companies, infrastructure managers and the EU railway industry from the technical perspective regarding the different GNSS services needed for fail-safe train localisation. 

The GSA will continue to collaborate with Shift2Rail and the European Railway Agency on the necessary changes to ERTMS and the relevant European GNSS services, with the ultimate goal of delivering GNSS-based localisation-related efficiency benefits to the future evolutions of the ERTMS.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

GNSS is a key technology underpinning future evolutions of the ERTMS

Satellite positioning, a game changer for the European Railway Traffic Management System

23.6.2020 9:29  
GNSS is a key technology underpinning future evolutions of the ERTMS
Published: 
23 June 2020

A Work Plan for the European Railway Traffic Management System (ERTMS), published by the European Commission in May this year, lists satellite positioning as one of the game changing technologies underpinning future evolutions of the system and a key element to be included in future Technological Specifications for Interoperability (TSI).

The ERTMS is a major industrial project that aims to make rail transport in Europe safer and more competitive. As a safety system, the ERTMS enforces train compliance with speed restrictions and signalling and consists of equipment installed both on trains and along the railway tracks.

According to the latest Work Plan, the ERTMS will become the backbone of railway digitalisation in Europe, allowing for the introduction of new technologies, including but not limited to automatic train operation, satellite positioning and other technologies capable of optimising rail performance and capacity. 

Positive cost benefits

“In light of the important role that GNSS positioning will play in the system, the GSA recently conducted a cost-benefit analysis for virtual balises, one of the possible technical solutions for the ERTMS,” said Daniel Lopour, Market Development manager for rail. “This analysis showed that there is a positive cost/benefit ratio, both for railway infrastructure managers and for the industry as a whole,” he said. 

Read this: ITT: EGNSS-based rail safety service analysis

The GSA report found that, to make a good economic case, a rail line must be in a location that enables the deployment of a large number of virtual balises, when physical balises have not yet been deployed. The cost of balise maintenance also has an impact on the attractiveness of the project: the maintenance cost per physical balise should be high to allow for more cost savings.

One of the guiding principles for the future evolution of the ERTMS, including the revision of the Control Command and Signalling (CCS) Technological Specifications for Interoperability (TSI) planned for 2022, is to ensure that the TSI will deliver significant business case improvements for the railway sector. For this to happen, and to achieve higher capacity and better performance, the ERTMS game changers should be included in the TSI revision.

Investing in the future

Within the framework of Horizon 2020, the GSA and the Shift2Rail Joint Undertaking have been investing to ensure that Galileo and EGNOS can support localisation objectives within the ERTMS. R&D projects such as ERSAT, STARS and X2RAIL2, for example, have helped to analyse the rail environment, define the necessary architecture of the train positioning subsystem and provide the first operational pilots, transferring early results to European tracks. 

Watch this: EGNOS and Galileo for Rail

To support the ERTMS Work Plan the GSA, together with European Space Agency (ESA), is also actively supporting railway companies, infrastructure managers and the EU railway industry from the technical perspective regarding the different GNSS services needed for fail-safe train localisation. 

The GSA will continue to collaborate with Shift2Rail and the European Railway Agency on the necessary changes to ERTMS and the relevant European GNSS services, with the ultimate goal of delivering GNSS-based localisation-related efficiency benefits to the future evolutions of the ERTMS.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

GNSS is a key technology underpinning future evolutions of the ERTMS

Satellite positioning: a game changer for the European Railway Traffic Management System

23.6.2020 9:29  
GNSS is a key technology underpinning future evolutions of the ERTMS
Published: 
23 June 2020

A Work Plan for the European Railway Traffic Management System (ERTMS), published by the European Commission in May this year, lists satellite positioning as one of the game changing technologies underpinning future evolutions of the system and a key element to be included in future Technological Specifications for Interoperability (TSI).

The ERTMS is a major industrial project that aims to make rail transport in Europe safer and more competitive. As a safety system, the ERTMS enforces train compliance with speed restrictions and signalling and consists of equipment installed both on trains and along the railway tracks.

According to the latest Work Plan, the ERTMS will become the backbone of railway digitalisation in Europe, allowing for the introduction of new technologies, including but not limited to automatic train operation, satellite positioning and other technologies capable of optimising rail performance and capacity. 

Positive cost benefits

“In light of the important role that GNSS positioning will play in the system, the GSA recently conducted a cost-benefit analysis for virtual balises, one of the possible technical solutions for the ERTMS,” said Daniel Lopour, Market Development manager for rail. “This analysis showed that there is a positive cost/benefit ratio, both for railway infrastructure managers and for the industry as a whole,” he said. 

Read this: ITT: EGNSS-based rail safety service analysis

The GSA report found that, to make a good economic case, a rail line must be in a location that enables the deployment of a large number of virtual balises, when physical balises have not yet been deployed. The cost of balise maintenance also has an impact on the attractiveness of the project: the maintenance cost per physical balise should be high to allow for more cost savings.

One of the guiding principles for the future evolution of the ERTMS, including the revision of the Control Command and Signalling (CCS) Technological Specifications for Interoperability (TSI) planned for 2022, is to ensure that the TSI will deliver significant business case improvements for the railway sector. For this to happen, and to achieve higher capacity and better performance, the ERTMS game changers should be included in the TSI revision.

Investing in the future

Within the framework of Horizon 2020, the GSA and the Shift2Rail Joint Undertaking have been investing to ensure that Galileo and EGNOS can support localisation objectives within the ERTMS. R&D projects such as ERSAT, STARS and X2RAIL2, for example, have helped to analyse the rail environment, define the necessary architecture of the train positioning subsystem and provide the first operational pilots, transferring early results to European tracks. 

Watch this: EGNOS and Galileo for Rail

To support the ERTMS Work Plan the GSA, together with European Space Agency (ESA), is also actively supporting railway companies, infrastructure managers and the EU railway industry from the technical perspective regarding the different GNSS services needed for fail-safe train localisation. 

The GSA will continue to collaborate with Shift2Rail and the European Railway Agency on the necessary changes to ERTMS and the relevant European GNSS services, with the ultimate goal of delivering GNSS-based localisation-related efficiency benefits to the future evolutions of the ERTMS.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

GNSS is a key technology underpinning future evolutions of the ERTMS

GNSS raw measurements take centre stage at GSA workshop

18.6.2020 10:12  
Stakeholders shared the latest knowledge around raw measurement use at the Raw Measurements Workshop
Published: 
18 June 2020

Over 200 participants from 32 countries took part in the fourth GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop, held online on 27-28 May 2020. At the workshop, participants had the opportunity to learn about progress around the use of raw measurements in Android devices and to benefit from the experience of the GSA’s Raw Measurements Task Force.

By sharing knowledge and experience around raw measurement use, the GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshops increase the global understanding of raw measurements and advance the science and practice of implementing raw measurements in apps and devices. This year the event was online, with lively discussions held over the two days of the workshop.

Sharing knowledge

In his keynote presentation on May 27, Google`s Frank Van Diggelen spoke about updated Google tools for logging and analysing GNSS measurements, with new features already available in GnssLogger, such as logging in RINEX format or logging of other sensor data, or in GNSS Analysis software - such as new PVT filters or “select satellite for position”. Additional features (e.g. antenna phase centre offset), to be available with the Android 11 release in the third quarter of this year, were also highlighted.

Read this: Hackers take on Raw Galileo challenge

Discussions at the workshop confirmed that GNSS raw measurements are increasingly used in educational and scientific projects around the world, leading to increased knowledge and interest in GNSS technology and better implementation of GNSS within smartphones. In addition, there is already a growing body of evidence that sub-meter positioning is feasible in real-time with current smartphones when using RTK and other techniques. So, it is just a question of when, rather than if, it will become widely used. What’s more, test results from dual frequency chipsets presented at the workshop showed Galileo’s added-value in improving accuracy by reducing multipath.

“The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop allows all stakeholders interested in raw measurement use to share their knowledge and experience and to ensure that the benefits of GNSS raw measurements are enjoyed by as many people as possible,” the GSA’s Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani said in her welcome address. 

And this: Power-efficient positioning for the IoT

Over 20 interesting presentations

The day concluded with presentations from Airbus (Tomasz Lewandowski) and ESA (Xurxo Otero) showing test results with dual-frequency smartphones and evaluation kits. There were also presentations from Qascom (Carlo Sarto) on future OS-NMA use in smartphones; the GSA (Joaquin Reyes) on how raw measurements improve the digitalisation of CAP controls; EC (Katarzyna Porzuc) on GNSS raw measurements in the context of ensuring caller location in emergency communications; and JRC (Maria Angeles Aragon) about the NeQuick-G algorithm.

On the second day of the workshop, when another eleven contributions were presented, Rokubun CTO Miquel Garcia-Fernandez spoke about WiFi RTT (Round Trip Time) measurements as the GNSS companion for Indoor Positioning. Regarding the workshop, he said: “After four editions, the GSA Raw Measurements Task Force has matured and has become a reference to be up to date in recent advances regarding GNSS data processing for mobile devices.”

“Its participants, from public institutions, academia, big companies as well as SMEs provide an updated and relevant snapshot of the GNSS community developing new location technology for smartphones,” Garcia-Fernandez said.

For an overview of all the presentations made at the workshop, click here.

Join the Task Force

The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force is dedicated to promoting a better and wider use of GNSS raw measurements. 

Since its launch in 2017, the Task Force has expanded from a handful of experts to a community of over 100 agencies, universities, research institutes and companies. Membership is open to anybody interested in GNSS raw measurements. To join the Task Force contact: market@gsa.europa.eu.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Stakeholders shared the latest knowledge around raw measurement use at the Raw Measurements Workshop

Galileo Masters: a springboard for your ideas

17.6.2020 9:43  
Galileo Masters: a springboard for next-generation space applications
Published: 
17 June 2020

Have an idea that uses Galileo positioning to address a pressing societal challenge? Take it to the next level by entering it in this year’s Galileo Masters competition. Every year, the Galileo Masters acts as a springboard for exciting new ideas and awards new applications and services that use Galileo and EGNOS, also in synergy with other space programmes, to respond to pressing needs facing business and society.

As in previous years, in 2020 the Galileo Masters partner challenges offer excellent opportunities for forward‐thinking ideas based on space data to make the jump from the drawing board to a working app. The deadline for submissions is 30 June, so there is still time to apply. Even if your idea is not yet fully formed, make sure to register so you can receive information about all the great support activities and additional opportunities that arise throughout the submission phase. You can register here.

This year there is a total of EUR 750,000 up for grabs across seven key challenges, of which the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is sponsoring three. The GSA’s Space for Being Safe and Healthy Challenge is looking for solutions that use downstream space data provided by Galileo, EGNOS and/or Copernicus to help stem the spread of COVID-19. 

Read this: JOHAN V5 leverages EGNOS for extra precision

In its Space for Fun Challenge, the GSA is targeting solutions using data from Galileo and EGNOS in the gaming, sports and leisure, and tourism markets. This challenge covers a number of market segments and so has a lot of scope for new ideas that need accurate and authenticated positioning. Finally, the Space for our Planet Challenge, aims to tackle climate change and environmental degradation, which represent an existential threat in Europe and worldwide. 

Space for future generations

“The focus of the GSA challenges in 2020 is essentially children. We are targeting applications that leverage space to make the world a better place for future generations,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “Pandemics like COVID-19 represent an ever-present threat and, although it was conceived before the current pandemic, the Space for Being Safe and Healthy Challenge aims to channel space tech into meeting this challenge,” she said.

“The other great threat to future generations comes from climate change, and solutions that will help with climate change adaptation and mitigation are our target in the Space for our Planet Challenge,” Diani said. “But there is a light-hearted side to this year’s challenges also – children deserve to play and have fun, and we hope to find some exciting new ideas for sports and games in our Space for Fun challenge,” she said.

Read this: Space synergies for food security

The GSA is co-hosting a webinar ‘Space for future generations’ on 17 June 2020 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM CEST along with competition organiser AZO and winner of last year’s Galileo-Copernicus Synergy Challenge Xylene. The webinar will focus on the Galileo-Copernicus Synergy Challenge and the benefits offered by synergies between the two European space programmes, while exploring potential applications with commercial and societal benefits arising from these synergies. Interested? Find out more here.

Inspiration from the past

While fine-tuning your idea for this year’s competition, you might take some inspiration from past winners. The overall winner at last year’s Galileo Masters was Performance Cockpit, a business intelligence system that aims to lessen the environmental footprint of the aviation sector by increasing operational efficiency and considerably reducing fuel consumption. 

The Galileo-Copernicus Synergy Challenge in 2019 went to Xylene, an app that revolutionises the way timber is supplied to the market. The concept behind the Xylene app is to document every step of the timber supply chain, from the forest to the final product. 

Winner in the 2019 "Start-up of the Year" category was PODIS (POst DIstress Signal). PODIS is a client-server IoT solution for automatic crash notification. Its unique selling point is its patented methodology for filtering out false alarms, which it does on the server side. In this way PODIS maximises use of the “golden hour” within which trauma professionals aim to get injured people into hospital to increase their chances of survival.

Finally, Idea of the Year in 2019 went to CX Geodrone, which is developing a drone payload based on radar equipment and post-processing techniques for geo-referenced data to complement (and sometimes replace) LiDAR laser technologies and take the next step in underground detection applications.

Inspired? Sign up now and take your idea to the next level in the Galileo Masters 2020!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Galileo Masters: a springboard for next-generation space applications

Galileo Masters: a springboard for your ideas

17.6.2020 9:43  
Galileo Masters: a springboard for next-generation space applications
Published: 
17 June 2020

Have an idea that uses Galileo positioning to address a pressing societal challenge? Take it to the next level by entering it in this year’s Galileo Masters competition. Every year, the Galileo Masters acts as a springboard for exciting new ideas and awards new applications and services that use Galileo and EGNOS, also in synergy with other space programmes, to respond to pressing needs facing business and society.

As in previous years, in 2020 the Galileo Masters partner challenges offer excellent opportunities for forward‐thinking ideas based on space data to make the jump from the drawing board to a working app. The deadline for submissions is 30 June, so there is still time to apply. Even if your idea is not yet fully formed, make sure to register so you can receive information about all the great support activities and additional opportunities that arise throughout the submission phase. You can register here.

This year there is a total of EUR 750,000 up for grabs across seven key challenges, of which the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is sponsoring three. The GSA’s Space for Being Safe and Healthy Challenge is looking for solutions that use downstream space data provided by Galileo, EGNOS and/or Copernicus to help stem the spread of COVID-19. 

Read this: JOHAN V5 leverages EGNOS for extra precision

In its Space for Fun Challenge, the GSA is targeting solutions using data from Galileo and EGNOS in the gaming, sports and leisure, and tourism markets. This challenge covers a number of market segments and so has a lot of scope for new ideas that need accurate and authenticated positioning. Finally, the Space for our Planet Challenge, aims to tackle climate change and environmental degradation, which represent an existential threat in Europe and worldwide. 

Space for future generations

“The focus of the GSA challenges in 2020 is essentially children. We are targeting applications that leverage space to make the world a better place for future generations,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “Pandemics like COVID-19 represent an ever-present threat and, although it was conceived before the current pandemic, the Space for Being Safe and Healthy Challenge aims to channel space tech into meeting this challenge,” she said.

“The other great threat to future generations comes from climate change, and solutions that will help with climate change adaptation and mitigation are our target in the Space for our Planet Challenge,” Diani said. “But there is a light-hearted side to this year’s challenges also – children deserve to play and have fun, and we hope to find some exciting new ideas for sports and games in our Space for Fun challenge,” she said.

Read this: Space synergies for food security

The GSA is co-hosting a webinar ‘Space for future generations’ on 17 June 2020 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM CEST along with competition organiser AZO and winner of last year’s Galileo-Copernicus Synergy Challenge Xylene. The webinar will focus on the Galileo-Copernicus Synergy Challenge and the benefits offered by synergies between the two European space programmes, while exploring potential applications with commercial and societal benefits arising from these synergies. Interested? Find out more here.

Inspiration from the past

While fine-tuning your idea for this year’s competition, you might take some inspiration from past winners. The overall winner at last year’s Galileo Masters was Performance Cockpit, a business intelligence system that aims to lessen the environmental footprint of the aviation sector by increasing operational efficiency and considerably reducing fuel consumption. 

The Galileo-Copernicus Synergy Challenge in 2019 went to Xylene, an app that revolutionises the way timber is supplied to the market. The concept behind the Xylene app is to document every step of the timber supply chain, from the forest to the final product. 

Winner in the 2019 "Start-up of the Year" category was PODIS (POst DIstress Signal). PODIS is a client-server IoT solution for automatic crash notification. Its unique selling point is its patented methodology for filtering out false alarms, which it does on the server side. In this way PODIS maximises use of the “golden hour” within which trauma professionals aim to get injured people into hospital to increase their chances of survival.

Finally, Idea of the Year in 2019 went to CX Geodrone, which is developing a drone payload based on radar equipment and post-processing techniques for geo-referenced data to complement (and sometimes replace) LiDAR laser technologies and take the next step in underground detection applications.

Inspired? Sign up now and take your idea to the next level in the Galileo Masters 2020!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Galileo Masters: a springboard for next-generation space applications

Galileo Masters: a springboard for your ideas

17.6.2020 9:43  
Galileo Masters: a springboard for next-generation space applications
Published: 
17 June 2020

Have an idea that uses Galileo positioning to address a pressing societal challenge? Take it to the next level by entering it in this year’s Galileo Masters competition. Every year, the Galileo Masters acts as a springboard for exciting new ideas and awards new applications and services that use Galileo and EGNOS, also in synergy with other space programmes, to respond to pressing needs facing business and society.

As in previous years, in 2020 the Galileo Masters partner challenges offer excellent opportunities for forward‐thinking ideas based on space data to make the jump from the drawing board to a working app. The deadline for submissions is 30 June, so there is still time to apply. Even if your idea is not yet fully formed, make sure to register so you can receive information about all the great support activities and additional opportunities that arise throughout the submission phase. You can register here.

This year there is a total of EUR 750,000 up for grabs across seven key challenges, of which the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is sponsoring three. The GSA’s Space for Being Safe and Healthy Challenge is looking for solutions that use downstream space data provided by Galileo, EGNOS and/or Copernicus to help stem the spread of COVID-19. 

Read this: JOHAN V5 leverages EGNOS for extra precision

In its Space for Fun Challenge, the GSA is targeting solutions using data from Galileo and EGNOS in the gaming, sports and leisure, and tourism markets. This challenge covers a number of market segments and so has a lot of scope for new ideas that need accurate and authenticated positioning. Finally, the Space for our Planet Challenge, aims to tackle climate change and environmental degradation, which represent an existential threat in Europe and worldwide. 

Space for future generations

“The focus of the GSA challenges in 2020 is essentially children. We are targeting applications that leverage space to make the world a better place for future generations,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “Pandemics like COVID-19 represent an ever-present threat and, although it was conceived before the current pandemic, the Space for Being Safe and Healthy Challenge aims to channel space tech into meeting this challenge,” she said.

“The other great threat to future generations comes from climate change, and solutions that will help with climate change adaptation and mitigation are our target in the Space for our Planet Challenge,” Diani said. “But there is a light-hearted side to this year’s challenges also – children deserve to play and have fun, and we hope to find some exciting new ideas for sports and games in our Space for Fun challenge,” she said.

Read this: Space synergies for food security

The GSA is co-hosting a webinar ‘Space for future generations’ on 17 June 2020 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM CEST along with competition organiser AZO and winner of last year’s Galileo-Copernicus Synergy Challenge Xylene. The webinar will focus on the Galileo-Copernicus Synergy Challenge and the benefits offered by synergies between the two European space programmes, while exploring potential applications with commercial and societal benefits arising from these synergies. Interested? Find out more here.

Inspiration from the past

While fine-tuning your idea for this year’s competition, you might take some inspiration from past winners. The overall winner at last year’s Galileo Masters was Performance Cockpit, a business intelligence system that aims to lessen the environmental footprint of the aviation sector by increasing operational efficiency and considerably reducing fuel consumption. 

The Galileo-Copernicus Synergy Challenge in 2019 went to Xylene, an app that revolutionises the way timber is supplied to the market. The concept behind the Xylene app is to document every step of the timber supply chain, from the forest to the final product. 

Winner in the 2019 "Start-up of the Year" category was PODIS (POst DIstress Signal). PODIS is a client-server IoT solution for automatic crash notification. Its unique selling point is its patented methodology for filtering out false alarms, which it does on the server side. In this way PODIS maximises use of the “golden hour” within which trauma professionals aim to get injured people into hospital to increase their chances of survival.

Finally, Idea of the Year in 2019 went to CX Geodrone, which is developing a drone payload based on radar equipment and post-processing techniques for geo-referenced data to complement (and sometimes replace) LiDAR laser technologies and take the next step in underground detection applications.

Inspired? Sign up now and take your idea to the next level in the Galileo Masters 2020!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Galileo Masters: a springboard for next-generation space applications

Galileo Masters: a springboard for your ideas

17.6.2020 9:43  
Galileo Masters: a springboard for next-generation space applications
Published: 
17 June 2020

Have an idea that uses Galileo positioning to address a pressing societal challenge? Take it to the next level by entering it in this year’s Galileo Masters competition. Every year, the Galileo Masters acts as a springboard for exciting new ideas and awards new applications and services that use Galileo and EGNOS, also in synergy with other space programmes, to respond to pressing needs facing business and society.

As in previous years, in 2020 the Galileo Masters partner challenges offer excellent opportunities for forward‐thinking ideas based on space data to make the jump from the drawing board to a working app. The deadline for submissions is 30 June, so there is still time to apply. Even if your idea is not yet fully formed, make sure to register so you can receive information about all the great support activities and additional opportunities that arise throughout the submission phase. You can register here.

This year there is a total of EUR 750,000 up for grabs across seven key challenges, of which the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is sponsoring three. The GSA’s Space for Being Safe and Healthy Challenge is looking for solutions that use downstream space data provided by Galileo, EGNOS and/or Copernicus to help stem the spread of COVID-19. 

Read this: JOHAN V5 leverages EGNOS for extra precision

In its Space for Fun Challenge, the GSA is targeting solutions using data from Galileo and EGNOS in the gaming, sports and leisure, and tourism markets. This challenge covers a number of market segments and so has a lot of scope for new ideas that need accurate and authenticated positioning. Finally, the Space for our Planet Challenge, aims to tackle climate change and environmental degradation, which represent an existential threat in Europe and worldwide. 

Space for future generations

“The focus of the GSA challenges in 2020 is essentially children. We are targeting applications that leverage space to make the world a better place for future generations,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “Pandemics like COVID-19 represent an ever-present threat and, although it was conceived before the current pandemic, the Space for Being Safe and Healthy Challenge aims to channel space tech into meeting this challenge,” she said.

“The other great threat to future generations comes from climate change, and solutions that will help with climate change adaptation and mitigation are our target in the Space for our Planet Challenge,” Diani said. “But there is a light-hearted side to this year’s challenges also – children deserve to play and have fun, and we hope to find some exciting new ideas for sports and games in our Space for Fun challenge,” she said.

Read this: Space synergies for food security

The GSA is co-hosting a webinar ‘Space for future generations’ on 17 June 2020 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM CEST along with competition organiser AZO and winner of last year’s Galileo-Copernicus Synergy Challenge Xylene. The webinar will focus on the Galileo-Copernicus Synergy Challenge and the benefits offered by synergies between the two European space programmes, while exploring potential applications with commercial and societal benefits arising from these synergies. Interested? Find out more here.

Inspiration from the past

While fine-tuning your idea for this year’s competition, you might take some inspiration from past winners. The overall winner at last year’s Galileo Masters was Performance Cockpit, a business intelligence system that aims to lessen the environmental footprint of the aviation sector by increasing operational efficiency and considerably reducing fuel consumption. 

The Galileo-Copernicus Synergy Challenge in 2019 went to Xylene, an app that revolutionises the way timber is supplied to the market. The concept behind the Xylene app is to document every step of the timber supply chain, from the forest to the final product. 

Winner in the 2019 "Start-up of the Year" category was PODIS (POst DIstress Signal). PODIS is a client-server IoT solution for automatic crash notification. Its unique selling point is its patented methodology for filtering out false alarms, which it does on the server side. In this way PODIS maximises use of the “golden hour” within which trauma professionals aim to get injured people into hospital to increase their chances of survival.

Finally, Idea of the Year in 2019 went to CX Geodrone, which is developing a drone payload based on radar equipment and post-processing techniques for geo-referenced data to complement (and sometimes replace) LiDAR laser technologies and take the next step in underground detection applications.

Inspired? Sign up now and take your idea to the next level in the Galileo Masters 2020!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Galileo Masters: a springboard for next-generation space applications

JOHAN V5 leverages EGNOS for extra precision

16.6.2020 13:17  
JOHAN GNSS-enabled sports trackers help improve team performance.
Published: 
16 June 2020

Winner of the GSA Special Prize at the 2013 European Satellite Navigation Competition (ESNC), JOHAN has successfully established a start-up and is expanding its products portfolio. The company has developed GNSS-enabled motion sensors for location determination and performance measurement of sports teams, especially football and hockey players. The latest version of the sports tracker - V5 - leverages EGNOS/SBAS for extra accuracy.

The JOHAN V5 tracking system was developed in close collaboration with professional sports teams and offers accuracy, usability, and efficiency in a system that allows sports coaches to make quick and data-based decisions about player performance, injury risks, and training programmes.

The latest version of the sports tracker, the JOHAN V5, is equipped with a small powerful GNSS chip which, in combination with GNSS ground stations and sensor fusion, ensures high positioning accuracy. In addition, the V5 sensor also contains an integrated heart rate monitor, so that GNSS and heart rate data can be collected simultaneously from the players, who only need to wear one sensor. The latest version of the tracker offers real-time functionality, making it possible to translate live insights into training adjustments, through a user-friendly app.

Galileo for team spirit

The GNSS tracker – which is Galileo enabled – can determine a player’s position up to 1.5 metres and when this is combined with measurements from inertial sensors the level of accuracy increases even further. The monitor allows sports coaches or trainers to monitor the heart rate, number of sprints, distance covered and speed of all the team’s players.

Read this: SARA scores at football match

After using the tracer, players and coaches can review their performance, allowing players to spot weaknesses and improve their game over time and enabling coaches to make data-based tactical decisions to take advantage of players’ strengths and improve overall team performance.

“Sports trackers are yet another example of how Europe’s investment in space is being leveraged to provide innovative services in multiple sectors. In this case, Galileo’s accurate positioning is used to provide data-driven insights, allowing trainers to better strategize and enabling players to improve their performance,” said Fiammetta Diani, Head of Market Development at the GSA.

The V5 trackers are connected to a smart JOHAN control suitcase using new Bluetooth 5 technology, enabling live tracking. Bluetooth 5 technology has a range of over 400 meters, making it possible connect with the Live App to present accurate and consistent live tracking data.

GSA prize winner

Winning the GSA Special Prize at the ESNC in 2013 provided finance for incubation at an incubation centre of the project’s choice and JOHAN decided to cooperate with the European Space Agency’s Business Innovation Centre in Noordwijk. Working from this centre, the company ramped up development, adding customers and raising funds. 

 

With kits to monitor teams of five players starting at EUR 995  per year, the company currently has more than 2,400 trackers in use by more than 120 teams in more than 24 countries, including Panathinaikos F.C. (Super League, Greece), Feyenoord Academy (Eredivisie, Netherlands), SC Braga Academy (Primeira Liga, Portugal) and the Icelandic national football team (FIFA, Iceland).

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

JOHAN GNSS-enabled sports trackers help improve team performance.

JOHAN V5 leverages EGNOS for extra precision

16.6.2020 13:17  
JOHAN GNSS-enabled sports trackers help improve team performance.
Published: 
16 June 2020

Winner of the GSA Special Prize at the 2013 Galileo Masters (former European Satellite Navigation Competition - ESNC), JOHAN has successfully established a start-up and is expanding its products portfolio. The company has developed GNSS-enabled motion sensors for location determination and performance measurement of sports teams, especially football and hockey players. The latest version of the sports tracker - V5 - leverages EGNOS/SBAS for extra accuracy.

The JOHAN V5 tracking system was developed in close collaboration with professional sports teams and offers accuracy, usability, and efficiency in a system that allows sports coaches to make quick and data-based decisions about player performance, injury risks, and training programmes.

The latest version of the sports tracker, the JOHAN V5, is equipped with a small powerful GNSS chip which, in combination with GNSS ground stations and sensor fusion, ensures high positioning accuracy. In addition, the V5 sensor also contains an integrated heart rate monitor, so that GNSS and heart rate data can be collected simultaneously from the players, who only need to wear one sensor. The latest version of the tracker offers real-time functionality, making it possible to translate live insights into training adjustments, through a user-friendly app.

Galileo for team spirit

The GNSS tracker – which is Galileo enabled – can determine a player’s position up to 1.5 metres and when this is combined with measurements from inertial sensors the level of accuracy increases even further. The monitor allows sports coaches or trainers to monitor the heart rate, number of sprints, distance covered and speed of all the team’s players.

Read this: SARA scores at football match

After using the tracer, players and coaches can review their performance, allowing players to spot weaknesses and improve their game over time and enabling coaches to make data-based tactical decisions to take advantage of players’ strengths and improve overall team performance.

“Sports trackers are yet another example of how Europe’s investment in space is being leveraged to provide innovative services in multiple sectors. In this case, Galileo’s accurate positioning is used to provide data-driven insights, allowing trainers to better strategize and enabling players to improve their performance,” said Fiammetta Diani, Head of Market Development at the GSA.

The V5 trackers are connected to a smart JOHAN control suitcase using new Bluetooth 5 technology, enabling live tracking. Bluetooth 5 technology has a range of over 400 meters, making it possible connect with the Live App to present accurate and consistent live tracking data.

GSA prize winner

Winning the GSA Special Prize at the ESNC in 2013 provided finance for incubation at an incubation centre of the project’s choice and JOHAN decided to cooperate with the European Space Agency’s Business Innovation Centre in Noordwijk. Working from this centre, the company ramped up development, adding customers and raising funds. 

 

With kits to monitor teams of five players starting at EUR 995  per year, the company currently has more than 2,400 trackers in use by more than 120 teams in more than 24 countries, including Panathinaikos F.C. (Super League, Greece), Feyenoord Academy (Eredivisie, Netherlands), SC Braga Academy (Primeira Liga, Portugal) and the Icelandic national football team (FIFA, Iceland).

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

JOHAN GNSS-enabled sports trackers help improve team performance.

The Global ARAIM for Dual-Constellation project and its contribution to the development of ARAIM concept for Civil Aviation

12.6.2020 9:39  
Collins Aerospace Global Landing Unit (GLU), GLU-2100 MMR, single frequency GPS L1 receiver, prototyped upgraded to support a GPS and Galileo DFMC GNSS and used as a baseline for the development of the ARAIM algorithm
Published: 
12 June 2020

A webinar is organised by Global ARAIM for Dual-Constellation (GLAD) project, co-funded by the European GNSS Agency (GSA), that is developing the Advanced Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring (RAIM) prototype receiver under the Fundamental Elements. It will take place on 24th June and will cover ARAIM concept, GLAD activities during the prototyping and demonstration of the results. You can register here.

The Advanced RAIM (ARAIM) concept extends the traditional legacy GPS single frequency Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring (RAIM) by using multiple GNSS constellations that may include signals from the same satellite transmitting more than one frequency. The Galileo constellation, in addition to GPS provides a Dual Frequency Multi-Constellation (DFMC) system that allows for robustness and redundancy. In the aviation sector, when DFMC is supported by Satellite Based Augmentation System (SBAS) and ARAIM, satellite availability is leveraged with accuracy in position, and the associated integrity and continuity elevated in terms of radio navigation performance.  

The ARAIM concept started to shape in the Working Group C, the ARAIM Technical Subgroup, that was established in 2010, based on the US-EU bilateral agreement on GPS-Galileo co-operation agreement signed in 2004 with the goal to develop GPS-Galileo integrated applications for Safety of Life operations. 

Concept wise, each GNSS Constellation Service Provider (CSP) will transmit an Integrity Support Message (ISM) to broadcast integrity information associated with its own system. The airborne receiver’s ARAIM algorithm processes this information to gain sufficient confidence in the information provided by the specific GNSS constellation in order to meet safety-required criteria in terms of lateral and vertical guidance, and as such addressing the requirement for all phases of flight up to Category I (CAT I) precision approach capability/LPV 200 approach globally in the future.

GLobal ARAIM for Dual-Constellation (GLAD) is an innovative project focusing on development an ARAIM capability within the Collins’ Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) Multi-Mode Receiver (MMR). This project is funded by the European GNSS Agency (GSA) under the “Development of an Advanced RAIM Multi-Constellation Receiver” Call for proposal. The key tenet for Collins Aerospace, a key aviation market player, was to work closely with the GSA to support the definition and development of ARAIM features to meet the global airspace modernisation requirements. To that effect, Collins put together a GLAD project team which comprises of Airbus, GMV, NATS and Pildo Labs to lead an ARAIM development prototyping activity. The project commenced in May 2018 and completes in June 2020. 

The key objectives of the GLAD project is the maturation of the ARAIM concept by prototyping the algorithm within critical components of the Collins’ GLU-2100 Multi-Mode Receiver (MMR), followed by testing and assessing the performance of the algorithm. In addition, the project focused on concepts of operations (CONOPS) using ARAIM and collaborated with Air Navigation Service Providers (ANSPs) to engage and understand the requirements for airport operations. The team also contributed to standardisation activities within GNSS working groups. 

The GLAD team has successfully conducted ground experiments demonstrating real-time horizontal and vertical ARAIM performance, with a horizontal precision of 0.3 NM and vertical precision supporting LPV-200. The future benefits to this will be significant contributions to improvements in position integrity, and underpins the economic (fuel and time), environmental (CO2) and safety aspects required by the aviation industry.

To conclude the objectives set out within the project framework, the GSA and GLAD Team take the opportunity to invite the stakeholders to a Webinar on 24th June 2020 to explain the ARAIM concept, outcomes of the project and show the ARAIM prototype developed. You can register here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Collins Aerospace Global Landing Unit (GLU), GLU-2100 MMR, single frequency GPS L1 receiver, prototyped upgraded to support a GPS and Galileo DFMC GNSS and used as a baseline for the development of the ARAIM algorithm

The Global ARAIM for Dual-Constellation project and its contribution to the development of ARAIM concept for Civil Aviation

12.6.2020 9:39  
Collins Aerospace Global Landing Unit (GLU), GLU-2100 MMR, single frequency GPS L1 receiver, prototyped upgraded to support a GPS and Galileo DFMC GNSS and used as a baseline for the development of the ARAIM algorithm
Published: 
12 June 2020

A webinar is organised by Global ARAIM for Dual-Constellation (GLAD) project, co-funded by the European GNSS Agency (GSA), that is developing the Advanced Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring (ARAIM) prototype receiver under the Fundamental Elements. It will take place on 24th June and will cover ARAIM concept, GLAD activities during the prototyping and demonstration of the results. You can register here.

The Advanced RAIM (ARAIM) concept extends the traditional legacy GPS single frequency Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring (RAIM) by using multiple GNSS constellations that may include signals from the same satellite transmitting more than one frequency. The Galileo constellation, in addition to GPS provides a Dual Frequency Multi-Constellation (DFMC) system that allows for robustness and redundancy. In the aviation sector, when DFMC is supported by Satellite Based Augmentation System (SBAS) and ARAIM, satellite availability is leveraged with accuracy in position, and the associated integrity and continuity elevated in terms of radio navigation performance.  

The ARAIM concept started to shape in the Working Group C, the ARAIM Technical Subgroup, that was established in 2010, based on the US-EU bilateral agreement on GPS-Galileo co-operation agreement signed in 2004 with the goal to develop GPS-Galileo integrated applications for Safety of Life operations. 

Concept wise, each GNSS Constellation Service Provider (CSP) will transmit an Integrity Support Message (ISM) to broadcast integrity information associated with its own system. The airborne receiver’s ARAIM algorithm processes this information to gain sufficient confidence in the information provided by the specific GNSS constellation in order to meet safety-required criteria in terms of lateral and vertical guidance, and as such addressing the requirement for all phases of flight up to Category I (CAT I) precision approach capability/LPV 200 approach globally in the future.

GLobal ARAIM for Dual-Constellation (GLAD) is an innovative project focusing on development an ARAIM capability within the Collins’ Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) Multi-Mode Receiver (MMR). This project is funded by the European GNSS Agency (GSA) under the “Development of an Advanced RAIM Multi-Constellation Receiver” Call for proposal. The key tenet for Collins Aerospace, a key aviation market player, was to work closely with the GSA to support the definition and development of ARAIM features to meet the global airspace modernisation requirements. To that effect, Collins put together a GLAD project team which comprises of Airbus, GMV, NATS and Pildo Labs to lead an ARAIM development prototyping activity. The project commenced in May 2018 and completes in June 2020. 

The key objectives of the GLAD project is the maturation of the ARAIM concept by prototyping the algorithm within critical components of the Collins’ GLU-2100 Multi-Mode Receiver (MMR), followed by testing and assessing the performance of the algorithm. In addition, the project focused on concepts of operations (CONOPS) using ARAIM and collaborated with Air Navigation Service Providers (ANSPs) to engage and understand the requirements for airport operations. The team also contributed to standardisation activities within GNSS working groups. 

The GLAD team has successfully conducted ground experiments demonstrating real-time horizontal and vertical ARAIM performance, with a horizontal precision of 0.3 NM and vertical precision supporting LPV-200. The future benefits to this will be significant contributions to improvements in position integrity, and underpins the economic (fuel and time), environmental (CO2) and safety aspects required by the aviation industry.

To conclude the objectives set out within the project framework, the GSA and GLAD Team take the opportunity to invite the stakeholders to a Webinar on 24th June 2020 to explain the ARAIM concept, outcomes of the project and show the ARAIM prototype developed. You can register here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Collins Aerospace Global Landing Unit (GLU), GLU-2100 MMR, single frequency GPS L1 receiver, prototyped upgraded to support a GPS and Galileo DFMC GNSS and used as a baseline for the development of the ARAIM algorithm

The Global ARAIM for Dual-Constellation project and its contribution to the development of ARAIM concept for Civil Aviation

12.6.2020 9:39  
Collins Aerospace Global Landing Unit (GLU), GLU-2100 MMR, single frequency GPS L1 receiver, prototyped upgraded to support a GPS and Galileo DFMC GNSS and used as a baseline for the development of the ARAIM algorithm
Published: 
12 June 2020

A webinar is being organised by the Global ARAIM for Dual-Constellation (GLAD) project, co-funded by the European GNSS Agency (GSA), which is developing the Advanced Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring (ARAIM) prototype receiver under the Fundamental Elements programme. It will take place on 24 June and will cover the ARAIM concept and GLAD activities during the prototyping and demonstration of the results. You can register here.

The Advanced RAIM (ARAIM) concept extends the traditional legacy GPS single frequency Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring (RAIM) by using multiple GNSS constellations that may include signals from the same satellite transmitting more than one frequency. The Galileo constellation, in addition to GPS, provides a Dual Frequency Multi-Constellation (DFMC) system that allows for robustness and redundancy. In the aviation sector, when DFMC is supported by a Satellite Based Augmentation System (SBAS) and ARAIM, satellite availability is leveraged with accuracy in position, and the associated integrity and continuity elevated in terms of radio navigation performance.  

The ARAIM concept started to take shape in the Working Group C, the ARAIM Technical Subgroup, that was established in 2010, based on the US-EU bilateral agreement on GPS-Galileo co-operation agreement signed in 2004 with the goal to develop GPS-Galileo integrated applications for Safety of Life operations. 

Concept wise, each GNSS Constellation Service Provider (CSP) will transmit an Integrity Support Message (ISM) to broadcast integrity information associated with its own system. The airborne receiver’s ARAIM algorithm processes this information to gain sufficient confidence in the information provided by the specific GNSS constellation in order to meet required safety criteria in terms of lateral and vertical guidance, thereby addressing the requirement for all phases of flight up to Category I (CAT I) precision approach capability/LPV 200 approach globally in the future.

GLobal ARAIM for Dual-Constellation (GLAD) is an innovative project focusing on the development of ARAIM capability within the Collins’ Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) Multi-Mode Receiver (MMR). This project is funded by the European GNSS Agency (GSA) under the “Development of an Advanced RAIM Multi-Constellation Receiver” Call for proposals. The key tenet for Collins Aerospace, a key aviation market player, was to work closely with the GSA to support the definition and development of ARAIM features to meet global airspace modernisation requirements. To that effect, Collins put together a GLAD project team which comprises Airbus, GMV, NATS and Pildo Labs to lead an ARAIM development prototyping activity. The project commenced in May 2018 and ends in June 2020. 

The key objectives of the GLAD project is the maturation of the ARAIM concept by prototyping the algorithm within critical components of the Collins’ GLU-2100 Multi-Mode Receiver (MMR), followed by testing and assessing the performance of the algorithm. In addition, the project focused on concepts of operations (CONOPS) using ARAIM and collaborated with Air Navigation Service Providers (ANSPs) to engage and understand the requirements for airport operations. The team also contributed to standardisation activities within GNSS working groups. 

The GLAD team has successfully conducted ground experiments demonstrating real-time horizontal and vertical ARAIM performance, with a horizontal precision of 0.3 NM and vertical precision supporting LPV-200. The future benefits will include significant contributions to improvements in position integrity, and to underpinning the economic (fuel and time), environmental (CO2) and safety aspects required by the aviation industry.

To reach the objectives set out within the project framework, the GSA and GLAD Team take the opportunity to invite stakeholders to a Webinar on 24th June 2020 to explain the ARAIM concept, outcomes of the project and show the ARAIM prototype developed. You can register here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Collins Aerospace Global Landing Unit (GLU), GLU-2100 MMR, single frequency GPS L1 receiver, prototyped upgraded to support a GPS and Galileo DFMC GNSS and used as a baseline for the development of the ARAIM algorithm

Global ARAIM for Dual-Constellation webinar took place on 24 June 2020

12.6.2020 9:39  
Collins Aerospace Global Landing Unit (GLU), GLU-2100 MMR, single frequency GPS L1 receiver, prototyped upgraded to support a GPS and Galileo DFMC GNSS and used as a baseline for the development of the ARAIM algorithm
Published: 
12 June 2020

A webinar was organised by the Global ARAIM for Dual-Constellation (GLAD) project, co-funded by the European GNSS Agency (GSA), which is developing the Advanced Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring (RAIM) prototype receiver under the Fundamental Elements programme. It took place on 24 June 2020 and covered the ARAIM concept and GLAD activities during the prototyping and demonstration of the results.

The Advanced RAIM (ARAIM) concept extends the traditional legacy GPS single frequency Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring (RAIM) by using multiple GNSS constellations that may include signals from the same satellite transmitting more than one frequency. The Galileo constellation, in addition to GPS, provides a Dual Frequency Multi-Constellation (DFMC) system that allows for robustness and redundancy. In the aviation sector, when DFMC is supported by a Satellite Based Augmentation System (SBAS) and ARAIM, satellite availability is leveraged with accuracy in position, and the associated integrity and continuity elevated in terms of radio navigation performance.  

The ARAIM concept started to take shape in the Working Group C, the ARAIM Technical Subgroup, that was established in 2010, based on the US-EU bilateral agreement on GPS-Galileo co-operation agreement signed in 2004 with the goal to develop GPS-Galileo integrated applications for Safety of Life operations. 

Concept wise, each GNSS Constellation Service Provider (CSP) will transmit an Integrity Support Message (ISM) to broadcast integrity information associated with its own system. The airborne receiver’s ARAIM algorithm processes this information to gain sufficient confidence in the information provided by the specific GNSS constellation in order to meet required safety criteria in terms of lateral and vertical guidance, thereby addressing the requirement for all phases of flight up to Category I (CAT I) precision approach capability/LPV 200 approach globally in the future.

GLobal ARAIM for Dual-Constellation (GLAD) is an innovative project focusing on the development of ARAIM capability within the Collins’ Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) Multi-Mode Receiver (MMR). This project is funded by the European GNSS Agency (GSA) under the “Development of an Advanced RAIM Multi-Constellation Receiver” Call for proposals. The key tenet for Collins Aerospace, a key aviation market player, was to work closely with the GSA to support the definition and development of ARAIM features to meet global airspace modernisation requirements. To that effect, Collins put together a GLAD project team which comprises Airbus, GMV, NATS and Pildo Labs to lead an ARAIM development prototyping activity. The project commenced in May 2018 and ends in June 2020. 

The key objectives of the GLAD project is the maturation of the ARAIM concept by prototyping the algorithm within critical components of the Collins’ GLU-2100 Multi-Mode Receiver (MMR), followed by testing and assessing the performance of the algorithm. In addition, the project focused on concepts of operations (CONOPS) using ARAIM and collaborated with Air Navigation Service Providers (ANSPs) to engage and understand the requirements for airport operations. The team also contributed to standardisation activities within GNSS working groups. 

The GLAD team has successfully conducted ground experiments demonstrating real-time horizontal and vertical ARAIM performance, with a horizontal precision of 0.3 NM and vertical precision supporting LPV-200. The future benefits will include significant contributions to improvements in position integrity, and to underpinning the economic (fuel and time), environmental (CO2) and safety aspects required by the aviation industry.

To reach the objectives set out within the project framework, the GSA and GLAD Team took the opportunity to invite stakeholders to a webinar on 24th June 2020 to explain the ARAIM concept, outcomes of the project and show the ARAIM prototype developed. You can now check the presentation shared during the webinar on this page.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Collins Aerospace Global Landing Unit (GLU), GLU-2100 MMR, single frequency GPS L1 receiver, prototyped upgraded to support a GPS and Galileo DFMC GNSS and used as a baseline for the development of the ARAIM algorithm

Global ARAIM for Dual-Constellation webinar set for 24 June

12.6.2020 9:39  
Collins Aerospace Global Landing Unit (GLU), GLU-2100 MMR, single frequency GPS L1 receiver, prototyped upgraded to support a GPS and Galileo DFMC GNSS and used as a baseline for the development of the ARAIM algorithm
Published: 
12 June 2020

A webinar is being organised by the Global ARAIM for Dual-Constellation (GLAD) project, co-funded by the European GNSS Agency (GSA), which is developing the Advanced Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring (ARAIM) prototype receiver under the Fundamental Elements programme. It will take place on 24 June and will cover the ARAIM concept and GLAD activities during the prototyping and demonstration of the results. You can register here.

The Advanced RAIM (ARAIM) concept extends the traditional legacy GPS single frequency Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring (RAIM) by using multiple GNSS constellations that may include signals from the same satellite transmitting more than one frequency. The Galileo constellation, in addition to GPS, provides a Dual Frequency Multi-Constellation (DFMC) system that allows for robustness and redundancy. In the aviation sector, when DFMC is supported by a Satellite Based Augmentation System (SBAS) and ARAIM, satellite availability is leveraged with accuracy in position, and the associated integrity and continuity elevated in terms of radio navigation performance.  

The ARAIM concept started to take shape in the Working Group C, the ARAIM Technical Subgroup, that was established in 2010, based on the US-EU bilateral agreement on GPS-Galileo co-operation agreement signed in 2004 with the goal to develop GPS-Galileo integrated applications for Safety of Life operations. 

Concept wise, each GNSS Constellation Service Provider (CSP) will transmit an Integrity Support Message (ISM) to broadcast integrity information associated with its own system. The airborne receiver’s ARAIM algorithm processes this information to gain sufficient confidence in the information provided by the specific GNSS constellation in order to meet required safety criteria in terms of lateral and vertical guidance, thereby addressing the requirement for all phases of flight up to Category I (CAT I) precision approach capability/LPV 200 approach globally in the future.

GLobal ARAIM for Dual-Constellation (GLAD) is an innovative project focusing on the development of ARAIM capability within the Collins’ Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) Multi-Mode Receiver (MMR). This project is funded by the European GNSS Agency (GSA) under the “Development of an Advanced RAIM Multi-Constellation Receiver” Call for proposals. The key tenet for Collins Aerospace, a key aviation market player, was to work closely with the GSA to support the definition and development of ARAIM features to meet global airspace modernisation requirements. To that effect, Collins put together a GLAD project team which comprises Airbus, GMV, NATS and Pildo Labs to lead an ARAIM development prototyping activity. The project commenced in May 2018 and ends in June 2020. 

The key objectives of the GLAD project is the maturation of the ARAIM concept by prototyping the algorithm within critical components of the Collins’ GLU-2100 Multi-Mode Receiver (MMR), followed by testing and assessing the performance of the algorithm. In addition, the project focused on concepts of operations (CONOPS) using ARAIM and collaborated with Air Navigation Service Providers (ANSPs) to engage and understand the requirements for airport operations. The team also contributed to standardisation activities within GNSS working groups. 

The GLAD team has successfully conducted ground experiments demonstrating real-time horizontal and vertical ARAIM performance, with a horizontal precision of 0.3 NM and vertical precision supporting LPV-200. The future benefits will include significant contributions to improvements in position integrity, and to underpinning the economic (fuel and time), environmental (CO2) and safety aspects required by the aviation industry.

To reach the objectives set out within the project framework, the GSA and GLAD Team take the opportunity to invite stakeholders to a Webinar on 24th June 2020 to explain the ARAIM concept, outcomes of the project and show the ARAIM prototype developed. You can register here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Collins Aerospace Global Landing Unit (GLU), GLU-2100 MMR, single frequency GPS L1 receiver, prototyped upgraded to support a GPS and Galileo DFMC GNSS and used as a baseline for the development of the ARAIM algorithm

Let’s learn about the Global ARAIM for Dual-Constellation (GLAD) project and its contribution to the development of ARAIM concept for Civil Aviation

12.6.2020 9:39  
Collins Aerospace Global Landing Unit (GLU), GLU-2100 MMR, single frequency GPS L1 receiver, prototyped upgraded to support a GPS and Galileo DFMC GNSS and used as a baseline for the development of the ARAIM algorithm
Published: 
12 June 2020

A webinar is organised by Global ARAIM for Dual-Constellation (GLAD) project, co-funded by the European GNSS Agency (GSA), that is developing the Advanced Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring (RAIM) prototype receiver under the Fundamental Elements. It will take place on 24th June and will cover ARAIM concept, GLAD activities during the prototyping and demonstration of the results. You can register here.

The Advanced RAIM (ARAIM) concept extends the traditional legacy GPS single frequency Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring (RAIM) by using multiple GNSS constellations that may include signals from the same satellite transmitting more than one frequency. The Galileo constellation, in addition to GPS provides a Dual Frequency Multi-Constellation (DFMC) system that allows for robustness and redundancy. In the aviation sector, when DFMC is supported by Satellite Based Augmentation System (SBAS) and ARAIM, satellite availability is leveraged with accuracy in position, and the associated integrity and continuity elevated in terms of radio navigation performance.  

The ARAIM concept started to shape in the Working Group C, the ARAIM Technical Subgroup, that was established in 2010, based on the US-EU bilateral agreement on GPS-Galileo co-operation agreement signed in 2004 with the goal to develop GPS-Galileo integrated applications for Safety of Life operations. 

Concept wise, each GNSS Constellation Service Provider (CSP) will transmit an Integrity Support Message (ISM) to broadcast integrity information associated with its own system. The airborne receiver’s ARAIM algorithm processes this information to gain sufficient confidence in the information provided by the specific GNSS constellation in order to meet safety-required criteria in terms of lateral and vertical guidance, and as such addressing the requirement for all phases of flight up to Category I (CAT I) precision approach capability/LPV 200 approach globally in the future.

GLobal ARAIM for Dual-Constellation (GLAD) is an innovative project focusing on development an ARAIM capability within the Collins’ Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) Multi-Mode Receiver (MMR). This project is funded by the European GNSS Agency (GSA) under the “Development of an Advanced RAIM Multi-Constellation Receiver” Call for proposal. The key tenet for Collins Aerospace, a key aviation market player, was to work closely with the GSA to support the definition and development of ARAIM features to meet the global airspace modernisation requirements. To that effect, Collins put together a GLAD project team which comprises of Airbus, GMV, NATS and Pildo Labs to lead an ARAIM development prototyping activity. The project commenced in May 2018 and completes in June 2020. 

The key objectives of the GLAD project is the maturation of the ARAIM concept by prototyping the algorithm within critical components of the Collins’ GLU-2100 Multi-Mode Receiver (MMR), followed by testing and assessing the performance of the algorithm. In addition, the project focused on concepts of operations (CONOPS) using ARAIM and collaborated with Air Navigation Service Providers (ANSPs) to engage and understand the requirements for airport operations. The team also contributed to standardisation activities within GNSS working groups. 

The GLAD team has successfully conducted ground experiments demonstrating real-time horizontal and vertical ARAIM performance, with a horizontal precision of 0.3 NM and vertical precision supporting LPV-200. The future benefits to this will be significant contributions to improvements in position integrity, and underpins the economic (fuel and time), environmental (CO2) and safety aspects required by the aviation industry.

To conclude the objectives set out within the project framework, the GSA and GLAD Team take the opportunity to invite the stakeholders to a Webinar on 24th June 2020 to explain the ARAIM concept, outcomes of the project and show the ARAIM prototype developed. You can register here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Collins Aerospace Global Landing Unit (GLU), GLU-2100 MMR, single frequency GPS L1 receiver, prototyped upgraded to support a GPS and Galileo DFMC GNSS and used as a baseline for the development of the ARAIM algorithm

Space synergies to drive economic growth and job creation

11.6.2020 15:30  
Synergies between GNSS and Earth observation can help tackle many of the challenges that Europe faces.
Published: 
11 June 2020

By reinforcing synergies with other space technologies and working with all the Member States, while creating a favourable ecosystem, the impact of the space sector on economic growth in Europe will expand and create more jobs, according to European GNSS Agency (GSA) Acting Executive Director Pascal Claudel.

The 2nd Earth Observation Summit was held online on 2-3 June, providing an opportunity to underline how the different components of the EU Space programme are creating value by building applications together.

“The space sector is of strategic importance to the Union. In the last decade, space related sectors grew twice as fast as the global economy. Europe has historically been on the forefront, investing greatly in space infrastructure such as Copernicus, Galileo and EGNOS. We are proud of these successful investments which are now the foundations and enablers for new applications and businesses. Indeed, space has a multiplier effect in terms of investment and the EU is well placed to capitalize on its strong space industry since more than 10% of the overall EU economy depends on space related services. Relevant technologies generate opportunities for job creation based on new skills, skills of the future,” said Ms Blaženka Divjak, Croatian Minister of Science and Education during her opening of the Summit.

Underlining this need for economic development based on innovative approaches, Timo Pesonen, Director General of the European Commission’s Directorate-General for Defence Industry and Space (DG DEFIS), confirmed: “New products, new satellite missions and new technology, especially digital, like Artificial Intelligence, Quantum technology, and high-performance computing are essential, to keep our industry competitive.” 

Pascal Claudel, GSA Acting Executive Director, said that synergies between all the EU’s Space Programmes are key to increasing the space sector’s presence with EU-ready market products in all market segments. “This will contribute to the growth of our SMEs and start-ups through innovative solutions,” he said.

Read this: European GNSS Agency (GSA) releases 6th GNSS Market Report

Space for a twin transition to a Green and Digital Europe

Timo Pesonen also cited the European Green Deal as a prime example of a political answer to global challenges. “An ambitious space programme, as the Commission proposes, will contribute to Europe’s digital and green transitions, to strengthening our resilience and strategic autonomy, and in turn our potential to innovate for the future,” he said.

In its operational role of ensuring that European companies are getting the best out of the EU satellite navigation systems, the GSA confirmed that significant new markets are coming, such as autonomous vehicles, cars and drones, or applications for smart mobility and smart cities. These will play a crucial role also for the European Green Deal. “To win parts of these markets, we need to have a performant EU entrepreneurship ecosystem and the involvement of all EU Member States. We have to gather our forces and our competencies,” the GSA Acting Executive Director said.

Indeed, EU Member States do not need to have specific competences in space technologies or a strong space sector to use space data and develop applications. The development of the Galileo Green Lane app, managed by the GSA, was led by traditional start-ups and SMEs. This app makes it possible to ease the transit of critical goods at borders within the EU. So, every Member State has the capacity to be an actor on these markets and to develop its own entrepreneurship.

Read this: Looking to space for solutions on Earth Day

The GSA also noted that EGNSS (Galileo and EGNOS) is a federator, making it possible to manage EU traffic, and maritime, inland waterway and rail transport. “We can federate all national traffic management systems towards a unique one," Claudel said.

Future funding

Speaking at a summit session on funding opportunities, Marta Krywanis, Head of Downstream R&D in the GSA Market Development Department, explained that research and development play a key role in the innovation process. “R&D is an investment in technology and future capabilities that can be transformed into new products, processes and services,” she said.

Krywanis explained that for years the GSA has applied a market-oriented approach to innovation in downstream applications. “This has proven to be a major factor in the market uptake of EGNOS and Galileo. The successful implementation of the Fundamental Elements and H2020 programmes have led to the creation of a portfolio of products and advanced prototypes,” she said.

With the Galileo system as operational and with the new version of EGNOS to be deployed, the primary goal will be to establish European GNSS as the leader in those markets and sectors that best benefit the unique differentiators of the systems. Krywanis noted that, towards this goal, the GSA had consulted with stakeholders and produced a report on proposed European GNSS (EGNSS) downstream funding priorities and tools for the years 2021-2027.

“We believe that R&D focused on EGNSS and its synergies with Copernicus and GovSatCom, for example, will bring many innovations and will contribute to more competitive industry and a greater number of products made in the EU,” she said.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Synergies between GNSS and Earth observation can help tackle many of the challenges that Europe faces.

Space synergies to drive economic growth and job creation

11.6.2020 15:30  
Synergies between GNSS and Earth observation can help tackle many of the challenges that Europe faces.
Published: 
11 June 2020

By reinforcing synergies with other space technologies and working with all the Member States, while creating a favourable ecosystem, the impact of the space sector on economic growth in Europe will largely expand and create more jobs, according to European GNSS Agency (GSA) Acting Executive Director Pascal Claudel.

The 2nd Earth Observation Summit has been held online on 2-3 June. This was the occasion to underline how the different components of the EU Space programme are creating value by building applications together.

“The space sector is of strategic importance to the Union. In the last decade space related sectors grew twice as fast as global economy grows. Europe has historically been on the forefront investing greatly in space infrastructure such as Copernicus, Galileo and EGNOS. We are proud of these successful investments which are now the foundations and enablers for new applications and businesses. Indeed, space has a multiplier effect in terms of investment and the EU is well placed to capitalize on its strong space industry since more than 10% of the overall EU economy depends on space related services. Relevant technologies generate opportunities for job creation based on new skills, skills of the future.” stated Ms Blaženka Divjak, Croatian Minister of Science and Education during her opening of the Summit.

Underlining this need for the economic development with innovative approaches in mind, Timo Pesonen, Director General of the European Commission’s Directorate-General for Defence Industry and Space (DG DEFIS), confirmed “New products, new satellite missions and new technology, especially digital, like Artificial Intelligence, Quantum technology, and high-performance computing are essential, to keep our industry competitive.” 

Pascal Claudel, GSA Acting Executive Director, confirmed that synergies between all the EU’s Space Programmes are key to increasing the space sector’s presence with EU-ready market products in all market segments. “This will contribute to the growth of our SMEs and start-ups through innovative solutions” he said

Read this: European GNSS Agency (GSA) releases 6th GNSS Market Report

Space for a twin transition to a Green and Digital Europe

Timo Pesonen also cited the European Green Deal as a prime example of a political answer to global challenges. “An ambitious space programme, as the Commission proposes, will contribute to Europe’s digital and green transitions, to strengthening our resilience and strategic autonomy, and in turn our potential to innovate for the future,” he said.

In its operational role of ensuring that European companies are getting the best out of the EU satellite navigation systems, GSA confirmed that significant new markets are coming, such as autonomous vehicles, cars and drones, or applications for smart mobility and smart cities. They will play a crucial role also for the European Green Deal.: “To win parts of these markets, we need to have a performant EU entrepreneurship ecosystem and the involvement of all EU Member States. We have to gather our forces and our competencies.” stated the GSA acting Executive Director.

Indeed, EU Member States do not need to have specific competences in space technologies or a strong space sector to use space data and develop applications. The development of the Galileo Green Lane app, managed by the GSA had been led by traditional start-ups and SMEs. This app makes it possible to ease the transit of critical goods at borders within EU. So, every Member State has the capacity to be an actor on these markets and to develop its own entrepreneurship.

Read this: Looking to space for solutions on Earth Day

Pascal Claudel also noted that, EGNSS (Galileo and EGNOS) is a federator, making it possible to manage EU traffic, and maritime, inland waterway and rail transport. “We can federate all national traffic management systems towards a unique one. Future funding.

Speaking at a summit session on funding opportunities, Marta Krywanis, Head of Downstream R&D in the GSA Market Development Department, explained that research and development play a key role in the innovation process. “R&D is an investment in technology and future capabilities that can be transformed into new products, processes and services,” she said.

M. Krywanis explained that, since years, the GSA had applied a market-oriented approach to innovation in downstream applications. “This has proven to be a major factor in the market uptake of EGNOS and Galileo. The successful implementation of Fundamental Elements and H2020 programmes have led to the creation of a portfolio of products and advanced prototypes,” she said.

Galileo system as an operational and with the new version of EGNOS to be deployed, the primary goal will be to establish European GNSS as the leader in those markets and sectors that best benefit the unique differentiators of the systems. M. Krywanis noted that, towards this goal, the GSA had consulted with stakeholders and produced a report on proposed European GNSS (EGNSS) downstream funding priorities and tools for the years 2021-2027.

“We believe that R&D focused on EGNSS and its synergies with Copernicus and GovSatCom, for example, will bring many innovations and will contribute to more competitive industry and a greater number of products made in the EU,” she said.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Synergies between GNSS and Earth observation can help tackle many of the challenges that Europe faces.

Space synergies to drive economic growth and job creation

11.6.2020 15:30  
Synergies between GNSS and Earth observation can help tackle many of the challenges that Europe faces.
Published: 
11 June 2020

By reinforcing synergies with other space technologies and working with all the Member States, while creating a favourable ecosystem, the impact of the space sector on economic growth in Europe will largely expand and create more jobs, according to European GNSS Agency (GSA) Acting Executive Director Pascal Claudel.

The 2nd Earth Observation Summit has been held online on 2-3 June. This was the occasion to underline how the different components of the EU Space programme are creating value by building applications together.

“The space sector is of strategic importance to the Union. In the last decade space related sectors grew twice as fast as global economy grows. Europe has historically been on the forefront investing greatly in space infrastructure such as Copernicus, Galileo and EGNOS. We are proud of these successful investments which are now the foundations and enablers for new applications and businesses. Indeed, space has a multiplier effect in terms of investment and the EU is well placed to capitalize on its strong space industry since more than 10% of the overall EU economy depends on space related services. Relevant technologies generate opportunities for job creation based on new skills, skills of the future.” stated Ms Blaženka Divjak, Croatian Minister of Science and Education during her opening of the Summit.

Underlining this need for the economic development with innovative approaches in mind, Timo Pesonen, Director General of the European Commission’s Directorate-General for Defence Industry and Space (DG DEFIS), confirmed “New products, new satellite missions and new technology, especially digital, like Artificial Intelligence, Quantum technology, and high-performance computing are essential, to keep our industry competitive.” 

Pascal Claudel, GSA Acting Executive Director, confirmed that synergies between all the EU’s Space Programmes are key to increasing the space sector’s presence with EU-ready market products in all market segments. “This will contribute to the growth of our SMEs and start-ups through innovative solutions” he said

Read this: European GNSS Agency (GSA) releases 6th GNSS Market Report

Space for a twin transition to a Green and Digital Europe

Timo Pesonen also cited the European Green Deal as a prime example of a political answer to global challenges. “An ambitious space programme, as the Commission proposes, will contribute to Europe’s digital and green transitions, to strengthening our resilience and strategic autonomy, and in turn our potential to innovate for the future,” he said.

In its operational role of ensuring that European companies are getting the best out of the EU satellite navigation systems, GSA confirmed that significant new markets are coming, such as autonomous vehicles, cars and drones, or applications for smart mobility and smart cities. They will play a crucial role also for the European Green Deal.: “To win parts of these markets, we need to have a performant EU entrepreneurship ecosystem and the involvement of all EU Member States. We have to gather our forces and our competencies.” stated the GSA acting Executive Director.

Indeed, EU Member States do not need to have specific competences in space technologies or a strong space sector to use space data and develop applications. The development of the Galileo Green Lane app, managed by the GSA had been led by traditional start-ups and SMEs. This app makes it possible to ease the transit of critical goods at borders within EU. So, every Member State has the capacity to be an actor on these markets and to develop its own entrepreneurship.

Read this: Looking to space for solutions on Earth Day

The GSA also noted that, EGNSS (Galileo and EGNOS) is a federator, making it possible to manage EU traffic, and maritime, inland waterway and rail transport. “We can federate all national traffic management systems towards a unique one.

Future funding

Speaking at a summit session on funding opportunities, Marta Krywanis, Head of Downstream R&D in the GSA Market Development Department, explained that research and development play a key role in the innovation process. “R&D is an investment in technology and future capabilities that can be transformed into new products, processes and services,” she said.

M. Krywanis explained that, since years, the GSA had applied a market-oriented approach to innovation in downstream applications. “This has proven to be a major factor in the market uptake of EGNOS and Galileo. The successful implementation of Fundamental Elements and H2020 programmes have led to the creation of a portfolio of products and advanced prototypes,” she said.

Galileo system as an operational and with the new version of EGNOS to be deployed, the primary goal will be to establish European GNSS as the leader in those markets and sectors that best benefit the unique differentiators of the systems. M. Krywanis noted that, towards this goal, the GSA had consulted with stakeholders and produced a report on proposed European GNSS (EGNSS) downstream funding priorities and tools for the years 2021-2027.

“We believe that R&D focused on EGNSS and its synergies with Copernicus and GovSatCom, for example, will bring many innovations and will contribute to more competitive industry and a greater number of products made in the EU,” she said.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Synergies between GNSS and Earth observation can help tackle many of the challenges that Europe faces.

Space synergies for food security

9.6.2020 16:18  
The combination of EGNSS with Earth observation can deliver significant benefits to the agricultural sector.
Published: 
10 June 2020

GNSS and Earth observation experts came together at a webinar organised by the European GNSS Agency (GSA) on 26 May to discuss how combining Galileo and EGNOS navigation and positioning tools with the data and services offered by EU Earth observation programme Copernicus can be used to improve food security and make agriculture in general more efficient and sustainable.

Disruptions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic have thrown the importance of our food supply chain into sharp focus. At the same time, synergies between positioning data from Galileo and EGNOS and Earth observation data from Copernicus offer huge untapped potential for making the agriculture sector more efficient, resilient and sustainable.

It was to explore this potential and to drive the use of space technology in the service of sustainable agriculture and a more secure food chain that the EO4AGRI H2020 project organised this webinar, in collaboration with GSA, targeted at students, researchers, data analysts, participants in European, national and international projects, service and application developers, and other stakeholders.

Early adopter

The agricultural sector was an early adopter of Europe’s satellite augmentation service EGNOS and over 95% of agricultural receivers in Europe are currently EGNOS-enabled, with more than 65% of receivers Galileo-enabled also. “Galileo plays a key role in precision agriculture not only in positioning but also when combined with other technologies such as Copernicus. The coming High Accuracy Service and Navigation Message Authentication will mean a turning point in smart farming applications”, said María-Eva Ramírez from the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC).

In agriculture, EGNOS-based solutions are used for low-value crop cultivation and low-accuracy operations such as ploughing, fertilizing and harvesting while Galileo receivers are used in a multi-constellation environment for high-value crop cultivation and precision operations such as sowing and transplanting. “EGNOS usage in European farming is a reality. Hundreds of thousands of cereal farmers benefit from free enhanced GPS accuracy. Thanks to EGNOS, crop productivity is increased and more sustainable farming is possible”, said Sofía Cilla from the European Satellite Service Provider (ESSP).

Watch this: European Satellites for Agriculture

“GNSS has become an integral part of smart, connected and integrated farm management solutions and is a key driver for precision farming across the whole crop cycle”, said Joaquín Reyes González, Market Development Technology Officer at the GSA.

Strength through synergy

But it is when EU GNSS and Earth observation services work in synergy that the benefits are most keenly felt. Synergies between EGNSS and Copernicus support a number of agriculture solutions, such as variable rate application, which enables the precise use of fertilisers and pesticides where and when they are most needed, thereby making the sector more resource-efficient and reducing its environmental footprint.

“We just scratched the surface of what is possible when these two core components are put into use operationally. The combination of these two European flagship space projects is a key enabler of the Farm to Fork Strategy, the core of the European Green Deal, allowing for a fair, healthy and environmentally-friendly food system in Europe and beyond”, said David Kolitzus from GeoVille Information Systems and Data Processing.

Read this: EGNSS and agriculture – a win-win relationship

EGNSS and Copernicus also enable soil moisture monitoring, providing timely information on water availability and reducing the amount of water used by linking it to the moisture level needed in the soil for a particular crop. Synergies between the two programmes also support the implementation of the Common Agricultural Policy, simplifying and digitising processes related to subsidies control and enabling more efficient checks. “EGNSS and Copernicus are core components in digital farming,” Reyes González said.

Webinar series

The May 26 webinar is the first in a series of webinars that will explore the benefits of EGNSS and Earth observation in the agriculture sector. All the presentations and video recording are now available here. A poll held at the event proposed two topics for future webinars: projects that showcase the use of EGNSS and Earth observation for agricultural applications, and technical tools for combining EGNSS and EO, with use cases from agriculture. 

The vote was evenly split, so both these topics are likely to be the subjects of future webinars organised by the GSA. Stay tuned for updates!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The combination of EGNSS with Earth observation can deliver significant benefits to the agricultural sector.

Galileo-enabled receivers soon in Prague tramways

9.6.2020 10:42  
By the end of 2020, the first Galileo-enabled trams in Prague are expected
Published: 
09 June 2020

The Prague Public Transit Company (DPP) has issued a tender for Galileo-enabled receivers to be included in the Prague tramways as part of their modernization plan to increase network efficiency and improve user experience.

Prague has one of the largest tram fleets in Europe. Tramways are using a 20 years old system based on GPS-only. DPP has decided a unique upgrade of their system and intends to replace the current system to improve the localization accuracy and to provide vehicle positioning data to passengers. DPP Prague plans to buy Galileo-enabled, multifrequency, multiconstellation receivers for its entire Tramway vehicle park. To elaborate the project, DPP has cooperated with the Czech Technical University in Prague, the Czech Department for Transportation, the Municipality of Prague and with the European GNSS Agency (GSA). The improvement in localization accuracy connected with the upgrade will bring important efficiency benefits to the DPP network such as a decrease of the maintenance costs.

"Space applications have a great potential for improving efficiency and safety across a wide variety of sectors and transport belongs to the largest users of space technologies. Galileo adoption in Prague Tramways is a great example how to apply European satellite navigation in practice," underlined Karel Havlíček, Deputy Prime Minister, Czech Republic.

The receivers are planned to be deployed in the entire tram fleet (838 receivers are procured).  DPP will be one of the first public transit companies to use Galileo in the entire tram fleet.

Read the czech version here: Přijímače Galilea brzy v pražských tramvajích

"Public transport has to be comfortable and user friendly not only inside the vehicles and at the stops. We managed to provide  real-time data about bus departures and their position on-line to passengers. For this year, we have promised to provide the same also for the tramways," said Adam Scheinherr, Deputy Mayor for Transport from Municipality of Prague

"Thanks to the new receivers and the possibility to use the European navigation system Galileo, we will be able to improve localization accuracy based on the test that have been carried out so far down to 1,5 meters. Further, it will allow us to improve other systems used within DPP, such as for example automatic speed limitation over the switches," added Petr Witowski, chairman of the board and executive director of DPP.

"Regarding the network extent and the quality of the transport service provided, Prague belongs to the top cities in the European Union. It shows therefore the recognition of Galileo efficiency  that DPP plans to use Galileo within the whole Tramway fleet as one of the first public transport operators in Europe," commented Pascal Claudel, Acting Executive Director of the European GNSS Agency.

DPP is expecting that the competition will be completed by the end of August 2020. The selected supplier will have to provide and install the receivers within the entire fleet of Prague Tramways within 180 days from the contract signature. It is therefore expected that the First Galileo-enabled trams should be on track at the end of 2020.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

By the end of 2020, the first Galileo-enabled trams in Prague are expected

Galileo-enabled receivers soon in Prague tramways

9.6.2020 10:42  
By the end of 2020, the first Galileo-enabled trams in Prague are expected
Published: 
09 June 2020

The Prague Public Transit Company (DPP) has issued a tender for Galileo-enabled receivers to be included in the Prague tramways as part of their modernization plan to increase network efficiency and improve user experience.

Prague has one of the largest tram fleets in Europe. Tramways are using a 20 years old system based on GPS-only. DPP has decided a unique upgrade of their system and intends to replace the current system to improve the localization accuracy and to provide vehicle positioning data to passengers. DPP Prague plans to buy Galileo-enabled, multifrequency, multiconstellation receivers for its entire Tramway vehicle park. To elaborate the project, DPP has cooperated with the Czech Technical University in Prague, the Czech Department for Transportation, the Municipality of Prague and with the European GNSS Agency (GSA). The improvement in localization accuracy connected with the upgrade will bring important efficiency benefits to the DPP network such as a decrease of the maintenance costs.

"Space applications have a great potential for improving efficiency and safety across a wide variety of sectors and transport belongs to the largest users of space technologies. Galileo adoption in Prague Tramways is a great example how to apply European satellite navigation in practice," underlined Karel Havlíček, Deputy Prime Minister, Czech Republic.

The receivers are planned to be deployed in the entire tram fleet (838 receivers are procured).  DPP will be one of the first public transit companies to use Galileo in the entire tram fleet.

Read the Czech version here: Přijímače Galilea brzy v pražských tramvajích

"Public transport has to be comfortable and user friendly not only inside the vehicles and at the stops. We managed to provide  real-time data about bus departures and their position on-line to passengers. For this year, we have promised to provide the same also for the tramways," said Adam Scheinherr, Deputy Mayor for Transport from Municipality of Prague

"Thanks to the new receivers and the possibility to use the European navigation system Galileo, we will be able to improve localization accuracy based on the test that have been carried out so far down to 1,5 meters. Further, it will allow us to improve other systems used within DPP, such as for example automatic speed limitation over the switches," added Petr Witowski, chairman of the board and executive director of DPP.

"Regarding the network extent and the quality of the transport service provided, Prague belongs to the top cities in the European Union. It shows therefore the recognition of Galileo efficiency  that DPP plans to use Galileo within the whole Tramway fleet as one of the first public transport operators in Europe," commented Pascal Claudel, Acting Executive Director of the European GNSS Agency.

DPP is expecting that the competition will be completed by the end of August 2020. The selected supplier will have to provide and install the receivers within the entire fleet of Prague Tramways within 180 days from the contract signature. It is therefore expected that the First Galileo-enabled trams should be on track at the end of 2020.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

By the end of 2020, the first Galileo-enabled trams in Prague are expected

Galileo-enabled receivers soon in Prague tramways

9.6.2020 10:42  
The first Galileo-enabled trams in Prague are expected by the end of 2020
Published: 
09 June 2020

The Prague Public Transit Company (DPP) has issued a tender for Galileo-enabled receivers to be included in Prague tramways as part of a modernization plan to increase network efficiency and improve user experience.

Prague has one of the largest tram fleets in Europe. The city's tramways are using a 20-year old system based on GPS-only. DPP has decided on a unique upgrade of their system to improve localization accuracy and provide vehicle positioning data to passengers. DPP Prague plans to buy Galileo-enabled, multifrequency, multiconstellation receivers for its entire tramway vehicle park. To develop the project, DPP cooperated with the Czech Technical University in Prague, the Czech Department for Transportation, the Municipality of Prague and the European GNSS Agency (GSA). The improvement in localization accuracy connected with the upgrade will bring important efficiency benefits to the DPP network such as a decrease in maintenance costs.

Satellite navigation in practice

"Space applications have a great potential for improving efficiency and safety across a wide variety of sectors and transport belongs to the largest users of space technologies. Galileo adoption in Prague tramways is a great example how to apply European satellite navigation in practice," said Karel Havlíček, Deputy Prime Minister, Czech Republic.

The receivers are planned to be deployed in the entire tram fleet (838 receivers are procured).  DPP will be one of the first public transit companies to use Galileo in their entire fleet.

Read the Czech version here: Přijímače Galilea brzy v pražských tramvajích

"Public transport has to be comfortable and user friendly not only inside the vehicles and at the stops. We managed to provide  real-time data about bus departures and their position on-line to passengers. For this year, we have promised to provide the same also for the tramways," said Adam Scheinherr, Deputy Mayor for Transport from the Municipality of Prague.

"Thanks to the new receivers and the possibility to use the European navigation system Galileo, we will be able to improve localization accuracy based on the tests that have been carried out so far down to 1.5 meters. Further, it will allow us to improve other systems used within DPP such as, for example, automatic speed limitation over the switches," added Petr Witowski, chairman of the board and executive director of DPP.

"Regarding the network extent and the quality of the transport service provided, Prague belongs to the top cities in the European Union. It shows therefore the recognition of Galileo efficiency that DPP plans to use Galileo within the whole tramway fleet as one of the first public transport operators in Europe," commented Pascal Claudel, Acting Executive Director of the European GNSS Agency.

DPP is expecting that the tender will be completed by the end of August 2020. The selected supplier will have to provide and install the receivers within the entire fleet of Prague tramways within 180 days from the contract signature. It is therefore expected that the First Galileo-enabled trams should be on track at the end of 2020.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The first Galileo-enabled trams in Prague are expected by the end of 2020

Galileo-enabled receivers soon in Prague tramways

9.6.2020 10:42  
By the end of 2020, the first Galileo-enabled trams in Prague are expected
Published: 
09 June 2020

The Prague Public Transit Company (DPP) has issued a tender for Galileo-enabled receivers to be included in the Prague tramways as part of their modernization plan to increase network efficiency and improve user experience.

Prague has one of the largest tram fleets in Europe. Tramways are using a 20 years old system based on GPS-only. DPP has decided a unique upgrade of their system and intends to replace the current system to improve the localization accuracy and to provide vehicle positioning data to passengers. DPP Prague plans to buy Galileo-enabled, multifrequency, multiconstellation receivers for its entire Tramway vehicle park. To elaborate the project, DPP has cooperated with the Czech Technical University in Prague, the Czech Department for Transportation, the Municipality of Prague and with the European GNSS Agency (GSA). The improvement in localization accuracy connected with the upgrade will bring important efficiency benefits to the DPP network such as a decrease of the maintenance costs.

"Space applications have a great potential for improving efficiency and safety across a wide variety of sectors and transport belongs to the largest users of space technologies. Galileo adoption in Prague Tramways is a great example how to apply European satellite navigation in practice," underlined Karel Havlíček, Deputy Prime Minister, Czech Republic.

The receivers are planned to be deployed in the entire tram fleet (838 receivers are procured).  DPP will be one of the first public transit companies to use Galileo in the entire tram fleet.

"Public transport has to be comfortable and user friendly not only inside the vehicles and at the stops. We managed to provide  real-time data about bus departures and their position on-line to passengers. For this year, we have promised to provide the same also for the tramways," said Adam Scheinherr, Deputy Mayor for Transport from Municipality of Prague

"Thanks to the new receivers and the possibility to use the European navigation system Galileo, we will be able to improve localization accuracy based on the test that have been carried out so far down to 1,5 meters. Further, it will allow us to improve other systems used within DPP, such as for example automatic speed limitation over the switches," added Petr Witowski, chairman of the board and executive director of DPP.

"Regarding the network extent and the quality of the transport service provided, Prague belongs to the top cities in the European Union. It shows therefore the recognition of Galileo efficiency  that DPP plans to use Galileo within the whole Tramway fleet as one of the first public transport operators in Europe," commented Pascal Claudel, Acting Executive Director of the European GNSS Agency.

DPP is expecting that the competition will be completed by the end of August 2020. The selected supplier will have to provide and install the receivers within the entire fleet of Prague Tramways within 180 days from the contract signature. It is therefore expected that the First Galileo-enabled trams should be on track at the end of 2020.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

By the end of 2020, the first Galileo-enabled trams in Prague are expected

Making space for the oceans

8.6.2020 11:50  
Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus all contribute to making our seas and oceans safer and more sustainable
Published: 
08 June 2020

On June 8 the world celebrates World Oceans Day, when people around the planet celebrate our oceans and seas and work to raise awareness about problems facing the marine environment. The EU space programmes Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus, with their positioning, navigation and Earth observation services, are helping to monitor and protect the oceans and make Europe’s Blue Economy more sustainable, in support of the European Green Deal agenda.

The EU space services play a key role in driving innovation in the context of marine sustainability by enabling the development of applications and services that help monitor and protect the marine environment and marine bio-resources. At the same time, highly accurate navigation and positioning information is helping to make maritime transport more efficient, safe and sustainable.

Increasing safety, protecting the environment

EGNOS, Europe’s sat-nav augmentation system, provides users with more accurate position information compared to GPS alone and a new maritime service based on the current version (EGNOS V2) will provide users with integrity information and maritime safety information, i.e. navigational warnings and notice to mariners, in line with IALA Guidelines. EGNOS V3, the planned evolution of this system, will augment Galileo signals in addition to GPS. 

Watch this: EGNOS for Maritime

A number of projects leverage EGNSS (Galileo and EGNOS) to increase maritime safety and help protect the environment. The EGNOSforAtoN project demonstrated operationally how to use EGNOS as source of differential corrections for IALA beacons and AIS stations in a cost-efficient way and in line with IALA Guidelines. The SeaSOLAS project has defined a potential maritime safety service based on EGNOS V3-enabled receivers on vessels, while the Hull-to-Hull project has defined new safety concepts based on EGNSS for operations between vessels and also for docking.

 The Safeport project delivered an EGNOS-based portable pilot unit and an app for pilotage and docking operations (SafePilot). The app is continuing to evolve and it is available for tablets and SmartWatches.

What’s more, EGNOS is helping to increase our awareness of the oceans through projects like CoSuDEC, which has created a system for enhanced surveying of coastal waters using standard navigation equipment. 

EGNSS is also a key enabler of the Automatic Identification System (AIS), which is used on ships and by vessel traffic services to identify and locate vessels. It also supports Long Range Identification and Tracking (LRIT), which is designed to collect and disseminate vessel position information. In so doing, the European space programmes are enabling more efficient traffic management and safer maritime navigation, and providing greater situational awareness in the marine environment.

In relation to this, the GNSS-enabled MEDUSE project aims at a more sustainable use of marine parks, and provides services to marine park users and tools to the park authorities, allowing them to track and trace vessels within restricted marine areas using AIS Class B transponders with EGNOS.

Fighting illegal fishing

GNSS also enables position reporting (the so-called ‘blue box’) in the Vessel Monitoring System (VMS), which is used in fisheries monitoring and provides data to the fisheries authorities on the location, course and speed of vessels. When combined with remote imagery in the Vessel Detection System (VDS), satellite technology is a key tool in the fight against illegal fishing, helping to identify and catch violators and protect fish stocks.

Read this: Space – underpinning the blue economy

Galileo satellites carry a SAR payload and the Galileo SAR service is an important contributor to the Global Cospas-Sarsat service for Search & Rescue. The Galileo SAR service is comprised of two components: an automatic Forward Link distress alert Service (FLS) and a Return Link Service (RLS), launched earlier this year, which allows people in distress to receive automatic acknowledgement that their alert has been received and is being processed. 

This combination, along with the increased positioning accuracy provided by Galileo, has reduced the time it takes to detect a person lost at sea from three hours to just 10 minutes after the distress beacon is activated. Localisation of the distress beacon has also improved - from 10 km to less than 5 km.

The Helios Project has developed maritime search and rescue beacons for vessels (EPIRBs) and for personal use (PLBs), which are already on the market and using Galileo (to see all Galileo enabled PLBs click here).

Europe’s eyes on Earth

It is not only the EGNSS component of the EU Space Programme that is helping support sustainability of our oceans and seas. Copernicus, “Europe’s eyes on Earth,” provides essential information in six main domains, including atmosphere monitoring, marine environment monitoring, and climate monitoring. In particular, the observations and forecasts produced by the Copernicus Marine Environment Monitoring Service (CMEMS) support marine applications, including safety, monitoring of marine resources and of the coastal and marine environment, in addition to providing weather, seasonal and climate forecasts.

According to the EU Blue Economy Report 2019, the usefulness of CMEMS is reflected in the increasing number of users not only among universities and public authorities, but also among businesses from different domains, including maritime safety, coastal and marine environment, marine resources and weather forecasting.

Copernicus services for security applications also offer maritime surveillance, thereby supporting a better understanding and improved monitoring of activities at sea within a wide range of operational functions such as maritime safety and security, fisheries control, customs, law enforcement, marine environment pollution monitoring, and others.

A final example of the exploitation of synergies between EGNSS and Copernicus for maritime surveillance and search and rescue is the SARA project, where a tethered drone installed on a vessel is used to locate seafarers and passengers in distress after a wreck.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus all contribute to making our seas and oceans safer and more sustainable

Making space for the oceans

8.6.2020 11:50  
Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus all contribute to making our seas and oceans safer and more sustainable
Published: 
08 June 2020

On June 8 the world celebrates World Oceans Day, when people around the planet celebrate our oceans and seas and work to raise awareness about problems facing the marine environment. The EU space programmes Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus, with their positioning, navigation and Earth observation services, are helping to monitor and protect the oceans and make Europe’s Blue Economy more sustainable, in support of the European Green Deal agenda.

The EU space services play a key role in driving innovation in the context of marine sustainability by enabling the development of applications and services that help monitor and protect the marine environment and marine bio-resources. At the same time, highly accurate navigation and positioning information is helping to make maritime transport more efficient, safe and sustainable.

Increasing safety, protecting the environment

EGNOS, Europe’s sat-nav augmentation system, provides users with more accurate position information compared to GPS alone and a new maritime service based on the current version (EGNOS V2) will provide users with integrity information and maritime safety information, i.e. navigational warnings and notice to mariners, in line with IALA Guidelines. EGNOS V3, the planned evolution of this system, will augment Galileo signals in addition to GPS. 

Watch this: EGNOS and Galileo for Waterborne Transport

A number of projects leverage EGNSS (Galileo and EGNOS) to increase maritime safety and help protect the environment. The EGNOSforAtoN project demonstrated operationally how to use EGNOS as source of differential corrections for IALA beacons and AIS stations in a cost-efficient way and in line with IALA Guidelines. The SeaSOLAS project has defined a potential maritime safety service based on EGNOS V3-enabled receivers on vessels, while the Hull-to-Hull project has defined new safety concepts based on EGNSS for operations between vessels and also for docking.

 The Safeport project delivered an EGNOS-based portable pilot unit and an app for pilotage and docking operations (SafePilot). The app is continuing to evolve and it is available for tablets and SmartWatches.

What’s more, EGNOS is helping to increase our awareness of the oceans through projects like CoSuDEC, which has created a system for enhanced surveying of coastal waters using standard navigation equipment. 

EGNSS is also a key enabler of the Automatic Identification System (AIS), which is used on ships and by vessel traffic services to identify and locate vessels. It also supports Long Range Identification and Tracking (LRIT), which is designed to collect and disseminate vessel position information. In so doing, the European space programmes are enabling more efficient traffic management and safer maritime navigation, and providing greater situational awareness in the marine environment.

In relation to this, the GNSS-enabled MEDUSE project aims at a more sustainable use of marine parks, and provides services to marine park users and tools to the park authorities, allowing them to track and trace vessels within restricted marine areas using AIS Class B transponders with EGNOS.

Fighting illegal fishing

GNSS also enables position reporting (the so-called ‘blue box’) in the Vessel Monitoring System (VMS), which is used in fisheries monitoring and provides data to the fisheries authorities on the location, course and speed of vessels. When combined with remote imagery in the Vessel Detection System (VDS), satellite technology is a key tool in the fight against illegal fishing, helping to identify and catch violators and protect fish stocks.

Read this: Space – underpinning the blue economy

Galileo satellites carry a SAR payload and the Galileo SAR service is an important contributor to the Global Cospas-Sarsat service for Search & Rescue. The Galileo SAR service is comprised of two components: an automatic Forward Link distress alert Service (FLS) and a Return Link Service (RLS), launched earlier this year, which allows people in distress to receive automatic acknowledgement that their alert has been received and is being processed. 

This combination, along with the increased positioning accuracy provided by Galileo, has reduced the time it takes to detect a person lost at sea from three hours to just 10 minutes after the distress beacon is activated. Localisation of the distress beacon has also improved - from 10 km to less than 5 km.

The Helios Project has developed maritime search and rescue beacons for vessels (EPIRBs) and for personal use (PLBs), which are already on the market and using Galileo (to see all Galileo enabled PLBs click here).

Europe’s eyes on Earth

It is not only the EGNSS component of the EU Space Programme that is helping support sustainability of our oceans and seas. Copernicus, “Europe’s eyes on Earth,” provides essential information in six main domains, including atmosphere monitoring, marine environment monitoring, and climate monitoring. In particular, the observations and forecasts produced by the Copernicus Marine Environment Monitoring Service (CMEMS) support marine applications, including safety, monitoring of marine resources and of the coastal and marine environment, in addition to providing weather, seasonal and climate forecasts.

According to the EU Blue Economy Report 2019, the usefulness of CMEMS is reflected in the increasing number of users not only among universities and public authorities, but also among businesses from different domains, including maritime safety, coastal and marine environment, marine resources and weather forecasting.

Copernicus services for security applications also offer maritime surveillance, thereby supporting a better understanding and improved monitoring of activities at sea within a wide range of operational functions such as maritime safety and security, fisheries control, customs, law enforcement, marine environment pollution monitoring, and others.

A final example of the exploitation of synergies between EGNSS and Copernicus for maritime surveillance and search and rescue is the SARA project, where a tethered drone installed on a vessel is used to locate seafarers and passengers in distress after a wreck.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus all contribute to making our seas and oceans safer and more sustainable

Power-efficient positioning for the IoT

5.6.2020 10:36  
The GSA White Paper looks at how positioning for the IoT can be made more power-efficient.
Published: 
05 June 2020

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) has published a White Paper on “Power-efficient positioning for the Internet of Things”, providing an overview of GNSS technologies that are relevant for low-power IoT applications, including those that require hybridisation with other connectivity solutions. The GSA is organising a dedicated webinar on 18 June to present the main findings from the paper. 

The world is embracing Internet of Things (IoT) applications. Billions of internet-connected devices are capable of sensing, communicating, interacting, computing and actuating. These devices are set to become even more integrated into our daily lives and by 2022 it is estimated that around 18 billion out of 29 billion connected devices will be related to the IoT.

With millions of moving interconnected devices in the IoT environment, many applications require or benefit from knowing the location of an individual device. In this context, the latest GSA White Paper looks at how GNSS-based positioning for the IoT can be made more power-efficient, to meet the needs of this growing market.

Key findings

GNSS is a viable solution for tracking objects in the IoT world. However, the power consumed by positioning is an important concern. Two basic approaches have emerged in recent years to optimise consumption: transmission of pseudoranges for remote position determination, and snapshot techniques. In the first of these, the power consumption related to determining position is saved by transmitting the measurements to an external facility with no power restrictions while, for the second, the GNSS receiver is only activated for short periods to determine the position. 

Read this: Harnessing Galileo to shape the future of IoT

Combining both approaches will decrease the power consumption even further but, ultimately, the optimal solution will depend on the application in question. “When deciding on a GNSS-based solution for a given application, numerous factors play a role including target accuracy, selected LPWAN, desired battery life, ease of integration, and hardware and implementation cost,” according to the report.

The White Paper also advises applications that require a position accuracy of one meter or less to use a multi-constellation, multi-frequency receiver. “However, as most low-power IoT applications prioritise extending battery life, a multi-constellation single-frequency receiver is sufficient when positioning accuracy of multiple meters is acceptable,” it notes.

The report also states that, when deciding on an energy-efficient GNSS technique, the choice of the terrestrial network limits the possible options, as most solutions rely on external data to determine the position via GNSS.

A dedicated webinar 

The main findings from the White Paper will be presented at a dedicated webinar on Power-efficient positioning for the Internet of Things, to take place at 15:00 CET on 18 June. This GSA-hosted webinar will also feature input from major chipset manufacturers in the IoT domain such as STM & U-blox. 

What’s more, EU-funded R&D projects that are working to reduce the power consumption of GNSS positioning for the Internet of Things will also present their innovative solutions. These include: “Accurate GNSS POsitioning for Low power and Low-cost Objects” (APOLLO), which aims at providing a Galileo-based geolocation solution for the IoT market by drastically reducing energy consumption.

The APOLLO project noted in the White Paper that: “The ability to calculate the GNSS position of IoT objects with a very small energy footprint will pave the way for a market of tens of millions of moving objects each year.”

Also presenting at the webinar will be the GEONAV IoT project, which is working to develop and deliver precise ubiquitous positioning and navigation applications and services; and the Galileo of Things gs(GoT) project, which is targeting the delivery of a Galileo semiconductor-IP core that mates with NB-IoT IP for low-power consumption solutions. 

Interested? For more information and to register, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GSA White Paper looks at how positioning for the IoT can be made more power-efficient.

Power-efficient positioning for the IoT

5.6.2020 10:36  
The GSA White Paper looks at how positioning for the IoT can be made more power-efficient.
Published: 
05 June 2020

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) has published a White Paper on “Power-efficient positioning for the Internet of Things”, providing an overview of GNSS technologies that are relevant for low-power IoT applications, including those that require hybridisation with other connectivity solutions. The GSA is organising a dedicated webinar on 18 June to present the main findings from the paper. 

The world is embracing Internet of Things (IoT) applications. Billions of internet-connected devices are capable of sensing, communicating, interacting, computing and actuating. These devices are set to become even more integrated into our daily lives and by 2022 it is estimated that around 18 billion out of 29 billion connected devices will be related to the IoT.

With millions of moving interconnected devices in the IoT environment, many applications require or benefit from knowing the location of an individual device. In this context, the latest GSA White Paper looks at how GNSS-based positioning for the IoT can be made more power-efficient, to meet the needs of this growing market.

Key findings

GNSS is a viable solution for tracking objects in the IoT world. However, the power consumed by positioning is an important concern. Two basic approaches have emerged in recent years to optimise consumption: transmission of pseudoranges for remote position determination, and snapshot techniques. In the first of these, the power consumption related to determining position is saved by transmitting the measurements to an external facility with no power restrictions while, for the second, the GNSS receiver is only activated for short periods to determine the position. 

Read this: Harnessing Galileo to shape the future of IoT

Combining both approaches will decrease the power consumption even further but, ultimately, the optimal solution will depend on the application in question. “When deciding on a GNSS-based solution for a given application, numerous factors play a role including target accuracy, selected LPWAN, desired battery life, ease of integration, and hardware and implementation cost,” according to the report.

The White Paper also advises applications that require a position accuracy of one meter or less to use a multi-constellation, multi-frequency receiver. “However, as most low-power IoT applications prioritise extending battery life, a multi-constellation single-frequency receiver is sufficient when positioning accuracy of multiple meters is acceptable,” it notes.

The report also states that, when deciding on an energy-efficient GNSS technique, the choice of the terrestrial network limits the possible options, as most solutions rely on external data to determine the position via GNSS.

A dedicated webinar 

The main findings from the White Paper will be presented at a dedicated webinar on Power-efficient positioning for the Internet of Things, to take place at 14:45 CET on 18 June. This GSA-hosted webinar will also feature input from major chipset manufacturers in the IoT domain such as STM & U-blox. 

What’s more, EU-funded R&D projects that are working to reduce the power consumption of GNSS positioning for the Internet of Things will also present their innovative solutions. These include: “Accurate GNSS POsitioning for Low power and Low-cost Objects” (APOLLO), which aims at providing a Galileo-based geolocation solution for the IoT market by drastically reducing energy consumption.

The APOLLO project noted in the White Paper that: “The ability to calculate the GNSS position of IoT objects with a very small energy footprint will pave the way for a market of tens of millions of moving objects each year.”

Also presenting at the webinar will be the GEONAV IoT project, which is working to develop and deliver precise ubiquitous positioning and navigation applications and services; and the Galileo of Things gs(GoT) project, which is targeting the delivery of a Galileo semiconductor-IP core that mates with NB-IoT IP for low-power consumption solutions. 

Interested? For more information and to register, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GSA White Paper looks at how positioning for the IoT can be made more power-efficient.

Power-efficient positioning for the IoT

5.6.2020 10:36  
The GSA White Paper looks at how positioning for the IoT can be made more power-efficient.
Published: 
05 June 2020

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) has published a White Paper on “Power-efficient positioning for the Internet of Things”, providing an overview of GNSS technologies that are relevant for low-power IoT applications, including those that require hybridisation with other connectivity solutions. The GSA is organising a dedicated webinar on 18 June to present the main findings from the paper. 

The world is embracing Internet of Things (IoT) applications. Billions of internet-connected devices are capable of sensing, communicating, interacting, computing and actuating. These devices are set to become even more integrated into our daily lives and by 2022 it is estimated that around 18 billion out of 29 billion connected devices will be related to the IoT.

With millions of moving interconnected devices in the IoT environment, many applications require or benefit from knowing the location of an individual device. In this context, the latest GSA White Paper looks at how GNSS-based positioning for the IoT can be made more power-efficient, to meet the needs of this growing market.

Key findings

GNSS is a viable solution for tracking objects in the IoT world. However, the power consumed by positioning is an important concern. Two basic approaches have emerged in recent years to optimise consumption: transmission of pseudoranges for remote position determination, and snapshot techniques. In the first of these, the power consumption related to determining position is saved by transmitting the measurements to an external facility with no power restrictions while, for the second, the GNSS receiver is only activated for short periods to determine the position. 

Read this: Harnessing Galileo to shape the future of IoT

Combining both approaches will decrease the power consumption even further but, ultimately, the optimal solution will depend on the application in question. “When deciding on a GNSS-based solution for a given application, numerous factors play a role including target accuracy, selected LPWAN, desired battery life, ease of integration, and hardware and implementation cost,” according to the report.

The White Paper also advises applications that require a position accuracy of one meter or less to use a multi-constellation, multi-frequency receiver. “However, as most low-power IoT applications prioritise extending battery life, a multi-constellation single-frequency receiver is sufficient when positioning accuracy of multiple meters is acceptable,” it notes.

The report also states that, when deciding on an energy-efficient GNSS technique, the choice of the terrestrial network limits the possible options, as most solutions rely on external data to determine the position via GNSS.

A dedicated webinar 

The main findings from the White Paper will be presented at a dedicated webinar on Power-efficient positioning for the Internet of Things, to take place at 15:00 on 18 June. This GSA-hosted webinar will also feature input from major chipset manufacturers in the IoT domain such as STM & U-blox. 

What’s more, EU-funded R&D projects that are working to reduce the power consumption of GNSS positioning for the Internet of Things will also present their innovative solutions. These include: “Accurate GNSS POsitioning for Low power and Low-cost Objects” (APOLLO), which aims at providing a Galileo-based geolocation solution for the IoT market by drastically reducing energy consumption.

The APOLLO project noted in the White Paper that: “The ability to calculate the GNSS position of IoT objects with a very small energy footprint will pave the way for a market of tens of millions of moving objects each year.”

Also presenting at the webinar will be the GEONAV IoT project, which is working to develop and deliver precise ubiquitous positioning and navigation applications and services; and the Galileo of Things gs(GoT) project, which is targeting the delivery of a Galileo semiconductor-IP core that mates with NB-IoT IP for low-power consumption solutions. 

Interested? For more information and to register, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GSA White Paper looks at how positioning for the IoT can be made more power-efficient.

Galileo Green Lane proving a hit with drivers

4.6.2020 12:56  
Galileo Green Lane is helping Europe mitigate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.
Published: 
04 June 2020

With over 2 500 downloads since it was launched at the start of May, the Galileo Green Lane app is proving to be popular with drivers. Developed by the European GNSS Agency (GSA) in collaboration with the European Commission, the app is a key tool in the EU’s COVID-19 pandemic response. By easing traffic flow through the EU’s borders, the app is helping to support a fundamental EU principle - the free movement of goods and freight in the internal market.

The Galileo Green Lane app uses the positioning services of Galileo- Europe’s Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) - to monitor and facilitate the free movement of freight, making it possible to reduce waiting times at the EU’s internal land borders and facilitate the transport of goods. 

Keeping transport moving

Over the last few months, the transport sector has played a vital role in the European response to the pandemic – transporting essential goods to fight the crisis and keeping the internal market intact. The Galileo Green Lane App supports drivers and national authorities as they keep up their essential work in these difficult circumstances. The initiative builds on the so-called ‘Green Lanes’, established at land border crossing points by EU Member States following guidelines from the European Commission: On 23 March, the Commission asked all EU Member States to designate relevant border-crossing points along the Trans-European Transport Network (TEN-T) as ‘Green Lane’ border crossings to minimise waiting times and keep freight moving. Via these Green Lanes, freight vehicles should be able to cross the border within a maximum of 15 minutes. 

Two-interface solution

The Galileo Green Lane app is designed to address the needs of both border control authorities and of truck drivers, through two intuitive user interfaces. For border control authorities, the app provides a real-time visualisation of the situation at border crossings along with regular updates on the traffic flow situation. For truck and passenger car drivers, the app also provides real-time border visualisation with an EU-wide map produced by real-time visibility provider Sixfold. This enables drivers to better prepare their routes, by providing advance knowledge of the waiting time at each border crossing. 

At the same time, the app provides Member States with a website where they can generate reports automatically, making it easier to comply with EU recommendations. The solution is the product of cooperation not only between EU Member States and agencies, but also with users, who provide the data that is aggregated and analysed to produce the solution. To check out the Galileo Green Lane benefits, download the app here.

A welcome initiative 

Several European Union countries have welcomed the opportunity to use “Galileo Green Lane” and the app has been already been tested with the Border Police at border crossings in Hungary, the Czech Republic and Spain, with over 5 000 datasets collected. Testing is still ongoing in in France and Greece.

“With the ‘Galileo Green Lane’ app, the GSA is fulfilling its mission to address economic and societal challenges by leveraging the European GNSS capabilities,” said GSA Acting Executive Director Pascal Claudel. “If more Member States get involved, more border crossings will be brought into play, which means that the benefits of EU investment in space will be more widely felt,” he said. 

A pilot has also been carried out with drivers, in collaboration with the International Road Transport Union (IRU), with over 2,500 apps downloaded. This pilot generated data from 97 of the total 187 Green Lane border crossings in 26 EU and neighbouring countries.

Coordinated support

The GSA is coordinating the Galileo Green Lane project with the support of the European Commission, in particular the Directorate-General for Mobility and Transport (DG MOVE) regarding needs linked to the Green Lanes, the Directorate-General for Defence Industry and Space (DG DEFIS), the Directorate-General for Migration and Home Affairs (DG HOME), bringing together the border authorities of the Member States, and the Joint Research Centre (JRC) with its geo-fencing technology development expertise.

Commissioner for Transport, Adina Vălean, said: “While borders were closing and lockdowns looming we opened Green Lanes, thus preventing a supply chain crisis. Member States embraced this concept and made it operational very quickly. The Galileo Green Lane app is a direct result of EU coordination in the transport sector and I encourage transport workers and operators to download and use it.”

Commissioner for Internal Market, Thierry Breton, said: “Through the Galileo Green Lane app, we demonstrate the value of space based technologies and applications to provide innovative and concrete solutions, for instance in support to the free flow of goods across the Single Market.”

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Galileo Green Lane is helping Europe mitigate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Galileo Green Lane proving a hit with drivers

4.6.2020 12:56  
Galileo Green Lane is helping Europe mitigate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.
Published: 
04 June 2020

With over 2 500 downloads since it was launched at the start of May, the Galileo Green Lane app is proving to be popular with drivers. Developed by the European GNSS Agency (GSA) in collaboration with the European Commission, the app is a key tool in the EU’s COVID-19 pandemic response. By easing traffic flow through the EU’s borders, the app is helping to support a fundamental EU principle - the free movement of goods and freight in the internal market.

The Galileo Green Lane app uses the positioning services of Galileo- Europe’s Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) - to monitor and facilitate the free movement of freight, making it possible to reduce waiting times at the EU’s internal land borders and facilitate the transport of goods. 

Keeping transport moving

Over the last few months, the transport sector has played a vital role in the European response to the pandemic – transporting essential goods to fight the crisis and keeping the internal market intact. The Galileo Green Lane App supports drivers and national authorities as they keep up their essential work in these difficult circumstances. The initiative builds on the so-called ‘Green Lanes’, established at land border crossing points by EU Member States following guidelines from the European Commission: On 23 March, the Commission asked all EU Member States to designate relevant border-crossing points along the Trans-European Transport Network (TEN-T) as ‘Green Lane’ border crossings to minimise waiting times and keep freight moving. Via these Green Lanes, freight vehicles should be able to cross the border within a maximum of 15 minutes. 

Two-interface solution

The Galileo Green Lane app is designed to address the needs of both border control authorities and of truck drivers, through two intuitive user interfaces. For border control authorities, the app provides a real-time visualisation of the situation at border crossings along with regular updates on the traffic flow situation. For truck and passenger car drivers, the app also provides real-time border visualisation with an EU-wide map produced by real-time visibility provider Sixfold. This enables drivers to better prepare their routes, by providing advance knowledge of the waiting time at each border crossing. 

At the same time, the app provides Member States with a website where they can generate reports automatically, making it easier to comply with EU recommendations. The solution is the product of cooperation not only between EU Member States and agencies, but also with users, who provide the data that is aggregated and analysed to produce the solution. To check out the Galileo Green Lane benefits, download the app here.

A welcome initiative 

Several European Union countries have welcomed the opportunity to use “Galileo Green Lane” and the app has already been tested with the Border Police at border crossings in Hungary, the Czech Republic and Spain, with over 5 000 datasets collected. Testing is still ongoing in France and Greece.

“With the ‘Galileo Green Lane’ app, the GSA is fulfilling its mission to address economic and societal challenges by leveraging the European GNSS capabilities,” said GSA Acting Executive Director Pascal Claudel. “If more Member States get involved, more border crossings will be brought into play, which means that the benefits of EU investment in space will be more widely felt,” he said. 

A pilot has also been carried out with drivers, in collaboration with the International Road Transport Union (IRU), with over 2,500 apps downloaded. This pilot generated data from 97 of the total 187 Green Lane border crossings in 26 EU and neighbouring countries.

Coordinated support

The GSA is coordinating the Galileo Green Lane project with the support of the European Commission, in particular the Directorate-General for Mobility and Transport (DG MOVE) regarding needs linked to the Green Lanes, the Directorate-General for Defence Industry and Space (DG DEFIS), the Directorate-General for Migration and Home Affairs (DG HOME), bringing together the border authorities of the Member States, and the Joint Research Centre (JRC) with its geo-fencing technology development expertise.

Commissioner for Transport, Adina Vălean, said: “While borders were closing and lockdowns looming we opened Green Lanes, thus preventing a supply chain crisis. Member States embraced this concept and made it operational very quickly. The Galileo Green Lane app is a direct result of EU coordination in the transport sector and I encourage transport workers and operators to download and use it.”

Commissioner for Internal Market, Thierry Breton, said: “Through the Galileo Green Lane app, we demonstrate the value of space based technologies and applications to provide innovative and concrete solutions, for instance in support to the free flow of goods across the Single Market.”

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Galileo Green Lane is helping Europe mitigate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Galileo Green Lane proving a hit with drivers

4.6.2020 12:56  
Galileo Green Lane is helping Europe mitigate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.
Published: 
04 June 2020

With over 2 500 downloads since it was launched at the start of May, the Galileo Green Lane app is proving to be popular with drivers. Developed by the European GNSS Agency (GSA) in collaboration with the European Commission, the app is a key tool in the EU’s COVID-19 pandemic response. By easing traffic flow through the EU’s borders, the app is helping to support a fundamental EU principle - the free movement of goods and freight in the internal market.

The Galileo Green Lane app uses the positioning services of Galileo- Europe’s Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) - to monitor and facilitate the free movement of freight, making it possible to reduce waiting times at the EU’s internal land borders and facilitate the transport of goods. 

Keeping transport moving

Over the last few months, the transport sector has played a vital role in the European response to the pandemic – transporting essential goods to fight the crisis and keeping the internal market intact. The Galileo Green Lane App supports drivers and national authorities as they keep up their essential work in these difficult circumstances. The initiative builds on the so-called ‘Green Lanes’, established at land border crossing points by EU Member States following guidelines from the European Commission: On 23 March, the Commission asked all EU Member States to designate relevant border-crossing points along the Trans-European Transport Network (TEN-T) as ‘Green Lane’ border crossings to minimise waiting times and keep freight moving. Via these Green Lanes, freight vehicles should be able to cross the border within a maximum of 15 minutes. 

Two-interface solution

The Galileo Green Lane app is designed to address the needs of both border control authorities and of truck drivers, through two intuitive user interfaces. For border control authorities, the app provides a real-time visualisation of the situation at border crossings along with regular updates on the traffic flow situation. For truck and passenger car drivers, the app also provides real-time border visualisation with an EU-wide map produced by real-time visibility provider Sixfold. This enables drivers to better prepare their routes, by providing advance knowledge of the waiting time at each border crossing. 

At the same time, the app provides Member States with a website where they can generate reports automatically, making it easier to comply with EU recommendations. The solution is the product of cooperation not only between EU Member States and agencies, but also with users, who provide the data that is aggregated and analysed to produce the solution. To check out the Galileo Green Lane benefits, download the app here.

A welcome initiative 

Several European Union countries have welcomed the opportunity to use “Galileo Green Lane” and the app has already been tested with the Border Police at border crossings in Hungary, the Czech Republic and Spain, with over 5 000 datasets collected. Testing is still ongoing in France and Greece.

“With the ‘Galileo Green Lane’ app, the GSA is fulfilling its mission to address economic and societal challenges by leveraging the European GNSS capabilities,” said GSA Acting Executive Director Pascal Claudel. “If more Member States get involved, more border crossings will be brought into play, which means that the benefits of EU investment in space will be more widely felt,” he said. 

A pilot has also been carried out with drivers, in collaboration with the International Road Transport Union (IRU), with over 2,500 apps downloaded. This pilot generated data from 97 of the total 187 Green Lane border crossings in 26 EU and neighbouring countries.

Coordinated support

The GSA is coordinating the Galileo Green Lane project with the support of the European Commission, in particular the Directorate-General for Mobility and Transport (DG MOVE) regarding needs linked to the Green Lanes, the Directorate-General for Defence Industry and Space (DG DEFIS), the Directorate-General for Migration and Home Affairs (DG HOME), bringing together the border authorities of the Member States, and the Joint Research Centre (JRC) with its geo-fencing technology development expertise.

Commissioner for Transport, Adina Vălean, said: “While borders were closing and lockdowns looming we opened Green Lanes, thus preventing a supply chain crisis. Member States embraced this concept and made it operational very quickly. The Galileo Green Lane app is a direct result of EU coordination in the transport sector and I encourage transport workers and operators to download and use it.”

Commissioner for Internal Market, Thierry Breton, said: “Through the Galileo Green Lane app, we demonstrate the value of space based technologies and applications to provide innovative and concrete solutions, for instance in support to the free flow of goods across the Single Market.”

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Galileo Green Lane is helping Europe mitigate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Galileo Green Lane proving a hit with drivers

4.6.2020 12:56  
Galileo Green Lane is helping Europe mitigate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.
Published: 
04 June 2020

With over 2 500 downloads since it was launched at the start of May, the Galileo Green Lane app is proving to be popular with drivers. Developed by the European GNSS Agency (GSA) in collaboration with the European Commission, the app is a key tool in the EU’s COVID-19 pandemic response. By easing traffic flow through the EU’s borders, the app is helping to support a fundamental EU principle - the free movement of goods and freight in the internal market.

The Galileo Green Lane app uses the positioning services of Galileo- Europe’s Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) - to monitor and facilitate the free movement of freight, making it possible to reduce waiting times at the EU’s internal land borders and facilitate the transport of goods. 

Keeping transport moving

Over the last few months, the transport sector has played a vital role in the European response to the pandemic – transporting essential goods to fight the crisis and keeping the internal market intact. The Galileo Green Lane App supports drivers and national authorities as they keep up their essential work in these difficult circumstances. The initiative builds on the so-called ‘Green Lanes’, established at land border crossing points by EU Member States following guidelines from the European Commission: On 23 March, the Commission asked all EU Member States to designate relevant border-crossing points along the Trans-European Transport Network (TEN-T) as ‘Green Lane’ border crossings to minimise waiting times and keep freight moving. Via these Green Lanes, freight vehicles should be able to cross the border within a maximum of 15 minutes. 

Two-interface solution

The Galileo Green Lane app is designed to address the needs of both border control authorities and of truck drivers, through two intuitive user interfaces. For border control authorities, the app provides a real-time visualisation of the situation at border crossings along with regular updates on the traffic flow situation. For truck and passenger car drivers, the app also provides real-time border visualisation with an EU-wide map produced by real-time visibility provider Sixfold. This enables drivers to better prepare their routes, by providing advance knowledge of the waiting time at each border crossing. 

At the same time, the app provides Member States with a website where they can generate reports automatically, making it easier to comply with EU recommendations. The solution is the product of cooperation not only between EU Member States and agencies, but also with users, who provide the data that is aggregated and analysed to produce the solution. To check out the Galileo Green Lane benefits, download the app here.

A welcome initiative 

Several European Union countries have welcomed the opportunity to use “Galileo Green Lane” and the app has already been tested with the Border Police at border crossings in Hungary, the Czech Republic and Spain, with over 5 000 datasets collected. Testing is still ongoing in France and Greece.

“With the ‘Galileo Green Lane’ app, the GSA is fulfilling its mission to address economic and societal challenges by leveraging the European GNSS capabilities,” said GSA Acting Executive Director Pascal Claudel, more Member States getting involved and more border crossings brought into play, means the benefits of EU investment in space will be more widely felt.

A pilot has also been carried out with drivers, in collaboration with the International Road Transport Union (IRU), with over 2,500 apps downloaded. This pilot generated data from 97 of the total 187 Green Lane border crossings in 26 EU and neighbouring countries.

Coordinated support

The GSA is coordinating the Galileo Green Lane project with the support of the European Commission, in particular the Directorate-General for Mobility and Transport (DG MOVE) regarding needs linked to the Green Lanes, the Directorate-General for Defence Industry and Space (DG DEFIS), the Directorate-General for Migration and Home Affairs (DG HOME), bringing together the border authorities of the Member States, and the Joint Research Centre (JRC) with its geo-fencing technology development expertise.

Commissioner for Transport, Adina Vălean, said: “While borders were closing and lockdowns looming we opened Green Lanes, thus preventing a supply chain crisis. Member States embraced this concept and made it operational very quickly. The Galileo Green Lane app is a direct result of EU coordination in the transport sector and I encourage transport workers and operators to download and use it.”

Commissioner for Internal Market, Thierry Breton, said: “Through the Galileo Green Lane app, we demonstrate the value of space based technologies and applications to provide innovative and concrete solutions, for instance in support to the free flow of goods across the Single Market.”

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Galileo Green Lane is helping Europe mitigate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

EGNOS key for emergency and medical operations in EU COVID-19 response

29.5.2020 11:22  
Published: 
29 May 2020

The European Space Programmes are playing a key role in managing the COVID-19 pandemic and in particular in supporting emergency and medical operations in all weather, anytime, when they are most needed. We have talked to air ambulance and emergency operators using EGNOS about their experience and how EGNOS is helping them to take care of EU citizens, operate more effectively in these difficult times and save lives.

During this difficult period, the perception of our world has changed and we recognise the health sector and care givers as our new heroes. When patients from remote areas need to be taken to a hospital at night, in difficult weather situations and life is at stake, EGNOS makes the operation safe. Michael Diefenbach, Managing Director of German air ambulance operator Jetcall noted “We do see an increase in complex mission requests that are extremely challenging, both medically as well as from the operational and aviation perspective,” he said.

Patients with confirmed COVID-19 infection need to be transported in an operation that is safe for patients and crew. 

EGNOS to save lives during critical missions

The accessibility and efficiency gains offered by EGNOS make it possible to land in adverse weather conditions and limited visibility, which is a major advantage. The gains on mission time might well make the difference between life and death of a critically ill patient in regions with limited medical services available. 

Watch this: EGNOS for Aviation - Making Europe's airports more accessible

Jetcall is being funded by the GSA to upgrade two air ambulance aircraft with EGNOS capabilities in order to better serve their clients. EGNOS enables instrument approach procedures best suited for these operations, such as low-level routes, which means being able to fly at low altitude. 

Previously, operators had to fly under visual flight rules, and therefore faced restrictions in difficult weather conditions or at night. This type of operation can be implemented at helipads in hospitals without the ground infrastructure costs required in conventional operations. In this way, EGNOS provides a cost efficient and safe solution to transfer patients and medical teams to those hospitals with increased reliability and availability, which is essential to save lives. 

“Any tool that allows us to perform faster approaches, to use more remote airfields located closer to the patient, or utilise this last available airport that still accepts us for re-fuel or overnight stops might become mission critical. It makes a huge difference, not only to our ability to execute a mission and stay in business, but most importantly to the patients and their families, who face the very real and present danger of losing a loved one,” Diefenbach said.

“Our clients are constantly looking for two things in their service providers: outstanding quality in the medical services performed on board, and maximum reliability without compromising on flexibility. Having systems like EGNOS services available is definitely an added value as regards mission capability and flexibility and this is highly appreciated by our customers,” he added.

Read this: Maintaining EGNSS operations and security in challenging times: the GSA response

Like Diefenbach, Ivo Airaudi, crew training post holder at the Italian emergency operator Airgreen is also seeing increased challenges in helicopter rescue missions during the COVID-Crisis. 

However, helicopters have been called also for transporting medical doctors and equipment on remote sites. In such situations EGNOS is making the operation possible. “Our helicopters are able to work with EGNOS and to profit from its high accuracy and integrity, which is much better than with standard GPS,” he said. “For example, in one of our rescue bases located on Cuneo Airport if we have bad weather conditions using standard procedures, we may not be able to land at an airport. But using LPV (localizer performance with vertical guidance) we are able to land because we have a lower decision altitude,” Airaudi said. 

“We are participating in a really interesting project financed by the GSA – the ECARO project. This project will develop these EGNOS enabled low-level routes in additional locations in Italy. This will allow helicopters to move from the north to the south of Italy along many different low-level routes. This will be a really big step forward for us thanks to EGNOS,” he said.

Responding to user needs with a harmonised European approach

The GSA was pioneer in supporting the implementation of EGNOS-based approaches and low-level routes in Europe, and is funding a large number of operations and helicopter upgrades. As of today, 23 operational helicopter approaches are using EGNOS in Italy, Austria, Norway, Italy, Czech Republic, France, Switzerland and Germany. 

Building on users’ needs, the EGNOS Safety of Life Service Definition Document also explicitly reflects rotorcraft operations and, in particular, EGNOS-based Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS) operations.

In order to harmonise implementation of operations, the GSA supported the creation of the Five Lives Advisory Group (FLAG) of helicopter users, now consolidated as the European focal point for the coordination of EGNOS-based operations for emergency response. In cooperation with EASA and Eurocontrol, the group now includes more than 40 experts from National Aviation Authorities and Air Navigation Service Providers from all Member States, along with emergency operators and manufacturers working on helicopter operations based on EGNOS. In collaboration with all stakeholders the group has developed a three-year work programme for implementation and support of satellite-based rotorcraft operations and published Safety Guidance material for these operations. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

EGNOS, like the other EU space programmes, has a key role to play in the COVID-19 response

EGNOS key for emergency and medical operations in EU COVID-19 response

29.5.2020 11:22  
Published: 
29 May 2020

The European Space Programmes are playing a key role in managing the COVID-19 pandemic and in particular in supporting emergency and medical operations in all weather, anytime, when they are most needed. We have talked to air ambulance and emergency operators using EGNOS about their experience and how EGNOS is helping them to take care of EU citizens, operate more effectively in these difficult times and save lives.

During this difficult period, the perception of our world has changed and we recognise the health sector and care givers as our new heroes. When patients from remote areas need to be taken to a hospital at night, in difficult weather situations and life is at stake, EGNOS makes the operation safe. Michael Diefenbach, Managing Director of German air ambulance operator Jetcall noted “We do see an increase in complex mission requests that are extremely challenging, both medically as well as from the operational and aviation perspective,” he said.

Patients with confirmed COVID-19 infection need to be transported in an operation that is safe for patients and crew. 

EGNOS to save lives during critical missions

The accessibility and efficiency gains offered by EGNOS make it possible to land in adverse weather conditions and limited visibility, which is a major advantage. The gains on mission time might well make the difference between life and death of a critically ill patient in regions with limited medical services available. 

Watch this: EGNOS for Aviation - Making Europe's airports more accessible

Jetcall is being funded by the GSA to upgrade two air ambulance aircraft with EGNOS capabilities in order to better serve their clients. EGNOS enables instrument approach procedures best suited for these operations, such as low-level routes, which means being able to fly at low altitude. 

Previously, operators had to fly under visual flight rules, and therefore faced restrictions in difficult weather conditions or at night. This type of operation can be implemented at helipads in hospitals without the ground infrastructure costs required in conventional operations. In this way, EGNOS provides a cost efficient and safe solution to transfer patients and medical teams to those hospitals with increased reliability and availability, which is essential to save lives. 

“Any tool that allows us to perform faster approaches, to use more remote airfields located closer to the patient, or utilise this last available airport that still accepts us for re-fuel or overnight stops might become mission critical. It makes a huge difference, not only to our ability to execute a mission and stay in business, but most importantly to the patients and their families, who face the very real and present danger of losing a loved one,” Diefenbach said.

“Our clients are constantly looking for two things in their service providers: outstanding quality in the medical services performed on board, and maximum reliability without compromising on flexibility. Having systems like EGNOS services available is definitely an added value as regards mission capability and flexibility and this is highly appreciated by our customers,” he added.

Read this: Maintaining EGNSS operations and security in challenging times: the GSA response

Like Diefenbach, Ivo Airaudi, crew training post holder at the Italian emergency operator Airgreen is also seeing increased challenges in helicopter rescue missions during the COVID-Crisis. 

However, helicopters have been called also for transporting medical doctors and equipment on remote sites. In such situations EGNOS is making the operation possible. “Our helicopters are able to work with EGNOS and to profit from its high accuracy and integrity, which is much better than with standard GPS,” he said. “For example, in one of our rescue bases located on Cuneo Airport if we have bad weather conditions using standard procedures, we may not be able to land at an airport. But using LPV (localizer performance with vertical guidance) we are able to land because we have a lower decision altitude,” Airaudi said. 

“We are participating in a really interesting project financed by the GSA – the ECARO project. This project will develop these EGNOS enabled low-level routes in additional locations in Italy. This will allow helicopters to move from the north to the south of Italy along many different low-level routes. This will be a really big step forward for us thanks to EGNOS,” he said.

Responding to user needs with a harmonised European approach

The GSA was pioneer in supporting the implementation of EGNOS-based approaches and low-level routes in Europe, and is funding a large number of operations and helicopter upgrades. As of today, 23 operational helicopter approaches are using EGNOS in Italy, Austria, Norway, Italy, Czech Republic, France, Switzerland and Germany. 

Building on users’ needs, the EGNOS Safety of Life Service Definition Document also explicitly reflects rotorcraft operations and, in particular, EGNOS-based Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS) operations.

In order to harmonise implementation of operations, the GSA supported the creation of the Five Lives Advisory Group (FLAG) of helicopter users, now consolidated as the European focal point for the coordination of EGNOS-based operations for emergency response. In cooperation with EASA and Eurocontrol, the group now includes more than 40 experts from National Aviation Authorities and Air Navigation Service Providers from all Member States, along with emergency operators and manufacturers working on helicopter operations based on EGNOS. In collaboration with all stakeholders the group has developed a three-year work programme for implementation and support of satellite-based rotorcraft operations and published Safety Guidance material for these operations. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

EGNOS, like the other EU space programmes, has a key role to play in the COVID-19 response

EGNOS key for emergency and medical operations in EU COVID-19 response

29.5.2020 11:22  
Published: 
29 May 2020

The European Space Programmes are playing a key role in managing the COVID-19 pandemic and in particular in supporting emergency and medical operations in all weather, anytime, when they are most needed. We have talked to air ambulance and emergency operators using EGNOS about their experience and how EGNOS is helping them to take care of EU citizens, operate more effectively in these difficult times and save lives.

During this difficult period, the perception of our world has changed and we recognise the health sector and care givers as our new heroes. When patients from remote areas need to be taken to a hospital at night, in difficult weather situations and life is at stake, EGNOS makes the operation safe. Michael Diefenbach, Managing Director of German air ambulance operator Jetcall noted “We do see an increase in complex mission requests that are extremely challenging, both medically as well as from the operational and aviation perspective,” he said.

Patients with confirmed COVID-19 infection need to be transported in an operation that is safe for patients and crew. 

EGNOS to save lives during critical missions

The accessibility and efficiency gains offered by EGNOS make it possible to land in adverse weather conditions and limited visibility, which is a major advantage. The gains on mission time might well make the difference between life and death of a critically ill patient in regions with limited medical services available. 

Watch this: EGNOS for Aviation - Making Europe's airports more accessible

Jetcall is being funded by the GSA to upgrade two air ambulance aircraft with EGNOS capabilities in order to better serve their clients. EGNOS enables instrument approach procedures best suited for these operations, such as low-level routes, which means being able to fly at low altitude. 

Previously, operators had to fly under visual flight rules, and therefore faced restrictions in difficult weather conditions or at night. This type of operation can be implemented at helipads in hospitals without the ground infrastructure costs required in conventional operations. In this way, EGNOS provides a cost efficient and safe solution to transfer patients and medical teams to those hospitals with increased reliability and availability, which is essential to save lives. 

“Any tool that allows us to perform faster approaches, to use more remote airfields located closer to the patient, or utilise this last available airport that still accepts us for re-fuel or overnight stops might become mission critical. It makes a huge difference, not only to our ability to execute a mission and stay in business, but most importantly to the patients and their families, who face the very real and present danger of losing a loved one,” Diefenbach said.

“Our clients are constantly looking for two things in their service providers: outstanding quality in the medical services performed on board, and maximum reliability without compromising on flexibility. Having systems like EGNOS services available is definitely an added value as regards mission capability and flexibility and this is highly appreciated by our customers,” he added.

Read this: Maintaining EGNSS operations and security in challenging times: the GSA response

Like Diefenbach, Ivo Airaudi, crew training post holder at the Italian emergency operator Airgreen is also seeing increased challenges in helicopter rescue missions during the COVID-Crisis. 

However, helicopters have been called also for transporting medical doctors and equipment on remote sites. In such situations EGNOS is making the operation possible. “Our helicopters are able to work with EGNOS and to profit from its high accuracy and integrity, which is much better than with standard GPS,” he said. “For example, in one of our rescue bases located on Cuneo Airport if we have bad weather conditions using standard procedures, we may not be able to land at an airport. But using LPV (localizer performance with vertical guidance) we are able to land because we have a lower decision altitude,” Airaudi said. 

“We are participating in a really interesting project financed by the GSA – the ECARO project. This project will develop these EGNOS enabled low-level routes in additional locations in Italy. This will allow helicopters to move from the north to the south of Italy along many different low-level routes. This will be a really big step forward for us thanks to EGNOS,” he said.

Responding to user needs with a harmonised European approach

The GSA was pioneer in supporting the implementation of EGNOS-based approaches and low-level routes in Europe, and is funding a large number of operations and helicopter upgrades. As of today, 23 operational helicopter approaches are using EGNOS in Italy, Austria, Norway, Italy, Czech Republic, France, Switzerland and Germany. 

Building on users’ needs, the EGNOS Safety of Life Service Definition Document also explicitly reflects rotorcraft operations and, in particular, EGNOS-based Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS) operations.

In order to harmonise implementation of operations, the GSA supported the creation of the Five Lives Advisory Group (FLAG) of helicopter users, now consolidated as the European focal point for the coordination of EGNOS-based operations for emergency response. In cooperation with EASA and Eurocontrol, the group now includes more than 40 experts from National Aviation Authorities and Air Navigation Service Providers from all Member States, along with emergency operators and manufacturers working on helicopter operations based on EGNOS. In collaboration with all stakeholders the group has developed a three-year work programme for implementation and support of satellite-based rotorcraft operations and published Safety Guidance material for these operations. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

EGNOS, like the other EU space programmes, has a key role to play in the COVID-19 response

EGNOS key for emergency and medical operations in EU COVID-19 response

29.5.2020 11:22  
EGNOS, like the other EU space programmes, has a key role to play in the COVID-19 response
Published: 
29 May 2020

The European Space Programmes are playing a key role in managing the COVID-19 pandemic and in particular in supporting emergency and medical operations in all weather, anytime, when they are most needed. We have talked to air ambulance and emergency operators using EGNOS about their experience and how EGNOS is helping them to take care of EU citizens, operate more effectively in these difficult times and save lives.

During this difficult period, the perception of our world has changed and we recognise the health sector and care givers as our new heroes. When patients from remote areas need to be taken to a hospital at night, in difficult weather situations and life is at stake, EGNOS makes the operation safe. Michael Diefenbach, Managing Director of German air ambulance operator Jetcall noted “We do see an increase in complex mission requests that are extremely challenging, both medically as well as from the operational and aviation perspective,” he said.

Patients with confirmed COVID-19 infection need to be transported in an operation that is safe for patients and crew. 

EGNOS to save lives during critical missions

The accessibility and efficiency gains offered by EGNOS make it possible to land in adverse weather conditions and limited visibility, which is a major advantage. The gains on mission time might well make the difference between life and death of a critically ill patient in regions with limited medical services available. 

Watch this: EGNOS for Aviation - Making Europe's airports more accessible

Jetcall is being funded by the GSA to upgrade two air ambulance aircraft with EGNOS capabilities in order to better serve their clients. EGNOS enables instrument approach procedures best suited for these operations, such as low-level routes, which means being able to fly at low altitude. 

Previously, operators had to fly under visual flight rules, and therefore faced restrictions in difficult weather conditions or at night. This type of operation can be implemented at helipads in hospitals without the ground infrastructure costs required in conventional operations. In this way, EGNOS provides a cost efficient and safe solution to transfer patients and medical teams to those hospitals with increased reliability and availability, which is essential to save lives. 

“Any tool that allows us to perform faster approaches, to use more remote airfields located closer to the patient, or utilise this last available airport that still accepts us for re-fuel or overnight stops might become mission critical. It makes a huge difference, not only to our ability to execute a mission and stay in business, but most importantly to the patients and their families, who face the very real and present danger of losing a loved one,” Diefenbach said.

“Our clients are constantly looking for two things in their service providers: outstanding quality in the medical services performed on board, and maximum reliability without compromising on flexibility. Having systems like EGNOS services available is definitely an added value as regards mission capability and flexibility and this is highly appreciated by our customers,” he added.

Read this: Maintaining EGNSS operations and security in challenging times: the GSA response

Like Diefenbach, Ivo Airaudi, crew training post holder at the Italian emergency operator Airgreen is also seeing increased challenges in helicopter rescue missions during the COVID-Crisis. 

However, helicopters have been called also for transporting medical doctors and equipment on remote sites. In such situations EGNOS is making the operation possible. “Our helicopters are able to work with EGNOS and to profit from its high accuracy and integrity, which is much better than with standard GPS,” he said. “For example, in one of our rescue bases located on Cuneo Airport if we have bad weather conditions using standard procedures, we may not be able to land at an airport. But using LPV (localizer performance with vertical guidance) we are able to land because we have a lower decision altitude,” Airaudi said. 

“We are participating in a really interesting project financed by the GSA – the ECARO project. This project will develop these EGNOS enabled low-level routes in additional locations in Italy. This will allow helicopters to move from the north to the south of Italy along many different low-level routes. This will be a really big step forward for us thanks to EGNOS,” he said.

Responding to user needs with a harmonised European approach

The GSA was pioneer in supporting the implementation of EGNOS-based approaches and low-level routes in Europe, and is funding a large number of operations and helicopter upgrades. As of today, 23 operational helicopter approaches are using EGNOS in Italy, Austria, Norway, Italy, Czech Republic, France, Switzerland and Germany. 

Building on users’ needs, the EGNOS Safety of Life Service Definition Document also explicitly reflects rotorcraft operations and, in particular, EGNOS-based Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS) operations.

In order to harmonise implementation of operations, the GSA supported the creation of the Five Lives Advisory Group (FLAG) of helicopter users, now consolidated as the European focal point for the coordination of EGNOS-based operations for emergency response. In cooperation with EASA and Eurocontrol, the group now includes more than 40 experts from National Aviation Authorities and Air Navigation Service Providers from all Member States, along with emergency operators and manufacturers working on helicopter operations based on EGNOS. In collaboration with all stakeholders the group has developed a three-year work programme for implementation and support of satellite-based rotorcraft operations and published Safety Guidance material for these operations. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

EGNOS, like the other EU space programmes, has a key role to play in the COVID-19 response

EGNOS goes from strength to strength

27.5.2020 9:59  
Having benefitted users in the EU for 15 years, EGNOS is now broadening its horizons.
Published: 
27 May 2020

EGNOS, the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service, has been augmenting the GPS signal and providing services to users in Europe since its initial operations back in June 2005. About to celebrate its 15th anniversary, the system is going from strength to strength, with its coverage area set to expand and work towards the next generation EGNOS V3 well underway.

EGNOS is Europe's regional satellite-based augmentation system. It is used to improve the performance of GPS and, with the launch of EGNOS V3, will augment Galileo signals also. EGNOS information improves the accuracy and reliability of GNSS positioning information while also providing a crucial integrity message and transmitting an accurate time signal.

Benefitting numerous markets

The EGNOS programme is managed by the European GNSS Agency (GSA) on behalf of the European Commission. EGNOS service provision is handled by the European Satellite Services Provider (ESSP) under a contract signed with the GSA back in 2013. Based on this, the EGNOS programme currently provides three core services. 

Watch this: EGNOS is growing

The first of these, the Open Service (OS), aims to improve the positioning accuracy by correcting error sources affecting the GPS signals. The EGNOS Safety of Life (SoL) Service provides the most stringent level of signal-in-space performance to all SoL user communities and, finally, the EGNOS Data Access Service (EDAS) is aimed at users who require enhanced performance for commercial and professional use.

The provision of EGNOS services is bringing benefits to numerous market segments, including road, rail, maritime, surveying/mapping, location-based services and agriculture. EGNOS is particularly important for sectors and applications where accuracy and integrity are critical, such as the aviation sector. But, beyond aviation, EGNOS also improves and extends the scope of GNSS applications such as precision farming, on-road vehicle management and port and inland waterway navigation, to name but a few.

Set to expand

Currently providing corrections and integrity information in a broad area centred over Europe, the EGNOS coverage area is set to expand. The European Commission has set aside some EUR 8 million from the European Neighbourhood Instrument for the Eastern Partnership countries (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova, Ukraine), allowing Ukraine to benefit from the same EGNOS high-quality services and cutting-edge technology as the EU Member States. 

And this: EGNOS for Aviation

The EGNOS extension to Ukraine will be operational from 2026-27. This extension will allow Eastern Partnership countries to benefit from more accurate positioning and greater safety, in turn contributing to the digitalization and greening of their economies, as well as to the creation of a Single Transport Area for the EU and its Neighbourhood. The extension is complementary to the EGNOS extension to the Southern Neighbourhood countries, which is also being financed by the European Commission.

EGNOS V3

Since it took over the management of the EGNOS Exploitation programme in 2014, the GSA has started to prepare the complete overhaul of the EGNOS ground segment, which will see the deployment of EGNOS V3 in ground stations at more than 50 sites in Europe and its neighbouring countries.

Within EGNOS V3, the GSA also requested the development of new EGNOS capabilities to support the augmentation of a second GPS signal (L5) and of the Galileo signals E1-E5 to be compatible with the new International Civil Aviation Standards. Another requirement is that the system be made more robust, to deal with the increase in user numbers and to reflect their increasing dependence on EGNOS and its multi-modal applications.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Having benefitted users in the EU for 15 years, EGNOS is now broadening its horizons.

EGNOS goes from strength to strength

27.5.2020 9:59  
Having benefitted users in the EU for 15 years, EGNOS is now broadening its horizons.
Published: 
27 May 2020

EGNOS, the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service, has been augmenting the GPS signal and providing services to users in Europe since its initial operations back in June 2005. About to celebrate its 15th anniversary, the system is going from strength to strength, with its coverage area set to expand and work towards the next generation EGNOS V3 well underway.

EGNOS is Europe's regional satellite-based augmentation system. It is used to improve the performance of GPS and, with the launch of EGNOS V3, will augment Galileo signals also. EGNOS information improves the accuracy and reliability of GNSS positioning information while also providing a crucial integrity message.

Benefitting numerous markets

The EGNOS programme is managed by the European GNSS Agency (GSA) on behalf of the European Commission. EGNOS service provision is handled by the European Satellite Services Provider (ESSP) under a contract signed with the GSA back in 2013. Based on this, the EGNOS programme currently provides three core services. 

Watch this: EGNOS is growing

The first of these, the Open Service (OS), aims to improve the positioning accuracy by correcting error sources affecting the GPS signals. The EGNOS Safety of Life (SoL) Service provides the most stringent level of signal-in-space performance to all SoL user communities and, finally, the EGNOS Data Access Service (EDAS) (provided via the internet and mobile phones) is aimed at users who require enhanced performance for commercial and professional use.

The provision of EGNOS services is bringing benefits to numerous market segments, including road, rail, maritime, surveying/mapping, and agriculture. EGNOS is particularly important for sectors and applications where accuracy and integrity are critical, such as the aviation sector. But, beyond aviation, EGNOS also improves and extends the scope of GNSS applications such as precision farming, road vehicle management and port and inland waterway navigation, to name but a few.

Set to expand

Currently providing corrections and integrity information in a broad area centred over Europe, the EGNOS coverage area is set to expand. The European Commission has set aside some EUR 8 million from the European Neighbourhood Instrument for the Eastern Partnership countries (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova, Ukraine), allowing Ukraine to benefit from the same EGNOS high-quality services and cutting-edge technology as the EU Member States. 

And this: EGNOS for Aviation

The EGNOS extension to Ukraine will be operational from 2026-27. This extension will allow Eastern Partnership countries to benefit from more accurate positioning and greater safety, in turn contributing to the digitalization and greening of their economies, as well as to the creation of a Single Transport Area for the EU and its Neighbourhood countires. The extension is complementary to the EGNOS extension to the Southern Neighbourhood countries, which is also being financed by the European Commission.

EGNOS V3

Since it took over the management of the EGNOS in 2014, the GSA has started to prepare the complete overhaul of the EGNOS ground segment, which will see the deployment of EGNOS V3 in ground stations at more than 50 sites in Europe and its neighbouring countries.

Within EGNOS V3, the GSA also requested the development of new EGNOS capabilities to support the augmentation of a second GPS signal (L5) and of the Galileo signals E1-E5 to be compatible with the new International Civil Aviation Standards. Another requirement is that the system be made more robust, to deal with users increasing dependence on EGNOS and its multi-modal applications.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Having benefitted users in the EU for 15 years, EGNOS is now broadening its horizons.

EGNOS goes from strength to strength

27.5.2020 9:59  
Having benefitted users in the EU for 15 years, EGNOS is now broadening its horizons.
Published: 
27 May 2020

EGNOS, the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service, has been augmenting the GPS signal and providing services to users in Europe since its initial operations back in June 2005. About to celebrate its 15th anniversary, the system is going from strength to strength, with its coverage area set to expand and work towards the next generation EGNOS V3 well underway.

EGNOS is Europe's regional satellite-based augmentation system. It is used to improve the performance of GPS and, with the launch of EGNOS V3, will augment Galileo signals also. EGNOS information improves the accuracy and reliability of GNSS positioning information while also providing a crucial integrity message.

Benefitting numerous markets

The EGNOS programme is managed by the European GNSS Agency (GSA) on behalf of the European Commission. EGNOS service provision is handled by the European Satellite Services Provider (ESSP) under a contract signed with the GSA back in 2013. Based on this, the EGNOS programme currently provides three core services. 

Watch this: EGNOS is growing

The first of these, the Open Service (OS), aims to improve the positioning accuracy by correcting error sources affecting the GPS signals. The EGNOS Safety of Life (SoL) Service provides the most stringent level of signal-in-space performance to all SoL user communities and, finally, the EGNOS Data Access Service (EDAS) (provided via the internet and mobile phones) is aimed at users who require enhanced performance for commercial and professional use.

The provision of EGNOS services is bringing benefits to numerous market segments, including road, rail, maritime, surveying/mapping, and agriculture. EGNOS is particularly important for sectors and applications where accuracy and integrity are critical, such as the aviation sector. But, beyond aviation, EGNOS also improves and extends the scope of GNSS applications such as precision farming, to port and inland waterway navigation, to name but a few.

Set to expand

Currently providing corrections and integrity information in a broad area centred over Europe, the EGNOS coverage area is set to expand. The European Commission has set aside some EUR 8 million from the European Neighbourhood Instrument for the Eastern Partnership countries (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova, Ukraine), allowing Ukraine to benefit from the same EGNOS high-quality services and cutting-edge technology as the EU Member States. 

And this: EGNOS for Aviation

The EGNOS extension to Ukraine will be operational from 2026-27. This extension will allow Eastern Partnership countries to benefit from more accurate positioning and greater safety, in turn contributing to the digitalization and greening of their economies, as well as to the creation of a Single Transport Area for the EU and its Neighbourhood countires. The extension is complementary to the EGNOS extension to the Southern Neighbourhood countries, which is also being financed by the European Commission.

EGNOS V3

Since it took over the management of the EGNOS in 2014, the GSA has started to prepare the complete overhaul of the EGNOS ground segment, which will see the deployment of EGNOS V3 in ground stations at more than 50 sites in Europe and its neighbouring countries.

Within EGNOS V3, the GSA also requested the development of new EGNOS capabilities to support the augmentation of a second GPS signal (L5) and of the Galileo signals E1-E5 to be compatible with the new International Civil Aviation Standards. Another requirement is that the system be made more robust, to deal with users increasing dependence on EGNOS and its multi-modal applications.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Having benefitted users in the EU for 15 years, EGNOS is now broadening its horizons.

EGNOS goes from strength to strength

27.5.2020 9:59  
Having benefitted users in the EU for 15 years, EGNOS is now broadening its horizons.
Published: 
27 May 2020

EGNOS, the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service, has been augmenting the GPS signal and providing services to users in Europe since its initial operations back in June 2005. About to celebrate its 15th anniversary, the system is going from strength to strength, with its coverage area set to expand and work towards the next generation EGNOS V3 well underway.

EGNOS is Europe's regional satellite-based augmentation system. It is used to improve the performance of GPS and, with the launch of EGNOS V3, will augment Galileo signals also. EGNOS information improves the accuracy and reliability of GNSS positioning information while also providing a crucial integrity message.

Benefitting numerous markets

The EGNOS programme is managed by the European GNSS Agency (GSA) on behalf of the European Commission. EGNOS service provision is handled by the European Satellite Services Provider (ESSP) under a contract signed with the GSA back in 2013. Based on this, the EGNOS programme currently provides three core services. 

Watch this: EGNOS is growing

The first of these, the Open Service (OS), aims to improve the positioning accuracy by correcting error sources affecting the GPS signals. The EGNOS Safety of Life (SoL) Service provides the most stringent level of signal-in-space performance to all SoL user communities and, finally, the EGNOS Data Access Service (EDAS) (provided via the internet and mobile phones) is aimed at users who require enhanced performance for commercial and professional use.

The provision of EGNOS services is bringing benefits to numerous market segments, including road, rail, maritime, surveying/mapping, and agriculture. EGNOS is particularly important for sectors and applications where accuracy and integrity are critical, such as the aviation sector. But, beyond aviation, EGNOS also improves and extends the scope of GNSS applications such as precision farming, to port and inland waterway navigation, to name but a few.

Set to expand

Currently providing corrections and integrity information in a broad area centred over Europe, the EGNOS coverage area is set to expand. The European Commission has set aside some EUR 8 million from the European Neighbourhood Instrument for the Eastern Partnership countries (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova, Ukraine), allowing them to benefit from the same EGNOS high-quality services and cutting-edge technology as the EU Member States. 

And this: EGNOS for Aviation

The EGNOS extension to the Eastern Neighbourhood will be operational from 2026-27. This extension will allow Eastern Partnership countries to benefit from more accurate positioning and greater safety, in turn contributing to the digitalization and greening of their economies, as well as to the creation of a Single Transport Area for the EU and its Neighbourhood countires. The extension is complementary to the EGNOS extension to the Southern Neighbourhood countries, which is also being financed by the European Commission.

EGNOS V3

Since it took over the management of the EGNOS in 2014, the GSA has started to prepare the complete overhaul of the EGNOS ground segment, which will see the deployment of EGNOS V3 in ground stations at more than 50 sites in Europe and its neighbouring countries.

Within EGNOS V3, the GSA also requested the development of new EGNOS capabilities to support the augmentation of a second GPS signal (L5) and of the Galileo signals E1-E5 to be compatible with the new International Civil Aviation Standards. Another requirement is that the system be made more robust, to deal with users increasing dependence on EGNOS and its multi-modal applications.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Having benefitted users in the EU for 15 years, EGNOS is now broadening its horizons.

Galileo Masters international kick-off, don’t miss it!

25.5.2020 14:44  
The kick-off will highlight how space data can support human lives, health and development.
Published: 
25 May 2020

This year’s online International Kick-off of the Galileo Masters and Copernicus Masters will take place with a webinar on 26 May highlighting how space data can support human lives, health and development. Don’t miss this opportunity to meet with high-level representatives from both competitions, along with stakeholders from the broader partner community of 121 organisations from 34 countries. Sounds interesting? Register now!

Every year the Galileo Masters and Copernicus Masters International Kick-off brings together representatives from key institutional and industrial players that shape the Galileo and Copernicus Masters – the biggest innovation eco-system of the European Space Programme. 

This year is no different. In particular, the GSA’s Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani and Marta Krywanis-Brzostowska, Head of Downstream R&D in the GSA Market Development Department, will be on hand at the webinar to give tips and guidance. The webinar will take place at 10:30-13:30 (CEST) on 26 May.

Read this: Raw Measurements Workshop: Registration now open!

“The International Kick-off is an ideal opportunity to give impetus to your idea and find advice and help in taking it to the next level. So, if you are an innovator, start-up, SME, researcher, student, developer or just a space enthusiast, we look forward to welcoming you to our online event,” Diani said.

Ready for a challenge?

The 2020 edition of the Galileo Masters opened for submissions back in April and the GSA is sponsoring three challenges in this year’s competition. The Space for Being Safe and Healthy Challenge is looking for solutions that use downstream space data provided by Galileo, EGNOS and/or Copernicus to help stem the spread of COVID-19. Have an idea? Let us hear about it! 

In its Space for Fun Challenge, the GSA is targeting solutions using data from Galileo and EGNOS in the gaming, sports, leisure and tourism markets. Covering a number of market segments, this challenge has a lot of scope for new ideas that need accurate and authenticated positioning information. Have an application in mind? Sign up here!

And this: Galileo for wearables

Finally, the Space for our Planet Challenge, aims to tackle climate change and environmental degradation, which represent an existential threat in Europe and worldwide. Have an idea about how to save the planet? Let us know about it.

We look forward to welcoming you online on 26 May 2020!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The kick-off will highlight how space data can support human lives, health and development.

Harnessing space to save lives at sea

21.5.2020 18:01  
SARA offers improved continuity, usability, coverage and security of SAR drone operations.
Published: 
22 May 2020

The migration crisis in recent years has thrown into focus the fact that current technological solutions are simply not capable of saving the lives of all those who get lost at sea. A number of search and rescue services and other state authorities are increasingly using drones to make surveillance operations more efficient. However, drones usually have very limited flight time which is not sufficient for the needs of SAR services. This is where the SARA project comes in.

The GSA-funded SARA (Search And Rescue Aid using high-accuracy EGNSS) project has developed a turnkey solution for search and rescue (SAR) and surveillance operations based on a semi-autonomous tethered drone. This tethered drone solution offers multiple benefits, not least of which is the extended observation horizon it offers to a rescue mission. What’s more, tethering the drone enables the user to fully concentrate on the mission and significantly extends the drone’s flight time.

High-accuracy GNSS

This is because the drone is tethered using a patented cable through which it receives power. The cable also serves as a secure data link with the mission control. For navigation and control, as well as for target identification and localisation, the SARA solution uses high-accuracy Galileo-enabled GNSS receivers, which provide accuracy at the decimeter level.

Watch this: Sara Final Review

“Search and rescue is a core service of the Galileo programme. By taking advantage of Galileo’s accuracy to assist in rescue operations and help save lives, innovative solutions like those offered by SARA project are at the heart of the GSA’s mission of linking space to user needs,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. 

Thanks to Galileo, the solution is able to navigate in circumstances where both the drone and the boat are moving and the drone automatically follows the boat. During an operation, the power cable should not be stretched to the extent that it threatens the integrity of the cable or the safety of the drone. To avoid this, the drone needs to be able to adjust its position in real-time relative to the vessel. It can do this thanks to the high level of accuracy offered by Galileo.

In addition to its two high-accuracy Galileo GNSS receivers, the system is composed of a multi-copter drone equipped with two interchangeable payloads with high resolution cameras and thermal infrared for night vision. It also consists of a HANGAR ground station tailored for tethered search and rescue and continuous surveillance operations, along with a user terminal installed on the vessel or surveillance vehicle.

24-hour solution

Detection of people lost in the sea is particularly difficult during the hours of darkness. Thanks to its thermal infrared vision, the SARA solution can effectively support rescuers operating at night. The solution has been tested in these conditions, and people lost at sea have been detected up to 700 meters away, while a meter-long boat has been detected at a distance of 12 km. The system also uses data from EU’s Earth observation programme Copernicus in a semi-automatic methodology for vessel detection.

Read this: SARA scores at football match

The SARA system offers a remote eye installed on board of a ship, a car or any other moving vehicle. As such, it has many other use-cases outside of SAR, such as border control and monitoring and surveillance. This is confirmed by the fact that stakeholders such as Italy’s National Institute for Oceanography and Applied Geophysics (OGS) have expressed interest in using the SARA system to increase safety on icebreakers.

Given the benefits that SARA offers, the sales forecasts are encouraging, driven by the large number of enthusiastic users that were presented with the solution during the project. This, in addition to promising economic forecasts, with payback projected to be reached in the fourth year of operation, means that the future for SARA looks bright.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

SARA offers improved continuity, usability, coverage and security of SAR drone operations.

Raw Measurements Workshop: Registration now open!

14.5.2020 11:22  

Raw Measurements Workshop: Registration now open!

Registration is now open for the fourth GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop, which will take place on 27 and 28 May 2020. Participants in the event, which will be held online due to the current lockdown restrictions in place around Europe, will gain access to Task Force members’ experience and learn about progress around the use of raw measurements in Android devices. Interested? Register here!

The aim of the GSA’s Raw Measurements Task Force is to bridge the knowledge gap between raw measurement users. The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshops are a key element in this effort, providing a forum for stakeholders to share experience and knowledge around raw measurements use.

A full agenda

On the first day, 27 of May, following a welcome address from the GSA’s Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani, the opening session of the workshop will include a keynote presentation from Google`s Frank Van Diggelen and an overview of opportunities for Android developers from Justyna Redelkiewicz Musial, who is in charge of LBS and IoT market development at the GSA. Xurxo Otero from the European Space Agency will also be on hand to talk about testing of dual-frequency chipsets.

Read this: Hackers take on Raw Galileo challenge

“Using GNSS raw measurements in Android devices brings many benefits to users in terms of accuracy, and provides access to more advanced processing techniques. The workshop is an excellent opportunity to share knowledge around raw measurement use and ensure that the widest possible community of users enjoy these benefits,” Diani said.

The second session during the first day of the workshop will deal with Galileo differentiators when working with GNSS raw measurements. As an example, there will be a presentation from Carlo Sarto from Qascom focusing in detail on OS-NMA in smartphones. On 28 of May, starting again at 15:00 in the afternoon, the agenda will be fully dedicated to presentations from Task Force members, targeting their innovative work using raw measurements. For the full agenda, click here.

And this: Latest updates to Reports on User Needs and Requirements released

Join the Task Force

The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force is dedicated to promoting a better and wider use of GNSS raw measurements. 

Since its launch in 2017, the Task Force has expanded from a handful of experts to a community of over 100 agencies, universities, research institutes and companies. Membership is open to anybody interested in GNSS raw measurements. To join the Task Force contact: market@gsa.europa.eu .

 

 

Registration is now open for the fourth GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop, which will take place on 27 and 28 May 2020. Participants in the event, which will be held online due to the current lockdown restrictions in place around Europe, will gain access to Task Force members’ experience and learn about progress around the use of raw measurements in Android devices. Interested? Register here!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Raw Measurements Workshop: Registration now open!

14.5.2020 11:22  
The Task Force Workshop brings stakeholders together to discuss experience around raw measurement use.
Published: 
14 May 2020

Registration is now open for the fourth GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop, which will take place on 27 and 28 May 2020. Participants in the event, which will be held online due to the current lockdown restrictions in place around Europe, will gain access to Task Force members’ experience and learn about progress around the use of raw measurements in Android devices. Interested? Register here

The aim of the GSA’s Raw Measurements Task Force is to bridge the knowledge gap between raw measurement users. The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshops are a key element in this effort, providing a forum for stakeholders to share experience and knowledge around raw measurements use.

A full agenda

On the first day, 27 of May, following a welcome address from the GSA’s Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani, the opening session of the workshop will include a keynote presentation from Google`s Frank Van Diggelen and an overview of opportunities for Android developers from Justyna Redelkiewicz Musial, who is in charge of LBS and IoT market development at the GSA. Xurxo Otero from the European Space Agency will also be on hand to talk about testing of dual-frequency chipsets.

Read this: Hackers take on Raw Galileo challenge

“Using GNSS raw measurements in Android devices brings many benefits to users in terms of accuracy, and provides access to more advanced processing techniques. The workshop is an excellent opportunity to share knowledge around raw measurement use and ensure that the widest possible community of users enjoy these benefits,” Diani said.

The second session during the first day of the workshop will deal with Galileo differentiators when working with GNSS raw measurements. As an example, there will be a presentation from Carlo Sarto from Qascom focusing in detail on OS-NMA in smartphones. On 28 of May, starting again at 15:00 in the afternoon, the agenda will be fully dedicated to presentations from Task Force members, targeting their innovative work using raw measurements. For the full agenda, click here.

And this: Latest updates to Reports on User Needs and Requirements released

Join the Task Force

The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force is dedicated to promoting a better and wider use of GNSS raw measurements. 

Since its launch in 2017, the Task Force has expanded from a handful of experts to a community of over 100 agencies, universities, research institutes and companies. Membership is open to anybody interested in GNSS raw measurements. To join the Task Force contact: market@gsa.europa.eu .

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The Task Force Workshop brings stakeholders together to discuss experience around raw measurement use.

Raw Measurements Workshop: Registration now open!

14.5.2020 11:22  
The GNSS Task Force Workshop brings stakeholders together to discuss experience around raw measurement use.
Published: 
14 May 2020

Registration is now open for the fourth GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop, which will take place on 27 and 28 May 2020. Participants in the event, which will be held online due to the current lockdown restrictions in place around Europe, will gain access to Task Force members’ experience and learn about progress around the use of raw measurements in Android devices. Interested? Register here

The aim of the GSA’s Raw Measurements Task Force is to bridge the knowledge gap between raw measurement users. The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshops are a key element in this effort, providing a forum for stakeholders to share experience and knowledge around raw measurements use.

A full agenda

On the first day, 27 of May, following a welcome address from the GSA’s Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani, the opening session of the workshop will include a keynote presentation from Google`s Frank Van Diggelen and an overview of opportunities for Android developers from Justyna Redelkiewicz Musial, who is in charge of LBS and IoT market development at the GSA. Xurxo Otero from the European Space Agency will also be on hand to talk about testing of dual-frequency chipsets.

Read this: Hackers take on Raw Galileo challenge

“Using GNSS raw measurements in Android devices brings many benefits to users in terms of accuracy, and provides access to more advanced processing techniques. The workshop is an excellent opportunity to share knowledge around raw measurement use and ensure that the widest possible community of users enjoy these benefits,” Diani said.

The second session during the first day of the workshop will deal with Galileo differentiators when working with GNSS raw measurements. As an example, there will be a presentation from Carlo Sarto from Qascom focusing in detail on OS-NMA in smartphones. On 28 of May, starting again at 15:00 in the afternoon, the agenda will be fully dedicated to presentations from Task Force members, targeting their innovative work using raw measurements. For the full agenda, click here.

And this: Latest updates to Reports on User Needs and Requirements released

Join the Task Force

The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force is dedicated to promoting a better and wider use of GNSS raw measurements. 

Since its launch in 2017, the Task Force has expanded from a handful of experts to a community of over 100 agencies, universities, research institutes and companies. Membership is open to anybody interested in GNSS raw measurements. To join the Task Force contact: market@gsa.europa.eu .

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GNSS Task Force Workshop brings stakeholders together to discuss experience around raw measurement use.

Raw Measurements Workshop: Registration now open!

14.5.2020 11:22  
The GNSS Task Force Workshop brings stakeholders together to discuss experience around raw measurement use.
Published: 
14 May 2020

Registration is now open for the fourth GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop, which will take place on 27 and 28 May 2020. Participants in the event, which will be held online due to the current lockdown restrictions in place around Europe, will gain access to Task Force members’ experience and learn about progress around the use of raw measurements in Android devices. Interested? Register here

The aim of the GSA’s Raw Measurements Task Force is to bridge the knowledge gap between raw measurement users. The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshops are a key element in this effort, providing a forum for stakeholders to share experience and knowledge around raw measurements use.

A full agenda

On the first day, 27 of May, following a welcome address from the GSA’s Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani, the opening session of the workshop will include a keynote presentation from Google`s Frank Van Diggelen and an overview of opportunities for Android developers from Justyna Redelkiewicz Musial, who is in charge of LBS and IoT market development at the GSA. Xurxo Otero from the European Space Agency will also be on hand to talk about testing of dual-frequency chipsets.

Read this: Hackers take on Raw Galileo challenge

“Using GNSS raw measurements in Android devices brings many benefits to users in terms of accuracy, and provides access to more advanced processing techniques. The workshop is an excellent opportunity to share knowledge around raw measurement use and ensure that the widest possible community of users enjoy these benefits,” Diani said.

The second session during the first day of the workshop will deal with Galileo differentiators when working with GNSS raw measurements. As an example, there will be a presentation from Carlo Sarto from Qascom focusing in detail on OS-NMA in smartphones. On 28 of May, starting again at 15:00 in the afternoon, the agenda will be fully dedicated to presentations from Task Force members, targeting their innovative work using raw measurements. For the full agenda, click here.

And this: Latest updates to Reports on User Needs and Requirements released

Join the Task Force

The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force is dedicated to promoting a better and wider use of GNSS raw measurements. 

Since its launch in 2017, the Task Force has expanded from a handful of experts to a community of over 100 agencies, universities, research institutes and companies. Membership is open to anybody interested in GNSS raw measurements. To join the Task Force contact: market@gsa.europa.eu .

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GNSS Task Force Workshop brings stakeholders together to discuss experience around raw measurement use.

Raw Measurements Workshop: Registration now open!

14.5.2020 11:22  
The GNSS Task Force Workshop brings stakeholders together to discuss experience around raw measurement use.
Published: 
14 May 2020

Registration is now open for the fourth GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop, which will take place on 27 and 28 May 2020. Participants in the event, which will be held online due to the current lockdown restrictions in place around Europe, will gain access to Task Force members’ experience and learn about progress around the use of raw measurements in Android devices. Interested? Register here

The aim of the GSA’s Raw Measurements Task Force is to bridge the knowledge gap between raw measurement users. The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshops are a key element in this effort, providing a forum for stakeholders to share experience and knowledge around raw measurements use.

A full agenda

On the first day, 27 of May, following a welcome address from the GSA’s Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani, the opening session of the workshop will include a keynote presentation from Google`s Frank Van Diggelen and an overview of opportunities for Android developers from Justyna Redelkiewicz Musial, who is in charge of LBS and IoT market development at the GSA. Xurxo Otero from the European Space Agency will also be on hand to talk about testing of dual-frequency chipsets.

Read this: Hackers take on Raw Galileo challenge

“Using GNSS raw measurements in Android devices brings many benefits to users in terms of accuracy, and provides access to more advanced processing techniques. The workshop is an excellent opportunity to share knowledge around raw measurement use and ensure that the widest possible community of users enjoy these benefits,” Diani said.

The second session during the first day of the workshop will deal with Galileo differentiators when working with GNSS raw measurements. As an example, there will be a presentation from Carlo Sarto from Qascom focusing in detail on OS-NMA in smartphones. On 28 of May, starting again at 15:00 CET in the afternoon, the agenda will be fully dedicated to presentations from Task Force members, targeting their innovative work using raw measurements. For the full agenda, click here.

And this: Latest updates to Reports on User Needs and Requirements released

Join the Task Force

The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force is dedicated to promoting a better and wider use of GNSS raw measurements. 

Since its launch in 2017, the Task Force has expanded from a handful of experts to a community of over 100 agencies, universities, research institutes and companies. Membership is open to anybody interested in GNSS raw measurements. To join the Task Force contact: market@gsa.europa.eu .

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GNSS Task Force Workshop brings stakeholders together to discuss experience around raw measurement use.

Galileo in high latitudes and harsh environments: a success story

13.5.2020 15:07  
Forestry surveyor at work
Published: 
13 May 2020

Access to the Galileo signal in a multi-constellation environment is providing benefits and opportunities for businesses, thanks to the enhanced performance and increased accuracy on offer. Here we look at the experience of one GIS technology company in northern Europe that has been leveraging Galileo to increase the positioning accuracy of its solutions.

Use of a Galileo-enabled receiver significantly increases the number of satellites in view. This, in turn, considerably reduces the time needed to obtain a position with centimetre-level accuracy, compared to the performance from single-constellation receivers. Businesses have been eager to incorporate these performance gains into their solutions and pass the benefits on to their customers.

Swedish geographical information technology company SCIOR Geomanagement AB makes use of various technologies, such as drone aerial photography, terrestrial laser scanning, GNSS, or various combinations of these, in its equipment. 

As a producer of measurement technology, SCIOR is well aware of the benefits of RTK processing techniques and incorporates this approach to obtain faster and more accurate positions. However, the company also uses Galileo-enabled receivers to increase the positioning accuracy of its solutions even further.

Centimetre-level accuracy

According to the company’s findings, which it presented at the last Intergeo conference in Stuttgart, it has been achieving significantly enhanced performance and other benefits in its day to day activities from the use of Galileo-enabled equipment

“Our experience with Galileo has shown an improvement in the density of the constellation of visible satellites, and thus an improvement in the time needed to obtain centimetre-level accuracy. From my personal point of view, I would recommend using this constellation in combination with the other existing ones, since it provides you with a better and quicker performance,” said Javier Corral, an engineer at SCIOR Geomanagement AB.

The most significant performance improvements are observed at high latitudes and within forest environments. Even taking into account that better results can be obtained in open spaces, using multi-constellation GNSS with Galileo in the woods is sometimes the only way to obtain a satisfactory performance if there is no reference station close enough.

Good indicator

SCIOR’s testimonial about the benefits of using Galileo in high latitudes and harsh environments serves as a good indicator for other companies working in similar environments. Moreover, performance will be even better in coming years as the number of Galileo satellites increases to reach Full Operation Capability (FOC), allowing users to obtain their desired position accuracy and availability in a shorter period of time.

In the meantime, to continue harnessing the benefits of Galileo and multi-constellation users can register at the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) or contact the GSC Helpdesk at: www.gsc-europa.eu/helpdesk .

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Forestry surveyor at work

Galileo in high altitudes and harsh environments: a success story

13.5.2020 15:07  
Forestry surveyor at work
Published: 
13 May 2020

Access to the Galileo signal in a multi-constellation environment is providing benefits and opportunities for businesses, thanks to the enhanced performance and increased accuracy on offer. Here we look at the experience of one GIS technology company in northern Europe that has been leveraging Galileo to increase the positioning accuracy of its solutions.

Use of a Galileo-enabled receiver significantly increases the number of satellites in view. This, in turn, considerably reduces the time needed to obtain a position with centimetre-level accuracy, compared to the performance from single-constellation receivers. Businesses have been eager to incorporate these performance gains into their solutions and pass the benefits on to their customers.

Swedish geographical information technology company SCIOR Geomanagement AB makes use of various technologies, such as drone aerial photography, terrestrial laser scanning, GNSS, or various combinations of these, in its equipment. 

As a producer of measurement technology, SCIOR is well aware of the benefits of RTK processing techniques and incorporates this approach to obtain faster and more accurate positions. However, the company also uses Galileo-enabled receivers to increase the positioning accuracy of its solutions even further.

Centimetre-level accuracy

According to the company’s findings, which it presented at the last Intergeo conference in Stuttgart, it has been achieving significantly enhanced performance and other benefits in its day to day activities from the use of Galileo-enabled equipment

“Our experience with Galileo has shown an improvement in the density of the constellation of visible satellites, and thus an improvement in the time needed to obtain centimetre-level accuracy. From my personal point of view, I would recommend using this constellation in combination with the other existing ones, since it provides you with a better and quicker performance,” said Javier Corral, an engineer at SCIOR Geomanagement AB.

The most significant performance improvements are observed at high latitudes and within forest environments. Even taking into account that better results can be obtained in open spaces, using multi-constellation GNSS with Galileo in the woods is sometimes the only way to obtain a satisfactory performance if there is no reference station close enough.

Good indicator

SCIOR’s testimonial about the benefits of using Galileo in high altitudes and harsh environments serves as a good indicator for other companies working in similar environments. Moreover, performance will be even better in coming years as the number of Galileo satellites increases to reach Full Operation Capability (FOC), allowing users to obtain their desired position accuracy and availability in a shorter period of time.

In the meantime, to continue harnessing the benefits of Galileo and multi-constellation users can register at the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) or contact the GSC Helpdesk at: www.gsc-europa.eu/helpdesk .

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Forestry surveyor at work

EU Space growing #strongertogether: Happy Europe Day

7.5.2020 16:57  
The EU space programme is helping to support many of the EU’s key policies and goals
Published: 
08 May 2020

As the European Union celebrates Europe Day on May 9, we take a look at how the EU space programmes, themselves a result of European cooperation, are helping the European Union achieve concrete goals of a more united and prosperous Europe.

Europe Day 2020 marks the 70th anniversary of the signing of the Schuman Declaration in 1950, which laid out a blueprint for the creation of a new era of peace and prosperity in Europe. The European Union that grew out of this Declaration has among its key goals to promote scientific and technological progress and enhance economic, social and territorial cohesion in Europe. Space is playing a key role in reaching these goals.

By working at European level to deliver benefits to all Europeans, the Galileo programme embodies the EU spirit. Made possible by cooperation between the EU Member States, it is civilian in nature – its core aim is to benefit EU citizens - and free of charge. It is also 100% European and guarantees EU independence in satellite navigation.

Space at the forefront

Galileo, along with the other components of the European Space Programme EGNOS and Copernicus, is at the forefront of scientific and technological innovation in Europe. These programmes are making a core contribution to growth in the European economy, through job and revenue creation and the provision of services that have a positive impact on people’s lives. In total, the space programmes account for the creation of an estimated 250,000 jobs in Europe.

Read this: Galileo Green Lane, easing pressure at the EU’s internal borders

Satellites and the location-based and Earth-observation services that they enable, are transforming the way we live and work. Space technology is driving innovation in almost all sectors of the European economy. From agriculture and transport to healthcare, space technology is underpinning technological progress. A current example, with consequences for transport, healthcare and the economy as a whole, is the “Galileo Green Lane” app.

Developed by the European GNSS Agency (GSA), in collaboration with the European Commission, the “Galileo Green Lane” mobile solution is part of the EU response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The app uses Galileo positioning to facilitate the free movement of freight, reduce waiting times at the EU’s internal land borders and prioritise the transport of essential goods. In so doing, it supports a fundamental principle of the EU internal market - the free movements of goods and freight.

Solutions for citizens

Galileo Green Lane is one of a range of space-based solutions that are being used to fight the COVID-19 pandemic. The GSA is compiling a repository of these solutions emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand current needs and available resources.

And this: Looking to space for solutions on Earth Day

In other areas too, the European space programmes are at the cutting-edge of innovation. In autonomous transport Galileo is supporting the development of new solutions, such as the ESCAPE GNSS engine (EGE), which was successfully tested in France at the end of last year, bringing autonomous driving one step closer. 

From Galileo-enabled Search and Rescue and eCall, which are helping to save lives, to EGNOS-enabled precision farming, which is reducing the environmental footprint of the European agricultural sector, space is helping to make Europe safer, cleaner, and more prosperous. Earth observation is also a key tool in the EU’s efforts towards a better Europe, supporting environmental and climate objectives, for example, and helping to maintain the security of the EU’s external borders.

Watch this: Happy Europe Day

As stated in the Schuman Declaration: “Europe will be built through concrete achievements which first create a de facto solidarity.” So, on Europe Day, the GSA joins with all Europeans in celebrating European unity. The Agency, with its 200 staff from 21 different countries, remains committed to its core principle of leveraging space to meet the needs of European citizens, both during the current crisis and into the future.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The EU space programme is helping to support many of the EU’s key policies and goals

Working with Android GNSS raw measurements? GSA wants to hear from you!

27.4.2020 12:53  
This year’s GNSS Raw Measurements Taskforce Workshop will be held online on May 28
Published: 
27 April 2020

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) has launched two calls for papers ahead of its GNSS Raw Measurements Taskforce Workshop, to be held online on 28 May 2020. The first of these calls targets innovative work using raw measurements while the second is related to testing EGNOS Data Access Service (EDAS) corrections in smartphones. If you are working on innovative solutions in these areas, we want to hear from you! 

In its call for papers related to innovative work using raw measurements, the GSA is particularly interested in recent work using GNSS raw measurements in the field of high accuracy, robustness, testing or monitoring. However, other work in these fields beyond the use of raw measurements is also of interest. Proposals in this call should be submitted by 6 May. 

Sharing experience

“There are several advantages to using GNSS raw measurements in smartphones, including greater accuracy and flexibility when building multi-GNSS solutions. The GNSS Raw Measurements Taskforce Workshop is an excellent opportunity to share experience around these solutions,” said GSA Market Development Innovation Officer Martin Šunkevič. “I am looking forward to a very lively exchange that will benefit all the participants,” he said.

In the EDAS corrections in smartphones call, papers should assess the added value in terms of position accuracy that could be obtained by applying one of the EDAS real-time correction streams (EGNOS augmentation message, DGNSS corrections) to the GNSS raw data collected from a smartphone. 

Read this: Hackers take on Raw Galileo challenge

The paper could compare the solution obtained after applying the selected EDAS-based corrections with other potential positioning techniques, for example standalone DFMC, PPP, or others, while using the raw measurements from the available smartphone(s) as input. If possible, static and dynamic scenarios should be tested in different environments (e.g. open sky, rural or urban environments). Please submit your proposals by 13 May. 

Proposals, in the form of an abstract (maximum one page in length) should be sent to martin.sunkevic@gsa.europa.eu, clearly indicating the name of the call. In the event that too many proposals are received, the GSA reserves the right to choose the proposals to be presented at the workshop.

Some background information

The May workshop will be the fourth annual GNSS Raw Measurements Taskforce Workshop organised by the GSA. This year’s event, which will be held online due to the current lockdown restrictions in place around Europe, will aim to share Task Force members’ experience and progress around the use of raw measurements within Android devices. The agenda and registration for the online event will be announced in the coming days, so stay tuned!

With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to smartphone users. In June the following year, the GSA launched a GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force to share knowledge and expertise on Android raw measurements and their use, including their potential for robustness and high accuracy positioning techniques relevant to mass market applications.

EDAS is the EGNOS internet broadcast service, which provides free of charge access to EGNOS data. For more information, take a look at the EDAS Service Definition Document (SDD), the EDAS section on the EGNOS User Support site, the EGNOS Monthly Performance Report, and the EDAS coverage map with the expected geographical coverage for the supported positioning techniques. If you still have questions, you can contact: edas-support@essp-sas.eu.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

This year’s GNSS Raw Measurements Taskforce Workshop will be held online on May 28

Working with Android GNSS raw measurements? GSA wants to hear from you!

27.4.2020 12:53  
This year’s GNSS Raw Measurements Taskforce Workshop will be held online on May 28
Published: 
27 April 2020

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) has launched two calls for papers ahead of its GNSS Raw Measurements Taskforce Workshop, to be held online on 28 May 2020. The first of these calls targets innovative work using raw measurements while the second is related to testing EGNOS Data Access Service (EDAS) corrections in smartphones. If you are working on innovative solutions in these areas, we want to hear from you! 

In its call for papers related to innovative work using raw measurements, the GSA is particularly interested in recent work using GNSS raw measurements in the field of high accuracy, robustness, testing or monitoring. However, other work in these fields beyond the use of raw measurements is also of interest. Proposals in this call should be submitted by 6 May. 

Sharing experience

“There are several advantages to using GNSS raw measurements in smartphones, including greater accuracy and flexibility when building multi-GNSS solutions. The GNSS Raw Measurements Taskforce Workshop is an excellent opportunity to share experience around these solutions,” said GSA Market Development Innovation Officer Martin Šunkevič. “I am looking forward to a very lively exchange that will benefit all the participants,” he said.

In the EDAS corrections in smartphones call, papers should assess the added value in terms of position accuracy that could be obtained by applying one of the EDAS real-time correction streams (EGNOS augmentation message, DGNSS corrections) to the GNSS raw data collected from a smartphone. 

Read this: Hackers take on Raw Galileo challenge

The paper could compare the solution obtained after applying the selected EDAS-based corrections with other potential positioning techniques, for example standalone DFMC, PPP, or others, while using the raw measurements from the available smartphone(s) as input. If possible, static and dynamic scenarios should be tested in different environments (e.g. open sky, rural or urban environments). Please submit your proposals by 13 May. 

Proposals, in the form of an abstract (maximum one page in length) should be sent to martin.sunkevic@gsa.europa.eu, clearly indicating the name of the call. In the event that too many proposals are received, the GSA reserves the right to choose the proposals to be presented at the workshop.

Some background information

The May workshop will be the fourth annual GNSS Raw Measurements Taskforce Workshop organised by the GSA. This year’s event, which will be held online due to the current lockdown restrictions in place around Europe, will aim to share Task Force members’ experience and progress around the use of raw measurements within Android devices. The agenda and registration for the online event will be announced in the coming days, so stay tuned!

With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to smartphone users. In June the following year, the GSA launched a GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force to share knowledge and expertise on Android raw measurements and their use, including their potential for robustness and high accuracy positioning techniques relevant to mass market applications.

EDAS is the EGNOS internet broadcast service, which provides free of charge access to EGNOS data. For more information, take a look at the EDAS Service Definition Document (SDD), the EDAS section on the EGNOS User Support site, the EGNOS Monthly Performance Report, and the EDAS coverage map with the expected geographical coverage for the supported positioning techniques. If you still have questions, you can contact: EGNOS-Helpdesk@essp-sas.eu

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

This year’s GNSS Raw Measurements Taskforce Workshop will be held online on May 28

Galileo Green Lane, easing pressure at the EU’s internal borders

23.4.2020 18:28  
Galileo Green Lane will help reduce freight bottlenecks at EU borders
Published: 
24 April 2020

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is working together with the European Commission (EC) on an app to facilitate the movement of goods and freight within the EU in support of the COVID-19 pandemic response. The “Galileo Green Lane” app will ease the flow of freight through borders and enable the efficient transit of critical goods.

The COVID-19 outbreak represents a serious threat not only to public health, but also to the European economy. Lockdowns and other restrictive measures that are necessary to save lives also severely slow down the economy and may delay the transport of goods and services. 

With a view to ensuring the uninterrupted transport of critical goods across the EU’s internal land borders, the GSA and the Commission are working on the “Galileo Green Lane” app – a solution to monitor and facilitate freight traffic and reduce waiting times at Green Lane border crossings

“At the GSA, one of our key roles is to promote the use of Galileo and to address the economic and societal challenges that Europe faces. The European Commission´s Galileo Green Lane initiative fits this profile exactly,” said Pascal Claudel, Acting Executive Director at the GSA. “By supporting a solution that eases the transport of critical goods across borders, Galileo is making its contribution to help reduce the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on the EU’s economy and its citizens,” he said.

Real-time visualisation

The app will have two interfaces. The first is for border control authorities and provides a real-time visualisation of the overall border situation between a country and its neighbours. In turn, border officials can contribute information to the system by regularly feeding updates into the app on the traffic flow and waiting times at their borders. At the same time, the app will provide Member States with a website, generating reports automatically to demonstrate compliance to the EU on the Green Lanes implementation.

Read this: Calling for GNSS apps supporting the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

The app will also feature a user interface providing drivers with a real-time visualisation of borders of interest to them, through an EU-wide map indicating Green Lane border crossing times. When drivers enter a geo-fenced area within a specified distance to a border, they can receive a notification produced by the border officers on the situation at that border. 

Their location is collected anonymously only when they are approaching the border and it is solely used to update the overall border picture. Crowdsourced information from different sources is aggregated, including data from the leading European real-time visibility platform Sixfold.

Current status

Experts from the EC Joint Research Centre (JRC) are supporting the design of the geofencing algorithm, while the GSA is currently coordinating the project with operational units at the Commission’s Directorate-General for Defence Industry and Space (DG DEFIS) and with the Directorate-General for Mobility and Transport (DG MOVE) regarding needs linked to the Green Lanes. The app was also presented to the border authorities of the Member States at a meeting at the Directorate-General for Migration and Home Affairs (DG HOME) at which they were invited to contribute with user needs and to volunteer for the pilot. 

The app is already in its final development stage and the GSA has started to reach out to EU Member States that wish to pilot the app and work together to define case scenarios and fine-tune the technical solution. Talks are currently underway with border authorities in France, Romania, Hungary, Italy and the Czech Republic. 

The first pilot is starting next week in some selected border points and a simultaneous activity for drivers will be launched very soon with key transport companies from the International Road Union (IRU).

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Galileo Green Lane will help reduce freight bottlenecks at EU borders

Looking to space for solutions on Earth Day

22.4.2020 12:09  
Space technologies are a key asset in the fight for a greener, more sustainable planet.
Published: 
22 April 2020

Earth Day is celebrated around the world on April 22. Since its early days back in the seventies, Earth Day has striven to build the world’s largest environmental movement to drive transformative change for people and the planet. As an engine of this transformative change, space tech supports the goals of Earth Day by enabling innovative solutions that promote sustainable economic growth that is decoupled from resource use.

The world is faced with an existential threat brought about by growing demand for resources on one hand, and climate change and environmental degradation on the other. To effectively deal with this challenge, innovative solutions are needed to make the global economy more sustainable, boost the efficient use of resources, restore biodiversity and cut pollution.

Satellite technologies – both GNSS positioning and Earth observation – are already contributing to increased efficiency and reduced environmental impact in a number of core sectors of the economy. On Earth Day, we take a look at how these space solutions and applications are playing an increasingly important role in creating a more sustainable planet. 

From Farm to Fork

The agriculture sector has been an enthusiastic early adopter of satellite technology and now over 90% of tractors in the EU are already EGNOS-enabled. The benefits in terms of greening EU agriculture are clear. Satellite-enabled precision farming allows farmers to save fuel by avoiding overlaps in field cultivation. They can also reduce pesticide and fertiliser use thanks to more targeted application. One example of a solution that leverages EGNSS (Galileo and EGNOS) to improve agricultural performance is Tractor Navigator, a prize-winner at last year’s MyGalileoApp competition.

Watch this: European Satellites for Agriculture

By providing data on soil condition, drought, crop development and other conditions on the farm, Earth observation satellites also enable farmers to make more informed decisions. Using this data, farmers can plan where and when to irrigate, or how much fertilizer to apply, for example. Satellite images can also be used as a tool to predict agricultural output, which can be critical in anticipating crop failures and mitigating the effects of food shortages. Satellites also provide data on air quality and atmospheric composition, making it possible to monitor emissions of CO2, NOx and other greenhouse gasses. As such, Earth observation is a key tool in global efforts to monitor and mitigate the effects of climate change.

GNSS and greener transport

But it is not just on the farm that space tech is driving green innovation. On our roads too, GNSS also plays a role in many of the disruptive and innovative trends and apps that are making passenger and freight transport more sustainable - from drone deliveries to Mobility as a Service (MaaS). Satellite-based navigation generally makes life on the road easier – it significantly reduces congestion and, as a result, the carbon footprint of the road sector is significantly diminished. 

Ride-sharing and other sustainable mobility solutions all rely on precise positioning. In one example, the Galileo 4 Mobility project is leveraging Galileo for MaaS by identifying the geolocation needs of various stakeholders and is demonstrating the benefits of Galileo through pilot demonstrators of shared mobility services. 

And this: EGNOS for Aviation - High Precision, Low investment

In the air too EGNSS, in particular EGNOS, is helping to make flying cleaner and more accessible. EGNOS-enabled procedures at airports result in fewer aborted landings. This in turn means significant fuel savings for airlines, which has a corresponding impact on carbon emissions in the sector. 

Sustainable energy

Space technologies are also playing a major role in the area of sustainable energy, with both Earth observation and GNSS positioning supporting applications and services in the sector. In one such case, the Horizon 2020-funded EASY PV project uses GNSS to help photovoltaic (PV) field owners to boost energy production. Another project, LARA, is using state-of-the-art GNSS technologies and interactive computer graphics to allow utility workers to ‘see’ 3D models of underground water, gas and electric grids without digging, thereby significantly increasing the efficiency of network maintenance. 

Earth observation also makes a major contribution to improved sustainability in the energy sector, by providing information related to weather (wind, solar and hydro) and energy (capacity factors, demand, volatility) forecasts at a regional and national level in Europe. This allows energy providers and policy-makers to make informed choices on the future energy mix. 

Sustainability is one of the critical challenges of our times – sustainability of consumption, sustainability of transport and sustainability of the energy that we use to heat our homes and power our economies. Space tech – EGNSS and Earth observation – is making an increasingly important contribution to achieving sustainability targets in these areas and, as such, is a key asset in Europe’s environmental toolbox.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Space technologies are a key asset in the fight for a greener, more sustainable planet.

Galileo for wearables

16.4.2020 11:20  
Wearables are the second most sold GNSS devices, after smartphones
Published: 
16 April 2020

Galileo delivers more accurate and reliable positioning information to our mobile devices, including wearables. Used in fitness- and health-related, and other applications, GNSS-enabled wearables are contributing significantly to continued growth in the mobile services arena.

With Galileo, wearable GNSS location devices are more accurate and reliable, particularly in urban environments where narrow streets and tall buildings often block satellite signals and limit the usefulness of mobile services. GNSS-enabled wearables comprise mainly wrist-worn devices, often used in fitness-related applications, for doing things like tracking routes and calculating average speed, for runners, hikers or cyclists. But wearables also include personal trackers, for children, and for elderly people who may have health issues, and even for pets.

Find out if your device is Galileo-enabled here

Entertainment-related applications are appearing in greater numbers as well, based on e-glasses and other miniature, wearable 'infotainment' platforms. A smaller and more specialized market for complex, high-tech wearables is also gaining ground. In the fire-fighting sector, for example, new clothing features embedded sensors for monitoring dangerous gases, temperature, humidity, and wearers' physiological responses, all combined with precision GNSS-based tracking.

Increasing interest

According to the GSA Market Report, fitness wearables represent the largest segment of the wearables market, reaching EUR 13 billion in 2018, and are expected to reach 5.2% annual growth through 2023. Multi-GNSS, combining Galileo, GPS, GLONASS and/or BeiDou, is being leveraged by market leaders to provide more robust and more precise location and navigation information for wearable device users.

In recent years, new types of wearable devices have appeared on the market. Smart e-glasses enable easy, intuitive recording and storage of location-stamped videos and photos, in combination with advanced, augmented reality features and affordable prices. Professional sport and entertainment-related applications are now seen as very promising domains for such devices.

Watch this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Meanwhile, Galileo dual-frequency and high accuracy capabilities are rapidly gaining traction in the smartphones market. “New software and apps are providing endless opportunities to serve the smartphone mass market, and of course this is also true for wearable devices, ” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “Following smartphones, wearables have become the second most sold GNSS devices.”

The so-called 'silver economy', encompassing the senior community, is a key driver of growth in the area of health-related solutions, but there is also a trend towards 'democratisation' of sports and fitness for all ages.

Some unique challenges for the segment remain, including antenna-related issues and power supply,  which are the focus of intense activity on the part of developers, many of whom work under EU-funded research grants.

Now, big growth

After a slow start, wearables are today boosting the GNSS market significantly. Indeed, the new generation of smartphones is adopting new flexible designs that in some cases imitate wearable features. The foldable smartphone concept, first unveiled by Samsung and followed by brands such as Huawei and Xiaomi, is a case in point.

According to Statista, the number of connected wearable devices worldwide has more than doubled in the space of three years, increasing from 325 million in 2016 to 722 million in 2019, and the number of devices is expected to reach more than one billion by 2022. Key device integrators and vendors in the wearables market include Apple, Citizen, FitBit, Garmin, Microsoft, Polar, Suunto, Samsung, Timex, Xiaomi and Amer Sports. They understand that while smartphone shipments are maturing, the wearables markets is still on the upturn.

Read also : Galileo Masters now open

Consumers can now access an increasing number of smartphone services and apps via new interfaces, including GNSS-enabled wearables. The number and type of applications that can benefit from unique Galileo differentiators are limited only by the imagination. Indeed, a multitude of such applications, tailor-made to satisfy a wide variety of needs, are already in use.

Combining technologies such as GNSS, 5G, and IoT, any physical device, including wearables, can host new applications to facilitate end users' day-to-day lives. Artificial Intelligence (AI) increasingly provides an additional layer of sophistication. Finally, in the near future, indeed as we speak, augmented reality applications are bringing the virtual to the real world. "With enhanced Galileo-enabled performance, we are helping to improve the user experience, and we are ensuring that GNSS wearables are here to stay," Diani said.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Wearables are the second most sold GNSS devices, after smartphones

Maintaining EGNSS operations and security in challenging times: the GSA response

8.4.2020 12:34  
Supporting ongoing operations, security and staff health are priorities for the GSA.
Published: 
08 April 2020

The coronavirus pandemic has had an impact on organisations, businesses, individuals and their families. As one of the few European Agencies delivering services 24/7, and with centres spread across Europe, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) has put various measures into place to ensure continuity of services and the security of EGNSS infrastructure, while at the same time prioritising the health and safety of staff and contractors.

The GSA is responsible for ensuring business continuity and keeping Galileo and EGNOS secure and operational, and this can only be done by protecting the health and safety of its staff and partners, which remains the Agency’s top priority. 

The GSA is helped in this by the fact that, from its Prague headquarters, it is used to working remotely with the different Galileo and EGNOS sites across Europe. At the same time, special measures are being taken to protect the various operators working around the clock, seven days a week. The Agency is currently responding to the different scenarios in each country in order to manage security and operations, while putting measures in place to protect its people.

“These are very challenging times for all of us, requiring us to be flexible and resourceful. I am proud of how the GSA teams across our different sites have quickly adapted to the new situation,” said GSA Acting Executive Director Pascal Claudel. “The spirit of solidarity and cooperation I experience every day has shown me that the GSA’s team is its core asset and a strong foundation upon which to build the future of the Agency,” he said. “The entire European GNSS family has pulled together, and the GSA can rely on the support and commitment of all our partners, including Member States, industry, and SMEs.”

Read this: Are you aware? Beacons save lives!

GSA staff and contractors are learning new ways to work online to continue providing location, navigation and timing services to the user community. This applies equally at GSA headquarters and at the various sites. The Agency is also working with the European Commission, Member States and industry to find new solutions to emerging issues. “With the support of the Member States and industry, the GSA has demonstrated its leadership in this time of crisis, ensuring the continuity of the Galileo and EGNOS services. This is evidence that Europe is stronger together,” said GSA Administrative Board Chair Jean Yves Le Gall.

The GSA’s commitment to helping European industry benefit from EGNOS and Galileo remains as strong as ever, and the Agency is continuing its work on activities that are already underway.

Horizon 2020

The 21 ongoing projects remain on track (with the option of contractual adjustments to help partners impacted by the crisis). The new call with 44 project proposals is in the evaluation phase, for the first time taking place remotely via video conference. 

Fundamental Elements

There are 19 projects ongoing and on track (also with contractual flexibility to help partners impacted by the crisis). For later in 2020, 13 more projects are already published or are under evaluation.

Industrial contracts

During the COVID-19 crisis, the GSA is ensuring full support to the EU space industry by agreeing contractual adjustments to be implemented as needed throughout the entire supply chain, from Primes to SMEs. 

And this: eCall: 2 years of saving lives

GNSS and the response to COVID-19

Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS precise location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

To support the EU response to COVID-19, the EC and GSA are also working on the “Galileo Green Lane” app, to facilitate the movement of goods and freight within the EU. The objective of the “Galileo Green Lane” is to relieve borders from the pressure of handling goods and to manage more efficiently the transit of critical goods. At the same time, this Galileo app will provide Member States with a tool to report to the EU on the Green Lanes initiative. A first version of the app is expected in mid-April.

The GSA is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions and toolbox that are being used to fight the pandemic and to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand current needs and available resources.

If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are looking for apps that are already working and available. Submit some information on your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on the GNSS4Crisis page.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Supporting ongoing operations, security and staff health are priorities for the GSA.

Maintaining EGNSS operations and security in challenging times: the GSA response

8.4.2020 12:34  
Supporting ongoing operations, security and staff health are priorities for the GSA.
Published: 
08 April 2020

The coronavirus pandemic has had an impact on organisations, businesses, individuals and their families. As one of the few European Agencies delivering services 24/7, and with centres spread across Europe, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) has put various measures into place to ensure continuity of services and the security of EGNSS infrastructure, while at the same time prioritising the health and safety of staff and contractors.

The GSA is responsible for ensuring business continuity and keeping Galileo and EGNOS secure and operational, and this can only be done by protecting the health and safety of its staff and partners, which remains the Agency’s top priority. 

The GSA is helped in this by the fact that, from its Prague headquarters, it is used to working remotely with the different Galileo and EGNOS sites across Europe. At the same time, special measures are being taken to protect the various operators working around the clock, seven days a week. The Agency is currently responding to the different scenarios in each country in order to manage security and operations, while putting measures in place to protect its people.

“These are very challenging times for all of us, requiring us to be flexible and resourceful. I am proud of how the GSA teams across our different sites have quickly adapted to the new situation,” said GSA Acting Executive Director Pascal Claudel. “The spirit of solidarity and cooperation I experience every day has shown me that the GSA’s team is its core asset and a strong foundation upon which to build the future of the Agency,” he said. “The entire European GNSS family has pulled together, and the GSA can rely on the support and commitment of all our partners, including Member States, industry, and SMEs.”

Read this: Are you aware? Beacons save lives!

GSA staff and contractors are learning new ways to work online to continue providing location, navigation and timing services to the user community. This applies equally at GSA headquarters and at the various sites. The Agency is also working with the European Commission, Member States and industry to find new solutions to emerging issues. “With the support of the Member States and industry, the GSA has demonstrated its leadership in this time of crisis, ensuring the continuity of the Galileo and EGNOS services. This is evidence that Europe is stronger together,” said GSA Administrative Board Chair Jean Yves Le Gall.

The GSA’s commitment to helping European industry benefit from EGNOS and Galileo remains as strong as ever, and the Agency is continuing its work on activities that are already underway.

Horizon 2020

The 21 ongoing projects remain on track (with the option of contractual adjustments to help partners impacted by the crisis). The new call with 44 project proposals is in the evaluation phase, for the first time taking place remotely via video conference. 

Fundamental Elements

There are 19 projects ongoing and on track (also with contractual flexibility to help partners impacted by the crisis). For later in 2020, 13 more projects are already published or are under evaluation.

Industrial contracts

During the COVID-19 crisis, the GSA is ensuring full support to the EU space industry by agreeing contractual adjustments to be implemented as needed throughout the entire supply chain, from Primes to SMEs. 

And this: eCall: 2 years of saving lives

GNSS and the response to COVID-19

Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS precise location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

To support the EU response to COVID-19, the EC and GSA are also working on the “Galileo Green Lane” app, to facilitate the movement of goods and freight within the EU. The objective of the “Galileo Green Lane” is to relieve borders from the pressure of handling goods and to manage more efficiently the transit of critical goods. At the same time, this Galileo app will provide Member States with a tool to report to the EU on the Green Lanes initiative. A first version of the app is expected in mid-April.

The GSA is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions and toolbox that are being used to fight the pandemic and to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand current needs and available resources.

If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are looking for apps that are already working and available. Submit some information on your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on the GNSS4Crisis page.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Supporting ongoing operations, security and staff health are priorities for the GSA.

Are you aware? Beacons save lives!

6.4.2020 12:11  
Satellites help rescue over 6 people per day on average.
Published: 
06 April 2020

The GNSS world marks Beacon Awareness Day (406 Day) on 6 April. But this celebration also has a more serious purpose - serving as a reminder to the owners of Search and Rescue 406MHz beacons to test them, check their batteries and update their Cospas-Sarsat or National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) registration.

406 Day was started in 2013 by US beacon manufacturer ACR Electronics. Since then, the day has become an opportunity to raise public awareness of the benefits and responsibilities of owning 406 MHz beacons such as Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs) and Personal Locator Beacons (PLBs). It is also an opportunity to let people know that beacons save lives, and to encourage people to #getabeacon.

“We can’t stress it enough – beacons save lives. If you work at sea, carrying a beacon with you will enable search and rescue services to find you quickly in an emergency – it can literally mean the difference between life and death,” said Manuel Lopez, Technology Officer at the European GNSS Agency (GSA).

Watch this: MEOSAR – Reaching you faster when every minute counts

If you already own a beacon, you can register it on the Cospas-Sarsat database. For contact details for beacon registration in your country, click here. To register your beacon with the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), click here.

Galileo helping to save lives

The GSA officially launched the Galileo's SAR service to coincide with 406 Day back in 2017, and this service has recently received a significant upgrade, with the launch earlier this year of the Galileo Return Link Service (RLS), which allows people in distress to receive automatic acknowledgement that their alert has been received and is being processed. The RLS, currently offered uniquely by Galileo, is a free-of-charge global service available to Cospas-Sarsat RLS compatible beacons. 

The first performance evaluation of the Galileo RLS, published last month, showed excellent service provision that exceeded targets. The evaluation showed that the RLS was available 100% of the time, above the target value of 95%. On average, the system took 37 seconds to deliver automatic acknowledgement to the beacon, significantly better than the target value of 15 minutes. For more information, see the updated SAR/Galileo Service Definition Document.

Read this: Operation Shark Bait: Galileo SAR will save lives!

The Galileo SAR service, Europe’s contribution to the international satellite-based Cospas-Sarsat system, is comprised of two components: an automatic forward link distress alert and the RLS. This combination, along with the increased positioning accuracy provided by Galileo, has reduced the time it takes to detect a person lost at sea or in the mountains from three hours to just 10 minutes after the distress beacon is activated. Localisation of the distress beacon has also improved - from 10 km to less than 5 km.

To learn more of Galileo Search and Rescue service click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Satellites help rescue over 6 people per day on average.

Are you aware? Beacons save lives!

6.4.2020 12:11  

Steering drones for power generation
Image:
Steering drones for power generation

Are you aware? Beacons save lives!

6.4.2020 12:11  
Satellite navigation saves lives every day.
Published: 
06 April 2020

The GNSS world marks Beacon Awareness Day (406 Day) on 6 April. But this celebration also has a more serious purpose - serving as a reminder to the owners of Search and Rescue 406MHz beacons to test them, check their batteries and update their Cospas-Sarsat or National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) registration.

406 Day was started in 2013 by US beacon manufacturer ACR Electronics. Since then, the day has become an opportunity to raise public awareness of the benefits and responsibilities of owning 406 MHz beacons such as Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs) and Personal Locator Beacons (PLBs). It is also an opportunity to let people know that beacons save lives, and to encourage people to #getabeacon.

“We can’t stress it enough – beacons save lives. If you work at sea, carrying a beacon with you will enable search and rescue services to find you quickly in an emergency – it can literally mean the difference between life and death,” said Manuel Lopez, Technology Officer at the European GNSS Agency (GSA).

Watch this: MEOSAR – Reaching you faster when every minute counts

If you already own a beacon, you can register it on the Cospas-Sarsat database. For contact details for beacon registration in your country, click here. To register your beacon with the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), click here.

Galileo helping to save lives

The GSA officially launched the Galileo's SAR service to coincide with 406 Day back in 2017, and this service has recently received a significant upgrade, with the launch earlier this year of the Galileo Return Link Service (RLS), which allows people in distress to receive automatic acknowledgement that their alert has been received and is being processed. The RLS, currently offered uniquely by Galileo, is a free-of-charge global service available to Cospas-Sarsat RLS compatible beacons. 

The first performance evaluation of the Galileo RLS, published last month, showed excellent service provision that exceeded targets. The evaluation showed that the RLS was available 100% of the time, above the target value of 95%. On average, the system took 37 seconds to deliver automatic acknowledgement to the beacon, significantly better than the target value of 15 minutes. For more information, see the updated SAR/Galileo Service Definition Document.

Read this: Operation Shark Bait: Galileo SAR will save lives!

The Galileo SAR service, Europe’s contribution to the international satellite-based Cospas-Sarsat system, is comprised of two components: an automatic forward link distress alert and the RLS. This combination, along with the increased positioning accuracy provided by Galileo, has reduced the time it takes to detect a person lost at sea or in the mountains from three hours to just 10 minutes after the distress beacon is activated. Localisation of the distress beacon has also improved - from 10 km to less than 5 km.

To learn more of Galileo Search and Rescue service click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Satellite navigation saves lives every day.

Are you aware? Beacons save lives!

6.4.2020 12:11  
Satellite navigation saves lives every day. Image ©Orolia
Published: 
06 April 2020

The GNSS world marks Beacon Awareness Day (406 Day) on 6 April. But this celebration also has a more serious purpose - serving as a reminder to the owners of Search and Rescue 406MHz beacons to test them, check their batteries and update their Cospas-Sarsat or National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) registration.

406 Day was started in 2013 by US beacon manufacturer ACR Electronics. Since then, the day has become an opportunity to raise public awareness of the benefits and responsibilities of owning 406 MHz beacons such as Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs) and Personal Locator Beacons (PLBs). It is also an opportunity to let people know that beacons save lives, and to encourage people to #getabeacon.

“We can’t stress it enough – beacons save lives. If you work at sea, carrying a beacon with you will enable search and rescue services to find you quickly in an emergency – it can literally mean the difference between life and death,” said Manuel Lopez, Technology Officer at the European GNSS Agency (GSA).

Watch this: MEOSAR – Reaching you faster when every minute counts

If you already own a beacon, you can register it on the Cospas-Sarsat database. For contact details for beacon registration in your country, click here. To register your beacon with the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), click here.

Galileo helping to save lives

The GSA officially launched the Galileo's SAR service to coincide with 406 Day back in 2017, and this service has recently received a significant upgrade, with the launch earlier this year of the Galileo Return Link Service (RLS), which allows people in distress to receive automatic acknowledgement that their alert has been received and is being processed. The RLS, currently offered uniquely by Galileo, is a free-of-charge global service available to Cospas-Sarsat RLS compatible beacons. 

The first performance evaluation of the Galileo RLS, published last month, showed excellent service provision that exceeded targets. The evaluation showed that the RLS was available 100% of the time, above the target value of 95%. On average, the system took 37 seconds to deliver automatic acknowledgement to the beacon, significantly better than the target value of 15 minutes. For more information, see the updated SAR/Galileo Service Definition Document.

Read this: Operation Shark Bait: Galileo SAR will save lives!

The Galileo SAR service, Europe’s contribution to the international satellite-based Cospas-Sarsat system, is comprised of two components: an automatic forward link distress alert and the RLS. This combination, along with the increased positioning accuracy provided by Galileo, has reduced the time it takes to detect a person lost at sea or in the mountains from three hours to just 10 minutes after the distress beacon is activated. Localisation of the distress beacon has also improved - from 10 km to less than 5 km.

To learn more of Galileo Search and Rescue service click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Satellite navigation saves lives every day. Image ©Orolia

Galileo Masters 2020 now open!

2.4.2020 10:51  
The Galileo Masters has been rewarding the best EGNSS-based innovation since 2004.
Published: 
02 April 2020

The 2020 edition of the Galileo Masters opened for submissions on April 1. Seeking to award applications, services and new ideas that use Galileo and EGNOS also in synergy with other space programmes to respond to pressing needs facing business and society.

The 2020 competition has three GSA-sponsored challenges under the theme Space for Future Generations

Since it began in 2004, the Galileo Masters has scouted for the most forward‐thinking applications based on Galileo and EGNOS and this year is no different. Innovators and entrepreneurs are invited to submit their solutions to the competition by the deadline of 30 June 2020. The most innovative of these will be able to share in more than EUR 750,000 worth of cash prizes. Sounds interesting? To register, click here.

GSA Challenges

The GSA is partnering with Galileo Masters in three challenges in this year’s competition, all under the theme of: Space for Future Generations. The first of these, the Space for our Planet Challenge, aims to tackle climate change and environmental degradation, which represent an existential threat in Europe and worldwide. Services based on data from Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus Earth observation can be used to mitigate this threat by supporting more environmentally-conscious life choices, resulting in a healthier planet. Have an idea about how to save the planet? Let us know about it.

Currently very relevant, the Space for Being Safe and Healthy Challenge is looking for solutions that use downstream space data provided by Galileo, EGNOS and/or Copernicus as key enablers of innovative applications to help stem the spread of COVID-19. Solutions are expected to help public authorities to monitor and analyse emergency situations of this nature and increase public awareness about viruses like the coronavirus. To register for this challenge, click here.

Read this: Calling for GNSS apps supporting the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

In its Space for Fun Challenge, the GSA is targeting solutions using data from Galileo and EGNOS in the gaming, sports, leisure and tourism markets, where GNSS enables the monitoring of user performance and helps make augmented reality games even more immersive. Covering a number of market segments, this challenge has a lot of scope for new ideas that need accurate and authenticated positioning information. Ready to accept the challenge? Sign up here!

In all three challenges, there is a cash prize of EUR 10,000 up for grabs, with another EUR 10,000 awarded to the concept that is selected at the Galileo Masters 2020 overall winner. What’s more, participants in this year’s competition are in with a chance of winning one of six tailored Galileo Incubation prizes worth up to EUR 62,000 each.

Inspiration from the past

Even if your concept is not yet fully formed, make sure to register early. That way you will receive information about all the great support activities and additional opportunities that arise throughout the submission phase. Registration is free and available to participants from around the world. To find out more, click here

Meanwhile, as you are fine-tuning your concept, why not look to previous winners for inspiration:

Performance Cockpit takes overall prize at Galileo Masters 2019

Smart Gate takes first place in GSA Special Prize at ESNC

Winner of ‘EU at 60 – Space for Europe’ Special Prize helps keep kids safe

Drones2GNSS takes this year’s GSA Special Prize

And the 2015 winner is…

And the winner is…

He shoots, he scores! JOHAN wins EGNOS prize at ESNC 2013

Sound idea wins EGNOS prize at ESNC 2012

GSA satnav Prize winner creating system for Mini-UAVs in controlled airspace

Next generation navigation system scoops 2010 GSA Prize

GSA awards Special Topic Prize at Galileo Masters competition

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).
The Galileo Masters has been rewarding the best EGNSS-based innovation since 2004.

Galileo Masters 2020 now open!

2.4.2020 10:51  
The Galileo Masters has been rewarding the best EGNSS-based innovation since 2004.
Published: 
02 April 2020

The 2020 edition of the Galileo Masters opened for submissions on April 1. Seeking to award applications, services and new ideas that use Galileo and EGNOS also in synergy with other space programmes to respond to pressing needs facing business and society.

The 2020 competition has three GSA-sponsored challenges under the theme Space for Future Generations

Since it began in 2004, the Galileo Masters has scouted for the most forward‐thinking applications based on Galileo and EGNOS and this year is no different. Innovators and entrepreneurs are invited to submit their solutions to the competition by the deadline of 30 June 2020. The most innovative of these will be able to share in more than EUR 750,000 worth of cash prizes. Sounds interesting? To register, click here.

GSA Challenges

The GSA is partnering with Galileo Masters in three challenges in this year’s competition, all under the theme of: Space for Future Generations. The first of these, the Space for our Planet Challenge, aims to tackle climate change and environmental degradation, which represent an existential threat in Europe and worldwide. Services based on data from Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus Earth observation can be used to mitigate this threat by supporting more environmentally-conscious life choices, resulting in a healthier planet. Have an idea about how to save the planet? Let us know about it.

Currently very relevant, the Space for Being Safe and Healthy Challenge is looking for solutions that use downstream space data provided by Galileo, EGNOS and/or Copernicus as key enablers of innovative applications to help stem the spread of COVID-19. Solutions are expected to help public authorities to monitor and analyse emergency situations of this nature and increase public awareness about viruses like the coronavirus. To register for this challenge, click here.

Read this: Calling for GNSS apps supporting the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

In its Space for Fun Challenge, the GSA is targeting solutions using data from Galileo and EGNOS in the gaming, sports, leisure and tourism markets, where GNSS enables the monitoring of user performance and helps make augmented reality games even more immersive. Covering a number of market segments, this challenge has a lot of scope for new ideas that need accurate and authenticated positioning information. Ready to accept the challenge? Sign up here!

In all three challenges, there is a cash prize of EUR 10,000 up for grabs, with another EUR 10,000 awarded to the concept that is selected at the Galileo Masters 2020 overall winner. What’s more, participants in this year’s competition are in with a chance of winning one of six tailored Galileo Incubation prizes worth up to EUR 62,000 each.

Inspiration from the past

Even if your concept is not yet fully formed, make sure to register early. That way you will receive information about all the great support activities and additional opportunities that arise throughout the submission phase. Registration is free and available to participants from around the world. To find out more, click here

Meanwhile, as you are fine-tuning your concept, why not look to previous winners for inspiration:

Performance Cockpit takes overall prize at Galileo Masters 2019

Smart Gate takes first place in GSA Special Prize at ESNC

Winner of ‘EU at 60 – Space for Europe’ Special Prize helps keep kids safe

Drones2GNSS takes this year’s GSA Special Prize

And the 2015 winner is…

And the winner is…

He shoots, he scores! JOHAN wins EGNOS prize at ESNC 2013

Sound idea wins EGNOS prize at ESNC 2012

GSA satnav Prize winner creating system for Mini-UAVs in controlled airspace

Next generation navigation system scoops 2010 GSA Prize

GSA awards Special Topic Prize at Galileo Masters competition

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).
The Galileo Masters has been rewarding the best EGNSS-based innovation since 2004.

Galileo Masters 2020 now open!

2.4.2020 10:51  
The Galileo Masters has been rewarding the best EGNSS-based innovation since 2004.
Published: 
02 April 2020

The 2020 edition of the Galileo Masters opened for submissions on April 1st,  seeking to award applications, services and new ideas that use Galileo and EGNOS also in synergy with other space programmes to respond to pressing needs facing business and society.

The 2020 competition has three GSA-sponsored challenges under the theme Space for Future Generations

Since it began in 2004, the Galileo Masters has scouted for the most forward‐thinking applications based on Galileo and EGNOS and this year is no different. Innovators and entrepreneurs are invited to submit their solutions to the competition by the deadline of 30 June 2020. The most innovative of these will be able to share in more than EUR 750,000 worth of cash prizes. Sounds interesting? To register, click here.

GSA Challenges

The GSA is partnering with Galileo Masters in three challenges in this year’s competition, all under the theme of: Space for Future Generations. The first of these, the Space for our Planet Challenge, aims to tackle climate change and environmental degradation, which represent an existential threat in Europe and worldwide. Services based on data from Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus Earth observation can be used to mitigate this threat by supporting more environmentally-conscious life choices, resulting in a healthier planet. Have an idea about how to save the planet? Let us know about it.

Currently very relevant, the Space for Being Safe and Healthy Challenge is looking for solutions that use downstream space data provided by Galileo, EGNOS and/or Copernicus as key enablers of innovative applications to help stem the spread of COVID-19. Solutions are expected to help public authorities to monitor and analyse emergency situations of this nature and increase public awareness about viruses like the coronavirus. To register for this challenge, click here.

Read this: Calling for GNSS apps supporting the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

In its Space for Fun Challenge, the GSA is targeting solutions using data from Galileo and EGNOS in the gaming, sports, leisure and tourism markets, where GNSS enables the monitoring of user performance and helps make augmented reality games even more immersive. Covering a number of market segments, this challenge has a lot of scope for new ideas that need accurate and authenticated positioning information. Ready to accept the challenge? Sign up here!

In all three challenges, there is a cash prize of EUR 10,000 up for grabs, with another EUR 10,000 awarded to the concept that is selected at the Galileo Masters 2020 overall winner. What’s more, participants in this year’s competition are in with a chance of winning one of six tailored Galileo Incubation prizes worth up to EUR 62,000 each.

Inspiration from the past

Even if your concept is not yet fully formed, make sure to register early. That way you will receive information about all the great support activities and additional opportunities that arise throughout the submission phase. Registration is free and available to participants from around the world. To find out more, click here

Meanwhile, as you are fine-tuning your concept, why not look to previous winners for inspiration:

Performance Cockpit takes overall prize at Galileo Masters 2019

Smart Gate takes first place in GSA Special Prize at ESNC

Winner of ‘EU at 60 – Space for Europe’ Special Prize helps keep kids safe

Drones2GNSS takes this year’s GSA Special Prize

And the 2015 winner is…

And the winner is…

He shoots, he scores! JOHAN wins EGNOS prize at ESNC 2013

Sound idea wins EGNOS prize at ESNC 2012

GSA satnav Prize winner creating system for Mini-UAVs in controlled airspace

Next generation navigation system scoops 2010 GSA Prize

GSA awards Special Topic Prize at Galileo Masters competition

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).
The Galileo Masters has been rewarding the best EGNSS-based innovation since 2004.

Galileo Masters 2020 now open!

2.4.2020 10:51  
The Galileo Masters has been rewarding the best EGNSS-based innovation since 2004.
Published: 
02 April 2020

The 2020 edition of the Galileo Masters opened for submissions on April 1st,  seeking to award applications, services and new ideas that use Galileo and EGNOS also in synergy with other space programmes to respond to pressing needs facing business and society.

The 2020 competition has three GSA challenges under the theme Space for Future Generations

Since it began in 2004, the Galileo Masters has scouted for the most forward‐thinking applications based on Galileo and EGNOS and this year is no different. Innovators and entrepreneurs are invited to submit their solutions to the competition by the deadline of 30 June 2020. The most innovative of these will be able to share in more than EUR 750,000 worth of cash prizes. Sounds interesting? To register, click here.

GSA Challenges

The GSA is partnering with Galileo Masters in three challenges in this year’s competition, all under the theme of: Space for Future Generations. The first of these, the Space for our Planet Challenge, aims to tackle climate change and environmental degradation, which represent an existential threat in Europe and worldwide. Services based on data from Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus Earth observation can be used to mitigate this threat by supporting more environmentally-conscious life choices, resulting in a healthier planet. Have an idea about how to save the planet? Let us know about it.

Currently very relevant, the Space for Being Safe and Healthy Challenge is looking for solutions that use downstream space data provided by Galileo, EGNOS and/or Copernicus as key enablers of innovative applications to help stem the spread of COVID-19. Solutions are expected to help public authorities to monitor and analyse emergency situations of this nature and increase public awareness about viruses like the coronavirus. To register for this challenge, click here.

Read this: Calling for GNSS apps supporting the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

In its Space for Fun Challenge, the GSA is targeting solutions using data from Galileo and EGNOS in the gaming, sports, leisure and tourism markets, where GNSS enables the monitoring of user performance and helps make augmented reality games even more immersive. Covering a number of market segments, this challenge has a lot of scope for new ideas that need accurate and authenticated positioning information. Ready to accept the challenge? Sign up here!

In all three challenges, there is a cash prize of EUR 10,000 up for grabs, with another EUR 10,000 awarded to the concept that is selected at the Galileo Masters 2020 overall winner. What’s more, participants in this year’s competition are in with a chance of winning one of six tailored Galileo Incubation prizes worth up to EUR 62,000 each.

Inspiration from the past

Even if your concept is not yet fully formed, make sure to register early. That way you will receive information about all the great support activities and additional opportunities that arise throughout the submission phase. Registration is free and available to participants from around the world. To find out more, click here

Meanwhile, as you are fine-tuning your concept, why not look to previous winners for inspiration:

Performance Cockpit takes overall prize at Galileo Masters 2019

Smart Gate takes first place in GSA Special Prize at ESNC

Winner of ‘EU at 60 – Space for Europe’ Special Prize helps keep kids safe

Drones2GNSS takes this year’s GSA Special Prize

And the 2015 winner is…

And the winner is…

He shoots, he scores! JOHAN wins EGNOS prize at ESNC 2013

Sound idea wins EGNOS prize at ESNC 2012

GSA satnav Prize winner creating system for Mini-UAVs in controlled airspace

Next generation navigation system scoops 2010 GSA Prize

GSA awards Special Topic Prize at Galileo Masters competition

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).
The Galileo Masters has been rewarding the best EGNSS-based innovation since 2004.

eCall: 2 years of saving lives

31.3.2020 10:38  
eCall has been saving lives on EU roads for 2 years already.
Published: 
31 March 2020

In the two years since the launch of the EU’s eCall emergency response system, which automatically calls emergency services in the event of a road accident, manufacturers have been quick to implement the life-saving technology, with around 3 million eCall-enabled vehicles already sold in Europe.

The EU launched its eCall emergency response system with the publication, on 31 March 2018, of the European eCall regulation, requiring all new car and light van types sold in the EU to be fitted with the system. Manufacturers were quick to respond, with Volvo Cars being the first to certify the system for use in its vehicles and the first to launch an eCall-equipped model to the market – presenting the V60 at the ITS World Congress 2018 in Copenhagen in September 2018.

GSA helps pave the way

European Commission services – specifically the Joint Research Centre – and the GSA helped pave the way for a quick and smooth uptake by the automobile industry, publishing a set of guidelines to help the eCall industry value chain to pre-test the accuracy of their new devices and understand how to reap the benefits of Galileo.

Other manufacturers were quick to follow Volvo’s lead and currently there are 27 car brands offering over 65 models that are equipped with the system, with around 3 million vehicles sold on the EU market to date. To see which car models are currently available, check the UseGalileo site.

Watch this: eCall - Emergency Positioning

“eCall is a true success story for Europe,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “The system leverages EU technology – specifically Galileo precise positioning – to save our citizens lives.” she said.

According to European Commission figures, 25,300 people were killed and 135,000 people were seriously injured in road accidents in the EU in 2017. While new automotive technologies have resulted in a sharp drop in the number of fatalities – which have fallen by 57.5% since 2001, the numbers are still high. By speeding up emergency response times by 40% in urban areas and 50% in the countryside, it is estimated that eCall could help prevent 2,500 road deaths and save EUR 26 billion every year.

How does it work?

eCall is activated automatically as soon as in-vehicle sensors detect a serious crash. Once activated, the system dials the European emergency number 112 and establishes a telephone link to the appropriate emergency call centre.

Leveraging EGNSS (Galileo and EGNOS), the system sends the accurate position of the crashed vehicle and the direction of travel to the emergency services, enabling the emergency responders to get to the accident site faster. An eCall can also be triggered manually by pushing a button in the car, for example by a witness to a serious accident.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

eCall has been saving lives on EU roads for 2 years already.

eCall: 2 years of saving lives

31.3.2020 10:38  
eCall has been saving lives on EU roads for 2 years already.
Published: 
31 March 2020

In the two years since the launch of the EU’s eCall emergency response system, which automatically calls emergency services in the event of a road accident, manufacturers have been quick to implement the life-saving technology, with around 3 million eCall-enabled vehicles already sold in Europe.

The EU launched its eCall emergency response system with the publication, on 31 March 2018, of the European eCall regulation, requiring all new car and light van types sold in the EU to be fitted with the system. Manufacturers were quick to respond, with Volvo Cars being the first to certify the system for use in its vehicles and the first to launch an eCall-equipped model to the market – presenting the V60 at the ITS World Congress 2018 in Copenhagen in September 2018.

GSA helps pave the way

European Commission services – specifically the Joint Research Centre – and the GSA helped pave the way for a quick and smooth uptake by the automobile industry, publishing a set of guidelines to help the eCall industry value chain to pre-test the accuracy of their new devices and understand how to reap the benefits of Galileo.

Other manufacturers were quick to follow Volvo’s lead and currently there are 27 car brands offering over 65 models that are equipped with the system, with around 3 million vehicles sold on the EU market to date. To see which car models are currently available, check the UseGalileo site.

Watch this: eCall - Emergency Positioning

“eCall is a true success story for Europe,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “The system leverages EU technology – specifically Galileo precise positioning – to save our citizens lives.” she said.

According to European Commission figures, 25,300 people were killed and 135,000 people were seriously injured in road accidents in the EU in 2017. While new automotive technologies have resulted in a sharp drop in the number of fatalities – which have fallen by 57.5% since 2001, the numbers are still high. By speeding up emergency response times by 40% in urban areas and 50% in the countryside, it is estimated that eCall could help prevent 2,500 road deaths and save EUR 26 billion every year.

How does it work?

eCall is activated automatically as soon as in-vehicle sensors detect a serious crash. Once activated, the system dials the European emergency number 112 and establishes a telephone link to the appropriate emergency call centre.

Leveraging EGNSS (Galileo and EGNOS), the system sends the accurate position of the crashed vehicle and the direction of travel to the emergency services, enabling the emergency responders to get to the accident site faster. An eCall can also be triggered manually by pushing a button in the car, for example by a witness to a serious accident.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

eCall has been saving lives on EU roads for 2 years already.

eCall: 2 years of saving lives

31.3.2020 10:38  
eCall has been saving lives on EU roads for 2 years already.
Published: 
31 March 2020

In the two years since the launch of the EU’s eCall emergency response system, which automatically calls emergency services in the event of a road accident, manufacturers have been quick to implement the life-saving technology, with around 3 million eCall-enabled vehicles already sold in Europe.

The EU launched its eCall emergency response system with the publication, on 31 March 2018, of the European eCall regulation, requiring all new car and light van types sold in the EU to be fitted with the system. Manufacturers were quick to respond, with Volvo Cars being the first to certify the system for use in its vehicles and the first to launch an eCall-equipped model to the market – presenting the V60 at the ITS World Congress 2018 in Copenhagen in September 2018.

GSA helps pave the way

European Commission services – specifically the Joint Research Centre – and the GSA helped pave the way for a quick and smooth uptake by the automobile industry, publishing a set of guidelines to help the eCall industry value chain to pre-test the accuracy of their new devices and understand how to reap the benefits of Galileo.

Other manufacturers were quick to follow Volvo’s lead and currently there are 27 car brands offering over 65 models that are equipped with the system, with around 3 million vehicles sold on the EU market to date. To see which car models are currently available, check the UseGalileo site.

Watch this: eCall - Emergency Positioning

“eCall is a true success story for Europe,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “The system leverages EU technology – specifically Galileo precise positioning – to save our citizens lives.” she said.

According to European Commission figures, 25,300 people were killed and 135,000 people were seriously injured in road accidents in the EU in 2017. While new automotive technologies have resulted in a sharp drop in the number of fatalities – which have fallen by 57.5% since 2001, the numbers are still high. By speeding up emergency response times by 40% in urban areas and 50% in the countryside, it is estimated that eCall could help prevent 2,500 road deaths and save EUR 26 billion every year.

How does it work?

eCall is activated automatically as soon as in-vehicle sensors detect a serious crash. Once activated, the system dials the European emergency number 112 and establishes a telephone link to the appropriate emergency call centre.

Leveraging EGNSS (Galileo and EGNOS), the system sends the accurate position of the crashed vehicle and the direction of travel to the emergency services, enabling the emergency responders to get to the accident site faster. An eCall can also be triggered manually by pushing a button in the car, for example by a witness to a serious accident.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

eCall has been saving lives on EU roads for 2 years already.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively track and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively track and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA)1 is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Watch also this: Will Galileo satellites track my phone?

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Positioning is key

The requirement for reliable and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

  • 1. The GSA disclaims any responsibility concerning: the completeness of the list, possible omissions, the actual fitness for use of the listed applications, the possible breach of third parties’ rights arising from the use of the listed applications.
Apps leveraging GNSS positioning can be used to effectively monitor and map the spread of the virus.
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