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PIN: EGNOS service for payment and liability-critical road applications

21.10.2019 10:30  
What integrity concept to develop for payment and liability critical applications in the road sector using EGNOS?
Published: 
21 October 2019

The European Commission’s Directorate-General for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs (DG GROW) has issued a Prior Information Notice (PIN) for a planned call for a new service contract on using satellite-based augmentation systems (SBAS) for applications such as road tolling or pay-as-you-drive insurance with the aim of developing an appropriate integrity concept for payment/liability critical applications focused on the road sector.

When defining the service, the contractor shall consider to which extent evolutions of the EGNOS services, user equipment or the service provision scheme are needed to provide the required integrity assurance. Integrity in this context refers to the level of confidence that can be put in the navigation solution. The On-Board Unit (OBU) will have to allow all the features necessary to trust the position in situations where enforcement, payments and related claims are involved.

Since the E-GNSS sensor may just be one component among other sensors, the project shall address what other technologies or components may be needed on top of the current GNSS signals, and what would be the contribution of each element to the overall integrity assurance.

The contract notice will be published in the near future. More information can be found in the Prior Information Notice (PIN).

Tailored premiums

Pay-as-you-drive (PAYD) and pay-how-you-drive (PHYD) insurance are emerging applications in the road sector that rely on how much, where, when and how the road user drives. These applications make it possible to tailor the premiums paid by the policyholder.

Read this: European GNSS supports smarter mobility

In the future, other road applications such as reconstruction of accidents, mobility as a service, traffic infraction monitoring and fine management, traffic congestion monitoring, automatic charging in car parks, etc. may also rely on the vehicle’s position and navigation data.

EGNOS is the European SBAS and augments GPS L1 C/A civilian signal by providing corrections and integrity information for positioning and navigation applications over Europe. EGNOS Version 3, set to enter in service in the near future, will augment both GPS and Galileo constellations in the L1 and L5 bands and will extend the service area to the entire landmasses of EU Member States.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

What integrity concept to develop for payment and liability critical applications in the road sector using EGNOS?

MyGalileoApp enters the final stage

18.10.2019 11:28  
The MyGalileoApp awards will be handed out at a ceremony at GSA headquarters in Prague on 7 November.
Published: 
18 October 2019

Final preparations are underway as the October 21 deadline approaches for the 10 finalists in this year’s MyGalileoApp competition to deliver a finalised version of their app. All the teams to successfully complete the second development phase will be invited to the award ceremony, to be held at the Prague headquarters of the European GNSS Agency (GSA) on 7 November 2019, where they will present their apps to a GSA evaluation board. To register to attend the event, click here.

The finalists will be welcomed to the awards ceremony by GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides and Matthias Petschke, Director of EU Satellite Navigation Programmes at the European Commission. Then, following an introduction by GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani and a keynote on “How to create a successful app” by Google Geospatial Technologist Ed Parsons, the finalists will make their pitches.

The pitches will be made in two stages, with five teams pitching first, followed by demonstrations of their apps and a speech by a MyGalileoApp mentor. Then the second five teams will pitch and demonstrate their projects. The awards will be decided after these pitches and the awards will be presented at a special ceremony to be held in the evening. Check out the agenda here.

Read this: GSA releases 6th GNSS Market Report

So, who are the finalists?

Of the 10 finalists, four are in the Augmented Reality and Games innovation area: uMaze (Finland) creates mazes in specific outdoor areas in which users can play; while ARGEO (Italy) allows users to discover content such as prizes, coupons and shopping cards geo-located around the streets of a city. The app from STPR (Poland, Australia, Ukraine) combines a virtual environment with game-related physical experiences in the real world, and arstory (Germany) is a complete augmented reality ecosystem based on Galileo location and virtual objects in the real world.

The Smart Navigation and Infotainment innovation area accounts for three of the 10 finalists. The Ready Park app (France) makes parking easier by pairing drivers leaving a spot with users looking for one. GALILEONAUT (France) is a mobile app that helps sailors to navigate inside a port or a marina and provides a link to the harbour master's office, while the Trukatu app (Spain) is a mobile C2C platform that connects people who want to rent or lease items with owners who have items to rent out.

Two of the shortlisted projects fall in the Fitness, Sport and mHealth category. The first of these - PanPan - Possible Assistance Needed (Germany) - serves as backup safety solution for potentially dangerous activities that may leave users in need of assistance, while the second - LetMeAut (Italy) - makes everyday tasks easier for people with autism.

Finally, the Mapping, GIS and Agriculture innovation area accounts for one app among the top 10 shortlisted projects. Tractor Navigator (France) provides guidance for farmers driving tractors, enabling them to visualise their current position and trajectory in an open field.

And this: Galileo and EGNOS featured at InterGEO 2019

Awards ceremony

Following the pitches, there will be an investors’ panel, with presentations by experts from various institutions, from the European Investment Bank to venture capital firms and accelerators, providing information on how apps can bridge the gap between great ideas and viable business opportunities. In general, there will be many business opportunities to explore from among the MyGalileoApp projects, so if you are an investor looking to invest in forward-looking GNSS-based applications register here to take advantage of this unparalleled networking opportunity.

Finally, after careful deliberation of the pitches and presentations made earlier, the GSA evaluation board will be ready to announce the winners and hand out the awards. The first-place winner will receive a EUR 100,000 prize. The runner up and third place winners will receive EUR 50,000 and EUR 30,000 respectively. The award ceremony will also include a speech by motivational speaker and explorer Johan Ernst Nilson.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The MyGalileoApp awards will be handed out at a ceremony at GSA headquarters in Prague on 7 November.

MyGalileoApp enters the final stage

18.10.2019 11:28  
The MyGalileoApp awards will be handed out at a ceremony at GSA headquarters in Prague on 7 November.
Published: 
18 October 2019

Final preparations are underway as the October 21 deadline approaches for the 10 finalists in this year’s MyGalileoApp competition to deliver a finalised version of their app. All the teams to successfully complete the second development phase will be invited to the award ceremony, to be held at the Prague headquarters of the European GNSS Agency (GSA) on 7 November 2019, where they will present their apps to a GSA evaluation board. To register to attend the event, click here.

The finalists will be welcomed to the awards ceremony by GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides and Matthias Petschke, Director of EU Satellite Navigation Programmes at the European Commission. Then, following an introduction by GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani and a keynote on “How to create a successful app” by Google Geospatial Technologist Ed Parsons, the finalists will make their pitches.

The pitches will be made in two stages, with five teams pitching first, followed by demonstrations of their apps and a speech by a MyGalileoApp mentor. Then the second five teams will pitch and demonstrate their projects. The awards will be decided after these pitches and the awards will be presented at a special ceremony to be held in the evening. Check out the agenda here.

Read this: GSA releases 6th GNSS Market Report

So, who are the finalists?

Of the 10 finalists, four are in the Augmented Reality and Games innovation area: uMaze (Finland) creates mazes in specific outdoor areas in which users can play; while ARGEO (Italy) allows users to discover content such as prizes, coupons and shopping cards geo-located around the streets of a city. The app from STPR (Poland, Australia, Ukraine) combines a virtual environment with game-related physical experiences in the real world, and arstory (Germany) is a complete augmented reality ecosystem based on Galileo location and virtual objects in the real world.

The Smart Navigation and Infotainment innovation area accounts for three of the 10 finalists. The Ready Park app (France) makes parking easier by pairing drivers leaving a spot with users looking for one. GALILEONAUT (France) is a mobile app that helps sailors to navigate inside a port or a marina and provides a link to the harbour master's office, while the Trukatu app (Spain) is a mobile C2C platform that connects people who want to rent or lease items with owners who have items to rent out.

Two of the shortlisted projects fall in the Fitness, Sport and mHealth category. The first of these - PanPan - Possible Assistance Needed (Germany) - serves as backup safety solution for potentially dangerous activities that may leave users in need of assistance, while the second - LetMeAut (Italy) - makes everyday tasks easier for people with autism.

Finally, the Mapping, GIS and Agriculture innovation area accounts for one app among the top 10 shortlisted projects. Tractor Navigator (France) provides guidance for farmers driving tractors, enabling them to visualise their current position and trajectory in an open field.

And this: Galileo and EGNOS featured at InterGEO 2019

Awards ceremony

Following the pitches, there will be an investors’ panel, with presentations by experts from various institutions, from the European Investment Bank to venture capital firms and accelerators, providing information on how apps can bridge the gap between great ideas and viable business opportunities. In general, there will be many business opportunities to explore from among the MyGalileoApp projects, so if you are an investor looking to invest in forward-looking GNSS-based applications register here to take advantage of this unparalleled networking opportunity.

Finally, after careful deliberation of the pitches and presentations made earlier, the GSA evaluation board will be ready to announce the winners and hand out the awards. The first-place winner will receive a EUR 100,000 prize. The runner up and third place winners will receive EUR 50,000 and EUR 30,000 respectively. The award ceremony will also include a speech by motivational speaker and explorer Johan Ernst Nilson.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The MyGalileoApp awards will be handed out at a ceremony at GSA headquarters in Prague on 7 November.

MyGalileoApp enters the final stage

18.10.2019 11:28  
The MyGalileoApp awards will be handed out at a ceremony at GSA headquarters in Prague on 7 November.
Published: 
18 October 2019

Final preparations are underway as the October 21 deadline approaches for the 10 finalists in this year’s MyGalileoApp competition to deliver a finalised version of their app. All the teams to successfully complete the second development phase will be invited to the award ceremony, to be held at the Prague headquarters of the European GNSS Agency (GSA) on 7 November 2019, where they will present their apps to a GSA evaluation board. To register to attend the event, click here.

The finalists will be welcomed to the awards ceremony by GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides and Matthias Petschke, Director of EU Satellite Navigation Programmes at the European Commission. Then, following an introduction by GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani and a keynote on “How to create a successful app” by Google Geospatial Technologist Ed Parsons, the finalists will make their pitches.

The pitches will be made in two stages, with five teams pitching first, followed by demonstrations of their apps and a speech by a MyGalileoApp mentor. Then the second five teams will pitch and demonstrate their projects. The awards will be decided after these pitches and the awards will be presented at a special ceremony to be held in the evening. Check out the agenda here.

Read this: GSA releases 6th GNSS Market Report

So, who are the finalists?

Of the 10 finalists, four are in the Augmented Reality and Games innovation area: uMaze (Finland) creates mazes in specific outdoor areas in which users can play; while ARGEO (Italy) allows users to discover content such as prizes, coupons and shopping cards geo-located around the streets of a city. The app from STPR (Poland, Australia, Ukraine) combines a virtual environment with game-related physical experiences in the real world, and arstory (Germany) is a complete augmented reality ecosystem based on Galileo location and virtual objects in the real world.

The Smart Navigation and Infotainment innovation area accounts for three of the 10 finalists. The Ready Park app (France) makes parking easier by pairing drivers leaving a spot with users looking for one. GALILEONAUT (France) is a mobile app that helps sailors to navigate inside a port or a marina and provides a link to the harbour master's office, while the Trukatu app (Spain) is a mobile C2C platform that connects people who want to rent or lease items with owners who have items to rent out.

Two of the shortlisted projects fall in the Fitness, Sport and mHealth category. The first of these - PanPan - Possible Assistance Needed (Germany) - serves as backup safety solution for potentially dangerous activities that may leave users in need of assistance, while the second - LetMeAut (Italy) - makes everyday tasks easier for people with autism.

Finally, the Mapping, GIS and Agriculture innovation area accounts for one app among the top 10 shortlisted projects. Tractor Navigator (France) provides guidance for farmers driving tractors, enabling them to visualise their current position and trajectory in an open field.

And this: Galileo and EGNOS featured at InterGEO 2019

Awards ceremony

Following the pitches, there will be an investors’ panel, with presentations by experts from various institutions, from the European Investment Bank to venture capital firms and accelerators, providing information on how apps can bridge the gap between great ideas and viable business opportunities. In general, there will be many business opportunities to explore from among the MyGalileoApp projects, so if you are an investor looking to invest in forward-looking GNSS-based applications register here to take advantage of this unparalleled networking opportunity.

Finally, after careful deliberation of the pitches and presentations made earlier, the GSA evaluation board will be ready to announce the winners and hand out the awards. The first-place winner will receive a EUR 100,000 prize. The runner up and third place winners will receive EUR 50,000 and EUR 30,000 respectively. The award ceremony will also include a speech by motivational speaker and explorer Johan Ernst Nilson.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The MyGalileoApp awards will be handed out at a ceremony at GSA headquarters in Prague on 7 November.

GNSS Market Report downloaded 1,000 times in first 24 hours

17.10.2019 12:55  
The latest issue of the GNSS market Report was eagerly awaited by all market stakeholders.
Published: 
17 October 2019

The sixth issue of the GNSS Market Report from the European GNSS Agency (GSA) has been downloaded over 1,000 times since it was published on the GSA website on October 15. With its comprehensive overview of the current status and future trends on the global GNSS market, the report was eagerly awaited by all market players, from global corporations and SMEs to R&D organisations and academia.

Regularly referenced by policy-makers and business leaders around the world, the GNSS Market Report serves as the go-to resource for anybody requiring an in-depth look at GNSS market opportunities and trends across key market segments. The previous issue of the Market Report has been downloaded over 60,000 times since it was published in 2017.

Read this: GSA releases 6th GNSS Market Report

“Given the dynamism of the GNSS market, we anticipated that there would be high demand for the latest issue of the GNSS Market Report with its valuable insights and forecasts. The number of downloads in the first day of publication is a clear indicator of how highly it is valued as a resource by all stakeholders in the GNSS ecosystem,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani.

To read the report in full, download it for free here.

The structure of this year’s report has changed slightly compared to previous years and the number of GNSS market segments reviewed has increased to 10, to better reflect the situation on the market and to enable more specific and accurate findings. The market segments in this year’s report are: Consumer Solutions, Road, Manned Aviation, Drones, Maritime, Emergency Response, Rail, Agriculture, Geomatics and Critical Infrastructure.

GSA Reports

The GNSS Market Report is one of a series of intelligence reports produced by the GSA. It is published every two years. The Market Report alternates with the GNSS User Technology Report, which takes an in-depth look at the state-of-the-art in GNSS receiver technology and provides expert analysis on the evolutionary trends that are set to define the dynamic global GNSS user technology industry.

Other reports produced by the GSA include Reports on User Needs and Requirements for Position, Navigation and Time, which are the outcome of the European GNSS User Consultation Platform – the next meeting of which will take place at European Space Week in December. These reports provide an overview of GNSS trends across a broad range of applications, along with in-depth analysis of user needs and requirements applicable to specific market segments.

For a full list of GSA publications, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The latest issue of the GNSS market Report was eagerly awaited by all market stakeholders.

GNSS Market Report downloaded 1,000 times in first 24 hours

17.10.2019 12:55  
The latest issue of the GNSS market Report was eagerly awaited by all market stakeholders.
Published: 
17 October 2019

The sixth issue of the GNSS Market Report from the European GNSS Agency (GSA) has been downloaded over 1,000 times since it was published on the GSA website on October 15. With its comprehensive overview of the current status and future trends on the global GNSS market, the report was eagerly awaited by all market players, from global corporations and SMEs to R&D organisations and academia.

Regularly referenced by policy-makers and business leaders around the world, the GNSS Market Report serves as the go-to resource for anybody requiring an in-depth look at GNSS market opportunities and trends across key market segments. The previous issue of the Market Report has been downloaded over 60,000 times since it was published in 2017.

Read this: GSA releases 6th GNSS Market Report

“Given the dynamism of the GNSS market, we anticipated that there would be high demand for the latest issue of the GNSS Market Report with its valuable insights and forecasts. The number of downloads in the first day of publication is a clear indicator of how highly it is valued as a resource by all stakeholders in the GNSS ecosystem,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani.

To read the report in full, download it for free here.

The structure of this year’s report has changed slightly compared to previous years and the number of GNSS market segments reviewed has increased to 10, to better reflect the situation on the market and to enable more specific and accurate findings. The market segments in this year’s report are: Consumer Solutions, Road, Manned Aviation, Drones, Maritime, Emergency Response, Rail, Agriculture, Geomatics and Critical Infrastructure.

GSA Reports

The GNSS Market Report is one of a series of intelligence reports produced by the GSA. It is published every two years. The Market Report alternates with the GNSS User Technology Report, which takes an in-depth look at the state-of-the-art in GNSS receiver technology and provides expert analysis on the evolutionary trends that are set to define the dynamic global GNSS user technology industry.

Other reports produced by the GSA include Reports on User Needs and Requirements for Position, Navigation and Time, which are the outcome of the European GNSS User Consultation Platform – the next meeting of which will take place at European Space Week in December. These reports provide an overview of GNSS trends across a broad range of applications, along with in-depth analysis of user needs and requirements applicable to specific market segments.

For a full list of GSA publications, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The latest issue of the GNSS market Report was eagerly awaited by all market stakeholders.

EGNSS perspectives at InterGEO Stuttgart

16.10.2019 10:25  
Joint use of EGNSS and Earth observation enables applications of great interest to the mapping and surveying communities.
Published: 
16 October 2019

The InterGEO conference and trade show continues to be a positive occasion to highlight Europe's GNSS services in the fields of geodesy, geo-information, land management and related areas.

With over half a million event website users and over 16,000 visitors from 92 countries at the conference and trade show, InterGEO is one of the key platforms for industry dialogue around the world. The event covers a wide variety of fields, ranging from surveying, geo-information, remote sensing and photogrammetry to complementary solutions and technologies. 

Shared space with Copernicus

As such, InterGEO is the ideal platform for highlighting both of Europe's flagship space programmes, Galileo and Copernicus. Speaking at the shared Galileo and Copernicus stand at InterGEO 2019, GSA Market Development Officer Reinhard Blasi said: "This is now the third time that we have shared a common space with Copernicus at this event. The GNSS community of course knows about Galileo, but we really have a lot to gain by looking more closely at Copernicus." Copernicus is Europe's space-based earth observation and monitoring programme. Like Galileo, it delivers data openly and freely in a wide range of application areas, with both operational data and information services.

"The joint use of EGNSS, Galileo and EGNOS, and Earth observation data enables a number of applications of great interest to the mapping and surveying communities. There are a big number of potential value-added applications for the agriculture sector, for smart cities, road transport, maritime navigation, emergency and crisis management, in addition to utilities and many others,” Blasi said.

Read this: EGNSS and EO: A promising convergence for sustainable development

"These synergies exist in many market segments," he said, "for example in biomass monitoring, hydrographical offshore surveying or border surveillance. There are other examples in the area of precision agriculture, where Copernicus can deliver very detailed information about soil humidity and composition, which you can then use to generate metre- and centimetre-level maps of soil parameters." Farmers can then overlay Galileo- and EGNOS-generated location maps to guide targeted irrigation and other operations in their fields. In another vital area, that of environmental management, Copernicus delivers key information on the state of forests, water quality and snow cover, while again Galileo and EGNOS can provide precise guidance to specific areas of interest.

Based on the level of interest shown by the numerous visitors at the Galileo and Copernicus display, the EU space programmes are likely to remain a fixture at the event. The next InterGEO will take place in Berlin, 2020!

CLGE winner

InterGEO was also the scene of the 8th CLGE Students’ Contest award ceremony, including the GSA special prize encouraging innovative ideas leveraging the use of EGNOS, Galileo and Copernicus. This year’s winner of the GSA category was Pablo Pinto Santos, from Universitat Politècnica de València, with his paper titled “GNSS Open Service Case Study: Development of SW Tools for Assessing GPS and GALILEO Positioning Performances by Means of Post-Processing Single-Frequency Pseudorange Observations”.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Joint use of EGNSS and Earth observation enables applications of great interest to the mapping and surveying communities.

EGNSS perspectives at InterGEO Stuttgart

16.10.2019 10:25  
Joint use of EGNSS and Earth observation enables applications of great interest to the mapping and surveying communities.
Published: 
16 October 2019

The InterGEO conference and trade show continues to be a positive occasion to highlight Europe's GNSS services in the fields of geodesy, geo-information, land management and related areas.

With over half a million event website users and over 16,000 visitors from 92 countries at the conference and trade show, InterGEO is one of the key platforms for industry dialogue around the world. The event covers a wide variety of fields, ranging from surveying, geo-information, remote sensing and photogrammetry to complementary solutions and technologies. 

Shared space with Copernicus

As such, InterGEO is the ideal platform for highlighting both of Europe's flagship space programmes, Galileo and Copernicus. Speaking at the shared Galileo and Copernicus stand at InterGEO 2019, GSA Market Development Officer Reinhard Blasi said: "This is now the third time that we have shared a common space with Copernicus at this event. The GNSS community of course knows about Galileo, but we really have a lot to gain by looking more closely at Copernicus." Copernicus is Europe's space-based earth observation and monitoring programme. Like Galileo, it delivers data openly and freely in a wide range of application areas, with both operational data and information services.

"The joint use of EGNSS, Galileo and EGNOS, and Earth observation data enables a number of applications of great interest to the mapping and surveying communities. There are a big number of potential value-added applications for the agriculture sector, for smart cities, road transport, maritime navigation, emergency and crisis management, in addition to utilities and many others,” Blasi said.

Read this: EGNSS and EO: A promising convergence for sustainable development

"These synergies exist in many market segments," he said, "for example in biomass monitoring, hydrographical offshore surveying or border surveillance. There are other examples in the area of precision agriculture, where Copernicus can deliver very detailed information about soil humidity and composition, which you can then use to generate metre- and centimetre-level maps of soil parameters." Farmers can then overlay Galileo- and EGNOS-generated location maps to guide targeted irrigation and other operations in their fields. In another vital area, that of environmental management, Copernicus delivers key information on the state of forests, water quality and snow cover, while again Galileo and EGNOS can provide precise guidance to specific areas of interest.

Based on the level of interest shown by the numerous visitors at the Galileo and Copernicus display, the EU space programmes are likely to remain a fixture at the event. The next InterGEO will take place in Berlin, 2020!

CLGE winner

InterGEO was also the scene of the 8th CLGE Students’ Contest award ceremony, including the GSA special prize encouraging innovative ideas leveraging the use of EGNOS, Galileo and Copernicus. This year’s winner of the GSA category was Pablo Pinto Santos, from Universitat Politècnica de València, with his paper titled “GNSS Open Service Case Study: Development of SW Tools for Assessing GPS and GALILEO Positioning Performances by Means of Post-Processing Single-Frequency Pseudorange Observations”.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Joint use of EGNSS and Earth observation enables applications of great interest to the mapping and surveying communities.

European GNSS Agency (GSA) releases 6th GNSS Market Report

15.10.2019 9:47  
The GSA GNSS Market Report has become the go-to reference for all GNSS market players.
Published: 
15 October 2019

The GNSS market is developing rapidly. Demand for precise location information is also growing and the evolution of GNSS technology is ongoing. In this environment, the 6th issue of the GSA GNSS Market Report, officially launched today, is a valuable tool enabling all stakeholders to skilfully navigate and benefit from the flourishing GNSS market.

The 6th issue of the GSA’s GNSS Market Report provides comprehensive information on the dynamic global GNSS market along with in-depth analysis of the latest global trends and developments.

Key findings from the report:

  • Global GNSS downstream market revenue from both devices and services will grow from €150 bln in 2019 to €325 bln in 2029;
  • The global installed base of GNSS devices in use will increase from 6.4 bln in 2019 to 9.6 bln in 2029;
  • In 2017, European companies accounted for an estimated 27% of the global GNSS market;
  • In 2029, revenue from GNSS added value services will amount to €166 bln, accounting for 51% of total global GNSS revenue.

Growth on the GNSS market will be stimulated by global macro trends such as digitalisation, big data, the sharing economy and artificial intelligence, all of which use GNSS for position, navigation and timing. In combination with other technologies, GNSS will also contribute to tackling the climate change challenge by supporting environmentally friendly transport solutions, sustainable agriculture and meteorological monitoring.

To read the report in full, download it for free here.

A valuable resource

“The GNSS market is at a very exciting stage in its development and will expand rapidly in the coming years. By offering a comprehensive overview of the current market situation, along with forecasts of how the market is likely to develop to 2029, the latest issue of the GSA Market Report is a valuable resource for all GNSS market stakeholders,” says GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. “This is a real tool that European companies can use to develop their market entry strategies for new products and services.”

Regularly referenced by policy-makers and business leaders around the world, the GNSS Market Report serves as the go-to resource for anybody requiring an in-depth look at GNSS market opportunities and trends across key market segments.

“The analysis and data-based forecasts in the GNSS Market Report are eagerly awaited by all GNSS market stakeholders. The previous issue of the Market Report was downloaded over 60,000 times since it was published in 2017, and the report has served as a key tool for GNSS market players from global corporations and SMEs to R&D organisations and academia,” said GSA Chief Operating Officer Pascal Claudel. “The high number of downloads is a clear indicator of the value that is placed on the unique blend of GNSS market intelligence and expertise that the GSA and its staff has acquired over the years,” he said.

What’s new in issue 6?

In the 2019 edition of the GNSS Market Report, the number of GNSS market segments reviewed has increased to 10: Consumer Solutions, Road, Manned Aviation, Drones, Maritime, Emergency Response, Rail, Agriculture, Geomatics and Critical Infrastructure. 

This allows more specific and accurate findings:

  • Road and Consumer Solutions dominate all other market segments in terms of cumulative revenue, and will account for a combined 93.3% in 2019-2029;
  • Of the remaining revenue, more than 50% will be generated by Agriculture and Geomatics;
  • Drones have become a significant GNSS market segment, exceeding mature segments such as maritime, aviation and agriculture in terms of shipments.

The New Space market is the focus of the Editor’s Special section in this year’s report. This section examines key trends behind the rapid growth in the number of spacecraft in use, with a particular focus on growth in private low Earth orbit (LEO) service providers and on Galileo’s contribution to the Space Service Volume (SSV).

“In the latest version of the GNSS Market Report, we have updated the market segments to better reflect the actual situation on the market. This section of the report provides analysis of key trends and recent developments in each segment, along with predictions on how the market will evolve, allowing readers to keep track of developments as they unfold on this dynamic market,” said Fiammetta Diani, the GSA’s Head of Market Development.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GSA GNSS Market Report has become the go-to reference for all GNSS market players.

Galileo and EGNOS featured at InterGEO 2019

14.10.2019 13:24  
GSA Market Development Innovation Officer Eduard Escalona speaking at the InterGEO Galileo workshop
Published: 
14 October 2019

Galileo and EGNOS were the focus of attention at a special workshop at this year's InterGEO in Stuttgart. InterGEO is the world's leading conference and trade fair for geodesy, geo-information and land management.

InterGEO provided an opportunity to give an update on the status of the Galileo and EGNOS programmes and to present user case studies at a special workshop focusing on the geomatics market. 

In his presentation at the conference, Eduard Escalona, Market Development Innovation Officer at the European GNSS Agency (GSA), stressed the key role of GNSS. “GNSS is a cornerstone in many areas: It is a fundamental element for cadastral surveying, in the construction sector, in mining, land surveying and mapping activities, for all geographic information systems (GIS), for infrastructure monitoring and for marine surveying. For all of you who are working in these and many other areas, Galileo is now helping to provide the GNSS services you need," he said.

Dual frequency boosting market

The European GNSS programmes, Galileo and EGNOS, continue to move forward in terms of adoption by the professional market and among general users, thanks in no small part to the development of dual-frequency capability.

Traditionally, mobile, location-based applications have been powered by single-frequency GNSS receivers operating under stringent battery-power and footprint constraints. With a dual-frequency chipset, these devices now benefit from better accuracy, ionosphere error cancellation, improved tracking and better multipath resistance.

Read this: European GNSS supports smarter mobility

Galileo, as it happens, is leading the way in the area of dual-frequency signal delivery, now with more dual-frequency operational satellites in orbit than any other GNSS system. Market uptake of Galileo receivers has been impressive; in addition to the geomatics-related areas of particular interest to the InterGEO public, dual-frequency GNSS chipsets are also appearing in the automotive sector, where connected cars and autonomous vehicles present a clear and pressing need for accurate and reliable positioning information.

New services to come

"To date, more than one billion Galileo-enabled devices have been sold," said Escalona, "but Galileo isn't standing still, waiting. We are proposing new services to appear in the coming years." These include the much-anticipated High-Accuracy Service (HAS) and a new Authentication Service. "The HAS will be a free, globally available service providing an accuracy of 20 cm, with PPP [Precise Point Positioning] corrections." Meanwhile, the Authentication Service (OS-NMA) will provide protection against jamming, spoofing and meaconing on the E1B signal and a separate Signal Authentication Service (SAS) will provide an even higher level of protection on the E6 signal.

"EGNOS is currently working with GPS but of course we are looking forward to augmenting Galileo in the near future," said Sergio Cabrera Bona, EGNOS Service Adoption Tools Engineer at the European Satellite Services Provider, whose core activities comprise EGNOS operations and service provision.

And this: GSA GNSS Market Report

"GNSS is critical in all of these fields, whether it is mapping and GIS, farming, forestry, thermal pictures, management of natural terrains," Cabrera said. He went on to list some other areas, including management and inspection of utilities, power networks, water supply, telecoms, drones, inventory, surveying, field campaigns and determination of perimeters in agriculture as other areas where GNSS plays a key role. 

"It is not possible to mention all of the activities where you need reliable positioning. What you have to know is that with EGNOS augmentations you already have a horizontal accuracy below one metre and a vertical accuracy below two metres, so this is a very good accuracy," he said.

There is much more that could potentially be done right now, Cabrera explained. "Most of the professional equipment is already EGNOS-enabled, but in practice users do not always configure their equipment correctly to exploit this capability. EGNOS adoption and support is going ahead full speed, but in the GNSS device market, many users still do not know they can use EGNOS. So the education process remains an ongoing effort,” he said.

Cabrera explained that the EGNOS user support website can be an important part of this educational drive on the top of the help desk. "We have very interesting tools and resources available online. For example, we will have a new EGNOS usability map available very soon on the website. With this tool you will be able to easily see the current availability of EGNOS signals in your location, which will be very useful especially in urban environments, for example. We also have many user support services and there is a new mobile app coming, so please visit our website and take advantage of EGNOS. It is there for you." 

Introducing the GSC

Galileo services improvement expert Pedro Gómez Martínez informed participants about the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC), defining both the concept of operations as well as the procedures necessary to provide the services that the GSA offers to Galileo users.

"The European GNSS Service Centre is the single interface between the infrastructure and users of the Galileo open services, commercial service and search and rescue service (SAR)," said Gómez. "So the GSC is a centre that provides experts, know-how, evaluation of capability, distribution of information and support for the provision of value-added services provided by the Galileo system."

Read this: MyGalileoApp – targeting the future of mobility

The GSC website is a core resource for Galileo users, Gómez said, reporting real-time system status and incident notifications, with a bank of key documents and a full-time help desk. "It is very important for us that this is a two-way interactive service that includes your feed-back. We need you to report any incidents that you might experience related to the product, service and data provision. We are very interested in user satisfaction, and we want to know how you respond to improvements. And of course, in general, we are here to promote GNSS in all its forms, in all areas, for all users."

The GSC launched a new version of its website in the run-up to the InterGEO event. "More than ever we are making it easier for you to engage in dialogue with us and to provide your feedback. This is very important to us with new services coming up in the future," Gomez said.

Research fundamentals

"One of the very important responsibilities of the GSA is the management of a number of EGNSS research and development programmes," said Eduard Escalona. "We have Horizon 2020, the European Union's research Framework Programme. There we have a final call for proposals coming up in November, with a deadline in March 2020. The GSA also is overseeing the Fundamental Elements programme, which is funding research specifically targeted at developing Galileo-enabled chipsets, receivers and related technologies."

To illustrate Escalona's point, the presentations featured EU-funded GNSS-related research projects leveraging the accuracy and integrity offered by Galileo. Pere Molina of Geonumerics presented the MapKite project. Funded under Horizon 2020 and now completed, MapKite integrates an Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) and a Mobile Mapping System (MMS) for simultaneous capture of geo-data from the air and from the ground. Molina showed data from a successful corridor mapping exercise run using the MapKite system.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

GSA Market Development Innovation Officer Eduard Escalona speaking at the InterGEO Galileo workshop

Galileo and EGNOS featured at InterGEO 2019

14.10.2019 13:24  
GSA Market Development Innovation Officer Eduard Escalona speaking at the InterGEO Galileo workshop
Published: 
14 October 2019

Galileo and EGNOS were the focus of attention at a special workshop at this year's InterGEO in Stuttgart. InterGEO is the world's leading conference and trade fair for geodesy, geo-information and land management.

InterGEO provided an opportunity to give an update on the status of the Galileo and EGNOS programmes and to present user case studies at a special workshop focusing on the geomatics market. 

In his presentation at the conference, Eduard Escalona, Market Development Innovation Officer at the European GNSS Agency (GSA), stressed the key role of GNSS. “GNSS is a cornerstone in many areas: It is a fundamental element for cadastral surveying, in the construction sector, in mining, land surveying and mapping activities, for all geographic information systems (GIS), for infrastructure monitoring and for marine surveying. For all of you who are working in these and many other areas, Galileo is now helping to provide the GNSS services you need," he said.

Dual frequency boosting market

The European GNSS programmes, Galileo and EGNOS, continue to move forward in terms of adoption by the professional market and among general users, thanks in no small part to the development of dual-frequency capability.

Traditionally, mobile, location-based applications have been powered by single-frequency GNSS receivers operating under stringent battery-power and footprint constraints. With a dual-frequency chipset, these devices now benefit from better accuracy, ionosphere error cancellation, improved tracking and better multipath resistance.

Read this: European GNSS supports smarter mobility

Galileo, as it happens, is leading the way in the area of dual-frequency signal delivery, now with more dual-frequency operational satellites in orbit than any other GNSS system. Market uptake of Galileo receivers has been impressive; in addition to the geomatics-related areas of particular interest to the InterGEO public, dual-frequency GNSS chipsets are also appearing in the automotive sector, where connected cars and autonomous vehicles present a clear and pressing need for accurate and reliable positioning information.

New services to come

"To date, more than one billion Galileo-enabled devices have been sold," said Escalona, "but Galileo isn't standing still, waiting. We are proposing new services to appear in the coming years." These include the much-anticipated High-Accuracy Service (HAS) and a new Authentication Service. "The HAS will be a free, globally available service providing an accuracy of 20 cm, with PPP [Precise Point Positioning] corrections." Meanwhile, the Authentication Service (OS-NMA) will provide protection against jamming, spoofing and meaconing on the E1B signal and a separate Signal Authentication Service (SAS) will provide an even higher level of protection on the E6 signal.

"EGNOS is currently working with GPS but of course we are looking forward to augmenting Galileo in the near future," said Sergio Cabrera Bona, EGNOS Service Adoption Tools Engineer at the European Satellite Services Provider, whose core activities comprise EGNOS operations and service provision.

And this: GSA GNSS Market Report

"GNSS is critical in all of these fields, whether it is mapping and GIS, farming, forestry, thermal pictures, management of natural terrains," Cabrera said. He went on to list some other areas, including management and inspection of utilities, power networks, water supply, telecoms, drones, inventory, surveying, field campaigns and determination of perimeters in agriculture as other areas where GNSS plays a key role. 

"It is not possible to mention all of the activities where you need reliable positioning. What you have to know is that with EGNOS augmentations you already have a horizontal accuracy below one metre and a vertical accuracy below two metres, so this is a very good accuracy," he said.

There is much more that could potentially be done right now, Cabrera explained. "Most of the professional equipment is already EGNOS-enabled, but in practice users do not always configure their equipment correctly to exploit this capability. EGNOS adoption and support is going ahead full speed, but in the GNSS device market, many users still do not know they can use EGNOS. So the education process remains an ongoing effort,” he said.

Cabrera explained that the EGNOS user support website can be an important part of this educational drive on the top of the help desk. "We have very interesting tools and resources available online. For example, we will have a new EGNOS visibility map available very soon on the website. With this tool you will be able to easily see the current availability of EGNOS signals in your location, which will be very useful especially in urban environments, for example. We also have many user support services and there is a new mobile app coming, so please visit our website and take advantage of EGNOS. It is there for you." 

Introducing the GSC

Galileo services improvement expert Pedro Gómez Martínez informed participants about the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC), defining both the concept of operations as well as the procedures necessary to provide the services that the GSA offers to Galileo users.

"The European GNSS Service Centre is the single interface between the infrastructure and users of the Galileo open services, commercial service and search and rescue service (SAR)," said Gómez. "So the GSC is a centre that provides experts, know-how, evaluation of capability, distribution of information and support for the provision of value-added services provided by the Galileo system."

Read this: MyGalileoApp – targeting the future of mobility

The GSC website is a core resource for Galileo users, Gómez said, reporting real-time system status and incident notifications, with a bank of key documents and a full-time help desk. "It is very important for us that this is a two-way interactive service that includes your feed-back. We need you to report any incidents that you might experience related to the product, service and data provision. We are very interested in user satisfaction, and we want to know how you respond to improvements. And of course, in general, we are here to promote GNSS in all its forms, in all areas, for all users."

The GSC launched a new version of its website in the run-up to the InterGEO event. "More than ever we are making it easier for you to engage in dialogue with us and to provide your feedback. This is very important to us with new services coming up in the future," Gomez said.

Research fundamentals

"One of the very important responsibilities of the GSA is the management of a number of EGNSS research and development programmes," said Eduard Escalona. "We have Horizon 2020, the European Union's research Framework Programme. There we have a final call for proposals coming up in November, with a deadline in March 2020. The GSA also is overseeing the Fundamental Elements programme, which is funding research specifically targeted at developing Galileo-enabled chipsets, receivers and related technologies."

To illustrate Escalona's point, the presentations featured EU-funded GNSS-related research projects leveraging the accuracy and integrity offered by Galileo. Pere Molina of Geonumerics presented the MapKite project. Funded under Horizon 2020 and now completed, MapKite integrates an Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) and a Mobile Mapping System (MMS) for simultaneous capture of geo-data from the air and from the ground. Molina showed data from a successful corridor mapping exercise run using the MapKite system.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

GSA Market Development Innovation Officer Eduard Escalona speaking at the InterGEO Galileo workshop

Galileo and EGNOS featured at InterGEO 2019

14.10.2019 13:24  
GSA Market Development Innovation Officer Eduard Escalona speaking at the InterGEO Galileo workshop
Published: 
14 October 2019

Galileo and EGNOS were the focus of attention at a special workshop at this year's InterGEO in Stuttgart. InterGEO is the world's leading conference and trade fair for geodesy, geo-information and land management.

InterGEO provided an opportunity to give an update on the status of the Galileo and EGNOS programmes and to present user case studies at a special workshop focusing on the geomatics market. 

In his presentation at the conference, Eduard Escalona, Market Development Innovation Officer at the European GNSS Agency (GSA), stressed the key role of GNSS. “GNSS is a cornerstone in many areas: It is a fundamental element for cadastral surveying, in the construction sector, in mining, land surveying and mapping activities, for all geographic information systems (GIS), for infrastructure monitoring and for marine surveying. For all of you who are working in these and many other areas, Galileo is now helping to provide the GNSS services you need," he said.

Dual frequency boosting market

The European GNSS programmes, Galileo and EGNOS, continue to move forward in terms of adoption by the professional market and among general users, thanks in no small part to the development of dual-frequency capability.

Traditionally, mobile, location-based applications have been powered by single-frequency GNSS receivers operating under stringent battery-power and footprint constraints. With a dual-frequency chipset, these devices now benefit from better accuracy, ionosphere error cancellation, improved tracking and better multipath resistance.

Read this: European GNSS supports smarter mobility

Galileo, as it happens, is leading the way in the area of dual-frequency signal delivery, now with more dual-frequency operational satellites in orbit than any other GNSS system. Market uptake of Galileo receivers has been impressive; in addition to the geomatics-related areas of particular interest to the InterGEO public, dual-frequency GNSS chipsets are also appearing in the automotive sector, where connected cars and autonomous vehicles present a clear and pressing need for accurate and reliable positioning information.

New services to come

"To date, more than one billion Galileo-enabled devices have been sold," said Escalona, "but Galileo isn't standing still, waiting. We are proposing new services to appear in the coming years." These include the much-anticipated High-Accuracy Service (HAS) and a new Authentication Service. "The HAS will be a free, globally available service providing an accuracy of 20 cm, with PPP [Precise Point Positioning] corrections." Meanwhile, the Authentication Service (OS-NMA) will provide protection against jamming, spoofing and meaconing on the E1B signal and a separate Signal Authentication Service (SAS) will provide an even higher level of protection on the E6 signal.

"EGNOS is currently working with GPS but of course we are looking forward to augmenting Galileo in the near future," said Sergio Cabrera Bona, EGNOS Service Adoption Tools Engineer at the European Satellite Services Provider, whose core activities comprise EGNOS operations and service provision.

And this: GSA GNSS Market Report

"GNSS is critical in all of these fields, whether it is mapping and GIS, farming, forestry, thermal pictures, management of natural terrains," Cabrera said. He went on to list some other areas, including management and inspection of utilities, power networks, water supply, telecoms, drones, inventory, surveying, field campaigns and determination of perimeters in agriculture as other areas where GNSS plays a key role. 

"It is not possible to mention all of the activities where you need reliable positioning. What you have to know is that with EGNOS augmentations you already have a horizontal accuracy below one metre and a vertical accuracy below two metres, so this is a very good accuracy," he said.

There is much more that could potentially be done right now, Cabrera explained. "Most of the professional equipment is already EGNOS-enabled, but in practice users do not always configure their equipment correctly to exploit this capability. EGNOS adoption and support is going ahead full speed, but in the GNSS device market, many users still do not know they can use EGNOS. So the education process remains an ongoing effort,” he said.

Cabrera explained that the EGNOS user support website can be an important part of this educational drive on the top of the help desk. "We have very interesting tools and resources available online. For example, we will have a new EGNOS usability map available very soon on the website. With this tool you will be able to easily see the current availability of EGNOS signals in your location, which will be very useful especially in urban environments, for example. We also have many user support services and there is a new mobile app coming, so please visit our website and take advantage of EGNOS. It is there for you." 

Introducing the GSC

Galileo services improvement expert Pedro Gómez Martínez informed participants about the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC), defining both the concept of operations as well as the procedures necessary to provide the services that the GSA offers to Galileo users.

"The European GNSS Service Centre is the single interface between the infrastructure and users of the Galileo open services, commercial service and search and rescue service (SAR)," said Gómez. "So the GSC is a centre that provides experts, know-how, evaluation of capability, distribution of information and support for the provision of value-added services provided by the Galileo system."

Read this: MyGalileoApp – targeting the future of mobility

The GSC website is a core resource for Galileo users, Gómez said, reporting real-time system status and incident notifications, with a bank of key documents and a full-time help desk. "It is very important for us that this is a two-way interactive service that includes your feed-back. We need you to report any incidents that you might experience related to the product, service and data provision. We are very interested in user satisfaction, and we want to know how you respond to improvements. And of course, in general, we are here to promote GNSS in all its forms, in all areas, for all users."

The GSC launched a new version of its website in the run-up to the InterGEO event. "More than ever we are making it easier for you to engage in dialogue with us and to provide your feedback. This is very important to us with new services coming up in the future," Gomez said.

Research fundamentals

"One of the very important responsibilities of the GSA is the management of a number of EGNSS research and development programmes," said Eduard Escalona. "We have Horizon 2020, the European Union's research Framework Programme. There we have a final call for proposals coming up in November, with a deadline in March 2020. The GSA also is overseeing the Fundamental Elements programme, which is funding research specifically targeted at developing Galileo-enabled chipsets, receivers and related technologies."

To illustrate Escalona's point, the presentations featured EU-funded GNSS-related research projects leveraging the accuracy and integrity offered by Galileo. Pere Molina of Geonumerics presented the MapKite project. Funded under Horizon 2020 and now completed, MapKite integrates an Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) and a Mobile Mapping System (MMS) for simultaneous capture of geo-data from the air and from the ground. Molina showed data from a successful corridor mapping exercise run using the MapKite system.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

GSA Market Development Innovation Officer Eduard Escalona speaking at the InterGEO Galileo workshop

GSA, WGIC sign cooperation agreement

11.10.2019 12:11  
The GSA-WGIC agreement will increase the joint contribution of geospatial and satellite navigation technology to a wide range of projects.
Published: 
11 October 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) and the World Geospatial Industry Council (WGIC) have signed a memorandum covering cooperation to promote the combined use of geospatial technology and European satellite navigation systems, to jointly contribute to projects across a wide range of activities, from sustainable development and achieving global development agendas, including the SDGs, to innovative opportunities that benefit citizens and enterprises.

“The benefits of global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) are everywhere. GNSS plays a critical role in driving innovations for future economic growth, sustainability for businesses as well as public services,” said GSA Chief Operating Officer Pascal Claudel at the signing ceremony, which was held in Stuttgart, Germany on 19 September. 

Instrumental association

Claudel noted that space is a tangible service that addresses the need for apps among growing smartphones user communities, navigation systems for smart transport, accuracy for position, timing for flight landings, and much more. “This association with WGIC will be instrumental in leveraging the collective technical capabilities of geospatial information and space technology across different sectors, professional services and applications,” he said.

Read this: GSA, EIB sign agreement on investment in space

“GNSS and positioning technologies enable positional accuracy, time and precision for strategic insights, using geospatial information for location based services, smart transportation, mapping and surveying, facilitating development of innovative applications across various sectors of the economy,” said WGIC Secretary General and CEO Sanjay Kumar. 

“WGIC, with its member network from the entire ecosystem of the industry, is the single largest industry association worldwide to bring together all the stakeholders and partners to work in tandem towards successfully leveraging the potential of such technology collaborations,” he said.

New dialogue paradigms

This association between the GSA and WGIC will create new paradigms for dialogue on harnessing GNSS and geospatial technical capabilities. Both organisations will work closely to develop joint programmes and facilitate strategic dialogue to encourage the wider adoption of geospatial and GNSS capabilities for commercial as well as public institutions, towards the ultimate goal of achieving greater public good.

 Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GSA-WGIC agreement will increase the joint contribution of geospatial and satellite navigation technology to a wide range of projects.

EUTELSAT 5 West B successfully launched with EGNOS payload

10.10.2019 9:59  
Testing of the EGNOS GEO-3 payload will begin 2 weeks after the launch of EUTELSAT 5 West B.
Published: 
10 October 2019

The EUTELSAT 5 West B satellite was successfully launched on a Proton M/Breeze M launch vehicle from Pad 39 at Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, at 12.17 CET on Wednesday 9 October. Hosting the GEO-3 payload of the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay System (EGNOS), the satellite will support EGNOS V3 - the next generation of the EGNOS programme.

The satellite separated from the launch vehicle 15 hours 36 minutes after the launch and testing of the EGNOS GEO-3 payload should start within 2 weeks after separation. 

EGNOS V3 will augment both GPS and Galileo in the L1 and L5 bands. Furthermore, it will provide additional satellite-based augmentation system (SBAS) service capabilities through a new SBAS channel on L5 and will deliver increased EGNOS service availability within and beyond the EU Member States, supporting a growing number of users. 

“This new EGNOS payload will be key in developing and testing EGNOS V3 - the latest evolution of the system. This launch is also a first decisive step in the implementation of the EGNOS Space Segment roadmap defined by the GSA. Together with the next GEO-4 payload, which is under procurement, it will allow the programme to ensure a smooth transition to EGNOS V3 operations, with swaps between GEOs ensuring that the programme provides adequate service robustness to its increasing user base,” said EGNOS Services Programme Manager Jean-Marc Piéplu.

Read this: Airbus awarded EGNOS V3 contract

Reinforced security

The next generation of the EGNOS programme will also benefit from reinforced security, which will increase the robustness of EGNOS services against potential threats. EGNOS V3 will be made available in 2024 and will augment Galileo signals from 2025.

“This successful launch is an important milestone for the EU space programmes EGNOS and Galileo. It is carrying to orbit the foundation stone of the next generation of EGNOS, which will improve and expand EGNOS service provision and enable the programme to augment signals from Galileo satellites, bringing EGNSS full circle,” European GNSS Agency (GSA) Executive Director Carlo des Dorides said.

Supporting economic growth

The current EGNOS generation – EGNOS V2 – is already improving positioning accuracy and supporting applications in a range of sectors – from precision agriculture and shipping to the aviation sector. To learn more about the role of EGNOS in aviation, watch our new EGNOS for Aviation video here.

And this: Europe’s economy is increasingly dependent on space - ITRE committee hears

“Space plays an increasingly important role in the lives of Europeans, with about 10% of Europe’s economy and large numbers of jobs in various sectors dependent on space services. This launch implemented by EUTELSAT through their 5 West B satellite, and the subsequent evolution of EGNOS, will ensure that the European programmes Galileo and EGNOS continue to support economic growth in Europe and deliver services to European citizens,” said GSA Chief Operating Officer Pascal Claudel.

About EGNOS

EGNOS is Europe's regional satellite-based augmentation system (SBAS). It is currently used to improve the performance of GPS and will augment Galileo from 2025 onwards. EGNOS was deployed to provide safety of life navigation services to aviation, maritime and land-based users.

EGNOS uses GNSS measurements taken by reference stations deployed mainly across Europe and North Africa. These measurements are transferred to a central computing centre where differential corrections and integrity messages are calculated. These calculations are then broadcast over the covered area using geostationary satellites that serve as an augmentation, or overlay, to the original GNSS message. 

The information provided by EGNOS improves the accuracy and reliability of GNSS positioning information while also providing a crucial integrity message. In addition, EGNOS also transmits an accurate time signal.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Testing of the EGNOS GEO-3 payload will begin 2 weeks after the launch of EUTELSAT 5 West B.

EUTELSAT 5 West B successfully launched with EGNOS payload

10.10.2019 9:59  
Testing of the EGNOS GEO-3 payload will begin 2 weeks after the launch of EUTELSAT 5 West B.
Published: 
10 October 2019

The EUTELSAT 5 West B satellite was successfully launched on a Proton M/Breeze M launch vehicle from Pad 39 at Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, at 12.17 CET on Wednesday 9 October. Hosting the GEO-3 payload of the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay System (EGNOS), the satellite will support EGNOS V3 - the next generation of the EGNOS programme.

The satellite separated from the launch vehicle 15 hours 36 minutes after the launch and testing of the EGNOS GEO-3 payload should start within 2 weeks after separation. 

EGNOS V3 will augment both GPS and Galileo in the L1 and L5 bands. Furthermore, it will provide additional satellite-based augmentation system (SBAS) service capabilities through a new SBAS channel on L5 and will deliver increased EGNOS service availability within and beyond the EU Member States, supporting a growing number of users. 

“This new EGNOS payload will be key in developing and testing EGNOS V3 - the latest evolution of the system. This launch is also a first decisive step in the implementation of the EGNOS Space Segment roadmap defined by the GSA. Together with the next GEO-4 payload, which is under procurement, it will allow the programme to ensure a smooth transition to EGNOS V3 operations, with swaps between GEOs ensuring that the programme provides adequate service robustness to its increasing user base,” said EGNOS Services Programme Manager Jean-Marc Piéplu.

Read this: Airbus awarded EGNOS V3 contract

Reinforced security

The next generation of the EGNOS programme will also benefit from reinforced security, which will increase the robustness of EGNOS services against potential threats. EGNOS V3 will be made available in 2024 and will augment Galileo signals from 2025.

“This successful launch is an important milestone for the EU space programmes EGNOS and Galileo. It is carrying to orbit the foundation stone of the next generation of EGNOS, which will improve and expand EGNOS service provision and enable the programme to augment signals from Galileo satellites, bringing EGNSS full circle,” European GNSS Agency (GSA) Executive Director Carlo des Dorides said.

Supporting economic growth

The current EGNOS generation – EGNOS V2 – is already improving positioning accuracy and supporting applications in a range of sectors – from precision agriculture and shipping to the aviation sector. To learn more about the role of EGNOS in aviation, watch our new EGNOS for Aviation video here.

And this: Europe’s economy is increasingly dependent on space - ITRE committee hears

“Space plays an increasingly important role in the lives of Europeans, with about 10% of Europe’s economy and large numbers of jobs in various sectors dependent on space services. This launch implemented by EUTELSAT through their 5 West B satellite, and the subsequent evolution of EGNOS, will ensure that the European programmes Galileo and EGNOS continue to support economic growth in Europe and deliver services to European citizens,” said GSA Chief Operating Officer Pascal Claudel.

About EGNOS

EGNOS is Europe's regional satellite-based augmentation system (SBAS). It is currently used to improve the performance of GPS and will augment Galileo from 2025 onwards. EGNOS was deployed to provide safety of life navigation services to aviation, maritime and land-based users.

EGNOS uses GNSS measurements taken by reference stations deployed mainly across Europe and North Africa. These measurements are transferred to a central computing centre where differential corrections and integrity messages are calculated. These calculations are then broadcast over the covered area using geostationary satellites that serve as an augmentation, or overlay, to the original GNSS message. 

The information provided by EGNOS improves the accuracy and reliability of GNSS positioning information while also providing a crucial integrity message. In addition, EGNOS also transmits an accurate time signal.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Testing of the EGNOS GEO-3 payload will begin 2 weeks after the launch of EUTELSAT 5 West B.

Remote beacon activation with Galileo return link successfully tested

9.10.2019 9:20  
End-to-end tests were successfully carried out with remote beacon activation using the Galileo Return Link Service on Iberia and Air France planes.
Published: 
09 October 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) together with Orolia, CNES, Enaire, Spanish Mission Coordination Centre (MCC), Spanish Rescue Coordination Center (RCC) and French MCC, have successfully performed end-to-end test tests with the airlines Iberia and Air France on remote beacon activation using the Galileo Return Link Service (RLS). The tests helped to assess and validate the operational concept for a potential new use of Galileo to support fast response in distress situations.

The goal of the end-to-end test with Iberia and Air France, which was conducted on 16 and 19 September respectively, was to validate the operational concept for remote aviation beacon activation being developed by Eurocae Working Group-98 SG-1 RLS, as well as to test the usability of the end user interfaces. This is relevant for airspace users in specific confirmed distress situations when aircraft are no longer tracked by Air Traffic Service Units (ATSUs) and no contact can be established. This includes the case of non-cooperative crew when other means have failed.

A very positive outcome

The pilot case was performed in the framework of the Horizon 2020 HELIOS project, led by beacon manufacturer Orolia, which provided its ELT-DT prototype, the first Galileo model to hit the market. The pilot case simulated a real aircraft distress scenario: the Operational Control Center at Iberia confirmed the loss of information from a flight in the Atlantic and, following the standard procedures, performed the necessary operations with the Air Traffic Control at Enaire and the responsible Spanish Rescue Coordination Centre (RCC).

The team that took part in the successful testing of the remote beacon activation with Galileo return link.

Read this: World’s first Galileo-enabled PLB launched

Then, the participants declared a distress situation and agreed to activate the beacon. The interface with the airlines and the beacon activation with the Galileo RLS were implemented by the Galileo Service Centre and the French National Centre for Space Studies (CNES), which enabled the remote beacon activation by the Return Link Service Provider. 

 “We are extremely happy with the successful tests of the Galileo Return Link Service for this potential new use, which is a very positive outcome and one that bodes well for the future implementation of the service. The Return Link Service, whereby the sender of a distress signal is informed that their message has been received and successfully processed, is a key differentiator of Galileo and one that will result in many more lives saved,” said Pascal Claudel, GSA Chief Operating Officer.

Watch this: Galileo Search and Rescue

Efficient management of distress situations meeting users’ needs

The user interfaces were successfully tested, deriving additional requirements and feedback from the airline as the final user of the service. “This is a new functionality with high value that can support mitigation and efficient management of potential emergency situations,” said Jaime del Moral, Flight Watch & ATFM manager at Iberia.

The beacon was successfully activated within two minutes, enabling the efficient management of the distress situation. Remote deactivation was also tested, following a simulation of recovery of normal flight conditions. “The possibility for remote beacon activation is a positive innovation and would be very useful for all stakeholders involved in distress management, with a positive impact on safety,” said Montserrat Redondo, Air Traffic Control Centre Manager at Enaire. 

From the rescue centre perspective, Lieutenant Colonel Molina, Head of RCC Madrid highlighted “the great benefits of remote activation of ELT-DTs by Galileo to react in aircraft distress situations when it is not possible to locate the aircraft by other means”.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

End-to-end tests were successfully carried out with remote beacon activation using the Galileo Return Link Service on Iberia and Air France planes.

Remote beacon activation with Galileo return link successfully tested

9.10.2019 9:20  
End-to-end tests were successfully carried out with remote beacon activation using the Galileo Return Link Service on Iberia and Air France planes.
Published: 
09 October 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) together with Orolia, CNES, Enaire, Spanish Mission Coordination Centre (MCC), Spanish Rescue Coordination Center (RCC) and French MCC, have successfully performed end-to-end test tests with the airlines Iberia and Air France on remote beacon activation using the Galileo Return Link Service (RLS). The tests helped to assess and validate the operational concept for a potential new use of Galileo to support fast response in distress situations.

The goal of the end-to-end test with Iberia and Air France, which was conducted on 16 and 19 September respectively, was to validate the operational concept for remote aviation beacon activation being developed by Eurocae Working Group-98 SG-1 RLS, as well as to test the usability of the end user interfaces. This is relevant for airspace users in specific confirmed distress situations when aircraft are no longer tracked by Air Traffic Service Units (ATSUs) and no contact can be established. This includes the case of non-cooperative crew when other means have failed.

A very positive outcome

The pilot case was performed in the framework of the Horizon 2020 HELIOS project, led by beacon manufacturer Orolia, which provided its ELT-DT prototype, the first Galileo model to hit the market. The pilot case simulated a real aircraft distress scenario: the Operational Control Center at Iberia confirmed the loss of information from a flight in the Atlantic and, following the standard procedures, performed the necessary operations with the Air Traffic Control at Enaire and the responsible Spanish Rescue Coordination Centre (RCC).

The team that took part in the successful testing of the remote beacon activation with Galileo return link.

Read this: World’s first Galileo-enabled PLB launched

Then, the participants declared a distress situation and agreed to activate the beacon. The interface with the airlines and the beacon activation with the Galileo RLS were implemented by the Galileo Service Centre and the French National Centre for Space Studies (CNES), which enabled the remote beacon activation by the Return Link Service Provider. 

 “We are extremely happy with the successful tests of the Galileo Return Link Service for this potential new use, which is a very positive outcome and one that bodes well for the future implementation of the service. The Return Link Service, whereby the sender of a distress signal is informed that their message has been received and successfully processed, is a key differentiator of Galileo and one that will result in many more lives saved,” said Pascal Claudel, GSA Chief Operating Officer.

Watch this: Galileo Search and Rescue

Efficient management of distress situations meeting users’ needs

The user interfaces were successfully tested, deriving additional requirements and feedback from the airline as the final user of the service. “This is a new functionality with high value that can support mitigation and efficient management of potential emergency situations,” said Jaime del Moral, Flight Watch & ATFM manager at Iberia.

The beacon was successfully activated within two minutes, enabling the efficient management of the distress situation. Remote deactivation was also tested, following a simulation of recovery of normal flight conditions. “The possibility for remote beacon activation is a positive innovation and would be very useful for all stakeholders involved in distress management, with a positive impact on safety,” said Montserrat Redondo, Air Traffic Control Centre Manager at Enaire. 

From the rescue centre perspective, Lieutenant Colonel Molina, Head of RCC Madrid highlighted “the great benefits of remote activation of ELT-DTs by Galileo to react in aircraft distress situations when it is not possible to locate the aircraft by other means”.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

End-to-end tests were successfully carried out with remote beacon activation using the Galileo Return Link Service on Iberia and Air France planes.

Remote beacon activation with Galileo return link successfully tested

9.10.2019 9:20  
The team that took part in the successful testing of the remote beacon activation with Galileo return link.
Published: 
09 October 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) together with Orolia, CNES, Enaire, Spanish Mission Coordination Centre (MCC), Spanish Rescue Coordination Center (RCC) and French MCC, have successfully performed end-to-end test tests with the airlines Iberia and Air France on remote beacon activation using the Galileo Return Link Service (RLS). The tests helped to assess and validate the operational concept for a potential new use of Galileo to support fast response in distress situations.

The goal of the end-to-end test with Iberia and Air France, which was conducted on 16 and 19 September respectively, was to validate the operational concept for remote aviation beacon activation being developed by Eurocae Working Group-98 SG-1 RLS, as well as to test the usability of the end user interfaces. This is relevant for airspace users in specific confirmed distress situations when aircraft are no longer tracked by Air Traffic Service Units (ATSUs) and no contact can be established. This includes the case of non-cooperative crew when other means have failed.

A very positive outcome

The pilot case was performed in the framework of the Horizon 2020 HELIOS project, led by beacon manufacturer Orolia, which provided its ELT-DT prototype, the first Galileo model to hit the market. The pilot case simulated a real aircraft distress scenario: the Operational Control Center at Iberia confirmed the loss of information from a flight in the Atlantic and, following the standard procedures, performed the necessary operations with the Air Traffic Control at Enaire and the responsible Spanish Rescue Coordination Centre (RCC).

Read this: World’s first Galileo-enabled PLB launched

Then, the participants declared a distress situation and agreed to activate the beacon. The interface with the airlines and the beacon activation with the Galileo RLS were implemented by the Galileo Service Centre and the French National Centre for Space Studies (CNES), which enabled the remote beacon activation by the Return Link Service Provider. 

 “We are extremely happy with the successful tests of the Galileo Return Link Service for this potential new use, which is a very positive outcome and one that bodes well for the future implementation of the service. The Return Link Service, whereby the sender of a distress signal is informed that their message has been received and successfully processed, is a key differentiator of Galileo and one that will result in many more lives saved,” said Pascal Claudel, GSA Chief Operating Officer.

Watch this: Galileo Search and Rescue

Efficient management of distress situations meeting users’ needs

The user interfaces were successfully tested, deriving additional requirements and feedback from the airline as the final user of the service. “This is a new functionality with high value that can support mitigation and efficient management of potential emergency situations,” said Jaime del Moral, Flight Watch & ATFM manager at Iberia.

The beacon was successfully activated within two minutes, enabling the efficient management of the distress situation. Remote deactivation was also tested, following a simulation of recovery of normal flight conditions. “The possibility for remote beacon activation is a positive innovation and would be very useful for all stakeholders involved in distress management, with a positive impact on safety,” said Montserrat Redondo, Air Traffic Control Centre Manager at Enaire. 

From the rescue centre perspective, Lieutenant Colonel Molina, Head of RCC Madrid highlighted “the great benefits of remote activation of ELT-DTs by Galileo to react in aircraft distress situations when it is not possible to locate the aircraft by other means”.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The team that took part in the successful testing of the remote beacon activation with Galileo return link.

Remote beacon activation with Galileo return link successfully tested

9.10.2019 9:20  
End-to-end tests were successfully carried out with remote beacon activation using the Galileo Return Link Service on Iberia and Air France
Published: 
09 October 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) together with Orolia, CNES, Enaire, Spanish Mission Coordination Centre (MCC), Spanish Rescue Coordination Center (RCC) and French MCC, have successfully performed end-to-end test tests with the airlines Iberia and Air France on remote beacon activation using the Galileo Return Link Service (RLS). The tests helped to assess and validate the operational concept for a potential new use of Galileo to support fast response in distress situations.

The goal of the end-to-end test with Iberia and Air France, which was conducted on 16 and 19 September respectively, was to validate the operational concept for remote aviation beacon activation being developed by Eurocae Working Group-98 SG-1 RLS, as well as to test the usability of the end user interfaces. This is relevant for airspace users in specific confirmed distress situations when aircraft are no longer tracked by Air Traffic Service Units (ATSUs) and no contact can be established. This includes the case of non-cooperative crew when other means have failed.

The team that took part in the successful testing of the remote beacon activation with Galileo return link.

A very positive outcome

The pilot case was performed in the framework of the Horizon 2020 HELIOS project, led by beacon manufacturer Orolia, which provided its ELT-DT prototype, the first Galileo model to hit the market. The pilot case simulated a real aircraft distress scenario: the Operational Control Center at Iberia confirmed the loss of information from a flight in the Atlantic and, following the standard procedures, performed the necessary operations with the Air Traffic Control at Enaire and the responsible Spanish Rescue Coordination Centre (RCC).

Read this: World’s first Galileo-enabled PLB launched

Then, the participants declared a distress situation and agreed to activate the beacon. The interface with the airlines and the beacon activation with the Galileo RLS were implemented by the Galileo Service Centre and the French National Centre for Space Studies (CNES), which enabled the remote beacon activation by the Return Link Service Provider. 

 “We are extremely happy with the successful tests of the Galileo Return Link Service for this potential new use, which is a very positive outcome and one that bodes well for the future implementation of the service. The Return Link Service, whereby the sender of a distress signal is informed that their message has been received and successfully processed, is a key differentiator of Galileo and one that will result in many more lives saved,” said Pascal Claudel, GSA Chief Operating Officer.

Watch this: Galileo Search and Rescue

Efficient management of distress situations meeting users’ needs

The user interfaces were successfully tested, deriving additional requirements and feedback from the airline as the final user of the service. “This is a new functionality with high value that can support mitigation and efficient management of potential emergency situations,” said Jaime del Moral, Flight Watch & ATFM manager at Iberia.

The beacon was successfully activated within two minutes, enabling the efficient management of the distress situation. Remote deactivation was also tested, following a simulation of recovery of normal flight conditions. “The possibility for remote beacon activation is a positive innovation and would be very useful for all stakeholders involved in distress management, with a positive impact on safety,” said Montserrat Redondo, Air Traffic Control Centre Manager at Enaire. 

From the rescue centre perspective, Lieutenant Colonel Molina, Head of RCC Madrid highlighted “the great benefits of remote activation of ELT-DTs by Galileo to react in aircraft distress situations when it is not possible to locate the aircraft by other means”.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

End-to-end tests were successfully carried out with remote beacon activation using the Galileo Return Link Service on Iberia and Air France

Remote beacon activation with Galileo return link successfully tested

9.10.2019 9:20  
End-to-end tests were successfully carried out with remote beacon activation using the Galileo Return Link Service on Iberia and Air France planes.
Published: 
09 October 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) together with Orolia, CNES, Enaire, Spanish Mission Coordination Centre (MCC), Spanish Rescue Coordination Center (RCC) and French MCC, have successfully performed end-to-end test tests with the airlines Iberia and Air France on remote beacon activation using the Galileo Return Link Service (RLS). The tests helped to assess and validate the operational concept for a potential new use of Galileo to support fast response in distress situations.

The goal of the end-to-end test with Iberia and Air France, which was conducted on 16 and 19 September respectively, was to validate the operational concept for remote aviation beacon activation being developed by Eurocae Working Group-98 SG-1 RLS, as well as to test the usability of the end user interfaces. This is relevant for airspace users in specific confirmed distress situations when aircraft are no longer tracked by Air Traffic Service Units (ATSUs) and no contact can be established. This includes the case of non-cooperative crew when other means have failed.

A very positive outcome

The pilot case was performed in the framework of the Horizon 2020 HELIOS project, led by beacon manufacturer Orolia, which provided its ELT-DT prototype, the first Galileo model to hit the market. The pilot case simulated a real aircraft distress scenario: the Operational Control Center at Iberia confirmed the loss of information from a flight in the Atlantic and, following the standard procedures, performed the necessary operations with the Air Traffic Control at Enaire and the responsible Spanish Rescue Coordination Centre (RCC).

The team that took part in the successful testing of the remote beacon activation with Galileo return link.

Read this: World’s first Galileo-enabled PLB launched

Then, the participants declared a distress situation and agreed to activate the beacon. The interface with the airlines and the beacon activation with the Galileo RLS were implemented by the Galileo Service Centre and the French National Centre for Space Studies (CNES), which enabled the remote beacon activation by the Return Link Service Provider. 

 “We are extremely happy with the successful tests of the Galileo Return Link Service for this potential new use, which is a very positive outcome and one that bodes well for the future implementation of the service. The Return Link Service, whereby the sender of a distress signal is informed that their message has been received and successfully processed, is a key differentiator of Galileo and one that will result in many more lives saved,” said Pascal Claudel, GSA Chief Operating Officer.

Watch this: Galileo Search and Rescue

Efficient management of distress situations meeting users’ needs

The user interfaces were successfully tested, deriving additional requirements and feedback from the airline as the final user of the service. “This is a new functionality with high value that can support mitigation and efficient management of potential emergency situations,” said Jaime del Moral, Flight Watch & ATFM manager at Iberia.

The beacon was successfully activated within two minutes, enabling the efficient management of the distress situation. Remote deactivation was also tested, following a simulation of recovery of normal flight conditions. “The possibility for remote beacon activation is a positive innovation and would be very useful for all stakeholders involved in distress management, with a positive impact on safety,” said Montserrat Redondo, Air Traffic Control Centre Manager at Enaire. 

 

From the rescue centre perspective, Lieutenant Colonel Molina, Head of RCC Madrid highlighted “the great benefits of remote activation of ELT-DTs by Galileo to react in aircraft distress situations when it is not possible to locate the aircraft by other means”.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

End-to-end tests were successfully carried out with remote beacon activation using the Galileo Return Link Service on Iberia and Air France planes.

Remote beacon activation with Galileo return link successfully tested

9.10.2019 9:20  
End-to-end tests were successfully carried out with remote beacon activation using the Galileo Return Link Service on Iberia and Air France planes.
Published: 
09 October 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) together with Orolia, CNES, Enaire, Spanish Mission Coordination Centre (MCC), Spanish Rescue Coordination Center (RCC) and French MCC, have successfully performed end-to-end test tests with the airlines Iberia and Air France on remote beacon activation using the Galileo Return Link Service (RLS). The tests helped to assess and validate the operational concept for a potential new use of Galileo to support fast response in distress situations.

The goal of the end-to-end test with Iberia and Air France, which was conducted on 16 and 19 September respectively, was to validate the operational concept for remote aviation beacon activation being developed by Eurocae Working Group-98 SG-1 RLS, as well as to test the usability of the end user interfaces. This is relevant for airspace users in specific confirmed distress situations when aircraft are no longer tracked by Air Traffic Service Units (ATSUs) and no contact can be established. This includes the case of non-cooperative crew when other means have failed.

A very positive outcome

The pilot case was performed in the framework of the Horizon 2020 HELIOS project, led by beacon manufacturer Orolia, which provided its ELT-DT prototype, the first Galileo model to hit the market. The pilot case simulated a real aircraft distress scenario: the Operational Control Center at Iberia confirmed the loss of information from a flight in the Atlantic and, following the standard procedures, performed the necessary operations with the Air Traffic Control at Enaire and the responsible Spanish Rescue Coordination Centre (RCC).

The team that took part in the successful testing of the remote beacon activation with Galileo return link.

Read this: World’s first Galileo-enabled PLB launched

Then, the participants declared a distress situation and agreed to activate the beacon. The interface with the airlines and the beacon activation with the Galileo RLS were implemented by the Galileo Service Centre and the French National Centre for Space Studies (CNES), which enabled the remote beacon activation by the Return Link Service Provider. 

 “We are extremely happy with the successful tests of the Galileo Return Link Service for this potential new use, which is a very positive outcome and one that bodes well for the future implementation of the service. The Return Link Service, whereby the sender of a distress signal is informed that their message has been received and successfully processed, is a key differentiator of Galileo and one that will result in many more lives saved,” said Pascal Claudel, GSA Chief Operating Officer.

Watch this: Galileo Search and Rescue

Efficient management of distress situations meeting users’ needs

The user interfaces were successfully tested, deriving additional requirements and feedback from the airline as the final user of the service. “This is a new functionality with high value that can support mitigation and efficient management of potential emergency situations,” said Jaime del Moral, Flight Watch & ATFM manager at Iberia.

The beacon was successfully activated within two minutes, enabling the efficient management of the distress situation. Remote deactivation was also tested, following a simulation of recovery of normal flight conditions. “The possibility for remote beacon activation is a positive innovation and would be very useful for all stakeholders involved in distress management, with a positive impact on safety,” said Montserrat Redondo, Air Traffic Control Centre Manager at Enaire. 

From the rescue centre perspective, Lieutenant Colonel Molina, Head of RCC Madrid highlighted “the great benefits of remote activation of ELT-DTs by Galileo to react in aircraft distress situations when it is not possible to locate the aircraft by other means”.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

End-to-end tests were successfully carried out with remote beacon activation using the Galileo Return Link Service on Iberia and Air France planes.

Operation Shark Bait: Galileo SAR will save lives!

8.10.2019 9:34  
The Shark Bait test took just over three and a half minutes to locate the PLB developed under a GSA Horizon 2020 project.
Published: 
08 October 2019

The huge value of the Galileo Search and Rescue (SAR) service was underlined in a live demonstration off the coast of Belgium on Thursday 26 September. Operation Shark Bait showed how this vital service can quickly trigger a rescue operation and save lives at sea. Despite a grey day and choppy sea conditions, an emergency rescue was initiated in just over three and a half minutes after intrepid “volunteer victim”, Australian broadcaster and explorer Tara Foster, operated her Galileo-enabled SAR beacon from a small life raft buffeted by the waves just offshore from the port of Ostend.

Operation Shark Bait was a specially designed demonstration of the capabilities of the Galileo SAR service that took place around the new state-of-the-art Belgian Maritime Rescue and Coordination Centre (MRCC) in Ostend with an invited audience of VIPs and media. The whole operation was streamed live over YouTube and the Europe By Satellite (EBS) TV service.

The scenario was simple. Tara was left alone at sea in a small life raft, but with a 406MHz Cospas-Sarsat personal locator beacon (PLB). On activating the beacon, the stopwatch started. The time to receive the distress signal, compute her position and alert the relevant rescue authorities was recorded. The Belgian fast rescue boat ORKA R6 then dashed out to sea to pick her up. Subsequently a NH90 Cayman SAR helicopter from the Belgian 40th squadron was also scrambled to help transfer “injured” Tara to hospital. 

Read this: World’s first Galileo-enabled PLB launched

Shark Bait was a great success with just 3 minutes 32 seconds elapsing from Tara activating her Galileo-enabled Personal Locator Beacon (PLB) to the moment commanders at MRCC could dispatch the ORKA to her location. The location, with an initial accuracy of 100 metres, is provided by the Galileo receiver inside the PLB to the Galileo satellites in view. The Galileo satellites then forward this information to the Cospas-Sarsat infrastructure, where the position is validated. 

“The PLB used was developed under one of our Horizon 2020 projects and is the first Galileo-enabled beacon on the market,” said Fiammetta Diani, Head of Market Development at the GSA.

Time saver, life saver

The day started at the MRCC in Ostend with a visit to the operations centre, an inspection of the ORKA Fast Rescue Boat and a chance to talk to Tara Foster before she was “castaway” on the waves.

Dries Boodts, Deputy Nautical Director at MRCC, described the role of the centre, which has a single focus on safety at sea. “The globe is divided into Search and Rescue Regions (SRRs), said Boodts. “And the MRCC oversees the Belgian maritime region that extends up to 47 miles off the Belgian coast.”

The region includes major shipping lanes and two large offshore wind energy parks. The MRCC deals with around 450 incidents each year involving a range of craft and issues from collisions at sea to war munitions recovery. It can call on an assortment of assets including its own rescue craft, police and navy vessels and the Belgian air force and the MRCC collaborates extensively with authorities in neighbouring countries.

Galileo is Europe’s contribution to upgrading Cospas-Sarsat – the Global Satellite-based Search and Rescue system. Since its introduction in 1981, Cospas-Sarsat is estimated to have saved some 45 000 lives. The current MEOSAR (Mid Earth Orbit Search and Rescue) upgrade is based on the EU’s Galileo satellite constellation that carries a dedicated Cospas-Sarsat payload for the 406 MHz distress beacons that give users free access to global system.

Watch this: Galileo Search and Rescue (SAR) Service

The addition of Galileo (and other GNSS satellites) to the system has already enabled a dramatic increase in performance in terms of better accuracy to locate activated distress beacons and vastly improved global coverage. “With the Galileo system, all parts of the world will be covered at least every 10 minutes – previously this was up to four hours – and guaranteed location accuracy is reduced from 10 to 2 kilometres,” explained Jolanda van Eijndthoven from the European Commission.

As well as the 23 SAR payloads currently provided by Galileo, with more to come, the EU also provides ground infrastructure including MEO Local User Terminals (LUTs) to pick up the signals relayed from the satellites. These LUTs are not just in Europe, and a fourth facility is o be opened soon on La Reunion island to improve coverage across the Indian Ocean.

Return link reassurance

From the end of the year the Galileo system will also provide a Return Link Service (RLS) that will be able to send an acknowledgement to the victim that their distress signal has been received and help is on its way. This new ability to provide reassurance should deliver a valuable psychological lift to victims and further boost survival rates.

“The PLBs developed under our Horizon 2020 projects will be the first ones on the market to have the RLS capability,” said Fiammetta Diani.

Back on dry land, Tara confessed that the simulation had felt very real to her. “The scariest part was the transfer to the helicopter from the rescue boat,” she said. “The winch was like a lift without a floor and very fast! Stepping from the flimsy life raft to the ORKA was also not easy – those waves were high!”

“The operation went just like clockwork,” concluded Paul Flament Head of the Galileo and EGNOS unit at the European Commission’s DG GROW. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The Shark Bait test took just over three and a half minutes to locate the PLB developed under a GSA Horizon 2020 project.

Operation Shark Bait: Galileo SAR will save lives!

8.10.2019 9:34  
The Shark Bait test took just over three and a half minutes to locate the PLB developed under a GSA Horizon 2020 project.
Published: 
08 October 2019

The huge value of the Galileo Search and Rescue (SAR) service was underlined in a live demonstration off the coast of Belgium on Thursday 26 September. Operation Shark Bait showed how this vital service can quickly trigger a rescue operation and save lives at sea. Despite a grey day and choppy sea conditions, an emergency rescue was initiated in just over three and a half minutes after intrepid “volunteer victim”, Australian broadcaster and explorer Tara Foster, operated her Galileo-enabled SAR beacon from a small life raft buffeted by the waves just offshore from the port of Ostend.

Operation Shark Bait was a specially designed demonstration of the capabilities of the Galileo SAR service that took place around the new state-of-the-art Belgian Maritime Rescue and Coordination Centre (MRCC) in Ostend with an invited audience of VIPs and media. The whole operation was streamed live over YouTube and the Europe By Satellite (EBS) TV service.

The scenario was simple. Tara was left alone at sea in a small life raft, but with a 406MHz Cospas-Sarsat personal locator beacon (PLB). On activating the beacon, the stopwatch started. The time to receive the distress signal, compute her position and alert the relevant rescue authorities was recorded. The Belgian fast rescue boat ORKA R6 then dashed out to sea to pick her up. Subsequently a NH90 Cayman SAR helicopter from the Belgian 40th squadron was also scrambled to help transfer “injured” Tara to hospital. 

Read this: World’s first Galileo-enabled PLB launched

Shark Bait was a great success with just 3 minutes 32 seconds elapsing from Tara activating her Galileo-enabled Personal Locator Beacon (PLB) to the moment commanders at MRCC could dispatch the ORKA to her location. The location, with an initial accuracy of 100 metres, is provided by the Galileo receiver inside the PLB to the Galileo satellites in view. The Galileo satellites then forward this information to the Cospas-Sarsat infrastructure, where the position is validated. 

“The PLB used was developed under one of our Horizon 2020 projects and is the first Galileo-enabled beacon on the market,” said Fiammetta Diani, Head of Market Development at the GSA.

Time saver, life saver

The day started at the MRCC in Ostend with a visit to the operations centre, an inspection of the ORKA Fast Rescue Boat and a chance to talk to Tara Foster before she was “castaway” on the waves.

Dries Boodts, Deputy Nautical Director at MRCC, described the role of the centre, which has a single focus on safety at sea. “The globe is divided into Search and Rescue Regions (SRRs), said Boodts. “And the MRCC oversees the Belgian maritime region that extends up to 47 miles off the Belgian coast.”

The region includes major shipping lanes and two large offshore wind energy parks. The MRCC deals with around 450 incidents each year involving a range of craft and issues from collisions at sea to war munitions recovery. It can call on an assortment of assets including its own rescue craft, police and navy vessels and the Belgian air force and the MRCC collaborates extensively with authorities in neighbouring countries.

Galileo is Europe’s contribution to upgrading Cospas-Sarsat – the Global Satellite-based Search and Rescue system. Since its introduction in 1981, Cospas-Sarsat is estimated to have saved some 45 000 lives. The current MEOSAR (Mid Earth Orbit Search and Rescue) upgrade is based on the EU’s Galileo satellite constellation that carries a dedicated Cospas-Sarsat payload for the 406 MHz distress beacons that give users free access to global system.

Watch this: Galileo Search and Rescue (SAR) Service

The addition of Galileo (and other GNSS satellites) to the system has already enabled a dramatic increase in performance in terms of better accuracy to locate activated distress beacons and vastly improved global coverage. “With the Galileo system, all parts of the world will be covered at least every 10 minutes – previously this was up to four hours – and guaranteed location accuracy is reduced from 10 to 2 kilometres,” explained Jolanda van Eijndthoven from the European Commission.

As well as the 23 SAR payloads currently provided by Galileo, with more to come, the EU also provides ground infrastructure including MEO Local User Terminals (LUTs) to pick up the signals relayed from the satellites. These LUTs are not just in Europe, and a fourth facility is o be opened soon on La Reunion island to improve coverage across the Indian Ocean.

Return link reassurance

From the end of the year the Galileo system will also provide a Return Link Service (RLS) that will be able to send an acknowledgement to the victim that their distress signal has been received and help is on its way. This new ability to provide reassurance should deliver a valuable psychological lift to victims and further boost survival rates.

“The PLBs developed under our Horizon 2020 projects will be the first ones on the market to have the RLS capability,” said Fiammetta Diani.

Back on dry land, Tara confessed that the simulation had felt very real to her. “The scariest part was the transfer to the helicopter from the rescue boat,” she said. “The winch was like a lift without a floor and very fast! Stepping from the flimsy life raft to the ORKA was also not easy – those waves were high!”

“The operation went just like clockwork,” concluded Paul Flament Head of the Galileo and EGNOS unit at the European Commission’s DG GROW. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The Shark Bait test took just over three and a half minutes to locate the PLB developed under a GSA Horizon 2020 project.

GSA Open Days 2019: Accuracy Matters – look around you!

4.10.2019 15:13  
GSA Open Days 2019: Accuracy Matters - Look around you!
Published: 
04 October 2019

Have you ever wondered how pilots can land a plane when it is snowing or foggy? Or how a taxi drives right up to you and not 10 metres away, even when you are standing in the middle of nowhere? Or have you ever thought about how the exact time and position of your morning tram to work are known? The answers lie just five minutes away from downtown Prague.

The European Space Programmes are closer than you think. Satellites might be an invisible infrastructure spinning many thousand kilometres above our heads, but the services they deliver are more than visible. Look around you! Satellite navigation is used in much of our everyday life and, for all of the services that use satellite navigation, accuracy is of the essence.

Planes land smoothly with precision thanks to EGNOS. Trams, trains and buses #UseGalileo for accurate timing information, tractors use EU satellite-based technology for a greener environment. More than 1 billion Galileo-enabled smartphones are now in your pockets.

Still not convinced? 

Join us on Friday 8 and Saturday 9 of November for the #GSAOpenDays 2019 and experience first-hand why #AccuracyMatters

Be a pilot and land an airbus A350 using EGNOS or discover a satellite mock-up. Are you an adrenaline junkie? Experience a live rescue in the snow-capped Alps with the help of Galileo. If you’re afraid of heights you can always decrypt secret messages or take part in our various workshops running throughout the day.

Not sure how to find us? Let Galileo take care of that. Check if your smartphone uses Galileo here and rest assured you’ll make it to the event on time! After all Accuracy Matters, right?

Follow us on twitter @EU_GNSS and Instagram @space4eu for regular updates.

Use the hashtag #GSAOpenDays to share your experience of this year’s Open Days. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).
GSA Open Days 2019: Accuracy Matters - Look around you!

Galileo, Smart RTK Hackathon kicks off Thai Space Week

4.10.2019 10:42  
The hackathon brought together a large group of participants from a wide range of disciplines.
Published: 
04 October 2019

Over two days in August, to kick off Thai Space Week, GNSS.asia and Thailand’s Geo-Informatics and Space Technology Development Agency (GISTDA) ran a Galileo and Smart RTK Hackathon – challenging participants to think outside the box. With one hackathon already completed this year, this was a good opportunity to introduce Galileo to a new region and to a new group of enthusiastic innovators.

Participating in the hackathon were 50 undergraduates, entrepreneurs, business owners and PhD candidates with backgrounds ranging from engineering, computer science, and GIS, to marketing, geodesy and business management. Their diversity was fantastic also, with a 45 to 55  female to male ratio. There were 10 teams in total, with 9 mentors helping the teams iron out kinks, understand how to use the technology and turn their ideas into incredible projects.

Watch this: Galileo & Smart RTK Hackathon

In order to give the teams a well-rounded understanding of the technological concepts behind Galileo and Smart RTK, the first day opened with interactive training sessions by Dr Anindya Bose, from the University of Bardwan, India, and Ms Darunee Promchot from GISTDA. They both gave the participants the fundamentals behind GNSS, Thailand’s G-PPS (GISTDA Precise Positioning System) RTK network and some hints about how to incorporate them into their applications. Varadarajan Krish, Managing Director, Induct AS, India, took the hackers through the hard and soft skills needed to take ideas from concept to reality.

The teams were challenged to develop a solution to provide one of the following:

A user-friendly, fast and cost-efficient A-to-Z transport solution for Bangkok;

Smart agriculture, focusing on high precision or automatization;

A smart city solution for citizens who are disadvantaged and/or with health issues;

Other smart solutions for Bangkok, Thailand or globally (travel, sustainability, logistics, food distribution, new services…) using Galileo or G-PPS;

A smart mobile application platform for GNSS positioning in real-time, retrieved correction data from G-PPS to improve the accuracy of smartphone positioning called “Smart RTK.”

When it came to pitching time, the hackers did a superb job keeping to time and using the 10 slide template made especially for the occasion. There was a wide range of applications: GNSS-enabled ticketing to reduce traffic accidents; drone delivery for food, medical devices and urgent packages; outdoor/indoor 3D mapping for more effective firefighting; automatic ripeness assessment of fruit combining unpiloted aerial vehicles (UAVs) and GNSS; farming automation to mitigate rural depopulation to sustain farming into the future generations; driverless tractors with low cost GNSS receivers; and, identification of plant diseases using UAVs.

 

And the winners were…

The judges were impressed with the professionalism of all the pitches. Deliberations to award the prizes were passionate and almost heated, but a consensus was reached.

 

Smart RTK Prize: Team FarmFellow.

Solution: Digital platform for agricultural farmers for farm mapping, crop selection and farm monitoring.

Galileo Prize: Team Fling RTK.

Solution: Fling is using drones to deliver urgently-needed goods to city residents using multi-constellation GNSS and RTK to prevent jamming and position and land its drones safely and accurately.

Best Prize: Team – Second Eyes

Solution: EmergMap – Reducing costs due to fire damage for complex buildings, using 3D mapping, sensors and G-PPS technology to extinguish the fire efficiently and safely.

 

Congratulations to the winners and to all the teams involved. The event would not have been the success it was without the energy that they brought, the ideas that they had and the dedication to pitching such well researched and brilliantly delivered solutions using Galileo and the Thai GPPS network.

Read this: GNSS.asia highlights Europe-India cooperation

 

GNSS.asia

GNSS.asia is a Horizon 2020 project of the European GNSS Agency (GSA) that aims to stimulate the creation of partnerships between GNSS industries in Europe and Asia, while supporting institutional cooperation and encouraging Galileo adoption. It offers several services, including industry matchmaking and international cooperation events. GNSS.asia has permanent teams in Europe, India, China, Taiwan, South Korea and Japan.

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The hackathon brought together a large group of participants from a wide range of disciplines.

Galileo, Smart RTK Hackathon kicks off Thai Space Week

4.10.2019 10:42  
The hackathon brought together a large group of participants from a wide range of disciplines.
Published: 
04 October 2019

Over two days in August, to kick off Thai Space Week, GNSS.asia and Thailand’s Geo-Informatics and Space Technology Development Agency (GISTDA) ran a Galileo and Smart RTK Hackathon – challenging participants to think outside the box. With one hackathon already completed this year, this was a good opportunity to introduce Galileo to a new region and to a new group of enthusiastic innovators.

Participating in the hackathon were 50 undergraduates, entrepreneurs, business owners and PhD candidates with backgrounds ranging from engineering, computer science, and GIS, to marketing, geodesy and business management. Their diversity was fantastic also, with a 45 to 55  female to male ratio. There were 10 teams in total, with 9 mentors helping the teams iron out kinks, understand how to use the technology and turn their ideas into incredible projects.

Watch this: Galileo & Smart RTK Hackathon

In order to give the teams a well-rounded understanding of the technological concepts behind Galileo and Smart RTK, the first day opened with interactive training sessions by Dr Anindya Bose, from the University of Bardwan, India, and Ms Darunee Promchot from GISTDA. They both gave the participants the fundamentals behind GNSS, Thailand’s G-PPS (GISTDA Precise Positioning System) RTK network and some hints about how to incorporate them into their applications. Varadarajan Krish, Managing Director, Induct AS, India, took the hackers through the hard and soft skills needed to take ideas from concept to reality.

The teams were challenged to develop a solution to provide one of the following:

A user-friendly, fast and cost-efficient A-to-Z transport solution for Bangkok;

Smart agriculture, focusing on high precision or automatization;

A smart city solution for citizens who are disadvantaged and/or with health issues;

Other smart solutions for Bangkok, Thailand or globally (travel, sustainability, logistics, food distribution, new services…) using Galileo or G-PPS;

A smart mobile application platform for GNSS positioning in real-time, retrieved correction data from G-PPS to improve the accuracy of smartphone positioning called “Smart RTK.”

When it came to pitching time, the hackers did a superb job keeping to time and using the 10 slide template made especially for the occasion. There was a wide range of applications: GNSS-enabled ticketing to reduce traffic accidents; drone delivery for food, medical devices and urgent packages; outdoor/indoor 3D mapping for more effective firefighting; automatic ripeness assessment of fruit combining unpiloted aerial vehicles (UAVs) and GNSS; farming automation to mitigate rural depopulation to sustain farming into the future generations; driverless tractors with low cost GNSS receivers; and, identification of plant diseases using UAVs.

And the winners were…

The judges were impressed with the professionalism of all the pitches. Deliberations to award the prizes were passionate and almost heated, but a consensus was reached.

Smart RTK Prize: Team FarmFellow.

Solution: Digital platform for agricultural farmers for farm mapping, crop selection and farm monitoring.

Galileo Prize: Team Fling RTK.

Solution: Fling is using drones to deliver urgently-needed goods to city residents using multi-constellation GNSS and RTK to prevent jamming and position and land its drones safely and accurately.

Best Prize: Team – Second Eyes

Solution: EmergMap – Reducing costs due to fire damage for complex buildings, using 3D mapping, sensors and G-PPS technology to extinguish the fire efficiently and safely.

Congratulations to the winners and to all the teams involved. The event would not have been the success it was without the energy that they brought, the ideas that they had and the dedication to pitching such well researched and brilliantly delivered solutions using Galileo and the Thai GPPS network.

Read this: GNSS.asia highlights Europe-India cooperation

GNSS.asia

GNSS.asia is a Horizon 2020 project of the European GNSS Agency (GSA) that aims to stimulate the creation of partnerships between GNSS industries in Europe and Asia, while supporting institutional cooperation and encouraging Galileo adoption. It offers several services, including industry matchmaking and international cooperation events. GNSS.asia has permanent teams in Europe, India, China, Taiwan, South Korea and Japan.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The hackathon brought together a large group of participants from a wide range of disciplines.

Galileo, Smart RTK Hackathon kicks off Thai Space Week

4.10.2019 10:42  
The hackathon brought together a large group of participants from a wide range of disciplines.
Published: 
04 October 2019

Over two days in August, to kick off Thai Space Week, GNSS.asia and Thailand’s Geo-Informatics and Space Technology Development Agency (GISTDA) ran a Galileo and Smart RTK Hackathon – challenging participants to think outside the box. With one hackathon already completed this year, this was a good opportunity to introduce Galileo to a new region and to a new group of enthusiastic innovators.

Participating in the hackathon were 50 undergraduates, entrepreneurs, business owners and PhD candidates with backgrounds ranging from engineering, computer science, and GIS, to marketing, geodesy and business management. Their diversity was fantastic also, with a 45 to 55  female to male ratio. There were 10 teams in total, with 9 mentors helping the teams iron out kinks, understand how to use the technology and turn their ideas into incredible projects.

Watch this: Galileo & Smart RTK Hackathon

In order to give the teams a well-rounded understanding of the technological concepts behind Galileo and Smart RTK, the first day opened with interactive training sessions by Dr Anindya Bose, from the University of Bardwan, India, and Ms Darunee Promchot from GISTDA. They both gave the participants the fundamentals behind GNSS, Thailand’s G-PPS (GISTDA Precise Positioning System) RTK network and some hints about how to incorporate them into their applications. Varadarajan Krish, Managing Director, Induct AS, India, took the hackers through the hard and soft skills needed to take ideas from concept to reality.

The teams were challenged to develop a solution to provide one of the following:

A user-friendly, fast and cost-efficient A-to-Z transport solution for Bangkok;

Smart agriculture, focusing on high precision or automatization;

A smart city solution for citizens who are disadvantaged and/or with health issues;

Other smart solutions for Bangkok, Thailand or globally (travel, sustainability, logistics, food distribution, new services…) using Galileo or G-PPS;

A smart mobile application platform for GNSS positioning in real-time, retrieved correction data from G-PPS to improve the accuracy of smartphone positioning called “Smart RTK.”

When it came to pitching time, the hackers did a superb job keeping to time and using the 10 slide template made especially for the occasion. There was a wide range of applications: GNSS-enabled ticketing to reduce traffic accidents; drone delivery for food, medical devices and urgent packages; outdoor/indoor 3D mapping for more effective firefighting; automatic ripeness assessment of fruit combining unpiloted aerial vehicles (UAVs) and GNSS; farming automation to mitigate rural depopulation to sustain farming into the future generations; driverless tractors with low cost GNSS receivers; and, identification of plant diseases using UAVs.

 

And the winners were…

The judges were impressed with the professionalism of all the pitches. Deliberations to award the prizes were passionate and almost heated, but a consensus was reached.

 

Smart RTK Prize: Team FarmFellow.

Solution: Digital platform for agricultural farmers for farm mapping, crop selection and farm monitoring.

 

Galileo Prize: Team Fling RTK.

Solution: Fling is using drones to deliver urgently-needed goods to city residents using multi-constellation GNSS and RTK to prevent jamming and position and land its drones safely and accurately.

 

Best Prize: Team – Second Eyes

Solution: EmergMap – Reducing costs due to fire damage for complex buildings, using 3D mapping, sensors and G-PPS technology to extinguish the fire efficiently and safely.

 

Congratulations to the winners and to all the teams involved. The event would not have been the success it was without the energy that they brought, the ideas that they had and the dedication to pitching such well researched and brilliantly delivered solutions using Galileo and the Thai GPPS network.

Read this: GNSS.asia highlights Europe-India cooperation

GNSS.asia

GNSS.asia is a Horizon 2020 project of the European GNSS Agency (GSA) that aims to stimulate the creation of partnerships between GNSS industries in Europe and Asia, while supporting institutional cooperation and encouraging Galileo adoption. It offers several services, including industry matchmaking and international cooperation events. GNSS.asia has permanent teams in Europe, India, China, Taiwan, South Korea and Japan.

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The hackathon brought together a large group of participants from a wide range of disciplines.

Europe’s economy is increasingly dependent on space – ITRE committee hears

2.10.2019 10:22  
EGNSS and Copernicus support many services that fall within the European Parliament ITRE Committee’s sphere of interest.
Published: 
02 October 2019

During a presentation on the EU Space Programmes as enablers for policies requested by the European Parliament’s Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE) on 25 September 2019, attendees heard how the European economy is increasingly dependent on space-based services.

Introducing the speakers at the meeting, European Parliament’s ITRE Committee Chair Adina-Ioana Valean noted that Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus support many of the activities and services that fall within the sphere of interest of the ITRE Committee.

First to speak at the presentation was Deputy Director General for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs (DG GROW, European Commission) Pierre Delsaux. He said that the European Parliament had always been supportive of Europe’s space ambitions, and that the EU Space Programmes would need this continued support going forward, including in the upcoming long-term budget negotiations under the future multiannual financial framework.

Regarding the new Regulation on the EU Space Programme, he underlined that it was important to have one single instrument to cover all the components of the Programme. “In the future it will be important to bring synergies in applications and services between Copernicus and Galileo and to ensure that for digital services, for environmental monitoring and for transport, and so on, we have a combination of data from Copernicus and Galileo,” he said, adding that this would open up new horizons.

Instrumental role of GSA

European GNSS Agency (GSA) Executive Director Carlo des Dorides spoke about his Agency’s market development efforts and success stories, beginning with EGNOS, Europe’s satellite-based augmentation service. EGNOS was the first pan-European navigation system designed specifically for the civil aviation sector and launched in 2011. It has come a long way since then.

 “Currently, we have 40,000  flights a month that use EGNOS, more than 350 airports equipped with EGNOS, more than 50% of instrumental runways in Europe equipped with EGNOS approach procedures,” he said, adding that the GSA had been instrumental in making this happen, by bringing all of the different actors together.

He noted the same dynamic with respect to Galileo. “We have recently celebrated 1 billion Galileo-enabled receivers sold globally, this is thanks to the decision to launch initial services at the end of 2016, and to the unique integrated approach of GSA in linking space to the needs of all stakeholders.”

Read this: GSA celebrates 1 billion Galileo smartphone users

Looking to the future, he said that with the new Regulation, the perimeter of the GSA’s responsibilities would be enlarged. He said that the new Regulation would come into effect at the right time when Galileo reaches full operating capability.

“We need to be ready for this new phase, where the focus will be on service provision,” he said, adding that it would be necessary to change the speed and volume of investment to ensure sufficient market uptake of Galileo services.

Delivering innovative solutions

GSA Chief Operating Officer Pascal Claudel also noted that the GSA’s user-centric focus, and that the GSA was focused on using signals from space to meet the needs of all market segments through innovative solutions. These solutions are aimed at stimulating European industry, from start-ups to SMEs and traditional industries and the signals from space are currently at the heart of a technological revolution and represent an essential catalyst for the European economy, he said. “This is why all Member States of the EU should be involved in the development of the downstream activities. This brings the GSA at the centre of the New Space made in Europe”

About 10% of Europe’s economy depends on space services, European companies account for 25% of the space downstream market, large numbers of jobs have been created and billions of euros will be generated by Galileo and EGNOS by 2027, Claudel said, adding that the new Regulation would open tremendous possibilities for the EU’s industrial fabric, particularly when it comes to synergies between Galileo, EGNOS, Copernicus and Govsatcom. 

And this: GSA, EIB sign agreement on investment in space

Matthias Petschke, Director of European GNSS Programmes at DG GROW, underlined the strategic dimension of the space programmes and highlighted the three-fold role of the Commission in supporting the EU Space Programme. This role includes creating a regulatory framework when required, especially for safety and security reasons; secondly, there is standardisation, especially where this will drive market uptake; and finally – the Commission is active in the area of entrepreneurship, fostering start-ups and their use of space services and technologies.

Impressive results

Marta Krywanis-Brzostowska, Head of Downstream R&D in Market Development and Horizon 2020 Coordinator at the GSA highlighted this market uptake in her presentation. She noted that there are already over 600 EGNOS-based approach procedures in over 350 airports in 23 EU countries and that 85% of new tractors sold in the EU are EGNSS-enabled. 

What’s more, 17 car brands are currently commercialising EGNOS and Galileo eCall and, thanks to efficiency gains in transport, 3.5 billion litres of fuel and 15 tonnes of CO2 have been saved, she said, adding that all of these figures translate into concrete benefits for EU citizens. 

“These impressive results have only been possible thanks to the integrated approach adopted by the GSA towards users and industry,” she said.

And this: GSA GNSS Market Report 6 – coming soon!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

EGNSS and Copernicus support many services that fall within the European Parliament ITRE Committee’s sphere of interest.

Europe’s economy is increasingly dependent on space - ITRE committee hears

2.10.2019 10:22  
EGNSS and Copernicus support many services that fall within the European Parliament ITRE Committee’s sphere of interest.
Published: 
02 October 2019

During a presentation on the EU Space Programmes as enablers for policies requested by the European Parliament’s Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE) on 25 September 2019, attendees heard how the European economy is increasingly dependent on space-based services.

Introducing the speakers at the meeting, European Parliament’s ITRE Committee Chair Adina-Ioana Valean noted that Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus support many of the activities and services that fall within the sphere of interest of the ITRE Committee.

First to speak at the presentation was Deputy Director General for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs (DG GROW, European Commission) Pierre Delsaux. He said that the European Parliament had always been supportive of Europe’s space ambitions, and that the EU Space Programmes would need this continued support going forward, including in the upcoming long-term budget negotiations under the future multiannual financial framework.

Regarding the new Regulation on the EU Space Programme, he underlined that it was important to have one single instrument to cover all the components of the Programme. “In the future it will be important to bring synergies in applications and services between Copernicus and Galileo and to ensure that for digital services, for environmental monitoring and for transport, and so on, we have a combination of data from Copernicus and Galileo,” he said, adding that this would open up new horizons.

Instrumental role of GSA

European GNSS Agency (GSA) Executive Director Carlo des Dorides spoke about his Agency’s market development efforts and success stories, beginning with EGNOS, Europe’s satellite-based augmentation service. EGNOS was the first pan-European navigation system designed specifically for the civil aviation sector and launched in 2011. It has come a long way since then.

 “Currently, we have 40,000  flights a month that use EGNOS, more than 350 airports equipped with EGNOS, more than 50% of instrumental runways in Europe equipped with EGNOS approach procedures,” he said, adding that the GSA had been instrumental in making this happen, by bringing all of the different actors together.

He noted the same dynamic with respect to Galileo. “We have recently celebrated 1 billion Galileo-enabled receivers sold globally, this is thanks to the decision to launch initial services at the end of 2016, and to the unique integrated approach of GSA in linking space to the needs of all stakeholders.”

Read this: GSA celebrates 1 billion Galileo smartphone users

Looking to the future, he said that with the new Regulation, the perimeter of the GSA’s responsibilities would be enlarged. He said that the new Regulation would come into effect at the right time when Galileo reaches full operating capability.

“We need to be ready for this new phase, where the focus will be on service provision,” he said, adding that it would be necessary to change the speed and volume of investment to ensure sufficient market uptake of Galileo services.

Delivering innovative solutions

GSA Chief Operating Officer Pascal Claudel also noted that the GSA’s user-centric focus, and that the GSA was focused on using signals from space to meet the needs of all market segments through innovative solutions. These solutions are aimed at stimulating European industry, from start-ups to SMEs and traditional industries and the signals from space are currently at the heart of a technological revolution and represent an essential catalyst for the European economy, he said. “This is why all Member States of the EU should be involved in the development of the downstream activities. This brings the GSA at the centre of the New Space made in Europe”

About 10% of Europe’s economy depends on space services, European companies account for 25% of the space downstream market, large numbers of jobs have been created and billions of euros will be generated by Galileo and EGNOS by 2027, Claudel said, adding that the new Regulation would open tremendous possibilities for the EU’s industrial fabric, particularly when it comes to synergies between Galileo, EGNOS, Copernicus and Govsatcom. 

And this: GSA, EIB sign agreement on investment in space

Matthias Petschke, Director of European GNSS Programmes at DG GROW, underlined the strategic dimension of the space programmes and highlighted the three-fold role of the Commission in supporting the EU Space Programme. This role includes creating a regulatory framework when required, especially for safety and security reasons; secondly, there is standardisation, especially where this will drive market uptake; and finally – the Commission is active in the area of entrepreneurship, fostering start-ups and their use of space services and technologies.

Impressive results

Marta Krywanis-Brzostowska, Head of Downstream R&D in Market Development and Horizon 2020 Coordinator at the GSA highlighted this market uptake in her presentation. She noted that there are already over 600 EGNOS-based approach procedures in over 350 airports in 23 EU countries and that 85% of new tractors sold in the EU are EGNSS-enabled. 

What’s more, 17 car brands are currently commercialising EGNOS and Galileo eCall and, thanks to efficiency gains in transport, 3.5 billion litres of fuel and 15 tonnes of CO2 have been saved, she said, adding that all of these figures translate into concrete benefits for EU citizens. 

“These impressive results have only been possible thanks to the integrated approach adopted by the GSA towards users and industry,” she said.

And this: GSA GNSS Market Report 6 – coming soon!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

EGNSS and Copernicus support many services that fall within the European Parliament ITRE Committee’s sphere of interest.

Europe’s economy is increasingly dependent on space - ITRE committee hears

2.10.2019 10:22  
EGNSS and Copernicus support many services that fall within the European Parliament ITRE Committee’s sphere of interest.
Published: 
02 October 2019

During a presentation on the EU Space Programmes as enablers for policies requested by the European Parliament’s Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE) on 25 September 2019, attendees heard how the European economy is increasingly dependent on space-based services.

Introducing the speakers at the meeting, European Parliament’s ITRE Committee Chair Adina-Ioana Valean noted that Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus support many of the activities and services that fall within the sphere of interest of the ITRE Committee.

First to speak at the presentation was Deputy Director General for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs (DG GROW, European Commission) Pierre Delsaux. He said that the European Parliament had always been supportive of Europe’s space ambitions, and that the EU Space Programmes would need this continued support going forward, including in the upcoming long-term budget negotiations under the future multiannual financial framework.

Regarding the new Regulation on the EU Space Programme, he underlined that it was important to have one single instrument to cover all the components of the Programme. “In the future it will be important to bring synergies in applications and services between Copernicus and Galileo and to ensure that for digital services, for environmental monitoring and for transport, and so on, we have a combination of data from Copernicus and Galileo,” he said, adding that this would open up new horizons.

Instrumental role of GSA

European GNSS Agency (GSA) Executive Director Carlo des Dorides spoke about his Agency’s market development efforts and success stories, beginning with EGNOS, Europe’s satellite-based augmentation service. EGNOS was the first pan-European navigation system designed specifically for the civil aviation sector and launched in 2011. It has come a long way since then.

 “Currently, we have 40,000  flights a month that use EGNOS, more than 350 airports equipped with EGNOS, more than 50% of instrumental runways in Europe equipped with EGNOS approach procedures,” he said, adding that the GSA had been instrumental in making this happen, by bringing all of the different actors together.

He noted the same dynamic with respect to Galileo. “We have recently celebrated 1 billion Galileo-enabled receivers sold globally, this is thanks to the decision to launch initial services at the end of 2016, and to the unique integrated approach of GSA in linking space to the needs of all stakeholders.”

Read this: GSA celebrates 1 billion Galileo smartphone users

Looking to the future, he said that with the new Regulation, the perimeter of the GSA’s responsibilities would be enlarged. He said that the new Regulation would come into effect at the right time when Galileo reaches full operating capability.

“We need to be ready for this new phase, where the focus will be on service provision,” he said, adding that it would be necessary to change the speed and volume of investment to ensure sufficient market uptake of Galileo services.

Delivering innovative solutions

GSA Chief Operating Officer Pascal Claudel also noted that the GSA’s user-centric focus, and that the GSA was focused on using signals from space to meet the needs of all market segments through innovative solutions. These solutions are aimed at stimulating European industry, from start-ups to SMEs and traditional industries and the signals from space are currently at the heart of a technological revolution and represent an essential catalyst for the European economy, he said. “This is why all Member States of the EU should be involved in the development of the downstream activities. This brings the GSA at the centre of the New Space made in Europe”

About 10% of Europe’s economy depends on space services, European companies account for 25% of the space downstream market, large numbers of jobs have been created and billions of euros will be generated by Galileo and EGNOS by 2027, Claudel said, adding that the new Regulation would open tremendous possibilities for the EU’s industrial fabric, particularly when it comes to synergies between Galileo, EGNOS, Copernicus and Govsatcom. 

And this: GSA, EIB sign agreement on investment in space

Matthias Petschke, Director of European GNSS Programmes at DG GROW, underlined the strategic dimension of the space programmes and highlighted the three-fold role of the Commission in supporting the EU Space Programme. This role includes creating a regulatory framework when required, especially for safety and security reasons; secondly, there is standardisation, especially where this will drive market uptake; and finally – the Commission is active in the area of entrepreneurship, fostering start-ups and their use of space services and technologies.

Impressive results

Marta Krywanis-Brzostowska, Head of Downstream R&D in Market Development and Horizon 2020 Coordinator at the GSA highlighted this market uptake in her presentation. She noted that there are already over 600 EGNOS-based approach procedures in over 350 airports in 23 EU countries and that 85% of new tractors sold in the EU are EGNSS-enabled. 

What’s more, 17 car brands are currently commercialising EGNOS and Galileo eCall and, thanks to efficiency gains in transport, 3.5 billion litres of fuel and 15 tonnes of CO2 have been saved, she said, adding that all of these figures translate into concrete benefits for EU citizens. 

“These impressive results have only been possible thanks to the integrated approach adopted by the GSA towards users and industry,” she said.

And this: GSA GNSS Market Report 6 – coming soon!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

EGNSS and Copernicus support many services that fall within the European Parliament ITRE Committee’s sphere of interest.

Space – underpinning the blue economy

25.9.2019 11:14  
Europe’s space programmes help sustain Europe’s growing blue economy.
Published: 
26 September 2019

The European Union's blue economy is thriving - economic activities related to oceans, seas and coastal areas recorded gross profit of EUR 74.3 billion in 2017. By providing the tools needed to streamline marine navigation and port operations, support fast and effective search and rescue, and monitor the health of the marine environment, Europe’s GNSS and Earth Observation programmes offer crucial services for this vital segment of the European economy.

The maritime sector is critical for Europe’s economic well-being - almost 90% of the EU’s external freight trade is seaborne. For World Maritime Day, which falls on 26 September, we take a look at some of the ways that satellite technology is supporting effective maritime operations and the sustainable use of Europe’s marine resources.

Speaking at the ‘International Space Forum 2019 - The Mediterranean Chapter’ earlier this month, European GNSS Agency (GSA) Executive Director Carlo des Dorides noted that the core contribution of GNSS to the maritime world and the blue economy – the provision of accurate position, velocity and time – is already well known. 

Key contributions

Consequently, in his address at the event, des Dorides highlighted some lesser-known ways in which GNSS supports the blue economy. In particular, GNSS enables the generation of Automatic Identification System (AIS) and Long Range Identification and Tracking (LRIT) position reports for maritime traffic management and situational awareness.

Watch this: EGNOS for Waterborne Transport

What’s more, GNSS supports position reporting in Vessel Monitoring Systems (VMS). In the EU, all vessels above 15 metres are fitted with a VMS, and a “blue box” installed on the vessel transmits the GNSS-derived vessel position to the Fisheries Monitoring Centre (FMC) in the flag state, which then communicates this information to the state or regional fisheries body in whose waters the vessel is fishing.

Galileo SAR

Another key service offered by Galileo is its search and rescue (SAR) service. Galileo is the first GNSS constellation offering global SAR capability. The Galileo SAR service is also a fundamental European contribution to the Cospas-Sarsat International Programme, thanks to the SAR/Galileo repeaters and ground segment equipment that relay Cospas-Sarsat distress alerts to national authorities through the Cospas-Sarsat ground network.

And this: Galileo Search and Rescue (SAR) Service

Timed to coincide with World Maritime Day, Shark Bait - a live demonstration of how quickly the Galileo SAR service can help in triggering a rescue operation - will be held on 26 September in Oostende, Belgium. 

As part of the event, a ‘victim’ will be left on a life raft at sea with a 406MHz Cospas-Sarsat distress beacon. When the beacon is activated, a chronometer will be launched to calculate the time taken to receive the distress signal, to compute the raft’s position and to send the alert to the relevant authorities. The event will be broadcast live on YouTube and on EuropeBySatellite (EBS).

Europe’s eyes on Earth

But it’s not just European GNSS (Galileo and EGNOS) that offers services to support efficient maritime operations. The European Union's Earth Observation Programme – Copernicus, “Europe’s eyes on Earth,” also provides some crucial services to the maritime sector, offering information services based on satellite Earth Observation and in situ (non-space) data.

In particular, the Copernicus marine environment monitoring service provides regular and systematic core reference information on the state of the oceans and seas in support of all marine applications, including those related to marine safety, marine resources, the coastal and marine environment, and weather forecasting and climate action.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Europe’s space programmes help sustain Europe’s growing blue economy.

Space – underpinning the blue economy

25.9.2019 11:14  
Europe’s space programmes help sustain Europe’s growing blue economy.
Published: 
26 September 2019

The European Union's blue economy is thriving - economic activities related to oceans, seas and coastal areas recorded gross profit of EUR 74.3 billion in 2017. By providing the tools needed to streamline marine navigation and port operations, support fast and effective search and rescue, and monitor the health of the marine environment, Europe’s GNSS and Earth Observation programmes offer crucial services for this vital segment of the European economy.

The maritime sector is critical for Europe’s economic well-being - almost 90% of the EU’s external freight trade is seaborne. For World Maritime Day, which falls on 26 September, we take a look at some of the ways that satellite technology is supporting effective maritime operations and the sustainable use of Europe’s marine resources.

Speaking at the ‘International Space Forum 2019 - The Mediterranean Chapter’ earlier this month, European GNSS Agency (GSA) Executive Director Carlo des Dorides noted that the core contribution of GNSS to the maritime world and the blue economy – the provision of accurate position, velocity and time – is already well known. 

Key contributions

Consequently, in his address at the event, des Dorides highlighted some lesser-known ways in which GNSS supports the blue economy. In particular, GNSS enables the generation of Automatic Identification System (AIS) and Long Range Identification and Tracking (LRIT) position reports for maritime traffic management and situational awareness.

Watch this: EGNOS for Waterborne Transport

What’s more, GNSS supports position reporting in Vessel Monitoring Systems (VMS). In the EU, all vessels above 15 metres are fitted with a VMS, and a “blue box” installed on the vessel transmits the GNSS-derived vessel position to the Fisheries Monitoring Centre (FMC) in the flag state, which then communicates this information to the state or regional fisheries body in whose waters the vessel is fishing.

Galileo SAR

Another key service offered by Galileo is its search and rescue (SAR) service. Galileo is the first GNSS constellation offering global SAR capability. The Galileo SAR service is also a fundamental European contribution to the Cospas-Sarsat International Programme, thanks to the SAR/Galileo repeaters and ground segment equipment that relay Cospas-Sarsat distress alerts to national authorities through the Cospas-Sarsat ground network.

And this: Galileo Search and Rescue (SAR) Service

Timed to coincide with World Maritime Day, Shark Bait - a live demonstration of how quickly the Galileo SAR service can help in triggering a rescue operation - will be held on 26 September in Oostende, Belgium. 

As part of the event, a ‘victim’ will be left on a life raft at sea with a 406MHz Cospas-Sarsat distress beacon. When the beacon is activated, a chronometer will be launched to calculate the time taken to receive the distress signal, to compute the raft’s position and to send the alert to the relevant authorities. The event will be broadcast live on YouTube and on EuropeBySatellite (EBS).

Europe’s eyes on Earth

But it’s not just European GNSS (Galileo and EGNOS) that offers services to support efficient maritime operations. The European Union's Earth Observation Programme – Copernicus, “Europe’s eyes on Earth,” also provides some crucial services to the maritime sector, offering information services based on satellite Earth Observation and in situ (non-space) data.

In particular, the Copernicus marine environment monitoring service provides regular and systematic core reference information on the state of the oceans and seas in support of all marine applications, including those related to marine safety, marine resources, the coastal and marine environment, and weather forecasting and climate action.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Europe’s space programmes help sustain Europe’s growing blue economy.

Accuracy Matters a runner up at Digital Communication Awards 2019

24.9.2019 11:51  
Accuracy Matters campaign
Published: 
24 September 2019

The Galileo – Accuracy Matters campaign was a worthy runner-up in the ‘Campaign of the Year - Associations & Institutions’ category at this year’s Digital Communication Awards. The first place prize in the category went to Finland’s Capital of Metal campaign, which set out to determine which Finnish city deserves to be known internationally as the Capital of Metal. 

The Accuracy Matters team presented the campaign to the Awards jury in a pitch made at the Quadriga University of Applied Sciences Berlin in Berlin on Friday, 20 September, and the awards were presented at a ceremony held at the Kino International in Berlin later on the same day.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA), with the support of the European Commission, launched the Accuracy Matters #UseGalileo campaign last December to raise awareness about how Galileo, a component of the European Union's Space Programme, is making a real difference in the lives of the billion users who have Galileo’s added accuracy in their smart phones.

Making a real difference

The campaign began with a series of light-hearted videos showcasing everyday situations where ‘Accuracy Matters’ to anyone using location data on their smartphones. The campaign later took a more serious tone – highlighting how Galileo’s added accuracy makes a real difference in an emergency. Coinciding with the European elections, the campaign ran on Social Media and was advertised in metro stations, buses and airports across Europe, generating over 65 million impressions.

Read this: GSA celebrates 1 billion Galileo smartphone users

“We launched the Accuracy Matters campaign to increase public awareness of the benefits of Galileo. With this campaign, for the first time ever we engaged with European citizens, the final users and beneficiaries of the European Global Navigation Satellite System,” said GSA Head of Communications Donna Reay. “Thanks to this campaign, European citizens now know more about Galileo and we know more about their communication needs, which is an invaluable asset for the European GNSS Agency,” she continued. “Participation in the Digital Communication Awards has been a rewarding experience. It has increased the visibility of our campaign and will contribute to its ongoing success,” she said.

Honouring outstanding projects

 

The Digital Communication Awards honour outstanding projects, campaigns and innovations in the sphere of online communications. Launched and hosted by the Quadriga University of Applied Sciences since 2011, the DCA help to lift up industry-leading online communications campaigns. The Awards provide innovative online projects with the visibility and reputation they deserve. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Accuracy Matters campaign

Accuracy Matters a runner up at Digital Communication Awards 2019

24.9.2019 11:51  
Accuracy Matters campaign
Published: 
24 September 2019

The Galileo – Accuracy Matters campaign was a worthy runner-up in the ‘Campaign of the Year - Associations & Institutions’ category at this year’s Digital Communication Awards. The first place prize in the category went to Finland’s Capital of Metal campaign, which set out to determine which Finnish city deserves to be known internationally as the Capital of Metal. 

The Accuracy Matters team presented the campaign to the Awards jury in a pitch made at the Quadriga University of Applied Sciences Berlin in Berlin on Friday, 20 September, and the awards were presented at a ceremony held at the Kino International in Berlin later on the same day.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA), with the support of the European Commission, launched the Accuracy Matters #UseGalileo campaign last December to raise awareness about how Galileo, a component of the European Union's Space Programme, is making a real difference in the lives of the billion users who have Galileo’s added accuracy in their smart phones.

Making a real difference

The campaign began with a series of light-hearted videos showcasing everyday situations where ‘Accuracy Matters’ to anyone using location data on their smartphones. The campaign later took a more serious tone – highlighting how Galileo’s added accuracy makes a real difference in an emergency. Coinciding with the European elections, the campaign ran on Social Media and was advertised in metro stations, buses and airports across Europe, generating over 65 million impressions.

Read this: GSA celebrates 1 billion Galileo smartphone users

“We launched the Accuracy Matters campaign to increase public awareness of the benefits of Galileo. With this campaign, for the first time ever we engaged with European citizens, the final users and beneficiaries of the European Global Navigation Satellite System,” said GSA Head of Communications Donna Reay. “Thanks to this campaign, European citizens now know more about Galileo and we know more about their communication needs, which is an invaluable asset for the European GNSS Agency,” she continued. “Participation in the Digital Communication Awards has been a rewarding experience. It has increased the visibility of our campaign and will contribute to its ongoing success,” she said.

Honouring outstanding projects

The Digital Communication Awards honour outstanding projects, campaigns and innovations in the sphere of online communications. Launched and hosted by the Quadriga University of Applied Sciences since 2011, the DCA help to lift up industry-leading online communications campaigns. The Awards provide innovative online projects with the visibility and reputation they deserve. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Accuracy Matters campaign

Accuracy Matters a runner up at Digital Communication Awards 2019

24.9.2019 11:51  
Accuracy Matters campaign
Published: 
24 September 2019

The Galileo – Accuracy Matters campaign was a worthy runner-up in the ‘Campaign of the Year - Associations & Institutions’ category at this year’s Digital Communication Awards. The first place prize in the category went to Finland’s Capital of Metal campaign, which set out to determine which Finnish city deserves to be known internationally as the Capital of Metal. 

The Accuracy Matters team presented the campaign to the Awards jury in a pitch made at the Quadriga University of Applied Sciences Berlin in Berlin on Friday, 20 September, and the awards were presented at a ceremony held at the Kino International in Berlin later on the same day.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA), with the support of the European Commission, launched the Accuracy Matters #UseGalileo campaign last December to raise awareness about how Galileo, a component of the European Union's Space Programme, is making a real difference in the lives of the billion users who have Galileo’s added accuracy in their smart phones.

Making a real difference

The campaign began with a series of light-hearted videos showcasing everyday situations where ‘Accuracy Matters’ to anyone using location data on their smartphones. The campaign later took a more serious tone – highlighting how Galileo’s added accuracy makes a real difference in an emergency. Coinciding with the European elections, the campaign ran on Social Media and was advertised in metro stations, buses and airports across Europe, generating over 65 million impressions.

Read this: GSA celebrates 1 billion Galileo smartphone users

“We launched the Accuracy Matters campaign to increase public awareness of the benefits of Galileo. With this campaign, for the first time ever we engaged with European citizens, the final users and beneficiaries of the European Global Navigation Satellite System,” said GSA Head of Communications Donna Reay. “Thanks to this campaign, European citizens now know more about Galileo and we know more about their communication needs, which is an invaluable asset for the European GNSS Agency,” she continued. “Participation in the Digital Communication Awards has been a rewarding experience. It has increased the visibility of our campaign and will contribute to its ongoing success,” she said.

Honouring outstanding projects

The Digital Communication Awards honour outstanding projects, campaigns and innovations in the sphere of online communications. Launched and hosted by the Quadriga University of Applied Sciences since 2011, the DCA help to lift up industry-leading online communications campaigns. The Awards provide innovative online projects with the visibility and reputation they deserve. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Accuracy Matters campaign

MyGalileoApp – targeting the future of mobility

20.9.2019 10:37  
Many of the submissions in this year’s MyGalileoApp competition target solutions that improve users’ mobility experience
Published: 
20 September 2019

Submissions in the MyGalileoApp competitions target applications in 11 innovation areas. European Mobility Week, which is taking place this week, is a good opportunity to take a look at some of the applications addressing mobility-related issues that were shortlisted in the Top 30 in this year’s edition of the competition.

The Smart Navigation and Infotainment innovation area was a popular choice in this year’s MyGalileoApp competition, with a total of six submissions. Of these, five target applications that aim to improve users’ mobility experience. For example, the Mob(ility) app aims to help different communities of pedestrians living in urban areas that need to have real-time accurate information of their environment to improve everyday mobility. The app will display the best route between two different points of the city depending on users’ preferences.

Streamlining urban traffic

Two applications in this year’s competition aim to streamline urban traffic flows. Firstly, the ReadyPark app makes it possible to exchange parking spots in real-time, by pairing users leaving a spot with users looking for one, which will improve the urban driving experience. Secondly, the Mylights application displays the remaining time of a red or green signal at a traffic light controlled junction and provides optimal speed recommendation (within the applicable speed limit) for drivers to arrive at the junction just in time for a green signal.

Read this: GSA, EIB sign agreement on investment in space

Another mobile application - Lycie - notifies drivers whenever a dangerous situation is detected, by monitoring both the driver and the road. Potential Lycie users include all drivers exposed to road traffic risks: employees or individuals in a car, bus, train or even on a motorbike.

However, it’s not only road transport solutions that were developed in this year’s competition – maritime transport was also targeted. Specifically, the GALILEONAUT application helps sailors to find their way inside a port or a marina. The solution provides a link between the harbour master's office and sailors and allows the harbour master to assign a docking place to a boat entering the harbour, and the sailor to be guided without requiring any assistance from the harbour master’s office.

Mapping, GIS and Agriculture

The Smart Navigation and Infotainment innovation area was not the only one to receive mobility-related submissions. In the Mapping, GIS and Agriculture areas too, some of the applications address specific mobility-related needs. For example, the RoadEO project makes use of a smartphone’s accelerometer, gyroscope, microphone, camera and of course GNSS module to record its environment while driving in a car, truck, bike or other mode of transport, and combines this with Earth observation data in a predictive analytics solution that advises road authorities about where and when road segments need to be maintained.

And this: GSA celebrates 1 billion Galileo smartphone users

In the agriculture segment, Tractor Navigator provides guidance for farmers driving tractors. It is a navigation app (like a car GPS) that enables users to visualise their current position and trajectory on an open field (no road). Using the app, farmers can also accurately follow a predefined trajectory with live feedback to correct deviations and record and load saved trajectories to pick up work from where they left off, thereby avoiding covering the same area twice.

Moving forward

Of the seven mobility related submissions reviewed here, three – Tractor Navigator, Ready Park and GALILEONAUT – have made it through to the final 10 projects selected for the second development phase of the competition. So stay tuned to see how they do!

Along with the other projects in the final 10, these three projects have until October 21 to deliver a finalised version of their app with 100% functionality. All teams that will successfully complete the second development phase will be invited to the finals, to be held in November 2019, where they will present their application to the GSA evaluation board. The awards will be decided after these presentations, with the first-place winner receiving a EUR 100,000 prize. The runner up and third place winners will receive EUR 50,000 and EUR 30,000 respectively.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Many of the submissions in this year’s MyGalileoApp competition target solutions that improve users’ mobility experience

MyGalileoApp – targeting the future of mobility

20.9.2019 10:37  
Many of the submissions in this year’s MyGalileoApp competition target solutions that improve users’ mobility experience
Published: 
20 September 2019

Submissions in the MyGalileoApp competitions target applications in 11 innovation areas. European Mobility Week, which is taking place this week, is a good opportunity to take a look at some of the applications addressing mobility-related issues that were shortlisted in the Top 30 in this year’s edition of the competition.

The Smart Navigation and Infotainment innovation area was a popular choice in this year’s MyGalileoApp competition, with a total of six submissions. Of these, five target applications that aim to improve users’ mobility experience. For example, the Mob(ility) app aims to help different communities of pedestrians living in urban areas that need to have real-time accurate information of their environment to improve everyday mobility. The app will display the best route between two different points of the city depending on users’ preferences.

Streamlining urban traffic

Two applications in this year’s competition aim to streamline urban traffic flows. Firstly, the ReadyPark app makes it possible to exchange parking spots in real-time, by pairing users leaving a spot with users looking for one, which will improve the urban driving experience. Secondly, the Mylights application displays the remaining time of a red or green signal at a traffic light controlled junction and provides optimal speed recommendation (within the applicable speed limit) for drivers to arrive at the junction just in time for a green signal.

Read this: GSA, EIB sign agreement on investment in space

Another mobile application - Lycie - notifies drivers whenever a dangerous situation is detected, by monitoring both the driver and the road. Potential Lycie users include all drivers exposed to road traffic risks: employees or individuals in a car, bus, train or even on a motorbike.

However, it’s not only road transport solutions that were developed in this year’s competition – maritime transport was also targeted. Specifically, the GALILEONAUT application helps sailors to find their way inside a port or a marina. The solution provides a link between the harbour master's office and sailors and allows the harbour master to assign a docking place to a boat entering the harbour, and the sailor to be guided without requiring any assistance from the harbour master’s office.

Mapping, GIS and Agriculture

The Smart Navigation and Infotainment innovation area was not the only one to receive mobility-related submissions. In the Mapping, GIS and Agriculture areas too, some of the applications address specific mobility-related needs. For example, the RoadEO project makes use of a smartphone’s accelerometer, gyroscope, microphone, camera and of course GNSS module to record its environment while driving in a car, truck, bike or other mode of transport, and combines this with Earth observation data in a predictive analytics solution that advises road authorities about where and when road segments need to be maintained.

And this: GSA celebrates 1 billion Galileo smartphone users

In the agriculture segment, Tractor Navigator provides guidance for farmers driving tractors. It is a navigation app (like a car GPS) that enables users to visualise their current position and trajectory on an open field (no road). Using the app, farmers can also accurately follow a predefined trajectory with live feedback to correct deviations and record and load saved trajectories to pick up work from where they left off, thereby avoiding covering the same area twice.

Moving forward

Of the seven mobility related submissions reviewed here, three – Tractor Navigator, Ready Park and GALILEONAUT – have made it through to the final 10 projects selected for the second development phase of the competition. So stay tuned to see how they do!

Along with the other projects in the final 10, these three projects have until October 21 to deliver a finalised version of their app with 100% functionality. All teams that will successfully complete the second development phase will be invited to the finals, to be held in November 2019, where they will present their application to the GSA evaluation board. The awards will be decided after these presentations, with the first-place winner receiving a EUR 100,000 prize. The runner up and third place winners will receive EUR 50,000 and EUR 30,000 respectively.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Many of the submissions in this year’s MyGalileoApp competition target solutions that improve users’ mobility experience

GSA funding opportunity: Enhanced GNSS Receiver/User Terminal

19.9.2019 11:54  
The deadline for submissions is 31 October 2019, a webinar on 9 October will help you prepare.
Published: 
19 September 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) has opened a call for proposals within its Fundamental Elements funding mechanism, targeting the implementation of OS-NMA and/or I/NAV features in close-to-market receivers and/or GNSS user terminals. The deadline for submissions is 31 October 2019.

This Call for Proposals aims to implement OS-NMA and/or I/NAV improvements capability in close-to-market (i.e. min TRL 7) receivers and/or GNSS user terminals suitable for target application domains other than the Smart Tachograph.

The applicants are requested to propose a solution to reach this objective in such a way that:

  1. The receiver and/or terminal shall be able to receive and process OS-NMA and/or be fully compliant with and make optimal use of the new Galileo E1-OS I/NAV features introduced with the Galileo Open Service Interface Control Document (OS ICD).
  2. In case of OS-NMA implementation, the enhanced receiver and/or GNSS user terminal shall aim at optimising the level of protection at least against those spoofing attacks that are specific to the target application.
  3. The developed receiver and/or GNSS user terminal shall be cost efficient and compliant with the specific application constraints.

For more details, please see the call documentation package.

EGNSS differentiators: OS-NMA and I/NAV improvements

As part of its service portfolio, Galileo plans to provide a navigation message authentication feature over its Open Service (OS). From the Galileo standpoint, Navigation Message Authentication (NMA) is defined as the ability of the system to guarantee to users that they are utilising navigation data from the Galileo satellites and not from any other, potentially malicious, source.

In addition, with the same objective of enhancing the Galileo services portfolio, three new features will soon be provided free of charge to all Open Service users. These features will be gradually implemented from 2020 and will be openly accessible through the I/NAV message carried by the E1-B signal.

The OS-NMA feature is considered an important asset for the Galileo programme, being a strong technical differentiator with respect to the other GNSS. This capability will allow Galileo user terminals to assess the authenticity of the data provided through the Signal in Space transmitted by Galileo satellites against attempts to spoof it. It will also help improve the overall robustness of GNSS for various applications, particularly those for which security and trustworthiness are a priority. Furthermore, the OS-NMA will also offer a certain level of anti-replay capability. This capability will strictly depend on the measures implemented by the actual receiver and therefore cannot be considered a Galileo service.

The three new features, whilst ensuring full backward compatibility with existing Galileo receivers, will further improve the robustness of Galileo OS when retrieving the navigation data, particularly in challenging environments, and will enhance the Galileo OS capability to resolve users’ clock uncertainty. In this respect, a key performance metric (especially when GNSS operates in unassisted mode) is the time to receive Clock and Ephemeris Data (CED). Two of the newly introduced features contribute in different ways to improving the Time-To-CED, and therefore the overall Time to First Fix (TTFF).

Fundamental Elements call: at a glance

  • Market segment: Transversal
  • Deadline for submission of proposals: 31 October 2019
  • Expected signature of contract: April to June 2020
  • Maximum budget allocated: EUR 3 000 000
  • Maximum number of projects: 2
  • EU financing amount of each of the two projects: up to EUR 3 000 000 (70% co-funding)
  • Webinar date: 9 October 2019 15:00

Webinar

On 9 October 2019 at 15:00, a webinar on the Fundamental Elements Call “Enhanced GNSS Receiver/User Terminal” will be held to provide applicants with information on how to prepare a proposal. To connect to the webinar click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The deadline for submissions is 31 October 2019, a webinar on 9 October will help you prepare.

GSA webinars on Pre-Commercial Procurement funding opportunities tailored to public authorities

18.9.2019 16:56  
Webinars will be held on Maritime, Rail, Aviation and Timing and Synchronisation
Published: 
18 September 2019

In September 2019, public authorities will have the opportunity to attend and participate in several informative webinars on Pre-Commercial Procurement and learn about the available funding opportunities on this topic.

In September 2019 public authorities and research institutions will have the opportunity to attend and participate in a number of informative webinars on PCP: Pre-Commercial Procurement. Pre-Commercial Procurement is the new innovative procurement tool for Galileo applications R&D tailored to public authorities.

Participants in these webinars will have the opportunity to:

  • Discuss innovation areas in EGNSS downstream applications from which public authorities can benefit;
  • Learn about the general Pre-Commercial Procurement concept, along with its participation rules and conditions;
  • Find out about the upcoming funding opportunities on this topic.

The specific webinars are as follows:

You can also find information on workshops held earlier this year on ‘EGNSS Innovation procurement opportunities within Horizon 2020 and Horizon Europe’ here and here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Webinars will be held on Maritime, Rail, Aviation and Timing and Synchronisation

GSA webinars on Pre-Commercial Procurement funding opportunities tailored to public authorities

18.9.2019 16:56  
Webinars will be held on Maritime, Rail, Aviation and Timing and Synchronisation
Published: 
18 September 2019

In September 2019, public authorities will have the opportunity to attend and participate in several informative webinars on Pre-Commercial Procurement and learn about the available funding opportunities on this topic.

In September 2019 public authorities and research institutions will have the opportunity to attend and participate in a number of informative webinars on PCP: Pre-Commercial Procurement. Pre-Commercial Procurement is the new innovative procurement tool for Galileo applications R&D tailored to public authorities.

Participants in these webinars will have the opportunity to:

  • Discuss innovation areas in EGNSS downstream applications from which public authorities can benefit;
  • Learn about the general Pre-Commercial Procurement concept, along with its participation rules and conditions;
  • Find out about the upcoming funding opportunities on this topic.

The specific webinars are as follows:

You can also find information on workshops held earlier this year on ‘EGNSS Innovation procurement opportunities within Horizon 2020 and Horizon Europe’ here and here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Webinars will be held on Maritime, Rail, Aviation and Timing and Synchronisation

GSA funding opportunity: Enhanced GNSS Receiver/User Terminal

18.9.2019 11:54  
The deadline for submissions is 31 October 2019, a webinar on 9 October will help you prepare.
Published: 
18 September 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) has opened a call for proposals within its Fundamental Elements funding mechanism, targeting the implementation of OS-NMA and/or I/NAV features in close-to-market receivers and/or GNSS user terminals. The deadline for submissions is 31 October 2019.

This Call for Proposals aims to implement OS-NMA and/or I/NAV improvements capability in close-to-market (i.e. min TRL 7) receivers and/or GNSS user terminals suitable for target application domains other than the Smart Tachograph.

The applicants are requested to propose a solution to reach this objective in such a way that:

  1. The receiver and/or terminal shall be able to receive and process OS-NMA and/or be fully compliant with and make optimal use of the new Galileo E1-OS I/NAV features introduced with the Galileo Open Service Interface Control Document (OS ICD) issue 1.4.
  2. In case of OS-NMA implementation, the enhanced receiver and/or GNSS user terminal shall aim at optimising the level of protection at least against those spoofing attacks that are specific to the target application.
  3. The developed receiver and/or GNSS user terminal shall be cost efficient and compliant with the specific application constraints.

For more details, please see the call documentation package.

EGNSS differentiators: OS-NMA and I/NAV improvements

As part of its service portfolio, Galileo plans to provide a navigation message authentication feature over its Open Service (OS). From the Galileo standpoint, Navigation Message Authentication (NMA) is defined as the ability of the system to guarantee to users that they are utilising navigation data from the Galileo satellites and not from any other, potentially malicious, source.

In addition, with the same objective of enhancing the Galileo services portfolio, three new features will soon be provided free of charge to all Open Service users. These features will be gradually implemented from 2020 and will be openly accessible through the I/NAV message carried by the E1-B signal.

The OS-NMA feature is considered an important asset for the Galileo programme, being a strong technical differentiator with respect to the other GNSS. This capability will allow Galileo user terminals to assess the authenticity of the data provided through the Signal in Space transmitted by Galileo satellites against attempts to spoof it. It will also help improve the overall robustness of GNSS for various applications, particularly those for which security and trustworthiness are a priority. Furthermore, the OS-NMA will also offer a certain level of anti-replay capability. This capability will strictly depend on the measures implemented by the actual receiver and therefore cannot be considered a Galileo service.

The three new features, whilst ensuring full backward compatibility with existing Galileo receivers, will further improve the robustness of Galileo OS when retrieving the navigation data, particularly in challenging environments, and will enhance the Galileo OS capability to resolve users’ clock uncertainty. In this respect, a key performance metric (especially when GNSS operates in unassisted mode) is the time to receive Clock and Ephemeris Data (CED). Two of the newly introduced features contribute in different ways to improving the Time-To-CED, and therefore the overall Time to First Fix (TTFF).

Fundamental Elements call: at a glance

  • Market segment: Transversal
  • Deadline for submission of proposals: 31 October 2019
  • Expected signature of contract: April to June 2020
  • Maximum budget allocated: EUR 3 000 000
  • Maximum number of projects: 2
  • EU financing amount of each of the two projects: up to EUR 3 000 000 (70% co-funding)
  • Webinar date: 9 October 2019 15:00

Webinar

On 9 October 2019 at 15:00, a webinar on the Fundamental Elements Call “Enhanced GNSS Receiver/User Terminal” will be held to provide applicants with information on how to prepare a proposal. To connect to the webinar click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The deadline for submissions is 31 October 2019, a webinar on 9 October will help you prepare.

European GNSS supports smarter mobility

17.9.2019 13:17  
Galileo and EGNOS are supporting the smart mobility solutions of the future
Published: 
17 September 2019

Over the past few months, we have published a number of articles highlighting how GNSS is contributing to technological advancements in various transport sectors. Mobility Week is a good opportunity to look back at these and summarise how Galileo and EGNOS are enabling the intelligent transport applications that underpin the mobility solutions of the future.

Following the first Space for Innovation in Rail conference, held in Vienna back in March, we had a number of articles on the contribution of space to the modernisation of the rail sector. One of these featured leading Italian rail infrastructure manager Rete Ferroviaria Italiana (RFI), an early adopter of the European Rail Traffic Management System (ERTMS) and a company that has been quick to appreciate the benefits of using satellite positioning in the rail sector.

GNSS and the ERTMS are perfect complementary assets that can together considerably reduce rail operational costs. However, with new technologies such as GNSS, obstacles still remain to ensuring interoperability and open standards, and these obstacles require solutions to be developed by all stakeholders involved. This is something that the ERSAT (ERTMS on Satellite) project, co-funded by the GSA, aims to address.

Watch this: EGNOS and Galileo for Rail

This project targets the integration of GNSS positioning and public telecommunications over the ERTMS platform and is making an effective roadmap to allow others to follow a step-wise operational deployment. The ERSAT project has field-tested and demonstrated the capability of satellite-based positioning embedded within the ERTMS ecosystem. This has caught the eye of many train operators in Europe and beyond.

Boosting customer services

Once such operator is French national rail company SNCF, which is taking the lead in adopting Galileo technology to boost customer services, in particular in its high-speed TGV network. The company is already embracing GNSS-based systems, especially for passenger information, and fleet and traffic management. “At the beginning of 2019, some 250 high-speed trains were already equipped with Galileo-ready receivers. This represents nearly 50% of SNCF’s TGV fleet. Some 320 trains are expected to be Galileo-ready by the end of 2019,” said Antoine Barre, head of train localisation projects at SNCF. SNCF aims to equip its entire train fleet with Galileo receivers to assist non-safety relevant train localisation, and also plans to further investigate the future contribution of European GNSS within the ERTMS.

And this: Driving with Galileo

Supporting Mobility as a Service

The benefits of EGNSS stretch beyond the rail sector, however. New urban mobility schemes are rapidly evolving due to social, economic and technological changes and, against this backdrop, Galileo can deliver new accuracy and reliability for location-dependent services that get people where they need to go. This is supported by the omnipresence of smart mobile devices, which is allowing new business models to emerge based on the sharing of goods and services - the so-called sharing economy.

The Galileo 4 Mobility project is working to promote the introduction of Galileo technology within the MaaS context by analysing the geolocation needs of the different stakeholders involved and demonstrating the benefits of Galileo through pilot demonstrators of shared mobility services. GALILEO 4 MOBILITY encompasses a number of MaaS-oriented pilots, including a ride-sharing service in Thessaloniki, Greece.

Changing the way we fly

It is not just land-based transport that is benefiting from space-based solutions. In aviation too, EGNSS is also helping make transport cleaner, safer and more accessible, EGNOS and Galileo contribute to landing, surveillance and Search and Rescue operations, and actions targeting every aviation user. These benefits of EGNOS were in focus at the AERO International General Aviation Fair at Friedrichshafen, Germany, back in May.

And this: EGNOS for Aviation

At the event, Julian Scarfe, deputy chairman of PPL/IR – Europe, the leading group for private pilots across Europe interested in instrument flying, spoke about easier access to instrument flight rules for general aviation through the use of EGNOS and localiser performance with vertical guidance (LPV). "Today we have EGNOS that can enable vertical approaches to non-instrument runways. The GSA is running a project to enable this. This will change the way we fly," he said.

Likewise, in an interview with GSA, AirBaltic’s Senior Vice President for Flight Operations Pauls Cālītis spoke about how EGNOS is enabling the E-GEN project and the ’green flying’ concept, helping the airline to improve its efficiency  and reduce its environmental footprint and the level of emissions and noise that it produces.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Galileo and EGNOS are supporting the smart mobility solutions of the future

GSA, EIB sign agreement on investment in space

13.9.2019 11:33  
The GSA-EIB agreement will help create high-skilled jobs and improve the day-to-day lives of Europeans
Published: 
13 September 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) and the European Investment Bank (EIB) have signed an agreement to cooperate on supporting investment in the European space-based service economy. The agreement was signed as part of celebrations at GSA headquarters in Prague on September 10 to mark the Agency’s 15th anniversary.

With the new agreement, the GSA and EIB are bringing together their expertise and experience to explore new investment support for the European space-based economy. The common objective is to create high-skilled jobs in the EU and improve the day-to-day lives of Europeans by supporting innovative companies and accelerating the development of new applications that use European global navigation satellite systems and earth observation data.

Read this: GSA celebrates 15 years

European Commissioner for the Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs Elżbieta Bieńkowska has noted several times the critical importance of adequate funding for the future of the European space industry. "Access to finance remains a significant hurdle to unleashing the potential of European space entrepreneurship within and outside Europe,” the Commissioner said. This new agreement between the GSA and the EIB will help to overcome this hurdle.

Keeping Europe in the game

“Our expertise in market intelligence for satellite navigation and in supporting new business opportunities – thanks to EGNOS and Galileo – is the basis of our agreement with the EIB,” said Carlo des Dorides, GSA Executive Director. “We are confident that our cooperation will bring the extra added value required by entrepreneurs to transform their application businesses into globally successful companies.”

“We need to make sure that Europe stays in the game. That is why we are particularly enthusiastic about this agreement with GSA. It is an important step to develop further support for European space entrepreneurs and businesses to eventually give them and the EU a competitive edge in this new space race,” said EIB Vice-President Ambroise Fayolle, responsible for innovation.

A changing space sector

The global space economy has been evolving rapidly in recent years, with average annual growth of 6.7% over the past 10 years, which is almost twice the 3.5% average yearly growth of the global economy. The main driver of this growth has been the “New Space” phenomenon: a number of technological and business model innovations that have introduced new products and services and reduced the cost of accessing and using space.

And this: GSA celebrates 1 billion Galileo smartphone users

The transformation of the space economy has seen new space companies investing over EUR 14.8 billion since 2000, with a fast accelerating trend: total investment in space companies grew by a factor of 3.5 in 2012–2017 compared with the previous six-year period.

Historically, Europe has always been at the forefront of publicly-funded space exploration, investing massively in space infrastructures such as the Copernicus and Galileo satellite programmes. Europe still boasts academic and scientific excellence but risks missing the next wave of space innovation unless it seizes the opportunity to stimulate more private investment in the new space sector. This is something that the new agreement between the GSA and the EIB aims to address.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GSA-EIB agreement will help create high-skilled jobs and improve the day-to-day lives of Europeans

GSA celebrates 15 years

10.9.2019 14:26  
“GSA has been at the heart of the EGNOS and Galileo programmes over the past 15 years,” Carlo des Dorides.
Published: 
10 September 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is hosting a special event on September 10 to mark the 15th anniversary of its creation. The Agency was set up as the European GNSS Supervisory Authority in 2004 to oversee the development of the European space programmes EGNOS and Galileo.

GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides welcomed special guests to the GSA’s Prague headquarters to celebrate the event, including European Commissioner Elżbieta Bieńkowska, Czech Transport Minister Vladimir Kremlik, French Space Agency (CNES) President and GSA Administrative Board Chair Jean-Yves Le Gall and European Space Agency Director General Jan Woerner, in addition to other EGNOS and Galileo stakeholders.

“Over the last 15 years, the GSA has become one of the key players in building Europe’s independent capacity in satellite navigation,” said Commissioner Bieńkowska, responsible for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs. While participating in the celebrations, the Commissioner also presided over another historic milestone for both the Galileo programme and the GSA – the countdown to the 1 billionth Galileo-enabled smartphone sold.

Read this: GSA celebrates 1 billion Galileo smartphone users

Linking space to user needs

GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides said: “It is an honour and a great pleasure to celebrate this important milestone with representatives from all our stakeholders - the Commission, users, industry and other institutional bodies. Their presence here clearly shows that the GSA is delivering on its mission– linking space to user needs”.

“15 years ago, no one imagined how far the GSA and the EU satellite navigation systems EGNOS and Galileo would go. Now, no one can imagine Europe without Galileo and EGNOS, or Galileo and EGNOS without Europe. The GSA has been at the heart of these two programmes, accelerating progress in service provision, market uptake and guaranteeing operation security over the past 15 years. All that has been accomplished has been made possible thanks to the unique blend of expertise, dedication and commitment of the GSA’s staff,” des Dorides said.

Speaking at the event, GSA Administrative Board Chair Jean-Yves Le Gall said: “Today thanks to the European Union’s impressive investment, the European Space Agency’s technical expertise and the GSA’s outstanding commitment, Galileo is offering the best localisation available worldwide. The range of applications is vast. This is structuring our economy and the implementation of the public policies to ensure that European companies are taking full advantage of these fantastic services.”

Czech Transport Minister Vladimir Kremlik noted the importance to the Czech capital of hosting the EU agency. “It has been fifteen years of hard work and continual development. By chance it is also seven years since the seat of GSA has been relocated from Brussels to Prague. I am very proud, that the Czech Republic is the hosting country of the seat of such an important European agency with real global reach,” the minister said.

And this: GSA GNSS Market Report 6 – coming soon!

Looking to the future

Galileo will soon reach its Full Operational Capability, a phase that will require new governance to comply with benchmarked standards for the management of operational satellite services. It was with this in mind that the European Parliament and the Council agreed on a new EU Space Programme Regulation establishing the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) as the successor to the GSA.

“In the new governance the Commission will continue to be responsible for managing the overall programme. The GSA, to be renamed the 'EU Agency for the Space Programme', will increasingly support the exploitation and market uptake of EU space activities and play an increased role in ensuring the security of all programme components. The intergovernmental European Space Agency (ESA), given its expertise, will remain a major partner in the technical implementation of the EU space programme,” des Dorides said.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

“GSA has been at the heart of the EGNOS and Galileo programmes over the past 15 years,” Carlo des Dorides.

GSA celebrates 1 billion Galileo smartphone users

9.9.2019 11:33  
The number of Galileo-enabled smartphones in use has soared to 1 billion in just 3 years.
Published: 
09 September 2019

The estimated number of Galileo-enabled smartphones in use has reached one billion. This significant milestone has been achieved in the week when the European GNSS Agency (GSA), responsible for operation of the Galileo programme, celebrates its 15th anniversary, making this a memorable week for the Agency.

This is a truly historic moment for the Galileo programme. BQ pioneered Galileo use in smartphones with its Aquaris X5 Plus back in July 2016. Since then, market uptake of Galileo-enabled smartphones has been rapid as other manufacturers were quick to embrace the opportunities that Galileo offers, and there are currently 156 Galileo-enabled smartphone models available on the market. The ‘1 billion users’ milestone is based on the number of smartphones using Galileo sold across the world. The actual number of Galileo users around the world is much larger. You can track which devices, including smartphones, are Galileo-enabled on the UseGalileo.eu site.

Read this: GSA GNSS Market Report 6 – coming soon!

Today 95% of companies that produce smartphone chips for satellite navigation make chips that enable Galileo. According to figures in the latest GSA GNSS Market Report, which is to be published soon, global annual GNSS receiver shipments are forecast to grow continuously across the next decade, from 1.8 bln units in 2019 to 2.7 bln units in 2029. Most of these shipments are for receivers costing less than €5, and 90% of receivers in this price segment are used in smartphones and wearables.

Truly European effort

Ahead of a special event to mark the occasion, to be held at the GSA’s headquarters in Prague on September 10, Elżbieta Bieńkowska, Commissioner for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs, said: “Galileo is now providing high quality timing and navigation services to 1 billion smartphone users globally. This has been made possible by a truly European effort to build the most accurate navigation system in the world, with the support and dedication of the GSA. I am confident that our space industry will continue to thrive with more work, ideas and investment under the new EU Space Programme.”

And this: French railways embrace Galileo

GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides said: “One billion smartphone users is a significant milestone and a major achievement for the Galileo programme and for the GSA. The GSA has worked tirelessly to build bridges with research and industry and create a strong community of service providers who trust Galileo and understand the technological innovation opportunities it brings. Chipset and receiver manufacturers in particular have been quick to leverage Galileo’s outstanding performance. These manufacturers believed in Galileo from the beginning, when Galileo was still an idea, and invested in the technology. It is thanks to them and the unique blend of expertise and knowledge of the GSA team that we are now celebrating 1 billion Galileo-enabled smartphones.”

Prague celebrations

The 1-billionth smartphone milestone is being celebrated at a special event to mark the GSA’s 15th anniversary at the Agency’s Prague headquarters on September 10. The event is being attended by European Commissioner Elżbieta Bieńkowska, Czech Transport Minister Vladimir Kremlik, French Space Agency (CNES) President and GSA Administrative Board Chair Jean-Yves Le Gall and European Space Agency Director General Jan Woerner, in addition to stakeholders from industry, the user community and research institutions.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The number of Galileo-enabled smartphones in use has soared to 1 billion in just 3 years.

GSA celebrates 1 billion Galileo smartphone users

9.9.2019 11:33  
The number of Galileo-enabled smartphones in use has soared to 1 billion in just 3 years.
Published: 
09 September 2019

The estimated number of Galileo-enabled smartphones in use has reached one billion. This significant milestone has been achieved in the week when the European GNSS Agency (GSA), responsible for operation of the Galileo programme, celebrates its 15th anniversary, making this a memorable week for the Agency.

This is a truly historic moment for the Galileo programme. BQ pioneered Galileo use in smartphones with its Aquaris X5 Plus back in July 2016. Since then, market uptake of Galileo-enabled smartphones has been rapid as other manufacturers were quick to embrace the opportunities that Galileo offers, and there are currently 156 Galileo-enabled smartphone models available on the market. The ‘1 billion users’ milestone is based on the number of smartphones using Galileo sold across the world. The actual number of Galileo users around the world is much larger. You can track which devices, including smartphones, are Galileo-enabled on the UseGalileo.eu site.

Read this: GSA GNSS Market Report 6 – coming soon!

Today 95% of companies that produce smartphone chips for satellite navigation make chips that enable Galileo. According to figures in the latest GSA GNSS Market Report, which is to be published soon, global annual GNSS receiver shipments are forecast to grow continuously across the next decade, from 1.8 bln units in 2019 to 2.7 bln units in 2029. Most of these shipments are for receivers costing less than €5, and 90% of receivers in this price segment are used in smartphones and wearables.

Truly European effort

Ahead of a special event to mark the occasion, to be held at the GSA’s headquarters in Prague on September 10, Elżbieta Bieńkowska, Commissioner for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs, said: “Galileo is now providing high quality timing and navigation services to 1 billion smartphone users globally. This has been made possible by a truly European effort to build the most accurate navigation system in the world, with the support and dedication of the GSA. I am confident that our space industry will continue to thrive with more work, ideas and investment under the new EU Space Programme.”

And this: French railways embrace Galileo

GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides said: “One billion smartphone users is a significant milestone and a major achievement for the Galileo programme and for the GSA. The GSA has worked tirelessly to build bridges with research and industry and create a strong community of service providers who trust Galileo and understand the technological innovation opportunities it brings. Chipset and receiver manufacturers in particular have been quick to leverage Galileo’s outstanding performance. These manufacturers believed in Galileo from the beginning, when Galileo was still an idea, and invested in the technology. It is thanks to them and the unique blend of expertise and knowledge of the GSA team that we are now celebrating 1 billion Galileo-enabled smartphones.”

Prague celebrations

The 1-billionth smartphone milestone is being celebrated at a special event to mark the GSA’s 15th anniversary at the Agency’s Prague headquarters on September 10. The event is being attended by European Commissioner Elżbieta Bieńkowska, Czech Transport Minister Vladimir Kremlik, French Space Agency (CNES) President and GSA Administrative Board Chair Jean-Yves Le Gall and European Space Agency Director General Jan Woerner, in addition to stakeholders from industry, the user community and research institutions.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The number of Galileo-enabled smartphones in use has soared to 1 billion in just 3 years.

Galileo-Copernicus challenge leads the pack in Galileo Masters 2019

4.9.2019 11:33  
In total, 203 ideas were submitted in this year’s competition.
Published: 
04 September 2019

The Galileo-Copernicus Synergy Challenge, which seeks solutions that help to make our world safer and more sustainable using Earth observation combined with Galileo/EGNOS geo-referencing, received the most submissions in this year’s Galileo Masters, with a total of 54 completed ideas submitted.

In total, 203 completed ideas were submitted by the August 5 deadline. After the Galileo-Copernicus Synergy Challenge, the second most targeted challenge was the Galileo 5G Challenge with 49 completed ideas submitted. This challenge aims to identify innovative applications, services and business cases for the 5G IoT market that leverage Galileo’s added accuracy.

Solution generator

The next most targeted challenges were the University Challenge (35 completed ideas), followed by the DLR Artificial Intelligence Navigation Challenge (28 completed ideas), which is looking for solutions that enable automation and autonomy with reliable positioning, navigation, and timing.

Read this: Fundamental Elements: Call for experts

There was a good regional spread in this year’s competition, with submissions coming from across Europe. The most represented country is Germany, with 47 completed ideas, followed by Spain with 45 ideas and the United Kingdom with 24 ideas submitted. Other ideas came from Greece, the Netherlands, the Czech Republic, Austria, Estonia, Italy, France and Ireland.

“The Galileo Masters has established itself as a key generator of exciting applications and solutions that leverage Galileo’s precision to meet challenges facing business and society. There are a record number of submissions in this year’s competition, and we are very much looking forward to reviewing the exciting ideas that have been put forward,” said GSA Market Development Officer Marta Krywanis-Brzostowska.

Next steps

The submitted ideas will now be reviewed by a panel of experts and all the Special Prize finalists will be announced in November. The competition awards will be handed out during European Space Week, which will take place in Helsinki at the start of December.

And this: GSA to host Horizon 2020 Space Information Day

The winning solutions will share more than EUR 1 million worth of cash prizes. The winners will also be able to take advantage of business development opportunities, tailored E-GNSS Accelerator business support packages worth EUR 62,000, a crowd funding campaign worth EUR 35,000, and much more.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

In total, 203 ideas were submitted in this year’s competition.

GSA GNSS Market Report 6 – coming soon!

27.8.2019 9:18  
A sneak peek at the cover of the upcoming edition of the GSA’s GNSS Market Report.
Published: 
27 August 2019

The 2019 edition of the GSA’s GNSS Market Report will be launched in the autumn. As in previous years, the latest issue of the report will provide comprehensive information on the dynamic global GNSS market along with in-depth analysis of the latest global GNSS trends and developments. To be among the first to receive the Market Report straight into your inbox , register here.

With more than 60,000 downloads since it was published online in May 2017, the previous edition of the GNSS Market Report has proved to be an essential tool for all market players, from research institutions and industry to the various user communities, providing them with a comprehensive overview of the current status and future trends on the GNSS market.

Regularly referenced by policy-makers and business leaders around the world, the publication has established itself as the most authoritative reference document for information on the global GNSS market.

A sneak peek

The 2019 edition of the report will continue this tradition and build on the success of the previous reports. The structure of this year’s report is similar to previous years and will include:

  • A general overview of the GNSS market, including user requirements, forecasts for future shipments, revenues and the GNSS installed base, a global industry overview, and synergies between EGNSS and Copernicus;
  • Analysis of macro-trends affecting GNSS, including climate change and the circular economy, big data, artificial intelligence, the silver economy, cyber security and the sharing economy, that impact the adoption of GNSS solutions;
  • A review of the main GNSS market segments, which have increased to 10 in this year’s report: Consumer Solutions, Road, Manned Aviation, Drones, Maritime, Emergency Response, Rail, Agriculture, Geomatics and Critical Infrastructure.

The GNSS market segment review forms the core of the report and provides a summary of GNSS applications in each segment with an overview of user needs and requirements, value chain and relevant European GNSS differentiators for each specific segment. Also included in this section is analysis of key trends and recent developments in each segment and predictions on how the market will evolve, with forecasts for shipments and revenues over the next decade.

Editor’s Special – GNSS for New Space

Though originally conceived for terrestrial use, GNSS has also proven its worth as a valuable tool for in-space applications, and it is these in-space applications that are the focus of the Editor’s Special section in this year’s market report.

Formerly used mainly by governmental space entities, GNSS now also serves an increasing number of commercial stakeholders within the ‘New Space’ paradigm, providing the following in-space applications: real-time on-board autonomous navigation, attitude determination, Earth science applications and timing and synchronisation for satellites.

The Editor’s Special section examines key trends behind the rapid growth in the number of spacecraft with a particular focus on growth in private LEO service providers and on Galileo’s contribution to the Space Service Volume (SSV).

Don’t miss out!

The 2019 GNSS Market Report will be available to download for free. Don’t miss out on this opportunity to tap into the latest trends and developments on the GNSS market. To receive an e-mail notification when the Market Report will be available, register here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

A sneak peek at the cover of the upcoming edition of the GSA’s GNSS Market Report.

French railways embrace Galileo

22.8.2019 10:41  
More than 70 million TGV passengers will benefit from Galileo’s improved accuracy and positioning in 2019.
Published: 
22 August 2019

The French national rail company SNCF is taking a lead in adopting Galileo technology to boost customer services, in particular in its high-speed TGV network. With almost 50% of TGV trains already equipped with Galileo receivers, European GNSS is enabling improved customer information and traffic management. GNSS is a crucial technology for the digitalisation of infrastructure and autonomous train developments thanks to accurate and safe localisation of trains. Solutions are currently developed through partnerships between space and railway sectors.

Satellite positioning and geolocation technologies, like Galileo, are among the main technology building blocks that can precisely and safely locate trains and contribute to the future evolution of the European Rail Traffic Management System (ERTMS). Implementation of the ERTMS aims to harmonise signalling systems across Europe and European GNSS can help to reduce its costs.

French national rail company SNCF is already embracing GNSS-based systems, in particular for passenger information, and fleet and traffic management. “At the beginning of 2019, some 250 high-speed trains were already equipped with Galileo-ready receivers. This represents nearly 50% of SNCF’s TGV fleet. Some 320 trains are expected to be Galileo-ready by the end of 2019” said Antoine Barre, Head of Train localisation projects from SNCF.

70 million passengers to benefit

The aim is to deliver Galileo-enabled services along the entire train journey and customer experience. During 2019, more than 70 million passengers will benefit from the improved accuracy and positioning availability delivered to French TGV trains by Galileo. SNCF aims to equip its entire train fleet with Galileo receivers to assist non-safety relevant train localisation and also plans to further investigate the future contribution of European GNSS within ERTMS. “Having Galileo on the iconic TGV trains is a major milestone for us, confirming that European GNSS is delivering a clear value added to one of the main EU Railway undertakings. It is also good to see that SNCF is further progressing towards GNSS adoption on the regional fleet on the basis of the GSA position paper delivered earlier to the Community of European Railways (CER), explaining the benefits of Galileo for such applications“ comments Daniel Lopour, Market Development officer from GSA.

Read this: EGNSS key to increasing capacity, efficiency and sustainability in rail networks

Currently, signalling is enabled by equipment installed along rail tracks that requires regular inspection and maintenance. Accurate and reliable geolocation using GNSS will enable rail networks to reduce the cost related to the infrastructure. Receivers installed in the train and connected via wireless networks should considerably reduce the costs of operation, maintenance and renewal of the network.
SNCF has identified three main themes of work for future rail technologies: geolocation, telecommunication and the use of satellite images for infrastructure monitoring.

Technology forward

Speaking at the recent Space for Innovation in Rail event in Vienna Corinne Talotte, Director of Innovative Technologies at SNCF, described SNCF’s Technology Forward programme that is looking to build the ‘Railway for the Future’ – a railway that is “autonomous, connected, and zero emission”.

This spirit of innovation at SNCF aims to accelerate the implementation of new technologies. “First, this involves keeping an open mind on innovation and learning from other transport sectors,” says Talotte. “And our second important principle is to move to demonstrate innovative technologies as soon as possible in real operational situations to prepare the future deployment of innovations.”

Highly precise geolocation is a key element to enable autonomy in all modes of transport and future mobility systems. For trains, autonomous operation can increase the density of trains operating in the network while at the same time improving safety and reliability of customer services.

And this: Space4Rail - From innovation to implementation

“We need to know accurately the position, velocity and attitude in real time to enable autonomous train systems,” explains Talotte. “We are developing a multi-sensor system for localisation based on GNSS but combined with other inertial sensors. This hybrid approach is inspired by the approach already adopted in the aviation sector. SNCF is undertaking a number of demonstrations with several partners, including the ERTMS user group and the Shift2Rail Joint Undertaking.”

Hybrid architecture

At the Space for Innovation in Rail event Corinne Talotte said that SNCF was working on the remote operation of trains for use cases like shunting yards and the development of fully autonomous train prototypes.

The hybrid architecture makes it possible to take advantage of the benefits offered by both technologies: the GNSS corrects the natural drift of the inertial unit, and when the GNSS is not available, for example in tunnels or in dense urban environments, the inertial unit can take over to ensure continuity of location data. The inertial unit also protects the system from any possible disturbances in the GNSS signal, such as jamming or spoofing, as well as environmental factors.

The use of autonomous trains with innovative network control systems should enable SNCF to increase throughput on its lines. The objective is to carry more people and more goods, with greater regularity, improved energy efficiency and better economic performance, while ensuring continuing high levels of safety.

SNCF believes that the autonomous train is no longer science fiction, but the immediate future. A first prototype remote-controlled freight train should be tested during 2019, and the first prototypes of freight and passenger trains with autonomous driving capability are predicted from 2023, with gradual implementation.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

More than 70 million TGV passengers will benefit from Galileo’s improved accuracy and positioning in 2019.

MyGalileoApp – final 10 announced!

19.8.2019 10:35  
The final 10 have until October 21 to deliver a fully-functioning version of their app.
Published: 
19 August 2019

We can now reveal the ten projects in the MyGalileoApp competition judged to be the most exciting in terms of their level of innovation, market potential and technical feasibility. Selected from 30 projects shortlisted for the competition’s first development phase, these 10 projects will now advance to the second development phase, at the end of which they should deliver a fully functioning app.

Four of the 10 shortlisted projects are in the Augmented Reality and Games innovation area. In no particular order, these are: uMaze (Finland), ARGEO (Italy), STPR (Poland, Australia, Ukraine) and arstory (Germany). uMaze creates mazes in specific outdoor areas in which users can play, while ARGEO allows users to discover content such as prizes, coupons and shopping cards geo-located around the streets of a city. The STPR app combines a virtual environment with game-related physical experiences in the real world, and arstory is a complete augmented reality ecosystem based on four main components: Galileo location, virtual objects in the real world, clustering of objects and a wide array of content options.

The Smart Navigation and Infotainment innovation area accounts for three of the 10 finalists. The Ready Park app (France) makes parking easier by pairing drivers leaving a spot with users looking for one. GALILEONAUT (France) is a mobile app that helps sailors to navigate inside a port or a marina and provides a link to the harbour master's office, while the Trukatu app (Spain) is a mobile C2C platform that connects people who want to rent or lease items with owners who have items to rent out.

Read this: Galileo Demo Centre Hanoi – only a few spaces left!

Two of the shortlisted projects fall in the Fitness, Sport and mHealth category. The first of these - PanPan - Possible Assistance Needed (Germany) - serves as backup safety solution for potentially dangerous activities that may leave users in need of assistance, while the second - LetMeAut (Italy) - makes everyday tasks easier for people with autism.

Finally, the Mapping, GIS and Agriculture innovation area accounts for one app among the top ten shortlisted projects. Tractor Navigator (France) provides guidance for farmers driving tractors, enabling them to visualise their current position and trajectory in an open field.

“The standard of entry in this year’s competition was very high, which made the judges’ task a difficult one. However, the final 10 projects stood out in terms of their innovative approach and uptake potential and we are looking forward to seeing the final working apps in October,” said Justyna Redelkiewicz Musial, in charge of LBS and IoT market development at the European GNSS Agency (GSA). “We hope that the 20 projects that didn’t make it into the second development phase will continue to develop their apps because, at the finals, they will also have the opportunity to demonstrate the progress that they have made,” she said.

What comes next?

The 10 projects selected for the second development phase will have until October 21 to deliver a finalised version of their app with 100% functionality. During this phase the teams can receive technical support from the competition’s technical and business advisory team. At the end of the phase, the application should be already available for download on the Google Play and Apple platforms.

All teams that will successfully complete the second development phase will be invited to the finals, to be held in November 2019, where they will present their application to the GSA evaluation board. The awards will be decided after these presentations, with the first-place winner receiving a EUR 100,000 prize. The runner up and third place winners will receive EUR 50,000 and EUR 30,000 respectively.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The final 10 have until October 21 to deliver a fully-functioning version of their app.

MyGalileoApp – final 10 announced!

19.8.2019 10:35  
The final 10 have until October 21 to deliver a fully-functioning version of their app.
Published: 
19 August 2019

We can now reveal the ten projects in the MyGalileoApp competition judged to be the most exciting in terms of their level of innovation, market potential and technical feasibility. Selected from 30 projects shortlisted for the competition’s first development phase, these 10 projects will now advance to the second development phase, at the end of which they should deliver a fully functioning app.

Four of the 10 shortlisted projects are in the Augmented Reality and Games innovation area. In no particular order, these are: uMaze (Finland), ARGEO (Italy), STPR (Poland, Australia, Ukraine) and arstory (Germany). uMaze creates mazes in specific outdoor areas in which users can play, while ARGEO allows users to discover content such as prizes, coupons and shopping cards geo-located around the streets of a city. The STPR app combines a virtual environment with game-related physical experiences in the real world, and arstory is a complete augmented reality ecosystem based on four main components: Galileo location, virtual objects in the real world, clustering of objects and a wide array of content options.

The Smart Navigation and Infotainment innovation area accounts for three of the 10 finalists. The Ready Park app (France) makes parking easier by pairing drivers leaving a spot with users looking for one. GALILEONAUT (France) is a mobile app that helps sailors to navigate inside a port or a marina and provides a link to the harbour master's office, while the Trukatu app (Spain) is a mobile C2C platform that connects people who want to rent or lease items with owners who have items to rent out.

Read this: Galileo Demo Centre Hanoi – only a few spaces left!

Two of the shortlisted projects fall in the Fitness, Sport and mHealth category. The first of these - PanPan - Possible Assistance Needed (Germany) - serves as backup safety solution for potentially dangerous activities that may leave users in need of assistance, while the second - LetMeAut (Italy) - makes everyday tasks easier for people with autism.

Finally, the Mapping, GIS and Agriculture innovation area accounts for one app among the top ten shortlisted projects. Tractor Navigator (France) provides guidance for farmers driving tractors, enabling them to visualise their current position and trajectory in an open field.

“The standard of entry in this year’s competition was very high, which made the judges’ task a difficult one. However, the final 10 projects stood out in terms of their innovative approach and uptake potential and we are looking forward to seeing the final working apps in October,” said Justyna Redelkiewicz Musial, in charge of LBS and IoT market development at the European GNSS Agency (GSA). “We hope that the 20 projects that didn’t make it into the second development phase will continue to develop their apps because, at the finals, they will also have the opportunity to demonstrate the progress that they have made,” she said.

What comes next?

The 10 projects selected for the second development phase will have until October 21 to deliver a finalised version of their app with 100% functionality. During this phase the teams can receive technical support from the competition’s technical and business advisory team. At the end of the phase, the application should be already available for download on the Google Play and Apple platforms.

All teams that will successfully complete the second development phase will be invited to the finals, to be held in November 2019, where they will present their application to the GSA evaluation board. The awards will be decided after these presentations, with the first-place winner receiving a EUR 100,000 prize. The runner up and third place winners will receive EUR 50,000 and EUR 30,000 respectively.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The final 10 have until October 21 to deliver a fully-functioning version of their app.

Fundamental Elements: Call for experts

8.8.2019 11:16  
Apply early – the first experts should be appointed in Q3 2019!
Published: 
08 August 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is looking for experts with a high level of expertise and professional experience in navigation satellite systems to assist it with tasks related to the implementation of the Fundamental Elements funding mechanism.

The Agency is interested in experts with professional experience in specific market segments such as aviation, location-based services, agriculture, surveying, rail, road, maritime, and timing and synchronisation and/or with hi-tech business building skills.
Specifically, the GSA would like to involve business and technical experts with proven experience in one or more of the following areas:

  • E-GNSS signal processing;
  • Development (hardware, software/firmware algorithms etc.) of E-GNSS receivers and antennas;
  • Applications, services and products in the area of E-GNSS;
  • E-GNSS technologies state of the art boosting, particularly E-GNSS differentiators.

No deadline, but apply early

The call for expression of interest is permanently open, so there is no application deadline. However, early application is encouraged since the first experts should be appointed in the third quarter of 2019. If you are interested in this opportunity, you can register here.

Experts who have already registered in the Participant Portal expert database are invited to log-on here to declare their interest in Fundamental Elements assignments and to update their area(s) of expertise.

For more information and to download the call click here.

About Fundamental Elements

Fundamental Elements is an EU R&D funding mechanism supporting the development of EGNSS-enabled chipsets, receivers and antennas. Fundamental Elements projects are part of the overall European GNSS strategy for market uptake, led by the GSA. The objectives of the programme can be summarised as follows:

  • Facilitate the adoption of EGNSS, building on innovative services and differentiators;
  • Improve the competitiveness of EU industry ;
  • Address user needs in priority market segments ;
  • Maximise benefits to European citizens.

The total budget for projects to be carried out in 2015-2020 is EUR 111.5 million.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Apply early – the first experts should be appointed in Q3 2019!

Austro Control and EGNOS – a story of success

6.8.2019 10:18  
Austro Control plans to make EGNOS implementation at Austrian airports more widespread.
Published: 
06 August 2019

Austrian air navigation services provider Austro Control is in charge of implementing EGNOS-based procedures at the country’s airports. So far, EGNOS-based approach procedures, including rotorcraft procedures, have been implemented at seven airports/heliports and there are plans to make this implementation more widespread in the future.

The Austrian ANSP was an early adopter of Europe’s SBAS system EGNOS. The first LPV approach procedures for Linz and Graz airports were published in 2014, as part of the GSA-funded FP7 ACCEPTA project, providing Austro Control’s Instrument Flight Procedures team with some valuable early experience. A key pre-requisite for successful implementation was the involvement of all stakeholders from the very beginning of the process.

Stakeholder involvement

“We organized a workshop a couple of years ago with the European Satellite Services Provider (ESSP) in which we involved all stakeholders, including representatives from the state and from operators, in order to assist us in defining the implementation process and setting our final goals. This was key to ensuring successful implementation, and as a result the process went quite smoothly,” said Florian Buchmann, Head of Instrument Flight Procedures at Austro Control.

Read this: EGNOS Service Provider call is now open

Buchmann noted that a big advantage for Austria is the fact that the country is located inside the core EGNOS coverage area. Following the initial successful implementation at Linz and Graz, Austro Control has continued to roll-out LPV approaches throughout the country, with a view to increasing operational safety and all-weather accessibility of airports.

Florian Buchmann, Head of Instrument Flight Procedures at Austro Control

Florian Buchmann, Head of Instrument Flight Procedures at Austro Control

“We will finish EGNOS implementation at the main airports in Austria by the end of this year or next year, but then we will extend it to rotorcraft operations, serving Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS) bases or hospitals. The first of these approach procedures were implemented in February this year as part of the GSA co-funded project PIONEERS 2 within the Aviation Grant Programme,” Buchmann said. “In the future we will also look into low-level routes for helicopters as well as serving smaller airfields,” he said.

Positive response

When it comes to rotorcraft operators, the Austro Control representative noted that the best way forward is a coordinated approach at European level. He said that in Austria some operational issues had to be resolved at the national level, but overall the process had been straightforward and the feedback from operators had been extremely positive.

And this: Flying green with airBaltic

“The response from general aviation and business aircraft operators has been positive, thanks to the increased accessibility and the high-quality vertical guidance provided by EGNOS. In particular, for HEMS rotorcraft the main benefit is the safe flight operation in adverse weather conditions. If you can keep operations open regardless of the weather, this has a major positive impact in terms of service delivery and medical assistance,” Buchmann said.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Austro Control plans to make EGNOS implementation at Austrian airports more widespread.

Austro Control and EGNOS – a story of success

6.8.2019 10:18  
Austro Control plans to make EGNOS implementation at Austrian airports more widespread.
Published: 
06 August 2019

Austrian air navigation services provider Austro Control is in charge of implementing EGNOS-based procedures at the country’s airports. So far, EGNOS-based approach procedures, including rotorcraft procedures, have been implemented at seven airports/heliports and there are plans to make this implementation more widespread in the future.

The Austrian ANSP was an early adopter of Europe’s SBAS system EGNOS. The first LPV approach procedures for Linz and Graz airports were published in 2014, as part of the GSA-funded FP7 ACCEPTA project, providing Austro Control’s Instrument Flight Procedures team with some valuable early experience. A key pre-requisite for successful implementation was the involvement of all stakeholders from the very beginning of the process.

Stakeholder involvement

“We organized a workshop a couple of years ago with the European Satellite Services Provider (ESSP) in which we involved all stakeholders, including representatives from the state and from operators, in order to assist us in defining the implementation process and setting our final goals. This was key to ensuring successful implementation, and as a result the process went quite smoothly,” said Florian Buchmann, Head of Instrument Flight Procedures at Austro Control.

Read this: EGNOS Service Provider call is now open

Buchmann noted that a big advantage for Austria is the fact that the country is located inside the core EGNOS coverage area. Following the initial successful implementation at Linz and Graz, Austro Control has continued to roll-out LPV approaches throughout the country, with a view to increasing operational safety and all-weather accessibility of airports.

Florian Buchmann, Head of Instrument Flight Procedures at Austro Control

Florian Buchmann, Head of Instrument Flight Procedures at Austro Control

“We will finish EGNOS implementation at the main airports in Austria by the end of this year or next year, but then we will extend it to rotorcraft operations, serving Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS) bases or hospitals. The first of these approach procedures were implemented in February this year as part of the GSA co-funded project PIONEERS 2 within the Aviation Grant Programme,” Buchmann said. “In the future we will also look into low-level routes for helicopters as well as serving smaller airfields,” he said.

Positive response

When it comes to rotorcraft operators, the Austro Control representative noted that the best way forward is a coordinated approach at European level. He said that in Austria some operational issues had to be resolved at the national level, but overall the process had been straightforward and the feedback from operators had been extremely positive.

And this: Flying green with airBaltic

“The response from general aviation and business aircraft operators has been positive, thanks to the increased accessibility and the high-quality vertical guidance provided by EGNOS. In particular, for HEMS rotorcraft the main benefit is the safe flight operation in adverse weather conditions. If you can keep operations open regardless of the weather, this has a major positive impact in terms of service delivery and medical assistance,” Buchmann said.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Austro Control plans to make EGNOS implementation at Austrian airports more widespread.

Austro Control and EGNOS – a story of success

6.8.2019 10:18  
Austro Control plans to make EGNOS implementation at Austrian airports more widespread.
Published: 
06 August 2019

Austrian air navigation services provider Austro Control is in charge of implementing EGNOS-based procedures at the country’s airports. So far, EGNOS-based approach procedures, including rotorcraft procedures, have been implemented at seven airports/heliports and there are plans to make this implementation more widespread in the future.

The Austrian ANSP was an early adopter of Europe’s SBAS system EGNOS. The first LPV approach procedures for Linz and Graz airports were published in 2014, as part of the GSA-funded FP7 ACCEPTA project, providing Austro Control’s Instrument Flight Procedures team with some valuable early experience. A key pre-requisite for successful implementation was the involvement of all stakeholders from the very beginning of the process.

Buchmann noted that a big advantage for Austria is the fact that the country is located inside the core EGNOS coverage area. Following the initial successful implementation at Linz and Graz, Austro Control has continued to roll-out LPV approaches throughout the country, with a view to increasing operational safety and all-weather accessibility of airports.

Read this: EGNOS Service Provider call is now open

“We will finish EGNOS implementation at the main airports in Austria by the end of this year or next year, but then we will extend it to rotorcraft operations, serving Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS) bases or hospitals. The first of these approach procedures were implemented in February this year as part of the GSA co-funded project PIONEERS 2 within the Aviation Grant Programme,” Buchmann said. “In the future we will also look into low-level routes for helicopters as well as serving smaller airfields,” he said. In total, three helicopter approaches were designed and validated under the PIONEERS 2 project in Austria - at Oberwart, Bad Vöslay and Allentsteig.

Positive response

When it comes to rotorcraft operators, the Austro Control representative noted that the best way forward is a coordinated approach at European level. He said that in Austria some operational issues had to be resolved at the national level, but overall the process had been straightforward and the feedback from operators had been extremely positive.

Florian Buchmann, Head of Instrument Flight Procedures at Austro Control

Florian Buchmann, Head of Instrument Flight Procedures at Austro Control

And this: Flying green with airBaltic

“The response from general aviation and business aircraft operators has been positive, thanks to the increased accessibility and the high-quality vertical guidance provided by EGNOS. In particular, for HEMS rotorcraft the main benefit is the safe flight operation in adverse weather conditions. If you can keep operations open regardless of the weather, this has a major positive impact in terms of service delivery and medical assistance,” Buchmann said.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Austro Control plans to make EGNOS implementation at Austrian airports more widespread.

GSA to host Horizon 2020 Space Information Day

1.8.2019 10:40  
The Horizon 2020 Space Information Day and Brokerage Event will take place in Prague on 12-13 September 2019.
Published: 
01 August 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) and the Horizon 2020 Space NCP Network (COSMOS2020plus) are jointly organising the Horizon 2020 Space Information Day and Brokerage Event at the GSA’s headquarters in Prague, Czech Republic, on 12-13 September 2019.

The aim of the event is to present funding opportunities in Horizon 2020 Space and to provide first-hand information on the last Horizon 2020 Space Calls, with a special focus on the EGNSS/GALILEO Call. Since development of the next EU Framework Programme - Horizon Europe - is already underway, some early information on the new Framework Programme will be also provided.

Targeting public authorities, universities and research institutes, companies and other organisations, the Information Day will provide a “deep dive” on the 5th Horizon 2020 EGNSS downstream applications Call, and will also cover the EGNSS upstream – including mission, services, technology and infrastructure. What’s more, participants in the workshop will be able to talk with the authors of the Space Work Programme 2020 and get advice on Horizon 2020 proposal writing.

Read this: GSA presents EGNSS opportunities in aviation, hosts EGNOS awards

Why participate

Participants in the Information Day will have a unique opportunity to learn about a brand new topic on EGNSS applications for public authorities: the Pre-Commercial Procurement (PCP) Workshop will examine the added value of PCP and also inform about the rules for participation and the applicable conditions.

In addition to learning about space opportunities in the last Horizon 2020 call, participants will be able to network and meet potential partners for the final Horizon 2020 Space Calls and receive an overview of the Galileo Programme and its state of play.

To participate in the event and for more information, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The Horizon 2020 Space Information Day and Brokerage Event will take place in Prague on 12-13 September 2019.

UseGalileo.eu – tracking the rapid uptake of Galileo Initial Services

30.7.2019 11:37  
Galileo Initial Services have seen rapid market uptake and the number of Galileo-enabled smartphones is fast approaching 1 billion users.
Published: 
30 July 2019

As the number of Galileo-enabled smartphones in use rapidly approaches 1 billion, now is a good time to take a look at the other devices and applications where Galileo is adding accuracy – in the air, on the farm and in the world all around us. Over the past two years, the UseGalileo.eu portal has tracked Galileo’s market development – and the figures from the site are very encouraging!

The first and most visible statistic from the site is the fact that the number of Galileo-enabled smartphones in use is rapidly approaching the 1-billion mark. This milestone should be reached later in the autumn and we will be sure to keep you informed when we get there!

But it’s not all about smartphones; there are many other devices on the market where Galileo initial services are already contributing additional accuracy, resilience and robustness in a range of sectors – from road, maritime, rail and air transport to mapping and surveying, timing and synchronisation and location-based services. Two new areas have been added to this list recently, with new devices providing solutions for Space Applications and the Internet of Things.

Some exciting new developments

Some of the exciting recent additions to the growing list of Galileo-enabled devices include the Aceinna INS1000 high performance integrated navigation system. This system offers dual frequency RTK and tight coupling between its built-in GNSS and inertial sensors, to provide cm-level accuracy, enhanced reliability, and superior performance.

Another addition is the Furuno GT-88 Single-band Multi-Constellation GNSS receiver, which is targeted at users requiring UTC time-synchronised signals to meet new 5G requirements. The receiver only requires the L1/E1 GNSS signal to obtain extremely high stability of 4.5 ns (1 sigma), which is better than that of even a rubidium atomic clock. What’s more, with its new Dynamic Satellite Selection algorithm, the GT/GF-88 series provides outstanding multipath mitigation, especially in urban canyons.

The Tersus Oscar GNSS receiver is a new generation multi-constellation and multi-frequency GNSS RTK system that can provide high accuracy and stable signal detection. The receiver supports Galileo E1 and E5b bands and targets a variety of applications including surveying and mapping, construction engineering, unmanned aerial vehicle (UAVs), and precision agriculture.

Also targeting precision agriculture, among other applications, the Allystar TAU1303-0707 comes with built-in support for standard RTCM Protocol (MSM), supporting multi-band multi-system high-precision raw data output, including pseudo range, phase range, Doppler, SNR for third party integration and application. The tiny multi-constellation, multi-frequency module is compatible with the Galileo E1 and E5a bands.

.eu Web Awards

While tracking Galileo’s rapid and successful market uptake, the UseGalileo.eu site has also been noticed for its own success in closing the gap between space technology and users and raising public awareness of the benefits of Galileo.

We are happy to announce that the portal is a candidate for this year’s .eu Web Awards, which aim to acknowledge the best websites using the .eu or .ею extensions. Of course we think UseGalilo.eu is a great tool (but we may be a little impartial) – but if you agree with us, why not lend us your support by voting for us here. It only takes one click!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Galileo Initial Services have seen rapid market uptake and the number of Galileo-enabled smartphones is fast approaching 1 billion users.

UseGalileo.eu – tracking the rapid uptake of Galileo Initial Services

30.7.2019 11:37  
Galileo Initial Services have seen rapid market uptake and the number of Galileo-enabled smartphones is fast approaching 1 billion users.
Published: 
30 July 2019

As the number of Galileo-enabled smartphones in use rapidly approaches 1 billion, now is a good time to take a look at the other devices and applications where Galileo is adding accuracy – in the air, on the farm and in the world all around us. Over the past two years, the UseGalileo.eu portal has tracked Galileo’s market development – and the figures from the site are very encouraging!

The first and most visible statistic from the site is the fact that the number of Galileo-enabled smartphones in use is rapidly approaching the 1-billion mark. This milestone should be reached later in the autumn and we will be sure to keep you informed when we get there!

But it’s not all about smartphones; there are many other devices on the market where Galileo initial services are already contributing additional accuracy, resilience and robustness in a range of sectors – from road, maritime, rail and air transport to mapping and surveying, timing and synchronisation and location-based services. Two new areas have been added to this list recently, with new devices providing solutions for Space Applications and the Internet of Things.

Some exciting new developments

Some of the exciting recent additions to the growing list of Galileo-enabled devices include the Aceinna INS1000 high performance integrated navigation system. This system offers dual frequency RTK and tight coupling between its built-in GNSS and inertial sensors, to provide cm-level accuracy, enhanced reliability, and superior performance.

Another addition is the Furuno GT-88 Single-band Multi-Constellation GNSS receiver, which is targeted at users requiring UTC time-synchronised signals to meet new 5G requirements. The receiver only requires the L1/E1 GNSS signal to obtain extremely high stability of 4.5 ns (1 sigma), which is better than that of even a rubidium atomic clock. What’s more, with its new Dynamic Satellite Selection algorithm, the GT/GF-88 series provides outstanding multipath mitigation, especially in urban canyons.

The Tersus Oscar GNSS receiver is a new generation multi-constellation and multi-frequency GNSS RTK system that can provide high accuracy and stable signal detection. The receiver supports Galileo E1 and E5b bands and targets a variety of applications including surveying and mapping, construction engineering, unmanned aerial vehicle (UAVs), and precision agriculture.

Also targeting precision agriculture, among other applications, the Allystar TAU1303-0707 comes with built-in support for standard RTCM Protocol (MSM), supporting multi-band multi-system high-precision raw data output, including pseudo range, phase range, Doppler, SNR for third party integration and application. The tiny multi-constellation, multi-frequency module is compatible with the Galileo E1 and E5a bands.

.eu Web Awards

While tracking Galileo’s rapid and successful market uptake, the UseGalileo.eu site has also been noticed for its own success in closing the gap between space technology and users and raising public awareness of the benefits of Galileo.

We are happy to announce that the portal is a candidate for this year’s .eu Web Awards, which aim to acknowledge the best websites using the .eu or .ею extensions. Of course we think UseGalilo.eu is a great tool (but we may be a little impartial) – but if you agree with us, why not lend us your support by voting for us here. It only takes one click!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Galileo Initial Services have seen rapid market uptake and the number of Galileo-enabled smartphones is fast approaching 1 billion users.

Skyopener test highlights EGNSS benefits for drones

25.7.2019 10:34  
EGNSS improves positioning integrity and accuracy for the Boreal drone
Published: 
25 July 2019

The Skyopener project, which is co-financed by the European GNSS Agency (GSA), aims to pave the way towards increased use of Remotely Piloted Aircraft System (RPAS) in civil applications. The project has tested the benefits of multi-frequency GNSS and EGNOS in RPAS, revealing gains in terms of availability, accuracy and robustness.

There is increasing demand to operate RPAS over long distances due to their potential for a wide range of civil applications. However, regulation regarding RPAS use in civil airspace does not yet allow Beyond Visual Line of Sight (BVLOS) operations, and remotely piloted aircraft are currently not allowed to fly in non-segregated civil airspace and are not yet widely used for civil and commercial applications.

RPAS for civil applications

This is something that Skyopener aims to change. The project is developing operational processes that will reduce all categories of risks associated with RPAS and allow an Air Navigation Service Provider (ANSP) to manage very low level RPAS operations. Thanks to the benefits it offers in terms of improved integrity and positioning accuracy, EGNSS (GALILEO and EGNOS) will play a central role in these processes.

Read this: GSA highlights added value of EGNSS for drones at WATM 2019

Through these operational processes, Skyopener will contribute to the roadmap for the integration of civil RPAS into non-segregated airspace, which will have a huge impact on the service applications that can be offered by these aircraft.
“Systems that enable RPAS to fly safely, in compliance with regulations, will enable market access and significantly reduce the cost of insurance premiums for RPAS operators, making a wide range of RPAS applications more commercially attractive and widely used,” said Marc Pollina, CEO of Skyopener consortium member M3 Systems.

Excellent results

A test conducted by the project into the benefits of multi-frequency GNSS and EGNOS has delivered excellent results. The test found that the use of GPS and Galileo in L1/E1 and L5/E5 multi-frequency combinations provides improved availability, better accuracy and greater robustness against interference, as interference with one frequency band has no effect on the second.

What’s more, EGNOS helps meet increasingly stringent requirements for robust navigation, continuity, accuracy and availability, which is further complemented by Galileo’s multi-constellation capacity and integration with other sensors such as inertial or vision sensors, for example.

And this: KAUST wins GSA Special Prize at ERL Emergency Local Tournament 2019

The Boreal drone used in the project is a fixed wing system that operates over a long range (over 100 km) in BVLOS, with EGNOS and GALILEO enhancing navigation by improving positioning integrity and accuracy. In addition the RPAS is equipped with a newly developed Communication and Navigation Surveillance (CNS), which combines use of GNSS, SatCom and special security measures.

Essential GNSS

GNSS technologies are essential for RPAS. The primary need is obviously for navigation, since the RPAS use GNSS waypoints to follow the trajectory defined in their mission. However, GNSS also addresses other key needs, such as ‘geofencing’ to ensure that the RPAS keep within the mission parameters (‘fences’), and surveillance to enable adequate tracking by the operator and civil aviation authority.

GNSS also enables high-accuracy and, ultimately, automated landing and the geo-referencing of collected data. These benefits will increase in the future, with the Galileo authentication service reducing the risk of threats, and PPP data correction on E6 providing better geo-referencing.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

EGNSS improves positioning integrity and accuracy for the Boreal drone

Galileo Demo Centre Hanoi – only a few spaces left!

23.7.2019 9:59  
BELS+ develops GNSS markets for EU companies and helps EU GNSS applications gain a foothold in South East Asia
Published: 
23 July 2019

Space is in high demand in the Galileo Demo Centre, opened at the NAVIS Centre in Hanoi by the BELS+ project. The Demo Centre provides European companies with a venue to showcase their GNSS-based solutions to stakeholders from South East Asia, and BELS+ is offering vouchers to interested companies to support the installation of their products in the Centre. The call to apply is closing soon, so don’t miss out!

BELS+ aims to develop GNSS markets for EU companies and help EU GNSS applications gain a foothold in South East Asia. With this aim in mind, the project opened the Galileo Demo Centre at the NAVIS Centre in Hanoi, Vietnam, as a venue where European companies can showcase their GNSS-based solutions.

The Demo Centre offers companies the opportunity to establish business relations in the SEA region and provides a venue to promote their GNSS-based products and services as well as to find the right business partners and potential customers in the South East Asia region.

Read this: BELS Builds Bridges to Southeast Asia

Given these benefits, it is no surprise that demand for space in the Centre is high, and several European companies are already showcasing or preparing the presentation of their products and solutions in the Demo Centre. These include: Septentrio (Belgium), NSL and Spirent (UK), SpacEarth and SpaceExe (Italy), ANavS, navXperience, TeleOrbit and IFEN (Germany), marXact (the Netherlands), and Bluecover and TeroMovigo (Portugal).

What’s on offer?

BELS+ has opened a call for companies interested in space in the Galileo Demo Centre. The project is offering interested companies vouchers to support the installation of their products. Successful applicants will receive up to EUR 2,500 to cover travel and accommodation expenses in Hanoi and up to EUR 3,000 to cover expenses connected with setting up their demos, such as shipping costs and import duties.

The call to apply for a voucher is closing soon, so don’t miss out! For more information and to apply, click here.

About BELS+

BELS - Building European Links towards Southeast Asia - was set up in 2015 and extended, as BELS+, in 2018 to facilitate the breakthrough of EGNSS technology in the South East Asian (SEA) market. Funded under Horizon 2020, BELS+ conducts a range of coordinated activities to raise awareness and build capacities for the exploitation of EGNSS technologies in South East Asia.

And this: Exporting Galileo – developing EGNSS markets outside Europe

The BELS+ consortium brings together partners from Europe and South East Asia, including European companies with a presence in the region, as well as leading universities. Together, these partners concentrate on three core objectives:

  • Opening new markets to EU companies;
  • Increasing awareness of EGNSS technology through workshops;
  • Increasing the technical expertise of people in the region.

One of the project’s core aims is to promote Galileo and demonstrate how it can benefit the region. This work is particularly important as the SEA region lacks its own satellite navigation capabilities and is therefore dependent on other national or regional systems.

For more information, visit the project portal.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

BELS+ develops GNSS markets for EU companies and helps EU GNSS applications gain a foothold in South East Asia

Message from GSA Executive Director, Carlo des Dorides

19.7.2019 15:55  
GSA Executive Director, Carlo des Dorides
Published: 
19 July 2019

As members of the GNSS community, you are all undoubtedly aware of the recent technical incident that resulted in the temporary interruption of Galileo navigation and timing services.

The technical incident originated in the Galileo ground infrastructure equipment, affecting the calculation of time and orbit predictions which are used to compute the navigation message. The technical incident affected different elements of the ground facilities.

A team composed of GSA experts, industry, ESA and the Commission worked together 24/7 to address the incident, and Galileo Initial Services have now been restored. In particular, the dedication and work of our industrial partners has helped to achieve this result. Commercial users can already see signs of recovery of the Galileo navigation and timing services, although some fluctuations may be experienced until further notice.

The team is monitoring the quality of Galileo services to restore the Galileo timing and navigation services to their nominal levels. As soon as we gather all the technical elements and implement all necessary actions, we will provide more detailed information through our NAGU (Notice Advisory to Galileo Users) notifications to users.

All partners worked together to remedy the situation as soon as possible. We will set up an Independent Inquiry Board to identify the root causes of the incident. This will allow us to draw lessons for the management of a global operational system with several millions of users worldwide.

The Galileo system has grown stronger as a result of this experience, and we will continue to deliver Initial Services until full operational capability is declared. These challenging days have shown us how much you, the GNSS user community and stakeholders, rely on Galileo and how much you trust the Galileo system to deliver the services to support growth, business and sustainability. Europe and the world need a strong civil global satellite navigation system today more than ever.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

GSA Executive Director, Carlo des Dorides

Message from GSA Executive Director, Carlo des Dorides

19.7.2019 15:55  
GSA Executive Director, Carlo des Dorides
Published: 
19 July 2019

As members of the GNSS community, you are all undoubtedly aware of the recent technical incident that resulted in the temporary interruption of Galileo navigation and timing services.

The technical incident originated in the Galileo ground segment, affecting the calculation of time and orbit predictions which are used to compute the navigation message. The technical incident affected different elements of the ground facilities.

A team composed of GSA experts, industry, ESA and the Commission worked together 24/7 to address the incident, and Galileo Initial Services have now been restored. In particular, the dedication and work of our industrial partners has helped to achieve this result. Commercial users can already see signs of recovery of the Galileo navigation and timing services, although some fluctuations may be experienced until further notice.

The team is monitoring the quality of Galileo services to restore the Galileo timing and navigation services to their nominal levels. As soon as we gather all the technical elements and implement all necessary actions, we will provide more detailed information through our NAGU (Notice Advisory to Galileo Users) notifications to users.

All partners worked together to remedy the situation as soon as possible. We will set up an Independent Inquiry Board to identify the root causes of the incident. This will allow us to draw lessons for the management of a global operational system with several millions of users worldwide.

The Galileo system has grown stronger as a result of this experience, and we will continue to deliver Initial Services until full operational capability is declared. These challenging days have shown us how much you, the GNSS user community and stakeholders, rely on Galileo and how much you trust the Galileo system to deliver the services to support growth, business and sustainability. Europe and the world need a strong civil global satellite navigation system today more than ever.

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

GSA Executive Director, Carlo des Dorides

Message from GSA Executive Director, Carlo des Dorides

19.7.2019 15:55  
GSA Executive Director, Carlo des Dorides
Published: 
19 July 2019

As members of the GNSS community, you are all undoubtedly aware of the recent technical incident that resulted in the temporary interruption of Galileo navigation and timing services.

The technical incident originated by an equipment malfunction in the Galileo ground infrastructure, affecting the calculation of time and orbit predictions which are used to compute the navigation message. The technical incident affected different elements of the ground facilities.

A team composed of GSA experts, industry, ESA and the Commission worked together 24/7 to address the incident, and Galileo Initial Services have now been restored. In particular, the dedication and work of our industrial partners has helped to achieve this result. Commercial users can already see signs of recovery of the Galileo navigation and timing services, although some fluctuations may be experienced until further notice.

The team is monitoring the quality of Galileo services to restore the Galileo timing and navigation services to their nominal levels. As soon as we gather all the technical elements and implement all necessary actions, we will provide more detailed information through our NAGU (Notice Advisory to Galileo Users) notifications to users.

All partners worked together to remedy the situation as soon as possible. We will set up an Independent Inquiry Board to identify the root causes of the incident. This will allow us to draw lessons for the management of a global operational system with several millions of users worldwide.

The Galileo system has grown stronger as a result of this experience, and we will continue to deliver Initial Services until full operational capability is declared. These challenging days have shown us how much you, the GNSS user community and stakeholders, rely on Galileo and how much you trust the Galileo system to deliver the services to support growth, business and sustainability. Europe and the world need a strong civil global satellite navigation system today more than ever.

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

GSA Executive Director, Carlo des Dorides

Galileo Initial Services have now been restored

18.7.2019 11:46  
Commercial users can already see signs of recovery of the Galileo navigation and timing services.
Published: 
18 July 2019

Galileo Initial Services have now been restored. Commercial users can already see signs of recovery of the Galileo navigation and timing services, although some fluctuations may be experienced until further notice.

The technical incident originated by a malfunction in the ground segment, affecting the calculation of time and orbit predictions, and which are used to compute the navigation message. The malfunction affected different elements on the ground facilities.

A team composed of GSA experts, industry, ESA and Commission, worked together 24/7 to address the incident. The team is monitoring the quality of Galileo services to restore Galileo timing and navigation services at their nominal levels. 

We will set an Independent Inquiry Board to identify the root causes of the major incident. This will allow the Commission, as the programme manager, together with the EU Agency GSA to draw lessons for the management of an operational system with several millions of users worldwide. 

Galileo provides ‘initial services’ since December 2016. During this initial ‘pilot’ phase preceding the ‘full operational services’ phase, Galileo signals are used in combination with other satellite navigation systems, which allows for the detection of technical issues before the system becomes fully operational. In the full operational phase, Galileo should function independently of other satellite navigation systems.

Dedicated Notice Advisory to Galileo Users (NAGUs) have been published at the European GNSS Service Centre to inform users on the service impact: 

NAGU number 2019025 on 2019-07-11 14:45 on the potential service degradation;

NAGU number 2019026 on 2019-07-13 20:15 on the service outage;

NAGU number 2019027 on 2019-07-18 08:20 on the service recovery;

as well as a news item on the GSA website on 14 July and 17 July .

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Commercial users can already see signs of recovery of the Galileo navigation and timing services.

Galileo Initial Services have now been restored

18.7.2019 11:46  
Commercial users can already see signs of recovery of the Galileo navigation and timing services.
Published: 
18 July 2019

Galileo Initial Services have now been restored. Commercial users can already see signs of recovery of the Galileo navigation and timing services, although some fluctuations may be experienced until further notice.

The technical incident originated by an equipment malfunction in the Galileo ground infrastructure, affecting the calculation of time and orbit predictions, and which are used to compute the navigation message. The malfunction affected different elements on the ground facilities.

A team composed of GSA experts, industry, ESA and Commission, worked together 24/7 to address the incident. The team is monitoring the quality of Galileo services to restore Galileo timing and navigation services at their nominal levels. 

We will set an Independent Inquiry Board to identify the root causes of the major incident. This will allow the Commission, as the programme manager, together with the EU Agency GSA to draw lessons for the management of an operational system with several millions of users worldwide. 

Galileo provides ‘initial services’ since December 2016. During this initial ‘pilot’ phase preceding the ‘full operational services’ phase, Galileo signals are used in combination with other satellite navigation systems, which allows for the detection of technical issues before the system becomes fully operational. In the full operational phase, Galileo should function independently of other satellite navigation systems.

Dedicated Notice Advisory to Galileo Users (NAGUs) have been published at the European GNSS Service Centre to inform users on the service impact: 

NAGU number 2019025 on 2019-07-11 14:45 on the potential service degradation;

NAGU number 2019026 on 2019-07-13 20:15 on the service outage;

NAGU number 2019027 on 2019-07-18 08:20 on the service recovery;

as well as a news item on the GSA website on 14 July and 17 July .

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Commercial users can already see signs of recovery of the Galileo navigation and timing services.

Galileo Initial Services have now been restored

18.7.2019 11:46  
Commercial users can already see signs of recovery of the Galileo navigation and timing services.
Published: 
18 July 2019

Galileo Initial Services have now been restored. Commercial users can already see signs of recovery of the Galileo navigation and timing services, although some fluctuations may be experienced until further notice.

The technical incident originated by an equipment malfunction in the Galileo control centres that calculate time and orbit predictions, and which are used to compute the navigation message. The malfunction affected different elements on both centres.

A team composed of GSA experts, industry, ESA and Commission, worked together 24/7 to address the incident. The team is monitoring the quality of Galileo services to restore Galileo timing and navigation services at their nominal levels. 

We will set an Independent Inquiry Board to identify the root causes of the major incident. This will allow the Commission, as the programme manager, together with the EU Agency GSA to draw lessons for the management of an operational system with several millions of users worldwide. 

Galileo provides ‘initial services’ since December 2016. During this initial ‘pilot’ phase preceding the ‘full operational services’ phase, Galileo signals are used in combination with other satellite navigation systems, which allows for the detection of technical issues before the system becomes fully operational. In the full operational phase, Galileo should function independently of other satellite navigation systems.

Dedicated Notice Advisory to Galileo Users (NAGUs) have been published at the European GNSS Service Centre to inform users on the service impact: 

NAGU number 2019025 on 2019-07-11 14:45 on the potential service degradation;

NAGU number 2019026 on 2019-07-13 20:15 on the service outage;

NAGU number 2019027 on 2019-07-17 HH:MM on the service recovery;

as well as a news item on the GSA website on 14 July and 17 July .

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Commercial users can already see signs of recovery of the Galileo navigation and timing services.

Galileo Initial Services have now been restored

18.7.2019 11:46  
Commercial users can already see signs of recovery of the Galileo navigation and timing services.
Published: 
18 July 2019

Galileo Initial Services have now been restored. Commercial users can already see signs of recovery of the Galileo navigation and timing services, although some fluctuations may be experienced until further notice.

The technical incident originated by an equipment malfunction in the Galileo control centres that calculate time and orbit predictions, and which are used to compute the navigation message. The malfunction affected different elements on both centres.

A team composed of GSA experts, industry, ESA and Commission, worked together 24/7 to address the incident. The team is monitoring the quality of Galileo services to restore Galileo timing and navigation services at their nominal levels. 

We will set an Independent Inquiry Board to identify the root causes of the major incident. This will allow the Commission, as the programme manager, together with the EU Agency GSA to draw lessons for the management of an operational system with several millions of users worldwide. 

Galileo provides ‘initial services’ since December 2016. During this initial ‘pilot’ phase preceding the ‘full operational services’ phase, Galileo signals are used in combination with other satellite navigation systems, which allows for the detection of technical issues before the system becomes fully operational. In the full operational phase, Galileo should function independently of other satellite navigation systems.

Dedicated Notice Advisory to Galileo Users (NAGUs) have been published at the European GNSS Service Centre to inform users on the service impact: 

NAGU number 2019025 on 2019-07-11 14:45 on the potential service degradation;

NAGU number 2019026 on 2019-07-13 20:15 on the service outage;

NAGU number 2019027 on 2019-07-18 08:20 on the service recovery;

as well as a news item on the GSA website on 14 July and 17 July .

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Commercial users can already see signs of recovery of the Galileo navigation and timing services.

Galileo Initial Services have now been restored

18.7.2019 11:46  
Commercial users can already see signs of recovery of the Galileo navigation and timing services.
Published: 
18 July 2019

Galileo Initial Services have now been restored. Commercial users can already see signs of recovery of the Galileo navigation and timing services, although some fluctuations may be experienced until further notice.

The technical incident originated by an equipment malfunction in the Galileo ground infrastructure, affecting the calculation of time and orbit predictions, and which are used to compute the navigation message. The malfunction affected different elements on the ground facilities.

A team composed of GSA experts, industry, ESA and Commission, worked together 24/7 to address the incident. The team is monitoring the quality of Galileo services to restore Galileo timing and navigation services at their nominal levels. 

We will set an Independent Inquiry Board to identify the root causes of the major incident. This will allow the Commission, as the programme manager, together with the EU Agency GSA to draw lessons for the management of an operational system with several millions of users worldwide. 

Galileo provides ‘initial services’ since December 2016. During this initial ‘pilot’ phase preceding the ‘full operational services’ phase, Galileo signals are used in combination with other satellite navigation systems, which allows for the detection of technical issues before the system becomes fully operational. In the full operational phase, Galileo should function independently of other satellite navigation systems.

Dedicated Notice Advisory to Galileo Users (NAGUs) have been published at the European GNSS Service Centre to inform users on the service impact: 

NAGU number 2019025 on 2019-07-11 14:45 on the potential service degradation;

NAGU number 2019026 on 2019-07-13 20:15 on the service outage;

NAGU number 2019027 on 2019-07-18 08:20 on the service recovery;

as well as a news item on the GSA website on 14 July and 17 July .

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Commercial users can already see signs of recovery of the Galileo navigation and timing services.

Galileo Initial Service recovery actions underway

16.7.2019 23:39  
Galileo Initial Service recovery actions underway
Published: 
17 July 2019

A team of experts European GNSS Agency, industry, the European Space Agency and the European Commission is currently implementing and monitoring recovery actions for an incident related to the Galileo ground infrastructure that resulted in a temporary interruption of the Galileo Initial Services. The key objective is to restore the Galileo navigation and timing services for users as soon as possible. 

On 12 July, Galileo initial navigation and timing services were interrupted temporarily. The Galileo Search and Rescue service remains operational. 

Galileo is widely used by most of the commercially available receivers. Multi-constellation GNSS receivers will remain unaffected and compute position and timing using other constellations. Galileo-only receivers will not produce any navigation message.

As soon as the incident was declared, an Anomaly Review Board was convened and urgent recovery procedures were activated in the affected Galileo infrastructures. Operational teams are working on recovery actions 24/7 to restore the Galileo navigation and timing services as soon as possible.

Based on the results of the troubleshooting activities, several elements of the ground infrastructure were re-initiated. The progress is being closely monitored; it is too early to confirm an exact service recovery date.

A period for testing and perfecting

The Galileo satellite navigation system launched its Initial Services in December 2016 and since then it has been providing high quality positioning, navigation and timing services to users worldwide. The aim of this Initial Services phase is to allow for the detection of technical issues before the system becomes fully operational.

It was precisely to deal with issues of this nature that the EU opted for a progressive roll-out of the Galileo system. The evolution and planned upgrade of the ground infrastructure will reinforce redundancy of the system towards reaching the full operations phase.

As soon as the outage occurred, the users were informed by the Galileo Service Centre through technical notices on 11 and 13 July , as well as a news item on the GSA website on 14 July . Users will be regularly updated, including on the navigation and timing service recovery date, through notifications and information. 

The Galileo team would like to assure users that it is working hard to remedy the situation as soon as possible.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Galileo Initial Service recovery actions underway

Galileo Initial Service recovery actions underway

16.7.2019 23:39  
Galileo Initial Service recovery actions underway
Published: 
17 July 2019

A team of experts from the European GNSS Agency, industry, the European Space Agency and the European Commission is currently implementing and monitoring recovery actions for an incident related to the Galileo ground infrastructure that resulted in a temporary interruption of the Galileo Initial Services. The key objective is to restore the Galileo navigation and timing services for users as soon as possible. 

On 12 July, Galileo initial navigation and timing services were interrupted temporarily. The Galileo Search and Rescue service remains operational. 

Galileo is widely used by most of the commercially available receivers. Multi-constellation GNSS receivers will remain unaffected and compute position and timing using other constellations. Galileo-only receivers will not produce any navigation message.

As soon as the incident was declared, an Anomaly Review Board was convened and urgent recovery procedures were activated in the affected Galileo infrastructures. Operational teams are working on recovery actions 24/7 to restore the Galileo navigation and timing services as soon as possible.

Based on the results of the troubleshooting activities, several elements of the ground infrastructure were re-initiated. The progress is being closely monitored; it is too early to confirm an exact service recovery date.

A period for testing and perfecting

The Galileo satellite navigation system launched its Initial Services in December 2016 and since then it has been providing high quality positioning, navigation and timing services to users worldwide. The aim of this Initial Services phase is to allow for the detection of technical issues before the system becomes fully operational.

It was precisely to deal with issues of this nature that the EU opted for a progressive roll-out of the Galileo system. The evolution and planned upgrade of the ground infrastructure will reinforce redundancy of the system towards reaching the full operations phase.

As soon as the outage occurred, the users were informed by the Galileo Service Centre through technical notices on 11 and 13 July , as well as a news item on the GSA website on 14 July . Users will be regularly updated, including on the navigation and timing service recovery date, through notifications and information. 

The Galileo team would like to assure users that it is working hard to remedy the situation as soon as possible.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Galileo Initial Service recovery actions underway

Update on the availability of some Galileo Initial Services

14.7.2019 20:05  
Galileo Service Update
Published: 
14 July 2019

Galileo, the EU's satellite navigation system, is currently affected by a technical incident related to its ground infrastructure. The incident has led to a temporary interruption of the Galileo initial navigation and timing services, with the exception of the Galileo Search and Rescue (SAR) service. The SAR service - used for locating and helping people in distress situations for example at sea or mountains - is unaffected and remains operational.

Galileo provides ‘initial services’ since December 2016. During this initial "pilot" phase preceding the ‘full operational services’ phase, Galileo signals are used in combination with other satellite navigation systems, which allows for the detection of technical issues before the system becomes fully operational.

Experts are working to restore the situation as soon as possible. An Anomaly Review Board has been immediately set up to analyse the exact root cause and to implement recovery actions.

As foreseen in case of technical incidents, information Notices to Galileo Users (NAGU) were already published on the Galileo Service Centre website:

Users will be informed regularly, including on the service recovery date.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Galileo Service Update

Update on the availability of some Galileo Initial Services

14.7.2019 20:05  
Galileo Service Update
Published: 
14 July 2019

Galileo, the EU's satellite navigation system, is currently affected by a technical incident related to its ground infrastructure. The incident has led to a temporary interruption of the Galileo initial navigation and timing services, with the exception of the Galileo Search and Rescue (SAR) service. The SAR service - used for locating and helping people in distress situations for example at sea or mountains - is unaffected and remains operational.

Galileo provides ‘initial services’ since December 2016. During this initial "pilot" phase preceding the ‘full operational services’ phase, Galileo signals are used in combination with other satellite navigation systems, which allows for the detection of technical issues before the system becomes fully operational.

Experts are working to restore the situation as soon as possible. An Anomaly Review Board has been immediately set up to analyse the exact root cause and to implement recovery actions.

As foreseen in case of technical incidents, information Notices to Galileo Users (NAGU) were already published on the Galileo Service Centre website:

Users will be informed regularly, including on the service recovery date.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Galileo Service Update

Update on the availability of some Galileo Initial Services

14.7.2019 20:05  
Galileo Service Update
Published: 
14 July 2019

Galileo, the EU's satellite navigation system, is currently affected by a technical incident related to its ground infrastructure. The incident has led to a temporary interruption of the Galileo initial navigation and timing services, with the exception of the Galileo Search and Rescue (SAR) service. The SAR service - used for locating and helping people in distress situations for example at sea or mountains - is unaffected and remains operational.

Galileo provides ‘initial services’ since December 2016. During this initial "pilot" phase preceding the ‘full operational services’ phase, Galileo signals are used in combination with other satellite navigation systems, which allows for the detection of technical issues before the system becomes fully operational.

Experts are working to restore the situation as soon as possible. An Anomaly Review Board has been immediately set up to analyse the exact root cause and to implement recovery actions.

As foreseen in case of technical incidents, information Notices to Galileo Users (NAGU) were already published on the Galileo Service Centre website:

Users will be informed regularly, including on the service recovery date.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Galileo Service Update

Experts gather at GSA GNSS Raw Measurements Workshop

12.7.2019 10:05  
The workshop brought around 100 experts together to share their experience and progress around the use of raw measurements.
Published: 
12 July 2019

The third workshop of the GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force, held on 26 June 2019 at the European GNSS Agency (GSA) headquarters, brought around 100 experts together to share their experience and progress around the use of GNSS raw measurements for robustness and for high-accuracy applications within Android devices.

The workshop was kicked off by GSA Fiammetta Diani, who highlighted the progress made within the Task Force. In just two years the Task Force has grown from a handful of people to more than 150 members, becoming de facto the global forum on GNSS raw measurements, gathering the leading innovators in high performance for mass market applications.

The workshop continued with a presentation by GSA Martin Sunkevic who presented some of the new tools available to Task Force members, including a database of logged data and a discussion forum. This was followed by a keynote speech from Google’s Frank van Diggelen, in which he reviewed Android tools featured in 2018 and highlighted new logging and analysis tools and shared GNSS Measurements API updates in 2019.

Galileo apps

The GSA’s Justyna Redelkiewicz and Paolo Crosta from the European Space Agency (ESA) then presented the best practices of using raw measurements in two app competitions organised by GSA and ESA respectively.

The GSA`s MyGalileoApp competition aims at delivering apps to be used on a large scale by smartphone users. So far, the top 30 applications have been selected to advance to the next round of the competition and the winners will be announced at a ceremony on 14 November. Meanwhile, the 2nd ESA Galileo App competition recently concluded, yielding five apps that leverage not only dual-frequency, but also augmented reality, spoofing detection and advanced high accuracy algorithms and use various types of data correction streams.

The session closed with a special presentation from u-blox, introducing a low power tracking demonstration toolset, which opens the door to expanding the Task Force’s scope to non-Android IoT topics in the future.
GNSS Raw Measurements for robustness

The second session at the workshop was mostly dedicated to the upcoming Open Service Navigation Message Authentication service (OS-NMA) and highlighted either already finalised products or, in case of Android Raw Measurements, a guideline on how to implement them within suitable smartphone device(s).

The first presentation, from Regulus Cyber, focused on the company`s GNSS Resiliency Report summary, highlighting the results of spoofing tests carried out both on Android and other devices. STMicroelectronics presented the already OS-NMA-compatible Teseo V chipset and SpaceTech introduced its EGNSS4CAP app, currently under development, which will utilise the OS-NMA for agri-government controls.

Sophie Damy, from the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre, provided an overview of the JRC`s testing capabilities for OS-NMA-enabled receivers and Moisés Navarro Gallardo, Navigation User Receiver Testing Engineer at Airbus, showed how to find suitable smartphones capable of processing the OS-NMA data with acceptable performance levels. Finally, the GSA’s Flavio Sbardellati provided an overview of upcoming R&D funding opportunities, with a particular focus on the Enhanced GNSS Receiver/User Terminal call, which aims at implementing OS-NMA and/or I/NAV improvements capability in close-to-market receivers and/or GNSS user terminals.

GNSS Raw Measurements for high accuracy applications

At the two afternoon sessions, Task Force members shared their experience and knowledge on implementing high accuracy techniques within smartphones. The performance results of RTK, DGNSS, PPP and other techniques were presented at the session, complemented by analyses of dual-frequency smartphone raw GNSS observations and additional topics such as GNSS-base heading and precise velocity estimation for pedestrian navigation.

All presentations from the workshop are available for download here.

About the GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force

Launched in June 2017 and coordinated by the European GNSS Agency (GSA), the GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force aims to share knowledge and expertise on Android raw measurements and their use, including their potential for robustness and high accuracy positioning techniques relevant to mass market applications. The Task Force includes more than 150 international GNSS experts, scientists and market players, all of whom are dedicated to promoting a wider use of these raw measurements.

More information on the Task Force, its members and their work can be found here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The workshop brought around 100 experts together to share their experience and progress around the use of raw measurements.

Orolia selected for Galileo resilient time receiver initiative

9.7.2019 12:14  
The GEARS project will provide accurate and highly robust Galileo-based time and frequency data for critical infrastructure
Published: 
09 July 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) has awarded a grant of up to €1.7 million to resilient positioning, navigation and timing (PNT) solution provider Orolia to develop a resilient time and frequency receiver to protect critical GNSS-reliant systems. The Galileo Authenticated Robust Timing System (GEARS) project will provide accurate and highly robust Galileo-based time and frequency data for critical infrastructure. The project should deliver its robust Galileo timing solution by 2021.

Critical infrastructure such as telecommunications, broadcast, data centres, transportation, energy generation and distribution, and finance all rely on GNSS signals. However, detailed studies have documented the vulnerability of this infrastructure to threats from signal jamming or spoofing. This is where the GEARS project comes in.

Accurate and robust time

 

The GEARS solution will leverage the new Galileo navigation data authentication signal and utilise Orolia’s portfolio of interference detection and mitigation capabilities to increase resistance to jamming. Finally, it will develop a new approach for GNSS timing system protection by defining minimum testing criteria to qualify robustness against threats.

“Once adopted, this will help ensure that Galileo’s GNSS timing and synchronisation services are resilient to intentional and unintentional interference, or denial of service, for all critical infrastructure operations,” said Thierry Delhomme, EMEA General Manager at Orolia. “Orolia is honoured to support Resilient PNT initiatives for GSA and Galileo,” he said.

Key role for Galileo

“We have only scratched the surface of the potential of Galileo for Timing and Synchronisation solutions,” said GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. “Galileo has a key role to play in the management of critical infrastructure, and by developing a Galileo-based timing receiver for this infrastructure we are enabling a wealth of solutions to secure the provision of critical applications to all citizens in important markets, such as telecommunication, energy and finance, once again responding to user needs with space technologies,” he said, adding: “I look forward to the first prototype.”

And this: Time as a service with Galileo

The two-year grant agreement with the GSA will be coordinated by Orolia, collaborating with four European partners: FDC (France), NLR (Netherlands Aerospace Centre, Netherlands), NLS - FGI (National Land Survey of Finland – Finnish Geospatial Research Institute, Finland) and NavCert (Germany). The prototype to be developed and validated will embed all relevant new technologies and innovations to ensure maximum robustness for Galileo’s timing receivers by 2021.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GEARS project will provide accurate and highly robust Galileo-based time and frequency data for critical infrastructure

Orolia selected for Galileo resilient time server initiative

9.7.2019 12:14  
The GEARS project will provide accurate and highly robust Galileo-based time and frequency data for critical infrastructure
Published: 
09 July 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) has awarded a grant of up to €1.7 million to resilient positioning, navigation and timing (PNT) solution provider Orolia to develop a resilient time and frequency server to protect critical GNSS-reliant systems. The Galileo Authenticated Robust Timing System (GEARS) project will provide accurate and highly robust Galileo-based time and frequency data for critical infrastructure. The project should deliver its robust Galileo timing solution by 2021.

Critical infrastructure such as telecommunications, broadcast, data centres, transportation, energy generation and distribution, and finance all rely on GNSS signals. However, detailed studies have documented the vulnerability of this infrastructure to threats from signal jamming or spoofing. This is where the GEARS project comes in.

Accurate and robust time

The GEARS programme will fund the development of a timing system to validate GNSS signals and protect the Galileo system from GNSS threats, providing accurate and robust time in GNSS challenged environments. It will also provide a backup signal and timing reference if Galileo is unavailable.

Read this: Demetra delivers dividends for ELPROMA

The time server will leverage the new Galileo navigation data authentication signal to make it resilient to spoofing. It will also utilise Orolia’s portfolio of interference detection and mitigation capabilities to increase resistance to jamming. Finally, the initiative will develop a new standard for GNSS timing system protection by defining minimum testing criteria to qualify robustness against threats.

“Once adopted, this new standard will help ensure that Galileo’s GNSS timing and synchronisation services are resilient to intentional and unintentional interference, or denial of service, for all critical infrastructure operations,” said Thierry Delhomme, EMEA General Manager at Orolia. “Orolia is honoured to support Resilient PNT initiatives for GSA and Galileo,” he said.

Key role for Galileo

“We have only scratched the surface of the potential of Galileo for Timing and Synchronisation solutions,” said GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. “Galileo has a key role to play in the management of critical infrastructure, and by developing a Galileo-based timing receiver for this infrastructure we are enabling a wealth of solutions to secure the provision of critical applications to all citizens in important markets, such as telecommunication, energy and finance, once again responding to user needs with space technologies,” he said, adding: “I look forward to the first prototype.”

And this: Time as a service with Galileo

The two-year grant agreement with the GSA will be coordinated by Orolia, collaborating with four European partners: FDC (France), NLR (Netherlands Aerospace Centre, Netherlands), NLS - FGI (National Land Survey of Finland – Finnish Geospatial Research Institute, Finland) and NavCert (Germany). The prototype to be developed and validated will embed all relevant new technologies and innovations to ensure maximum security and robustness for Galileo’s timing receivers by 2021.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GEARS project will provide accurate and highly robust Galileo-based time and frequency data for critical infrastructure

Orolia selected for Galileo resilient time receiver initiative

9.7.2019 12:14  
The GEARS project will provide accurate and highly robust Galileo-based time and frequency data for critical infrastructure
Published: 
09 July 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) has awarded a grant of up to €1.7 million to resilient positioning, navigation and timing (PNT) solution provider Orolia to develop a resilient time and frequency server to protect critical GNSS-reliant systems. The Galileo Authenticated Robust Timing System (GEARS) project will provide accurate and highly robust Galileo-based time and frequency data for critical infrastructure. The project should deliver its robust Galileo timing solution by 2021.

Critical infrastructure such as telecommunications, broadcast, data centres, transportation, energy generation and distribution, and finance all rely on GNSS signals. However, detailed studies have documented the vulnerability of this infrastructure to threats from signal jamming or spoofing. This is where the GEARS project comes in.

Accurate and robust time

 

The GEARS solution will leverage the new Galileo navigation data authentication signal and utilise Orolia’s portfolio of interference detection and mitigation capabilities to increase resistance to jamming. Finally, it will develop a new approach for GNSS timing system protection by defining minimum testing criteria to qualify robustness against threats.

“Once adopted, this will help ensure that Galileo’s GNSS timing and synchronisation services are resilient to intentional and unintentional interference, or denial of service, for all critical infrastructure operations,” said Thierry Delhomme, EMEA General Manager at Orolia. “Orolia is honoured to support Resilient PNT initiatives for GSA and Galileo,” he said.

Key role for Galileo

“We have only scratched the surface of the potential of Galileo for Timing and Synchronisation solutions,” said GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. “Galileo has a key role to play in the management of critical infrastructure, and by developing a Galileo-based timing receiver for this infrastructure we are enabling a wealth of solutions to secure the provision of critical applications to all citizens in important markets, such as telecommunication, energy and finance, once again responding to user needs with space technologies,” he said, adding: “I look forward to the first prototype.”

And this: Time as a service with Galileo

The two-year grant agreement with the GSA will be coordinated by Orolia, collaborating with four European partners: FDC (France), NLR (Netherlands Aerospace Centre, Netherlands), NLS - FGI (National Land Survey of Finland – Finnish Geospatial Research Institute, Finland) and NavCert (Germany). The prototype to be developed and validated will embed all relevant new technologies and innovations to ensure maximum robustness for Galileo’s timing receivers by 2021.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GEARS project will provide accurate and highly robust Galileo-based time and frequency data for critical infrastructure

EGNOS Service Provider call is now open

8.7.2019 10:56  
The EGNOS Service Provider call has been published in the Official Journal of the European Union.
Published: 
08 July 2019

The GSA has published a call - OJ/S 299295-2019-EN - in the Official Journal of the European Union containing all the information on the EGNOS Service Provider call.

The EGNOS Service Provision consists in delivering three types of services: the Open Service (OS), the Safety of Life service (SoL) and EGNOS Data Access Services (EDAS). The current Version 2 of the EGNOS System was developed in the early 2000s and is to be replaced by a new generation (named EGNOS V3), which is currently under development.

This latter is foreseen to enter into service in 2024. After the completion of the transition to V3, the V2 system will be decommissioned. The first version of EGNOS V3, V3.1, is expected to ensure continuity of EGNOS augmentation of GPS L1, while the second EGNOS V3 version, V3.2, will provide additional SBAS service capabilities through a new SBAS channel on L5, including augmentation of Galileo on top of GPS signals. EGNOS V3 security will be reinforced to increase the robustness of EGNOS services against potential threats.

Presently, the provision of EGNOS Services is ensured via the current ESP contract, which continues until the end of 2021, as a baseline. The subject of the present procurement is the continuation of the EGNOS service provision.

It is expected that the next EGNOS Service Provider will be in charge of:

  • the delivery of EGNOS Open Service and Safety of Life service and contribution to EDAS service provision based on EGNOS V2 infrastructure from the end of the current ESP contract, following a hand-over from the current contractor, including operations, integrated logistics support, service performance and security monitoring, user services, some maintenance tasks, support to service and system evolutions, EGNOS releases deployment, etc.
  • the management of V2 to V3 transition;
  • the delivery of the EGNOS services listed in (i), extended to DFMC services based on EGNOS V3 infrastructure until the end of the contract as explained in the procurement documents; and
  • the decommissioning of the EGNOS V2 infrastructure.

The contract is expected to be signed before the end of 2020, with a duration of 8 years and an option for extension by up to 24 months.

As EGNOS provides Safety of Life (SoL) service for civil aviation, the next EGNOS service provider will have to be certified according to the European Single European Sky regulations, and maintain this certificate for the duration of the Contract. The Contractor shall have the responsibility and obligation to complete the certification process by September 2021 as per the applicable EASA rules and procedures.

Call details are available here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The EGNOS Service Provider call has been published in the Official Journal of the European Union.

Galileo Demo Centre Hanoi – only a few spaces left!

8.7.2019 9:59  
BELS+ develops GNSS markets for EU companies and helps EU GNSS applications gain a foothold in South East Asia
Published: 
08 July 2019

Space is in high demand in the Galileo Demo Centre, opened at the NAVIS Centre in Hanoi by the BELS+ project. The Demo Centre provides European companies with a venue to showcase their GNSS-based solutions to stakeholders from South East Asia, and BELS+ is offering vouchers to interested companies to support the installation of their products in the Centre. The call to apply is closing soon, so don’t miss out!

BELS+ aims to develop GNSS markets for EU companies and help EU GNSS applications gain a foothold in South East Asia. With this aim in mind, the project opened the Galileo Demo Centre at the NAVIS Centre in Hanoi, Vietnam, as a venue where European companies can showcase their GNSS-based solutions.

The Demo Centre offers companies the opportunity to establish business relations in the SEA region and provides a venue to promote their GNSS-based products and services as well as to find the right business partners and potential customers in the South East Asia region.

Read this: BELS Builds Bridges to Southeast Asia

Given these benefits, it is no surprise that demand for space in the Centre is high, and several European companies are already showcasing or preparing the presentation of their products and solutions in the Demo Centre. These include: Septentrio (Belgium), NSL and Spirent (UK), SpacEarth and SpaceExe (Italy), ANavS, navXperience, TeleOrbit and IFEN (Germany), marXact (the Netherlands), and Bluecover and TeroMovigo (Portugal).

What’s on offer?

BELS+ has opened a call for companies interested in space in the Galileo Demo Centre. The project is offering interested companies vouchers to support the installation of their products. Successful applicants will receive up to EUR 2,500 to cover travel and accommodation expenses in Hanoi and up to EUR 3,000 to cover expenses connected with setting up their demos, such as shipping costs and import duties.

The call to apply for a voucher is closing soon, so don’t miss out! For more information and to apply, click here.

About BELS+

BELS - Building European Links towards Southeast Asia - was set up in 2015 and extended, as BELS+, in 2018 to facilitate the breakthrough of EGNSS technology in the South East Asian (SEA) market. Funded under Horizon 2020, BELS+ conducts a range of coordinated activities to raise awareness and build capacities for the exploitation of EGNSS technologies in South East Asia.

And this: Exporting Galileo – developing EGNSS markets outside Europe

The BELS+ consortium brings together partners from Europe and South East Asia, including European companies with a presence in the region, as well as leading universities. Together, these partners concentrate on three core objectives:

  • Opening new markets to EU companies;
  • Increasing awareness of EGNSS technology through workshops;
  • Increasing the technical expertise of people in the region.

One of the project’s core aims is to promote Galileo and demonstrate how it can benefit the region. This work is particularly important as the SEA region lacks its own satellite navigation capabilities and is therefore dependent on other national or regional systems.

For more information, visit the project portal.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

BELS+ develops GNSS markets for EU companies and helps EU GNSS applications gain a foothold in South East Asia

Spending a day with Earth Observation

3.7.2019 15:12  
“We are really looking forward to helping to make Copernicus an even bigger success than it is today,” GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides at ‘A Day with EO’
Published: 
03 July 2019

At the ‘A Day with EO’ conference, held as part of the annual assembly of the European Association of Remote Sensing Companies (EARSC), stakeholders from various sectors came together to discuss the multiple activities that have been made possible, or influenced by Earth Observation. At the event, GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides spoke about how the collective experience of the GSA’s market development team would be engaged to benefit the Copernicus programme.

In a series of panel discussions at the conference, stakeholders outlined how Earth Observation (EO) data is leveraged to improve efficiency and tackle a wide range of challenges – from food production and environmental protection to the built environment, security and the management of cultural heritage.

Golden era for EO

Will Marshall, founder and CEO of satellite designer Planet said that we are currently living in “a golden era for Earth Observation,” thanks to new datasets and advances in machine learning that enable more applications based on this data. “You can’t fix what you can’t see,” he said, adding that action to save the planet required data on a faster time-scale than the planet is changing.

In his presentation Patrick Child, Deputy Director General of the European Commission’s Directorate General for Research and Innovation (DG RTD), noted that if we are currently in the ‘golden era of EO’, then this is “precisely because we are facing some immediate and significant existential challenges for the planet, and EO will need to be a big part of the response to these challenges – in particular the challenge of climate change.”

Read this: EGNSS and EO: A promising convergence for sustainable development

Child noted that there was a strong and growing demand internationally for research and innovation and for EO in particular to bring solutions. He said that the EU was currently leading the global debate on climate change and sustainability. Child noted that the EU had made significant investment in developing its EO systems and was keen that this investment should bring benefits to European industry, which is ideally placed to rise to these challenges.

Kamil Kiljanski, Head of Unit for Space Data for Societal Challenges and Growth at DG GROW, noted that, to reap the greatest benefits from EO data, it is important that it be combined with other data. He specifically noted the importance of interaction between the Copernicus and Galileo programmes.

Space Regulation

Kiljanski said that, with its new Space Regulation, the Commission was moving in this direction – more towards its traditional role of gatekeeper and market regulator, operating and exploiting the systems with the assistance of specialised agencies, in particular the European Union Agency for the Space Programme in Prague, the European Space Agency, Eumetsat and all the other entities involved in the delivery of Copernicus services.

Thanks to new datasets and advances in machine learning we are now living in a golden era for Earth Observation

 

European GNSS Agency (GSA) Executive Director Carlo des Dorides confirmed that his agency is well placed to provide this assistance, in particular thanks to its market development team, whose work has made a significant contribution to the success of the Galileo programme. “Today we have close to one billion users worldwide. This is the most visible figure, but there are also success stories in the maritime sector, in civil aviation, in the automotive and rail sectors and many others,” des Dorides said.

And this: Space serving our blue planet

Des Dorides noted that the new Space Regulation would bring a horizontal dimension to the EU space programmes. “For the first time we have one regulation for both GNSS and Copernicus. This is important because it creates a uniform approach for the two programmes,” he said.

He stressed that the role of the GSA was to support the Commission, to support market development and to communicate about and promote the EU space programme, including Copernicus. “There are three main areas of focus along these lines, one is to adopt a user-centric approach, the second is to maximise the social and economic value of the Copernicus programme, leveraging all the services, and finally to develop the downstream segment using Horizon Europe,” he said, adding: “We are really looking forward to helping to make Copernicus an even bigger success than it is today.”

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

“We are really looking forward to helping to make Copernicus an even bigger success than it is today,” GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides at ‘A Day with EO’

Spending a day with Earth Observation

3.7.2019 15:12  
Thanks to new datasets and advances in machine learning we are now living in a golden era for Earth Observation
Published: 
03 July 2019

At the ‘A Day with EO’ conference, held as part of the annual assembly of the European Association of Remote Sensing Companies (EARSC), stakeholders from various sectors came together to discuss the multiple activities that have been made possible, or influenced by Earth Observation. At the event, GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides spoke about how the collective experience of the GSA’s market development team would be engaged to benefit the Copernicus programme.

In a series of panel discussions at the conference, stakeholders outlined how Earth Observation (EO) data is leveraged to improve efficiency and tackle a wide range of challenges – from food production and environmental protection to the built environment, security and the management of cultural heritage.

Golden era for EO

Will Marshall, founder and CEO of satellite designer Planet said that we are currently living in “a golden era for Earth Observation,” thanks to new datasets and advances in machine learning that enable more applications based on this data. “You can’t fix what you can’t see,” he said, adding that action to save the planet required data on a faster time-scale than the planet is changing.

In his presentation Patrick Child, Deputy Director General of the European Commission’s Directorate General for Research and Innovation (DG RTD), noted that if we are currently in the ‘golden era of EO’, then this is “precisely because we are facing some immediate and significant existential challenges for the planet, and EO will need to be a big part of the response to these challenges – in particular the challenge of climate change.”

Read this: EGNSS and EO: A promising convergence for sustainable development

Child noted that there was a strong and growing demand internationally for research and innovation and for EO in particular to bring solutions. He said that the EU was currently leading the global debate on climate change and sustainability. Child noted that the EU had made significant investment in developing its EO systems and was keen that this investment should bring benefits to European industry, which is ideally placed to rise to these challenges.

Kamil Kiljanski, Head of Unit for Space Data for Societal Challenges and Growth at DG GROW, noted that, to reap the greatest benefits from EO data, it is important that it be combined with other data. He specifically noted the importance of interaction between the Copernicus and Galileo programmes.

Space Regulation

Kiljanski said that, with its new Space Regulation, the Commission was moving in this direction – more towards its traditional role of gatekeeper and market regulator, operating and exploiting the systems with the assistance of specialised agencies, in particular the European Union Agency for the Space Programme in Prague, the European Space Agency, Eumetsat and all the other entities involved in the delivery of Copernicus services.

“We are really looking forward to helping to make Copernicus an even bigger success than it is today,” GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides at ‘A Day with EO’

 

European GNSS Agency (GSA) Executive Director Carlo des Dorides confirmed that his agency is well placed to provide this assistance, in particular thanks to its market development team, whose work has made a significant contribution to the success of the Galileo programme. “Today we have close to one billion users worldwide. This is the most visible figure, but there are also success stories in the maritime sector, in civil aviation, in the automotive and rail sectors and many others,” des Dorides said.

And this: Space serving our blue planet

Des Dorides noted that the new Space Regulation would bring a horizontal dimension to the EU space programmes. “For the first time we have one regulation for both GNSS and Copernicus. This is important because it creates a uniform approach for the two programmes,” he said.

He stressed that the role of the GSA was to support the Commission, to support market development and to communicate about and promote the EU space programme, including Copernicus. “There are three main areas of focus along these lines, one is to adopt a user-centric approach, the second is to maximise the social and economic value of the Copernicus programme, leveraging all the services, and finally to develop the downstream segment using Horizon Europe,” he said, adding: “We are really looking forward to helping to make Copernicus an even bigger success than it is today.”

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Thanks to new datasets and advances in machine learning we are now living in a golden era for Earth Observation

First Galileo IS OS & SAR Performance Reports of 2019 published!

1.7.2019 13:47  
Both the Open Service and the SAR Service performance figures generally exceed the MPL targets in Q1-2019.
Published: 
01 July 2019

OS and SAR Service Performance Reports for the first quarter of 2019 (covering January, February and March) have been published in the Performance Reports section of the European GNSS Service Centre’s web portal.

The Galileo Open Service (OS) and SAR Service Quarterly Performance Reports for the first quarter of 2019 are available in the Electronic Library, under the Performance Reports section. The reports provide the status of the Galileo constellation and the achieved performance over the reporting period (January, February and March 2019).

These quarterly reports provide the public with the latest information on the Galileo OS and SAR/Galileo Initial Services performance statistics, measured against their Minimum Performance Levels (MPLs) as declared in their respective Galileo Service Definition Documents (OS - SDD and SAR - SDD). In particular, the reports provide information on parameters such as:

  • For Open Service: Initial Ranging Performance, Galileo to GPS Time Offset (GGTO) determination performance, Galileo Positioning Performance, the Timely Publication of NAGUs;
  • For SAR/Galileo Service: Detection and Location Performance and Infrastructure Availability Performance.

Highlights from Q1-2019 on Galileo Open Service and SAR Service:

As in previous periods, the measured Galileo OS and SAR Service performance figures comfortably exceed their MPL thresholds.

Some highlights from the Q1-2019 performance reports:

Open Service (see Performance Report)

  • The Availability of both the Galileo Ranging Service at the Worst User Location (WUL) and the Healthy Signal were significantly better than the MPLs (all above the MPL target of 87%). In particular, in the first quarter the first of these reached a monthly value of 100% for the entire quarter.
  • The Galileo UTC Determination Service Availability reached a monthly value of 100% for the entire quarter, exceeding the MPL target of 87%. Moreover, the GGTO Determination Availability comfortably exceeded the MPL target of 80% over the reported months (98.24% in January, 97.66% in February and 97.33% in March).
  • The target MPLs for Publishing NAGUs were met both for Planned (publication at least 24 hours before the start of a scheduled event) and Unplanned (publication no more than 72 hours after an unscheduled event starts) events. A total of 11 NAGUs were published on the GSC web portal in the reporting period.

SAR Service (see Performance Report)

  • Detection Service Probability for each of the Reference Beacons (REFBE) was 99.5% every month - above the MPL target of 99%.
  • Both the single and multi-burst Location Probabilities for each REFBE were, in all cases, well above the MPLs (which are 75% and 98%, respectively).
  • SAR Service Infrastructure Performance is measured by the following figures: Availability of the SAR/Galileo Ground Segment, SAR/Galileo Space Segment and SAR/Galileo Server. Regarding the Ground Segment availability, all EU MEOLUT Local Facilities show long-term normalised “Nominal” mode availability performance better than the MPL target (set at 95%), achieving in March 2019 values of 96.4%, 98.2% and 98.3% for Larnaca, Maspalomas and Spitsbergen respectively. A reduced “Nominal” mode short-term availability is observed in Larnaca during the month of January (89%), which is linked to unplanned events after the MEOLUT Facility SW upgrade.

For the most up-to-date information on the Galileo system and constellation, visit the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) website, in particular, the Galileo constellation status section. For an exhaustive description of the Minimum Performance Levels (MPLs), refer to the Galileo OS SDD.

For more details on Galileo performance and its Services, do not hesitate to contact the Galileo Help Desk. Moreover, if you wish to receive NAGUs automatically, please, register on the GSC web portal.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Both the Open Service and the SAR Service performance figures generally exceed the MPL targets in Q1-2019.

First Galileo IS OS & SAR Performance Reports of 2019 published!

1.7.2019 13:47  
The Open Service and the SAR Service performance figures generally exceed the MPL targets in Q1-2019.
Published: 
01 July 2019

OS and SAR Service Performance Reports for the first quarter of 2019 (covering January, February and March) have been published in the Performance Reports section of the European GNSS Service Centre’s web portal.

The Galileo Open Service (OS) and SAR Service Quarterly Performance Reports for the first quarter of 2019 are available in the Electronic Library, under the Performance Reports section. The reports provide the status of the Galileo constellation and the achieved performance over the reporting period (January, February and March 2019).

These quarterly reports provide the public with the latest information on the Galileo OS and SAR/Galileo Initial Services performance statistics, measured against their Minimum Performance Levels (MPLs) as declared in their respective Galileo Service Definition Documents (OS - SDD and SAR - SDD). In particular, the reports provide information on parameters such as:

  • For Open Service: Initial Ranging Performance, Galileo to GPS Time Offset (GGTO) determination performance, Galileo Positioning Performance, the Timely Publication of NAGUs;
  • For SAR/Galileo Service: Detection and Location Performance and Infrastructure Availability Performance.

Highlights from Q1-2019 on Galileo Open Service and SAR Service:

As in previous periods, the measured Galileo OS and SAR Service performance figures comfortably exceed their MPL thresholds.

Some highlights from the Q1-2019 performance reports:

Open Service (see Performance Report)

  • The Availability of both the Galileo Ranging Service at the Worst User Location (WUL) and the Healthy Signal were significantly better than the MPLs (all above the MPL target of 87%). In particular, in the first quarter the first of these reached a monthly value of 100% for the entire quarter.
  • The Galileo UTC Determination Service Availability reached a monthly value of 100% for the entire quarter, exceeding the MPL target of 87%. Moreover, the GGTO Determination Availability comfortably exceeded the MPL target of 80% over the reported months (98.24% in January, 97.66% in February and 97.33% in March).
  • The target MPLs for Publishing NAGUs were met both for Planned (publication at least 24 hours before the start of a scheduled event) and Unplanned (publication no more than 72 hours after an unscheduled event starts) events. A total of 11 NAGUs were published on the GSC web portal in the reporting period.

SAR Service (see Performance Report)

  • Detection Service Probability for each of the Reference Beacons (REFBE) was 99.5% every month - above the MPL target of 99%.
  • Both the single and multi-burst Location Probabilities for each REFBE were, in all cases, well above the MPLs (which are 75% and 98%, respectively).
  • SAR Service Infrastructure Performance is measured by the following figures: Availability of the SAR/Galileo Ground Segment, SAR/Galileo Space Segment and SAR/Galileo Server. Regarding the Ground Segment availability, all EU MEOLUT Local Facilities show long-term normalised “Nominal” mode availability performance better than the MPL target (set at 95%), achieving in March 2019 values of 96.4%, 98.2% and 98.3% for Larnaca, Maspalomas and Spitsbergen respectively. A reduced “Nominal” mode short-term availability is observed in Larnaca during the month of January (89%), which is linked to unplanned events after the MEOLUT Facility SW upgrade.

For the most up-to-date information on the Galileo system and constellation, visit the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) website, in particular, the Galileo constellation status section. For an exhaustive description of the Minimum Performance Levels (MPLs), refer to the Galileo OS SDD.

For more details on Galileo performance and its Services, do not hesitate to contact the Galileo Help Desk. Moreover, if you wish to receive NAGUs automatically, please, register on the GSC web portal.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The Open Service and the SAR Service performance figures generally exceed the MPL targets in Q1-2019.

First Galileo IS OS & SAR Performance Reports of 2019 published!

1.7.2019 13:47  
Both the Initial Open Service and the SAR Service performance figures generally exceed the MPL targets in Q1-2019.
Published: 
01 July 2019

OS and SAR Service Performance Reports for the first quarter of 2019 (covering January, February and March) have been published in the Performance Reports section of the European GNSS Service Centre’s web portal.

The Galileo Open Service (OS) and SAR Service Quarterly Performance Reports for the first quarter of 2019 are available in the Electronic Library, under the Performance Reports section. The reports provide the status of the Galileo constellation and the achieved performance over the reporting period (January, February and March 2019).

These quarterly reports provide the public with the latest information on the Galileo OS and SAR/Galileo Initial Services performance statistics, measured against their Minimum Performance Levels (MPLs) as declared in their respective Galileo Service Definition Documents (OS - SDD and SAR - SDD). In particular, the reports provide information on parameters such as:

  • For Open Service: Initial Ranging Performance, Galileo to GPS Time Offset (GGTO) determination performance, Galileo Positioning Performance, the Timely Publication of NAGUs;
  • For SAR/Galileo Service: Detection and Location Performance and Infrastructure Availability Performance.

Highlights from Q1-2019 on Galileo Open Service and SAR Service:

As in previous periods, the measured Galileo OS and SAR Service performance figures comfortably exceed their MPL thresholds.

Some highlights from the Q1-2019 performance reports:

Open Service (see Performance Report)

  • The Availability of both the Galileo Ranging Service at the Worst User Location (WUL) and the Healthy Signal were significantly better than the MPLs (all above the MPL target of 87%). In particular, in the first quarter the first of these reached a monthly value of 100% for the entire quarter.
  • The Galileo UTC Determination Service Availability reached a monthly value of 100% for the entire quarter, exceeding the MPL target of 87%. Moreover, the GGTO Determination Availability comfortably exceeded the MPL target of 80% over the reported months (98.24% in January, 97.66% in February and 97.33% in March).
  • The target MPLs for Publishing NAGUs were met both for Planned (publication at least 24 hours before the start of a scheduled event) and Unplanned (publication no more than 72 hours after an unscheduled event starts) events. A total of 11 NAGUs were published on the GSC web portal in the reporting period.

SAR Service (see Performance Report)

  • Detection Service Probability for each of the Reference Beacons (REFBE) was 99.5% every month - above the MPL target of 99%.
  • Both the single and multi-burst Location Probabilities for each REFBE were, in all cases, well above the MPLs (which are 75% and 98%, respectively).
  • SAR Service Infrastructure Performance is measured by the following figures: Availability of the SAR/Galileo Ground Segment, SAR/Galileo Space Segment and SAR/Galileo Server. Regarding the Ground Segment availability, all EU MEOLUT Local Facilities show long-term normalised “Nominal” mode availability performance better than the MPL target (set at 95%), achieving in March 2019 values of 96.4%, 98.2% and 98.3% for Larnaca, Maspalomas and Spitsbergen respectively. A reduced “Nominal” mode short-term availability is observed in Larnaca during the month of January (89%), which is linked to unplanned events after the MEOLUT Facility SW upgrade.

For the most up-to-date information on the Galileo system and constellation, visit the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) website, in particular, the Galileo constellation status section. For an exhaustive description of the Minimum Performance Levels (MPLs), refer to the Galileo OS SDD.

For more details on Galileo performance and its Services, do not hesitate to contact the Galileo Help Desk. Moreover, if you wish to receive NAGUs automatically, please, register on the GSC web portal.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Both the Initial Open Service and the SAR Service performance figures generally exceed the MPL targets in Q1-2019.

EGNSS and ERTMS: a win-win for both rail and space

27.6.2019 11:48  
EGNSS and ERTMS: testing team
Published: 
27 June 2019

Italian rail company Rete Ferroviaria Italiana (RFI), one of Europe’s leading rail infrastructure managers, was an early adopter of the European Rail Traffic Management System (ERTMS). The company also realised the potential benefits of using satellite positioning early in 2012 when Hitachi Rail STS (formerly Ansaldo STS) was awarded a contract in Australia to deliver a train control system based on ERTMS technology and powered by a virtual balise module relying on satellite positioning data. They are now leading demonstration aiming to foster deployment of these technologies in Europe.

Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), such as Europe’s Galileo, and ERTMS are perfect complementary assets that together can considerably reduce rail operational costs. The tie-up between RFI and Hitachi looked to remove obstacles preventing the inclusion of GNSS in the specifications of the ERTMS, while preserving its safety and interoperability requirements.

Fish-eye camera mounted on the rooftop of test train

Fabio Senesi, Head of ERTMS at RFI underlines the importance of this cooperation: “Train positioning and train-to-ground communication assets dominate life cycle costs because of the massive deployment requirement and the need to maintain track-side infrastructures. The trouble is that with new technologies, such as GNSS, obstacles still remain to ensure interoperability and open standards, therefore a solution must be engineered jointly involving all stakeholders.”

Read this: Space4Rail: From innovation to implementation

“That was the reason to launch the ERSAT (ERTMS on Satellite) collaborative project in 2012 with European partners. The initiative was co-funded by the European GNSS Agency (GSA) under the Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme, the European Space Agency (ESA) and also gained financial support from the Italian Space Agency ASI,” comments Francesco Rispoli responsible for satellite technologies at Hitachi.

Field testing

The ERSAT project has since field tested and demonstrated the capability of satellite-based positioning embedded within the ERTMS ecosystem, which has caught the eye of many train operators in Europe and beyond. The project targets the integration of GNSS positioning and public telecommunications over the ERTMS platform and consists of a portfolio of projects making an effective roadmap to allow RFI to follow a step-wise operational deployment. The Australian system has been operating on a routine daily basis for a couple of years and ERSAT is now approaching its goal of validation and certification on the Pinerolo – Sangone line close to Turin that is representative of operational scenarios on regional lines across Italy.

“This programme targets the activation of an operational service,” explains Massimiliano Ciaffi, ERSAT programme manager. “And for this reason, we have involved all the key actors, since this is a first time for both the GNSS technology and the ERTMS.”

Watch this: EGNOS and Galileo for Rail

Previously the programme had effectively developed and verified the satellite technology for ERTMS on a test bed line in Sardinia. The objective now is to activate a first commercial line by the end of 2020.

“The Pinerolo – Sangone line is a European asset with the mission to contribute to the upgrading of the technical specifications for interoperability by 2022 as requested by the European Union Agency for Railways (ERA),” adds Senesi. “And for this reason, we are open to share this opportunity with other operators and the satellite community. Satellite technology will evolve much faster than we are used to with rail system technologies and for this reason the certification process is the real priority to allow a smooth activation without prejudging the use of alternative technologies whenever they become available.”

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

EGNSS and ERTMS: testing team

Ubiscale: low-power GNSS processing for tracking devices

25.6.2019 11:59  
The Ubiscale solution offers a ten-fold power consumption improvement compared to current state-of-the-art tracking devices.
Published: 
25 June 2019

A new solution developed by Ubiscale enables low-power GNSS sensing and position determination for applications such as asset tracking, where the tracking device does not need to know its own position. The GSA caught up with the project at MWC in Barcelona back in February.

GNSS-based tracking solutions allow companies to know where their assets are with high precision anywhere in the world. These assets can include transport containers and other logistics equipment or a variety of products. But tracking devices can also help common citizens keep tabs on personal belongings or help parents to ensure the safety of their children or other vulnerable family members.

Up to now, tracking solutions have faced major design limitations, because GPS sensors generally need a lot of power in order to work. Ubiscale has solved this problem by developing a unique software processing technology.

Read this: Where (exactly) are my things? Learn how Galileo empowers IoT solutions

The Ubiscale solution consists of an embedded software core that pre-process signals and a simple Application Programming Interface (API) to the 'Ubi.cloud' platform, which then delivers the effective device coordinates to the end user. Smart algorithms increase the reliability of the positioning. The solution is designed to enable close integration with 'Internet of Things' (IoT) and 'System on a Chip' (SoC) technologies.

Ubiscale General Manager Samuel Ryckewaert said, "What we can do with our Ubi.cloud solution is provide software that allows users to shift most of the data processing from a battery-powered tracking device to our cloud-based service. By doing so we can save a huge amount of power on the device side. The solution is perfect for applications such as asset tracking, where the size and lifetime of the device is critical.

"Imagine you are sending your child off to school," Ryckewaert said. "You can drop a small tracker in their bag and then on your cell phone you have regular reporting of their position. You can also define a clearly outlined safety area, for example, around the school, around the home and along the way from one to the other. If the tracker shows your child's position moving outside of this zone, you can receive an alert."

Ryckewaert said a number of services of this kind do already exist, "but the fact is that most of the devices now on the market can last only two days, three days, on a single battery charge, so it's very cumbersome in terms of the constraint to recharge the device."

Unique combination

The result delivered by the Ubiscale solution is a ten-fold power consumption improvement compared to current state-of-the-art tracking devices. "With our solution we have demonstrated that we can actually get up to eight months of autonomy with a small tracking device that you can easily hold with two fingers. So it's really a game-changer in this market," said Ryckewaert.

Ryckewaert pointed out that reducing the amount of power needed for GNSS signal processing is only one part of the problem. "It would not be a complete solution to simply reduce the signal processing part of the power consumption if we then needed a lot of power to transfer the remaining tasks to the cloud, so our solution includes ultra-light connectivity, using long range, Low-Power Wide-Area (LPWA) communication networks, such as NB-IoT, LTE-CatM1, LoRa, SigFox, Qowisio and others.

And this: Helping the visually impaired explore the outdoors

"With both of these elements, decreased power consumption by the GNSS chipset and low-power connectivity to the cloud, we have achieved in the end a very much extended autonomous capability for these devices," Ryckewaert said.

Growing market

Ubiscale is working with a number of chipset vendors, including market leaders u-blox and STMicroelectronics. "We are particularly interested in providing support for Galileo-enabled chipsets," Ryckewaert said. "We want to be able to drive these chipsets directly, and we also have customers manufacturing asset trackers, like the ones I described before. For example, we have Invoxia which is a company designing a tracker that can be used to track personal belongings and people. We are also working with network operators, especially in the domain of seaport logistics."

In the near future, Ryckewaert said, Ubiscale sees these devices becoming more and more popular, especially as they get cheaper and more compact. "People will be able to wear these devices or set them in more discreet places. The goal is to make them small and difficult to find and remove, but we can also foresee higher-end, security-critical devices that work with different technologies, in combination with GNSS, because someone could try to jam a GNSS-only tracker."

There will be very clear security- and crime-related applications for this kind of technology, for instance the tracking of stolen objects. Ryckewaert said the police services and insurance business are very interested in these kinds of applications.

"So we think that we are just at the beginning of the usage of this kind of technology," Ryckewaert said. "The Ubiscale system, with this great step forward in terms of reduced power consumption, is therefore an important achievement."

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The Ubiscale solution offers a ten-fold power consumption improvement compared to current state-of-the-art tracking devices.

Galileo ANTEX file updated!

19.6.2019 11:44  
Galileo ANTEX file updated!
Published: 
19 June 2019

The European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) is pleased to announce the publication of the updated GALILEO ANTEX file in the Metadata section of the GSC web portal.

The Galileo ANTEX file includes the Phase Centre Variation (PCV), which is the variation of the electrical phase centre of the antenna with respect to the mean phase centre for a given direction. This file has now been updated to include the Direction-Dependant PCV figures for L9 and L10 Galileo satellites (see Satellite Launch Information section). The updated ANTEX file can be found here.

It takes several months to generate the ANTEX file. The process is not straightforward, as it requires performing complex measurements, as well as thorough post-processing and validation of the obtained data.

Galileo Satellite Metadata

The Galileo Satellite Metadata section (under the Support to Developers tab on the GSC site) contains information about the satellite properties, which is needed to properly implement advanced processing algorithms for precise orbit determination or Precise Point Positioning (PPP).

For further up-to-date information on the Galileo system and its services, visit the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) website, and the GSC Help Desk is available for any comments or questions related to Galileo.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Galileo ANTEX file updated!

Looking for a Galileo Masters idea? Take inspiration from past winners!

17.6.2019 10:56  
Register now, even if your idea is still a work in progress, so you can benefit from support activities and stay informed on all developments.
Published: 
17 June 2019

If you are struggling to formulate your idea for consideration in this year’s Galileo Masters, which opened for submissions on May 1, perhaps you could take inspiration from some of the innovative ideas that won the GSA Special Prize in previous editions of the competition. Already have an idea? Then register for this year’s competition here.

Sports applications have featured highly in previous editions of the Galileo Masters. Last year the prize went to Smart Gate, a system designed to measure time precisely during sporting activities – in this case skiing and snowboarding. Using GNSS precise timing combined with radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology, the application provides precise times on ski/snowboard runs, which sportspeople can use to hone their skills and techniques.

Then, in 2013, the GSA Special prize went to JOHAN, an application that also targeted improved sports performance. The JOHAN solution used tiny wearable GNSS receivers to monitor field sports in real-time and enable assessment of players’ performances and the development of new tactics based on players’ capabilities.

Finally, back in 2009 the prize went to Nogago, which leveraged the unique properties of EGNOS in a family of smartphone applications that turned smartphones into outdoor navigation devices targeting various needs: 'Nogago Outdoor' for hiking and trekking, 'Nogago Guide' for sightseeing and pedestrian navigation, and 'Nogago Sport' for running and biking.

Specific societal needs

Other winning solutions in the past have sought to address very specific societal needs. The CENTRIP (ChildrEN TRIp Protector) early warning system, which won the GSA Special Prize in 2017, aimed to help teachers to keep track of young children outdoors. The project combined a lightweight GNSS tracking device installed in a durable bracelet, which is worn by the child, with a geo-fence set up around a specified area, enabling teachers to track the location of each child.

Also addressing a very specific societal need, the winning application in 2012 was 3SOUND - a personal navigation solution based on the integration of acoustic binaural technologies (i.e. 3D sounds) and GNSS technologies. Designed to help vision impaired people navigate using sound cues and augmented satellite navigation signals, the technology could also help emergency services operate in low visibility environments.

Mass market potential

Mass market solutions can potentially generate mass profits, so it is no surprise that solutions with the potential for mass market uptake have featured prominently in the competition. In 2015, the prize went to the KYNEO project, which developed cheap, flexible Galileo and EGNOS-enabled modules that allow ubiquitous positioning data for applications in the Internet of Things – a potentially massive global market.

Then there was the Galileo for ARA project by Elecnor Deimos, which took the prize in 2014 and which also had its eye on the mass market. This innovative concept aimed to develop Galileo modules for the Google ARA modular smartphone concept – a potential game changer for positioning in the mobile phone market.

UAV and navigation

UAVs have featured prominently in winning applications from previous years. In 2016, the Drones2GNSS project combined Galileo’s multi-constellation capacity with unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) in an innovative approach that addressed a timeless problem of surveying engineers: positioning accuracy in urban canyons and vegetated areas. Earlier, in 2011, the Catalonian company CATNUV won the prize with a mini-UAV Traffic Collision Avoidance System (TCAS) that uses GPS and EGNOS to allow drones to navigate safely in controlled airspace.

Finally, the 2010 winner of the GSA special prize was the Wikitude Drive system from Austrian company Mobilizy. This application transformed a smartphone into an augmented reality dashboard satnav device, which overlays video captured through the camera with driving instructions. This allows users to drive through their phone, watching the road even while they are looking at directions.

This year’s categories

This year the competition is structured in two class categories– ‘Start-up of the Year’ and ‘Idea of the Year’ - both of which are sponsored by the GSA. In addition to the two general categories, you can also submit your solution to be eligible for one of six special prizes:

  • Galileo-Copernicus Synergy Challenge;
  • Galileo 5G IoT Challenge;
  • DLR Artificial Intelligence Navigation Challenge;
  • University Challenge;
  • BMVI Special Prize; and
  • GNSS Living Lab Prize.

There is also a Regional Challenge, where participants can choose a challenge set by a regional partner from around the world that best matches their business case.

If you would like to learn more about the Galileo-Copernicus Synergy Challenge, then take part in a webinar to be held on 19 July 2019 at 10:00 (CEST) to explore the synergies between these systems and see the potential applications with commercial and societal benefits.

Has the above given you inspiration? Even if your idea is not fully formed, make sure to register now so you can receive information about all the great support activities and additional opportunities that arise throughout the submission phase. Registration is free and available to participants all around the world. To find out more, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Register now, even if your idea is still a work in progress, so you can benefit from support activities and stay informed on all developments.

Flying green with airBaltic

13.6.2019 11:34  
“E-GEN is delivering real results with real benefits,” airBaltic Senior Vice President for Flight Operations Pauls Cālītis
Published: 
13 June 2019

AirBaltic’s Senior Vice President for Flight Operations Pauls Cālītis talks about the E-GEN project, EGNOS implementation and plans for the future.

Can you tell me a little about the E-GEN project and the ’green flying’ concept? What are its objectives?

At airBaltic, the green flying concept is all about utilising the latest commercial aviation technological advances and applying them to improve the efficiency of our operations. We continuously monitor the available technologies and the resulting economies. Other highly important factors include our environmental footprint and the level of emissions and noise, which we are seeking to reduce.

The implementation of satellite-based navigation procedures is a practical example of a modernisation effort, which has proven highly useful for airBaltic’s operational efficiency. airBaltic’s E-GEN project (“EGNOS Enabled – North”) entailed an upgrade of the full airBaltic Q400 fleet with the latest satellite navigation systems. The project was implemented together with the European GNSS Agency (GSA), which co-financed it. The upgrade enabled the implementation of satellite-based navigation, specifically for use of LPV approaches/for landing by LPV (Localiser Performance with Vertical guidance), which ensures horizontal and vertical guidance based on EGNOS geo-stationary satellites providing navigation signal improvements for the GPS navigation service. The implementation of satellite-based navigation required a comprehensive, step-by-step process, which involved a number of different divisions of our airline operations. It encompassed fleet aircraft replacement decisions, approvals from authorities, implementation of new operational procedures, retrofit of technical hardware and crew training.

Read this: EGNSS enabling change in General Aviation

Prior to the E-GEN project, did you have any experience of EGNOS implementation?

We had previous experience on a smaller scale with our AMBER project, but E-GEN was significantly more complex. Therefore the timing and project planning for the E-GEN project was critical. It was planned by creating a full business implementation schedule. Before the actual implementation, we carefully analysed the satellite navigation technology and performed a demonstration study, to provide solid justification for the required investment. During the E-GEN project, we carefully followed the project plan and gradually implemented the procedures into everyday line operations. It also served as a stepping stone for the introduction of our brand new Airbus A220 fleet into service. This state-of-the-art airliner already has LPV and other satellite navigation capabilities built in and ready for use from the very beginning.

How has EGNOS helped you to improve your environmental performance?

We value the reduced environmental impact. The increased efficiency directly translates into improved environmental performance and reduced impact. But airBaltic also views LPV approaches as an important incremental improvement in the safety of air transportation by leveraging advanced flight-deck procedures and the increased automation of aircraft. Also, the benefit in terms of economic efficiency is significant because it permits more reliable operations by minimising the possibility of diversions. This is a win-win for both passengers and the airline.

And this: GSA hosts RAISG meeting at its Prague HQ

What form did your cooperation with the GSA take on this project, and how has the experience been?

Cooperation with GSA has been an important enabler for the project. The project is co-financed by the European GNSS Agency via the grant program “Acceleration of EGNOS adoption in the field of civil aviation”. The co-financing made all the difference by turning the investment into a positive business case. Also, GSA, with its oversight role on EU satellite navigation activities, was perfectly placed to provide the best available knowledge on system performance and helped with a wide range of practical questions.

Now that the project has concluded, what are your plans for the future as regards ‘green flying’ and EGNOS implementation?

The project has already provided a positive contribution to the European aviation industry. Prior to our E-GEN project there were no EASA approved STC (supplemental type certificates) available for the Q400 aircraft type. Now, thanks to E-GEN, this certification is available to all Q400 operators. Several European airlines are already following the path we created.

Since the implementation of the project, airBaltic has already performed more than 500 LPV approaches across European airports, which would not have happened otherwise. So the project is delivering real results with real benefits. Following this development, we will make over 5000 LPV approaches on our Q400 fleet alone. When combined with the satellite-based approaches conducted by our A220 operations, airBaltic is proud to be truly one of the future navigation pioneers in Europe.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

“E-GEN is delivering real results with real benefits,” airBaltic Senior Vice President for Flight Operations Pauls Cālītis

Accuracy Matters: spreading the word about the benefits of Galileo

11.6.2019 9:47  
Three quarters of a billion people with Galileo-enabled smartphones are already benefitting from Galileo’s added accuracy.
Published: 
11 June 2019

The Galileo - Accuracy Matters campaign has been making an impact. Launched last December to raise awareness about how Galileo is making a real difference in the lives of the almost three quarters of a billion users who have Galileo’s added accuracy in their phones, the campaign has been resonating with the public.

There are almost 750 million Galileo-enabled smartphones already in use, yet people are often unaware of the fact that Galileo is improving the navigation signal that their smartphone receives, providing added accuracy and precision. The Accuracy Matters campaign aims to help change this.

The campaign began with a series of light-hearted videos showcasing everyday situations where ‘Accuracy Matters’ to anyone using location data on their smartphones.

A Europe-wide social media campaign was launched across Facebook, Instagram and Twitter in March and April this year. EU Member States were targeted with messages in 24 languages, with a total of almost 60 million impressions – which refers to the number of times the ad is shown to viewers. The response to the campaign has been impressive.

In total, the Accuracy Matters videos have been viewed over 2.5 million times, generating almost 250,000 link clicks, over 95,000 likes and almost 11,000 shares and retweets. Video ads on YouTube, launched only last week in 10 countries, have already generated almost half a million views, with a view rate almost double the average, at 25.4%. The online campaign was complemented by outdoor ads, which were placed in airports and on public transport in various locations across Europe.

Galileo saving lives

The campaign’s second phase, launched recently, took a more serious tone – highlighting how Galileo’s added accuracy makes a real difference in an emergency. The three videos in this series show how having Galileo in your phone helps emergency responders quickly find you to administer first aid, whether you have had a health emergency in a strange city, or just had a fall while jogging in the forest.

Watch these: Accuracy Matters when saving lives

Timed to coincide with the run-up to the European Parliament elections, the second phase of the campaign was an important reminder to Europeans that the Galileo programme is a real EU success story that would not have been possible for any single Member State to accomplish alone. The programme is already providing benefits to the 750 million people with Galileo-enabled phones in terms of added accuracy, while contributing to space-related economic growth and job creation in Europe.

Read this: New Regulation mandates Galileo capability for all smartphones sold in the EU

These benefits are particularly felt in the area of emergency response. Most calls to the 112 emergency number in Europe are placed from mobile phones. Reflecting the value of Galileo’s added accuracy, last December the European Commission published a Delegated Regulation setting out measures to introduce GNSS capability, particularly Galileo capability, in smartphones placed on the European Union market from 17 March 2022.

Unsure about whether your phone is Galileo-enabled?  You can check out all the devices that are already Galileo-enabled here: UseGalileo.eu

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Three quarters of a billion people with Galileo-enabled smartphones are already benefitting from Galileo’s added accuracy.

Accuracy Matters: spreading the word about the benefits of Galileo

11.6.2019 9:47  
Three quarters of a billion people with Galileo-enabled smartphones are already benefitting from Galileo’s added accuracy.
Published: 
11 June 2019

The Galileo - Accuracy Matters campaign has been making an impact. Launched last December to raise awareness about how Galileo is making a real difference in the lives of the almost three quarters of a billion users who have Galileo’s added accuracy in their phones, the campaign has been resonating with the public.

There are almost 750 million Galileo-enabled smartphones already in use, yet people are often unaware of the fact that Galileo is improving the navigation signal that their smartphone receives, providing added accuracy and precision. The Accuracy Matters campaign aims to help change this.

The campaign began with a series of light-hearted videos showcasing everyday situations where ‘Accuracy Matters’ to anyone using location data on their smartphones.

A Europe-wide social media campaign was launched across Facebook, Instagram and Twitter in March and April this year. EU Member States were targeted with messages in 24 languages, with a total of almost 57 million impressions – which refers to the number of times the ad is shown to viewers. The response to the campaign has been impressive.

In total, the Accuracy Matters videos have been viewed over 2.5 million times, generating almost 215,000 link clicks, over 85,000 likes and almost 9,000 retweets. Video ads on YouTube, launched only last week in 10 countries, have already generated almost half a million views, with a view rate almost double the average, at 25.4%. The online campaign was complemented by outdoor ads, which were placed in airports and on public transport in various locations across Europe.

Galileo saving lives

The campaign’s second phase, launched recently, took a more serious tone – highlighting how Galileo’s added accuracy makes a real difference in an emergency. The three videos in this series show how having Galileo in your phone helps emergency responders quickly find you to administer first aid, whether you have had a health emergency in a strange city, or just had a fall while jogging in the forest.

Watch these: Accuracy Matters when saving lives

Timed to coincide with the run-up to the European Parliament elections, the second phase of the campaign was an important reminder to Europeans that the Galileo programme is a real EU success story that would not have been possible for any single Member State to accomplish alone. The programme is already providing benefits to the 750 million people with Galileo-enabled phones in terms of added accuracy, while contributing to space-related economic growth and job creation in Europe.

Read this: New Regulation mandates Galileo capability for all smartphones sold in the EU

These benefits are particularly felt in the area of emergency response. Most calls to the 112 emergency number in Europe are placed from mobile phones. Reflecting the value of Galileo’s added accuracy, last December the European Commission published a Delegated Regulation setting out measures to introduce GNSS capability, particularly Galileo capability, in smartphones placed on the European Union market from 17 March 2022.

Unsure about whether your phone is Galileo-enabled?  You can check out all the devices that are already Galileo-enabled here: UseGalileo.eu

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Three quarters of a billion people with Galileo-enabled smartphones are already benefitting from Galileo’s added accuracy.

Accuracy Matters: spreading the word about the benefits of Galileo

11.6.2019 9:47  
Three quarters of a billion people with Galileo-enabled smartphones are already benefitting from Galileo’s added accuracy.
Published: 
11 June 2019

The Galileo - Accuracy Matters campaign has been making an impact. Launched last December to raise awareness about how Galileo is making a real difference in the lives of the almost three quarters of a billion users who have Galileo’s added accuracy in their phones, the campaign has been resonating with the public.

There are almost 750 million Galileo-enabled smartphones already in use, yet people are often unaware of the fact that Galileo is improving the navigation signal that their smartphone receives, providing added accuracy and precision. The Accuracy Matters campaign aims to help change this.

The campaign began with a series of light-hearted videos showcasing everyday situations where ‘Accuracy Matters’ to anyone using location data on their smartphones.

A Europe-wide social media campaign was launched across Facebook, Instagram and Twitter in March and April this year. EU Member States were targeted with messages in 24 languages, with a total of almost 60 million impressions – which refers to the number of times the ad is shown to viewers. The response to the campaign has been impressive.

In total, the Accuracy Matters videos have been viewed over 2.5 million times, generating almost 250,000 link clicks, over 95,000 likes and almost 11,000 retweets. Video ads on YouTube, launched only last week in 10 countries, have already generated almost half a million views, with a view rate almost double the average, at 25.4%. The online campaign was complemented by outdoor ads, which were placed in airports and on public transport in various locations across Europe.

Galileo saving lives

The campaign’s second phase, launched recently, took a more serious tone – highlighting how Galileo’s added accuracy makes a real difference in an emergency. The three videos in this series show how having Galileo in your phone helps emergency responders quickly find you to administer first aid, whether you have had a health emergency in a strange city, or just had a fall while jogging in the forest.

Watch these: Accuracy Matters when saving lives

Timed to coincide with the run-up to the European Parliament elections, the second phase of the campaign was an important reminder to Europeans that the Galileo programme is a real EU success story that would not have been possible for any single Member State to accomplish alone. The programme is already providing benefits to the 750 million people with Galileo-enabled phones in terms of added accuracy, while contributing to space-related economic growth and job creation in Europe.

Read this: New Regulation mandates Galileo capability for all smartphones sold in the EU

These benefits are particularly felt in the area of emergency response. Most calls to the 112 emergency number in Europe are placed from mobile phones. Reflecting the value of Galileo’s added accuracy, last December the European Commission published a Delegated Regulation setting out measures to introduce GNSS capability, particularly Galileo capability, in smartphones placed on the European Union market from 17 March 2022.

Unsure about whether your phone is Galileo-enabled?  You can check out all the devices that are already Galileo-enabled here: UseGalileo.eu

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Three quarters of a billion people with Galileo-enabled smartphones are already benefitting from Galileo’s added accuracy.

Locating you in an emergency – what you need to know about E112

10.6.2019 9:10  
E112 is a location-enhanced version of the 112 emergency service, allowing responders to quickly and accurately locate people in distress
Published: 
10 June 2019

Videos shared on social media as part of the Galileo Accuracy Matters campaign, highlighting Galileo’s contribution to the European Commission’s E112 emergency response service, have generated a number of questions from users across Europe. Here we address some of the main queries raised in an effort to bring more clarity on the issue.

112 is the European emergency number. It can be dialled free of charge from most mobile phones and, in some countries, fixed telephones to reach emergency services such as ambulance, fire and rescue, or the police. The 112 service is in place everywhere in the European Union and in other European countries.

Location enhanced

E112 is a location-enhanced version of the 112 emergency service, where emergency responders receive the position of the person in distress, similar to the eCall system for cars, enabling them to locate the caller’s position quickly and accurately. To support this, in December 2018, the European Commission adopted new measures requiring all smartphones sold in the EU from 17 March 2022 to have GNSS capability, particularly Galileo capability, so that they can use GNSS to provide caller location information to the emergency services.

Watch these: Accuracy Matters when saving lives

However, there is already a solution in place that uses GNSS technology in emergency calls made from smartphones. Advanced Mobile Location, or AML, transmits a ‘fused location’ comprising the GNSS, Wi-Fi or cell-ID information available on the caller's smartphone via a message to a dedicated end-point, known as a Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP, the place where the emergency calls are answered), which makes the caller location available to emergency responders.

It should be noted that 112 does not have an inherent ability to locate people making emergency calls. For this to be possible two conditions should be met. Firstly, the PSAP must have AML technology in place and, secondly, the caller’s handset must be AML-enabled (AML is deployed in all Android-based smartphones and in iPhones running iOS 11.3 and above). Otherwise, the person making the call will have to inform the responder of their location, if they know it.

So, in short: 112 is the emergency service, E112 is a location-enhanced version of this service, and AML is a technological platform for locating callers to the 112 number. However, not all 112 operators are equipped with AML. For those that are, the Galileo-enabled E112 service will support the provision of accurate GNSS positioning as part of the fused location. Check with your local emergency services if you would like to know whether caller location is deployed in your area.

Getting to you faster

Testing conducted as part of the European Commission (EC)-funded HELP112 project showed that Public Safety Answering Points receive most location messages within 30 seconds of the start of the call. This means that by the time the caller has given their name and described the situation, the PSAP already knows their position. Location by cell-ID alone, which uses the GSM tower routing the call, is the fastest but least precise method of locating a caller.

Read this: Do eCall devices conform?

The project found that the average location accuracy using Cell-ID was about 1.6 km, using Wi-Fi it was 23 metres and using GNSS it was about 16 metres. This means that in a situation where only cell-ID is used, the rescuers would need to get close to the location and then search for the victims. With GNSS or Wi-Fi they would most likely be able to see the victims as soon as they arrived. GNSS combined with Wi-Fi provides an ideal indoor-outdoor solution.

The EC study found, based on tests conducted in three Member States, that on average 59% of the calls used GNSS as the main positioning method, 28% used Wi-Fi, 9% used Cell-ID and 4% of calls returned no position. Testing is currently being carried out to assess the accuracy gains provided by Galileo.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

E112 is a location-enhanced version of the 112 emergency service, allowing responders to quickly and accurately locate people in distress

SARA scores at football match

5.6.2019 13:58  
The SARA solution has multiple applications – from SAR to security surveillance and sports broadcasting.
Published: 
05 June 2019

SARA, a GSA-funded project developing a turnkey solution for search and rescue (SAR) and surveillance operations, has been successfully tested at a recent football match. Based on the test, the economic viability of using the solution for event filming and monitoring/surveying is currently being investigated.

The SARA project is working on engineering and commercialising a tethered drone-based SAR and surveillance solution using an already existing prototype. The solution is able to guarantee continuous operations by means of a patented cable used for power supply and as a secure data link. For drone navigation and control, as well as for target identification and localisation, SARA uses high-accuracy Galileo-enabled GNSS receivers.

Successful test

The test was carried out continuously for the duration of the football match, which offered an interesting test case requiring continuous surveillance over a two-hour period. The SARA terminal was set to monitor several players, whose positions were tracked over time. The footballers were localised using a Galileo-enabled GNSS receiver installed on the drone, which provided a reference, along with a computer vision algorithm that transformed pixels into 2D geographical positions.

Watch this: SARA for Football

A profile of the positions (one per second) was created and compared with the video material. “This qualitative test revealed interesting results in terms of target identification (the right player) and localisation within the football field zone, and also in terms of the limited cost of the equipment used,” said Marco Nisi, Head of Integrated GNSS Solutions at project partner Sistematica.

“This use case is now being studied) to evaluate the economic viability of using the solution to film at events and to carry out monitoring and surveillance operations,” he said.

Range of applications

Maritime SAR is the primary target market but, as the football match test has shown, the solution has potential applications in other areas. One such area is security surveillance, particularly with the aim of preventing trespassing and detecting potential threats in open spaces. Possible use cases include monitoring and surveillance of building sites and other infrastructure, and security surveillance at major sporting events.

Read this: KAUST wins GSA Special Prize at ERL Emergency Local Tournament 2019

“In particular, as a very promising side market, the SARA team is continuing to address the technological challenges and to experiment with the business model with a view to reaching the sports domain as a provider of event surveillance management solutions and livestream broadcasting,” Nisi said.

The solution will be further tested in Szczecin, Poland in September 2019, where the drone will be operated on board a vessel to simulate a maritime SAR scenario. In this case, the drone will act as a vertical pylon and will be set up in “follow the ship” mode, making it possible to survey and identify and locate targets with an extended coverage of several nautical miles.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The SARA solution has multiple applications – from SAR to security surveillance and sports broadcasting.

SARA scores at football match

5.6.2019 13:58  
The SARA solution has multiple applications – from SAR to security surveillance and sports broadcasting.
Published: 
05 June 2019

SARA, a GSA-funded project developing a turnkey solution for search and rescue (SAR) and surveillance operations, has been successfully tested at a recent football match. Based on the test, the economic viability of using the solution for event filming and monitoring/surveying is currently being investigated.

The SARA project is working on engineering and commercialising a tethered drone-based SAR and surveillance solution using an already existing prototype. The solution is able to guarantee continuous operations by means of a patented cable used for power supply and as a secure data link. For drone navigation and control, as well as for target identification and localisation, SARA uses high-accuracy Galileo-enabled GNSS receivers.

Successful test

The test was carried out continuously for the duration of the football match, which offered an interesting test case requiring continuous surveillance over a two-hour period. The SARA terminal was set to monitor several players, whose positions were tracked over time. The footballers were localised using a Galileo-enabled GNSS receiver installed on the drone, which provided a reference, along with a computer vision algorithm that transformed pixels into 2D geographical positions.

Watch this: SARA for Football

A profile of the positions (one per second) was created and compared with the video material. “This qualitative test revealed interesting results in terms of target identification (the right player) and localisation within the football field zone, and also in terms of the limited cost of the equipment used,” said Marco Nisi, Head of Integrated GNSS Solutions at project partner Sistematica.

“This use case is now being studied to evaluate the economic viability of using the solution to film at events and to carry out monitoring and surveillance operations,” he said.

Range of applications

Maritime SAR is the primary target market but, as the football match test has shown, the solution has potential applications in other areas. One such area is security surveillance, particularly with the aim of preventing trespassing and detecting potential threats in open spaces. Possible use cases include monitoring and surveillance of building sites and other infrastructure, and security surveillance at major sporting events.

Read this: KAUST wins GSA Special Prize at ERL Emergency Local Tournament 2019

“In particular, as a very promising side market, the SARA team is continuing to address the technological challenges and to experiment with the business model with a view to reaching the sports domain as a provider of event surveillance management solutions and livestream broadcasting,” Nisi said.

The solution will be further tested in Szczecin, Poland in September 2019, where the drone will be operated on board a vessel to simulate a maritime SAR scenario. In this case, the drone will act as a vertical pylon and will be set up in “follow the ship” mode, making it possible to survey and identify and locate targets with an extended coverage of several nautical miles.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The SARA solution has multiple applications – from SAR to security surveillance and sports broadcasting.

SARA scores at football match

5.6.2019 13:58  
The SARA solution has multiple applications – from SAR to security surveillance and sports broadcasting.
Published: 
05 June 2019

SARA, a GSA-funded project developing a turnkey solution for search and rescue (SAR) and surveillance operations, has been successfully tested at a recent football match. Based on the test, the economic viability of using the solution for event filming and monitoring/surveying is currently being investigated.

The SARA project is working on engineering and commercialising a tethered drone-based SAR and surveillance solution using an already existing prototype. The solution is able to guarantee continuous operations by means of a patented cable used for power supply and as a secure data link. For drone navigation and control, as well as for target identification and localisation, SARA uses high-accuracy Galileo-enabled GNSS receivers.

Successful test

The test was carried out continuously for the duration of the football match, which offered an interesting test case requiring continuous surveillance over a two-hour period. The SARA terminal was set to monitor several players, whose positions were tracked over time. The footballers were localised using a Galileo-enabled GNSS receiver installed on the drone, which provided a reference, along with a computer vision algorithm that transformed pixels into 2D geographical positions.

Watch this: SARA for Football

A profile of the positions (one per second) was created and compared with the video material. “This qualitative test revealed interesting results in terms of target identification (the right player) and localisation within the football field zone, and also in terms of the limited cost of the equipment used,” said Marco Nisi, Head of Integrated GNSS Solutions at project partner Sistematica.

“This use case is now being studied) to evaluate the economic viability of using the solution to film at events and to carry out monitoring and surveillance operations,” he said.

Range of applications

Maritime SAR is the primary target market but, as the football match test has shown, the solution has potential applications in other areas. One such area is security surveillance, particularly with the aim of preventing trespassing and detecting potential threats in open spaces. Possible use cases include monitoring and surveillance of building sites and other infrastructure, and security surveillance at major sporting events.

Read this: KAUST wins GSA Special Prize at ERL Emergency Local Tournament 2019

“In particular, as a very promising side market, the SARA team is continuing to address the technological challenges and to experiment with the business model with a view to reaching the sports domain as a provider of event surveillance management solutions and livestream broadcasting,” Nisi said.

The solution will be further tested in Szczecin, Poland in September 2019, where the drone will be operated on board a vessel to simulate a maritime SAR scenario. In this case, the drone will act as a vertical pylon and will be set up in “follow the ship” mode, making it possible to survey and identify and locate targets with an extended coverage of several nautical miles.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The SARA solution has multiple applications – from SAR to security surveillance and sports broadcasting.

Demetra delivers dividends for ELPROMA

3.6.2019 10:41  
Safe Time represents a special version of the ELPROMA Rubidium NTS-5000 Time Server powered by Horizon 2020 DEMETRA TSI#2 technology
Published: 
03 June 2019

ELPROMA, a Polish manufacturer of NTP/PTP time servers, has won a seven-figure US$ contract to supply Rubidium IEEE1588 NTS-5000 servers to support a country-scale modern smart grid system in Asia. The servers, which are custom built (designated “Safe Time”), incorporate a modified version of the cyber-security TSI#2 solution developed as part of the Horizon 2020 ‘DEMonstrator of EGNSS services based on Time Reference Architecture’ (Demetra) project, in which ELPROMA participated in 2015-2016.

While it is not yet possible, for reasons of commercial secrecy, to name the client country, we can reveal that the contract is for a total of over 350 mostly advanced Rubidium-class PTP IEEE1588 time servers. These servers will ensure the cyber security and robust nanosecond synchronisation of the country-scale electricity grid, which is in the process of transition from a classical grid to a state-of-the-art IEC61850 system capable of safely distributing power throughout the country.

Read thisTime as a service with Galileo

“This is the biggest one-off deal of its kind so far,” Tomasz Widomski, a member of the ELPROMA Supervisory Board, said. “For comparison, a stock exchange or a new 5G telecom network requires approximately 10-15 grandmaster PTP IEEE1588 servers to operate efficiently, so 350 is a really huge number of servers,” he said. Due to the server volume, the system requires a special management and monitoring facility to ensure the accuracy and time domain operation of the IEC61850 smart grid.

Nanosecond accuracy

The PTP servers will be customised according to the specific needs of the client to ensure reliable, country-scale synchronisation and time domain operation. The Demetra TSI#2 solution is a core element of the new smart grid, with a modified version of the solution implemented inside the NTS-5000 dual oscillator servers (Rubidium and OCXO), helping to ensure the delivery of nanosecond accuracy and top-level cyber security. The key is real-time auditing, which ensures that everything stays stable during power distribution management.

“ELPROMA is the first supplier in the world of this level of synchronisation and this size of system, which will be more and more popular once Industry 4.0 technology becomes a reality,” Widomski said, adding that Galileo accuracy is a key element for improving security. “The ELPROMA servers are multi-constellation and are able to select the GNSS system that they operate with, however Galileo is the preferred one, with GPS, BaiDou and Glonass as a backup,” he said.

Watch this: Demetra – Time as a Service

ELPROMA is currently in the process of delivering the servers to the client and these will be gradually deployed over the next two to three months. “It is expected that the system will be fully operational at the end of 2019,” Widomski said.

Demetra solution

ELPROMA was member of Demetra Horizon 2020 project (2015-2016), which developed a prototype of an EGNSS-based time disseminator that provides time certification, redundancy, resilience, integrity and improved accuracy, while validating the concept of ‘time as a service’.

The Demetra developers engaged with the main timing and synchronisation users, including energy companies, to ensure that their needs were incorporated into the project design. The demonstrator was built around the concept of a common core infrastructure hosting advanced time services. It was deployed as an open and scalable architecture with common interfaces, making it easier to integrate new services and enabling service developers to focus on performance at user level.

The ELPROMA contract is a good example of how EGNSS-based innovations, such as the solutions created by Demetra, are driving economic growth and job creation in Europe. “The servers are 100% manufactured in the EU, in Poland,” Widomski said.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Safe Time represents a special version of the ELPROMA Rubidium NTS-5000 Time Server powered by Horizon 2020 DEMETRA TSI#2 technology

Galileo supporting Mobility as a Service

29.5.2019 11:40  
Galileo delivers the accuracy and reliability needed to support Mobility as a Service applications.
Published: 
29 May 2019

With an increasing number of people moving to big cities, clean and efficient urban mobility is more important than ever. New urban mobility schemes are rapidly evolving due to social, economic and technological changes. Against this backdrop, Galileo can deliver new accuracy and reliability for location-dependant services that get people where they need to go.

The omnipresence of smart mobile devices is allowing new business models to emerge based on the sharing of goods and services, the so-called sharing economy. The growth of the sharing economy in recent years involves a shift from the owning of goods towards accessing them when you need them. Particularly in urban settings, we now see the appearance of 'Mobility as a Service' (MaaS), enabling people to make the mobility choices that best suit their needs.

"Here's the way to think about MaaS," said Josep Maria Salanova, Senior Researcher at the Hellenic Institute of Transport. "It's like today you have your data agreement for your mobile phone; you pay a certain amount for a certain amount of data and then you can use it. With MaaS, you could have the same thing on your mobile phone, but it's a mobility credit. You will pay an amount per month and you will have access to a variety of mobility options, busses, taxis, car sharing and so on."

Galileo 4 mobility

Salanova's Hellenic Institute of Transport (HIT) is part of the Centre for Research and Technology Hellas (CERTH). "Under the EU-funded 'GALILEO 4 MOBILITY' project, HIT/CERTH is coordinating a pilot study in Thessaloniki," he said. "This is aimed at testing a mobile-based MaaS platform with a fleet of taxis."

Read this: Satellite positioning is changing how we move

Salanova explained how it works: "In Thessaloniki we have a ride sharing service. So, we are asking people who use their cars to go to work if they would like to share a taxi instead." Customers need to have a mobile phone with the ride-sharing app. They can request a one-off trip, or they can request regular transport on a scheduled basis.

Users can access all kinds of information on previous and pending trips, real-time location of their taxi, and so forth. The trip starts when they are in the taxi and they are automatically debited for the amount of mobility received.

Galileo connection

"So what does this have to do with Galileo?" asked Salanova. "Well, when you do this it's important to know the location of the customer, because this is really a location-based service. You don't have to give an address but the taxi has to find you. They have to know where you are standing, for example maybe on what side of the road, on what corner. So we want to demonstrate that Galileo will make this system work better. In Thessaloniki we have already had cases where drivers are complaining that they can't find the customer."

There is already ample evidence to show that Galileo, especially in conjunction with other GNSS constellations, improves accuracy and location fixes in difficult real-world environments, such as in cities where urban canyons create multipath effects and obstruct views of satellites.

The Thessaloniki pilot is currently running and will run through July 2019. "We will analyse the data and then perhaps have a second round from September 2019," said Salanova.

More than a trial

The GALILEO 4 MOBILITY project encompasses a number of MaaS-oriented pilots, one of which is the Thessaloniki taxi-sharing scheme. "Overall I would say the idea of GALILEO 4 MOBILITY is to support the introduction of GALILEO technology within the Mobility as a Service context," said Martí Jofre, coordinator of the project from Pildo Labs. "We want to see if this works or not. Does Galileo bring added value? We expect yes, but we want to test this, to show this. So we have pilots in other locations and with different kinds of schemes."

And this: Satellites and the City

"In Paris we have a bicycle-sharing and a car-sharing scheme, and then we also have a number of pilots in Barcelona. With one of them we have buses and the customer can declare whether or not he is at the bus stop, and if not the bus can change its route to skip the stop. And also in Barcelona there is an autonomous shuttle at a local university using Galileo to do routes and pick-ups on the university campus. This one is not yet mature, but it is coming."

On top of actually running the pilots, Jofre said, the GALILEO 4 MOBILITY team is concerned with developing new tools for data analysis, reviewing the newest and most convincing business models, and, crucially, considering ways to accelerate the acceptance of new mobility schemes among local authorities and their use by the general public.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Galileo delivers the accuracy and reliability needed to support Mobility as a Service applications.

GNSS.asia highlights Europe-India cooperation

27.5.2019 14:17  
The GNSS.asia roundtable promoted cooperation between GNSS research and industrial communities in Europe and Asia-Pacific.
Published: 
27 May 2019

The EU-funded GNSS.asia H2020 project hosted a major roundtable discussion around the theme of 'Europe meets India' at the Munich Satellite Navigation Summit back in March. The event aimed at promoting cooperation between the GNSS research and industrial communities in Europe and Asia-Pacific.

Speaking on behalf of the European Commission, Christoph Kautz, Deputy Head of Unit, Galileo Directorate, DG GROW, reaffirmed the EU's commitment to partnering with India, as illustrated by the recent visit to India of Elzbieta Bienkowska, European Commissioner for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs. Kautz also described the current operational status of the European satellite navigation programmes, Galileo and EGNOS. There are now 26 Galileo satellites in orbit, 22 of which are fully operational. The constellation is set for completion by 2020.

The keynote was delivered by Manish Saxena, Associate Director, Satellite Navigation Directorate, India Space Research Organisation (ISRO). He talked about the Indian Regional Navigation Satellite System (IRNSS), also known as NavIC, which means 'the sky' in Hindi. NavIC is an autonomous regional satellite navigation system that provides accurate real-time positioning and timing services. It covers India and a region extending more than 1000 km around it, with plans for further extension.

"One of our very important ultimate goals is to have NavIC available in mobile phones," said Saxena. "This will open up scope for many applications in a compact form factor and a convenient interface. This initiative needs to be pursued by developers to benefit the common citizens." Saxena pointed out that the recently unveiled Xiaomi MI8 smartphone is NavIC-enabled.

Meanwhile, India's GAGAN is a satellite-based augmentation system (SBAS) for the Indian airspace. Its purpose is to serve safety-of-life civil aviation applications. The system has been successfully completed and is interoperable with other international SBAS systems, such as WAAS in the US, Europe's EGNOS and the Japanese MSAS. GAGAN's footprint extends from Africa to Australia and can be expanded for seamless SBAS navigation services across regions.

One of the key challenges for GAGAN, Saxena explained, is that India falls under equatorial regions, where ionospheric scintillation effects are most pronounced and can affect signal quality. Thus, the results of research work on these effects will be of interest to the wider GNSS community.

GSA contribution

The very important topic of 'downstream ecosystem dynamics' was introduced by Martin Sunkevic, Market Development Officer at the European GNSS Agency (GSA). The GSA is responsible for market development and operations of Galileo and EGNOS. It publishes the GNSS Market Report and the GNSS User Technology Report, each of which presents trends and forecasting in their respective subject areas.

Among its other tasks, the GSA also supports research towards the development of new GNSS receivers and applications, and the creation of new business. "What's really important for us right now is to create synergies with other space data," said Sunkevic, "and to bring the GNSS industrial and research communities together to identify new downstream applications."

Next to speak was SV Satish, Executive Director of Air Traffic Management for India's Airport Authority. He discussed a range of new applications being made possible by the NavIC system, for helping fisherman to identify fishing zone boundaries, for receiving targeted weather alerts. "There are various downstream applications that we can imagine for the common public," Satish said. "This is a huge market. It will change agriculture. All application developers should be looking at this; India is a vast country, with oceans and mountains. So we have the marine field. There are definitely opportunities all over the place."

More background on the European GNSS initiatives was provided by Thierry Racaud, CEO of the EGNOS Satellite Service Provider (ESSP). ”Our main mission is to act as the EGNOS service provider. The EGNOS contract is funded by the EU and managed through the GSA, and it gives us a clear mandate to help foster the use of satellite navigation within Europe and particularly in the domain of aviation," he said.

In addition to EGNOS Services, ESSP delivers consultancy services for aviation, and global, satellite-based communication, navigation and surveillance (CNS) services for aviation.

Industry steps forward

The GNSS.asia initiative brings together European and Asian GNSS and industrial communities with the aim of forming partnerships. European industry took the spotlight, in the persons of Philippe Badia, Business Development officer at Syntony, Alexander Rügamer, Group Leader at Fraunhofer IIS, Luis Serrano, Technical Marketing Manager at STMicroelectronics, and Petr Bares, CEO of Iguassu Software. Each of them delivered a brief pitch, explaining what their companies can do in the field of GNSS, and specifically what kinds of things they can offer in terms of cooperation with India and other Asian partners.

Also joining the 'Europe meets India' roundtable event was Sanguk Lee of ETRI, based in Korea. ETRI is a global IT research institute that has been making an immense effort to stimulate growth in Korea in the field of IT. Indeed, Korea is the latest member of the international GNSS club, having just recently launched the new KPS (Korean Positioning System) programme. Meanwhile, the EU-Korea Galileo Agreement has been in place since 2006. The Agreement provides for co-operative activities in the areas of scientific research and training, industrial cooperation, trade and market development, standards, certification and regulatory measures, regional and local augmentations, etc.

Lee presented the EU-funded STRIKE3 project, whose overall objective is to develop and validate new international standards for the monitoring, reporting and testing of GNSS threats. "We have particular problems in South Korea with hostile jamming and other issues," said Lee. "International standards require international collaboration and international agreement. Moreover, such an ambitious task is only possible by bringing together existing organisations and technologies."

STRIKE3 will also provide a crucial new tool for police forces, highway authorities, toll operators, port authorities and governmental organisations, essentially creating an international task-force to defend against the criminal use of jamming technologies.

Joining hands with India

Closing remarks were delivered by Matthias Petschke, European Commission Director of European GNSS Programmes. "We see a huge potential and a very vibrant start-up scene in India," he said. "The visit of Commissioner Bienkowska to India resulted in, among many other things, a new joint bilateral GNSS working group, which is very significant. So this is just the start of our bilateral relations and we look forward to our future cooperation."

The EU-India exchange didn't end there. The Indian delegation of course attended the Munich Satellite Navigation Summit, which opened in the same venue just after the 'Europe meets India' event ended and they also enjoyed industrial visits and Bavarian-style networking across the region on subsequent days.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GNSS.asia roundtable promoted cooperation between GNSS research and industrial communities in Europe and Asia-Pacific.

MyGalileoApp : top 30 revealed!

23.5.2019 18:09  
The 30 selected projects will now work on the beta versions of their apps.
Published: 
24 May 2019

The top 30 applications, recently selected to advance to the next round of the MyGalileoApp competition, have now been revealed. The projects cover a range of applications that leverage Galileo’s added accuracy to provide solutions to social and environmental challenges. You can check out the full list here.

The 30 shortlisted projects were selected from a total of 148 submissions based on their level of innovation. Other key criteria taken into consideration included their market potential, their technical feasibility and the extent to which they leverage Galileo.

The shortlisted projects cover eight of the 11 innovation areas open to submissions. The innovation areas with the most selected projects in the second round of the competition are Mapping, GIS and Agriculture, with a total of eight projects, followed by Augmented Reality and Games, with four.

A taste of what to expect

The applications target a wide range of societal and environmental challenges and needs. The need to move more efficiently around our cities is something we have all experienced. Addressing this, one of the apps in this year’s competition monitors traffic lights and provides optimal speed recommendations, enabling drivers to arrive at the lights just as they turn green. Another matches people looking for parking spots with others leaving a spot, reducing headaches for drivers and benefitting retailers in areas with bad parking conditions.

It’s not just smart mobility needs that are addressed – one app helps farmers to visualise their in-field positions, providing constant feedback to optimise their work, while another helps drone users perfect their skills, supporting them in taking the best flight decisions.

There when you need it

One team is developing an app that sends distress signals even when the user is no longer able to access the device. Another crowdsources the location of your favourite products and delicatessens, while another integrates augmented reality and blockchain for geomarketing and an out-of-this world customer experience.

Mixing gamification, crowdsourcing and positioning can lead users to new worlds, but also help them experience their familiar spots in a completely different way, or empower users to overcome obstacles and find a tailored experience that suits their needs.

All in all, the applications in this year’s competition are impressive in terms of the range and scope of the challenges that the address, they might not change the world, but they certainly have the potential to become solutions that improve our lives, make our societies more inclusive and help protect the environment.

Next steps

The 30 selected projects will now work on developing a beta version of their app until 15 July 2019. The beta versions will then be reviewed and the 30 shortlisted projects will be narrowed down further, with a maximum of 10 teams being selected to advance to the second development phase.

During the second development phase the projects should work on delivering a finalised version of their app with 100% functionality and a report of testing results. At the end of the phase, the application should be already available for download on the Google Play and Apple platforms.

The most creative and innovative projects from the second development phase will be invited to the finals, to be held in October 2019, where they will present their application to the GSA evaluation board. Following the presentations, the judges will announce the winners, with the first-place winner receiving a EUR 100,000 prize. The runner up and third place finishers will receive EUR 50,000 and EUR 30,000 respectively.

Information partners

MyGalileoApp has three key information partners. Geoawesomeness is a blog about geospatial technologies and everything related to them, providing constructive commentary on all that is happening in the geo-industry. Secondly, Aerospace Valley is a major innovation cluster in France in the fields of aeronautics, space and embedded systems, with members from industry and academia. Finally, Spaceoneers, an initiative of Design & Data GmbH, seeks to spur creativity and innovation within the space sector in Europe.

"Geoawesomeness is delighted to see the creativity and ingenuity of the 30 shortlisted projects to emerge from the MyGalileoApp competition. At Geoawesomeness, we are always on the lookout for the next big idea in the Geospatial industry and these shortlisted projects certainly have us excited! We wish the teams the very best for the next stages," Managing Editor Muthukumar Kumar said.

Philippe Lattes, deputy director for Space Sector at Aerospace Valley commented: “At Aerospace Valley we are supporting startup creation and development of new services using space. Acting together with a European Agency like GSA is a powerful way to support young startups and promote European innovations.”

Spaceoneers Editor-in-Chief Ryan Laird had this to say: “At Spaceoneers we are always keen to follow the creativity and innovation within the space sector in Europe. We’re very excited to see the diversity of ideas from this competition and look forward to following the next stages.”

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The 30 selected projects will now work on the beta versions of their apps.

MyGalileoApp : top 30 revealed!

23.5.2019 18:09  
The 30 selected projects will now work on the beta versions of their apps.
Published: 
24 May 2019

The top 30 applications, recently selected to advance to the next round of the MyGalileoApp competition, have now been revealed. The projects cover a range of applications that leverage Galileo’s added accuracy to provide solutions to social and environmental challenges. You can check out the full list here.

The 30 shortlisted projects were selected from a total of 148 submissions based on their level of innovation. Their market potential, their technical feasibility and the extent to which they leverage Galileo.

The shortlisted projects cover eight of the 11 innovation areas open to submissions. The innovation areas with the most selected projects in the second round of the competition are Mapping, GIS and Agriculture, with a total of eight projects, followed by Augmented Reality and Games, with four.

A taste of what to expect

The applications target a wide range of societal and environmental challenges and needs. The need to move more efficiently around our cities is something we have all experienced. Addressing this, one of the apps in this year’s competition monitors traffic lights and provides optimal speed recommendations, enabling drivers to arrive at the lights just as they turn green. Another matches people looking for parking spots with others leaving a spot, reducing headaches for drivers and benefitting retailers in areas with bad parking conditions.

It’s not just smart mobility needs that are addressed – one app helps farmers to visualise their in-field positions, providing constant feedback to optimise their work, while another helps drone users perfect their skills, supporting them in taking the best flight decisions.

There when you need it

One team is developing an app that sends distress signals even when the user is no longer able to access the device. Another crowdsources the location of your favourite products and delicatessens, while another integrates augmented reality and blockchain for geomarketing and an out-of-this world customer experience.

Mixing gamification, crowdsourcing and positioning can lead users to new worlds, but also help them experience their familiar spots in a completely different way, or empower users to overcome obstacles and find a tailored experience that suits their needs.

All in all, the applications in this year’s competition are impressive in terms of the range and scope of the challenges that the address, they might not change the world, but they certainly have the potential to become solutions that improve our lives, make our societies more inclusive and help protect the environment.

Next steps

The 30 selected projects will now work on developing a beta version of their app until 15 July 2019. The beta versions will then be reviewed and the 30 shortlisted projects will be narrowed down further, with a maximum of 10 teams being selected to advance to the second development phase.

During the second development phase the projects should work on delivering a finalised version of their app with 100% functionality and a report of testing results. At the end of the phase, the application should be already available for download on the Google Play and Apple platforms.

The best ranked projects from the second development phase will be invited to the finals, to be held in October 2019, where they will present their application to the GSA evaluation board. Following the presentations, theaward will take place, with the first-place winner receiving a EUR 100,000 prize. The runner up and third place finishers will receive EUR 50,000 and EUR 30,000 respectively.

Information partners

MyGalileoApp has three key information partners. Geoawesomeness is a blog about geospatial technologies and everything related to them, providing constructive commentary on all that is happening in the geo-industry. Secondly, Aerospace Valley is a major innovation cluster in France in the fields of aeronautics, space and embedded systems, with members from industry and academia. Finally, Spaceoneers, an initiative of Design & Data GmbH, seeks to spur creativity and innovation within the space sector in Europe.

"Geoawesomeness is delighted to see the creativity and ingenuity of the 30 shortlisted projects to emerge from the MyGalileoApp competition. At Geoawesomeness, we are always on the lookout for the next big idea in the Geospatial industry and these shortlisted projects certainly have us excited! We wish the teams the very best for the next stages," Managing Editor Muthukumar Kumar said.

Philippe Lattes, deputy director for Space Sector at Aerospace Valley commented: “At Aerospace Valley we are supporting startup creation and development of new services using space. Acting together with a European Agency like GSA is a powerful way to support young startups and promote European innovations.”

Spaceoneers Editor-in-Chief Ryan Laird had this to say: “At Spaceoneers we are always keen to follow the creativity and innovation within the space sector in Europe. We’re very excited to see the diversity of ideas from this competition and look forward to following the next stages.”

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The 30 selected projects will now work on the beta versions of their apps.

MyGalileoApp : top 30 revealed!

23.5.2019 18:09  
The 30 selected projects will now work on the beta versions of their apps.
Published: 
24 May 2019

The top 30 applications, recently selected to advance to the next round of the MyGalileoApp competition, have now been revealed. The projects cover a range of applications that leverage Galileo’s added accuracy to provide solutions to social and environmental challenges. You can check out the full list here.

The 30 shortlisted projects were selected from a total of 148 submissions based on their level of innovation. Their market potential, their technical feasibility and the extent to which they leverage Galileo.

The shortlisted projects cover eight of the 11 innovation areas open to submissions. The innovation areas with the most selected projects in the second round of the competition are Mapping, GIS and Agriculture, with a total of eight projects, followed by Augmented Reality and Games, with four.

A taste of what to expect

The applications target a wide range of societal and environmental challenges and needs. The need to move more efficiently around our cities is something we have all experienced. Addressing this, one of the apps in this year’s competition monitors traffic lights and provides optimal speed recommendations, enabling drivers to arrive at the lights just as they turn green. Another matches people looking for parking spots with others leaving a spot, reducing headaches for drivers and benefitting retailers in areas with bad parking conditions.

It’s not just smart mobility needs that are addressed – one app helps farmers to visualise their in-field positions, providing constant feedback to optimise their work, while another helps drone users perfect their skills, supporting them in taking the best flight decisions.

There when you need it

One team is developing an app that sends distress signals even when the user is no longer able to access the device. Another crowdsources the location of your favourite products and delicatessens, while another integrates augmented reality and blockchain for geomarketing and an out-of-this world customer experience.

Mixing gamification, crowdsourcing and positioning can lead users to new worlds, but also help them experience their familiar spots in a completely different way, or empower users to overcome obstacles and find a tailored experience that suits their needs.

All in all, the applications in this year’s competition are impressive in terms of the range and scope of the challenges that the address, they might not change the world, but they certainly have the potential to become solutions that improve our lives, make our societies more inclusive and help protect the environment.

Next steps

The 30 selected projects will now work on developing a beta version of their app until 15 July 2019. The beta versions will then be reviewed and the 30 shortlisted projects will be narrowed down further, with a maximum of 10 teams being selected to advance to the second development phase.

During the second development phase the projects should work on delivering a finalised version of their app with 100% functionality and a report of testing results. At the end of the phase, the application should be already available for download on the Google Play and Apple platforms.

The best ranked projects from the second development phase will be invited to the finals, to be held in October 2019, where they will present their application to the GSA evaluation board. Following the presentations, theaward will take place, with the first-place winner receiving a EUR 100,000 prize. The runner up and third place finishers will receive EUR 50,000 and EUR 30,000 respectively.

Information partners

MyGalileoApp has three key information partners. Geoawesomeness is a blog about geospatial technologies and everything related to them, providing constructive commentary on all that is happening in the geo-industry. Secondly, Aerospace Valley is a major innovation cluster in France in the fields of aeronautics, space and embedded systems, with members from industry and academia. Finally, Spaceoneers, an initiative of Design & Data GmbH, seeks to spur creativity and innovation within the space sector in Europe.

"Geoawesomeness is delighted to see the creativity and ingenuity of the 30 shortlisted projects to emerge from the MyGalileoApp competition. At Geoawesomeness, we are always on the lookout for the next big idea in the Geospatial industry and these shortlisted projects certainly have us excited! We wish the teams the very best for the next stages," Managing Editor Muthukumar Kumar said.

Philippe Lattes, deputy director for Space Sector at Aerospace Valley commented: “At Aerospace Valley we are supporting startup creation and development of new services using space. Acting together with a European Agency like GSA is a powerful way to support young startups and promote European innovations.”

Spaceoneers Editor-in-Chief Ryan Laird had this to say: “At Spaceoneers we are always keen to follow the creativity and innovation within the space sector in Europe. We’re very excited to see the diversity of ideas from this competition and look forward to following the next stages.”

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The 30 selected projects will now work on the beta versions of their apps.

EGNSS enabling change in General Aviation

21.5.2019 15:56  
EGNSS is changing the face of general aviation
Published: 
21 May 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) was once again at the AERO International General Aviation Fair at Friedrichshafen, Germany emphasising the advantages that European GNSS can bring to all general aviation users and, effectively, changing the way they fly.

This 27th edition of the international aviation exhibition saw a record number of visitors with over 32 000 attendees from around the world. The GSA was present with a stand in the main exhibition hall and contributed a number of presentations to capacity audiences.

The GSA’s first speaking contribution was as part of the European Air Safety Agency (EASA) update session on its roadmap for general aviation. The session outlined the achievements of the General Aviation Roadmap so far, and described the exciting activities ahead to develop the next phase: the EASA GA Roadmap 2.0.

Recently appointed EASA Certification Director Rachel Daeschler and a range of speakers from the European Commission and other stakeholders presented the latest successes and the path forward. EASA underlined its continued commitment to making general aviation easier and safer by embracing innovation and affordability. EASA’s new Basic Regulation for General Aviation, adopted last year, allows for much greater flexibility across the sector.

EGNOS increasing safety for general aviation

Katerina Strelcova from the GSA described the Agency’s work on the development of safety promotional material on the implementation of GNSS-based Instrument Flight Procedures (IFP) for General Aviation. This was coordinated by EASA and other stakeholders and is intended to be published under the EASA Safety Promotion – Safety Together initiative. This document provides an assessment of the existing regulatory framework and a complete analysis of current enablers, and shares best practices that can facilitate implementation of IFP.

Satellite technologies, such as EGNOS, can in effect implement an instrument approach to a small field. Bringing more IFP into general aviation will increase safety in Europe, which is the ultimate objective of EASA. The document will be available soon and should be considered as an initial step, with further and fuller guidance in the pipeline, including on how to tackle specific areas of implementation.

Changing how we fly

In addition to the contribution to the EASA event, the GSA organised a dedicated session on satellite navigation for general aviation on 12 April that attracted a full room of participants.

The current status of European GNSS (EGNOS and Galileo), how it is contributing to landing, surveillance and Search and Rescue operations, and actions targeting every aviation user were highlighted at the session. Easier access to instrument flight rules for general aviation through the use of EGNOS and localiser performance with vertical guidance (LPV) was described by Julian Scarfe, deputy chairman of PPL/IR – Europe, the leading group for private pilots across Europe interested in instrument flying. He said: "Today we have EGNOS that can enable vertical approaches to non-instrument runways. The GSA is running a project to enable this. This will change the way we fly."

Other speakers in the session were Martin Robinson, CEO of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA), who described aircraft tracking for general aviation and Philip Church, director of engineering consultancy Helios, who talked about ADS-B (Automatic Dependent Surveillance—Broadcast), a surveillance technology in which an aircraft determines its position using satellite navigation technologies and periodically broadcasts its location, thereby enabling accurate tracking.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

EGNSS is changing the face of general aviation

GSA hosts RAISG meeting at its Prague HQ

17.5.2019 11:01  
EGNOS-based approach procedures are operational at 326 airports in 23 countries
Published: 
17 May 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) together with air traffic management organisation EUROCONTROL jointly organised the 16th meeting of the RNP Approach Implementation Support Group (RAISG) together with the Aviation Grants programme workshop at the GSA’s Prague headquarters.

The two-day meeting featured an interesting blend of presentations and roundtable discussions focused on required navigation performance (RNP) approach implementation and sharing experience and project implementation of different GSA co-funded aviation projects fostering EGNOS adoption in aviation. As of March 2019, 617 EGNOS-based approach procedures are operational at 326 airports in 23 countries, of which 324 procedures are localiser performance with vertical guidance (LPV) and 169 are LPV-200.

The meeting, which was organised within the context of a Framework Partnership Agreement between EUROCONTROL and the GSA, attracted 90 participants from various backgrounds, including National Air Navigation Service Providers and authorities, civil and military aircraft operators, pilots, international aviation associations, equipment manufacturers and rotorcraft.

Watch this: EGNOS for Aviation

Success stories

The first day of the meeting was devoted to the Aviation Grant Programme, the GSA’s funding tool designed to foster EGNOS adoption in aviation. Through the various success stories of GSA-funded projects, the participants had the opportunity to exchange best practices, discuss the specificities of RNP approach implementation in different countries and equipping the European fleet with EGNOS.

The GSA established its Aviation Grants Programme in 2014 to promote EGNOS operational implementation and stimulate EGNOS adoption in aviation. There was a significant increase in demand from applicants in the last call and, so far, it has awarded 42 projects with a total budget of EUR 22 million.

Thanks to the Programme, more than 100 LPV procedures have been implemented and more than 50 EGNOS-enabled aircraft are operating in Europe. The Grants Programme will soon be responsible for an additional 60 EGNOS-based LPV approaches at European airports and another 70 EGNOS equipped aircraft (including 20 rotorcraft), thereby making a significant contribution to increasing safety and accessibility in the aviation sector and boosting the EGNOS based network in Europe.

Improving accessibility

Since 2014, EUROCONTROL and the GSA have worked together to develop advanced systems and operations for aviation-based space technology, contributing jointly to Europe’s GNSS policies. In particular, they are focused on improving airport accessibility, aviation efficiency and air traffic management capacity, while also reducing safety risks. “The success of the previous RAISG meeting in Prague in 2016 encouraged us to renew this organisation as part of our collaboration with EUROCONTROL,” said Fiammetta Diani, GSA Head of Market Development.

Read this: Getting ready for the evolution of EGNOS

As part of the agreement, EUROCONTROL and the GSA also aim to coordinate aviation research and development (R&D), standardise aviation regulations and monitor aviation-specific GNSS performance, while supporting the uptake of EGNSS for aviation at the international level. In addition, in July 2018, the EC published the PBN regulation, mandating RNP approaches to all instrument runway ends with two milestones: 2020 and 2024. These approaches will implement the three minima (LNAV, LNAV/VNAV and LPV), so there will be EGNOS approaches in all airports by that date. The GSA is working together with EC, EUROCONTROL, EASA and SDM to facilitate implementation in airports and aircraft.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

EGNOS-based approach procedures are operational at 326 airports in 23 countries

Third GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop - Register now!

15.5.2019 12:56  
The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop provides a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.
Published: 
15 May 2019

Registration is now open for the third GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop, which will take place on 26 June 2019 at the GSA Headquarters in Prague. Participants in the workshop will gain access to the Task Force’s wealth of experience and learn about progress around the use of raw measurements in Android devices, so register now!

In 2017, the European GNSS agency published a White Paper on Using GNSS Raw Measurements on Android devices and launched the Raw Measurements Task Force to bridge the existing knowledge gap among potential raw measurement users. The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshops play a major role in these efforts by providing a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.

Workshop agenda

The workshop agenda is being finalised, however you can already look forward to a keynote presentation from Google`s Frank Van Diggelen, focusing on upcoming disrupting innovations soon available for Android users.

Furthermore, selected Task Force members will present summaries of their activities around analyses and development trends that are driving the interest of the community, be it in the high accuracy, authentication, testing, education and other domains benefitting from Android raw measurements.

Finally, a discussion will be held on how to make good use of the Android raw measurements to best leverage the latest announced services and enhancements, focusing on Open Service Navigation Message Authentication (OS-NMA) that will be offered for free to all users worldwide.

Users` benefits

There are several advantages to using GNSS raw measurements in smartphones and IoT devices. Use of these measurements can lead to greater flexibility when building multi-GNSS solutions (e.g. selection of the satellites or constellations based on their performances or differentiators) and increased GNSS performance, as they open the door to more advanced GNSS processing techniques that were previously restricted to more professional receivers.

Read this: FLAMINGO unveils high-accuracy solution for smartphones

What’s more, dual-frequency smartphones are starting to come on the market following the launch of the first dual-frequency phone, the Xiaomi Mi8, in June last year. Combined with access to raw measurements, dual frequency capability is delivering significant benefits in terms of ubiquity and accuracy.

In addition, the recent announcement of the upcoming Open Service Navigation Message Authentication service is generating great interest in the application developers` community and its pioneering through raw measurements is being assessed.

Several applications stand to profit from increased accuracy and authentication, such as augmented reality, blockchain, location-based advertising, mobile health and asset management.

Don’t miss this opportunity to get more insights on this and exchange ideas with the major experts in the sector!

Join the Task Force

The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force is dedicated to promoting a better and wider use of GNSS raw measurements. Task Force members have access to a dedicated discussion forum, and to the raw measurement database, where they can upload data logs and relevant documents.

Since its launch in 2017, the Task Force has expanded from a handful of experts to a community of over 100 agencies, universities, research institutes and companies. Membership is open to anybody interested in GNSS raw measurements. To join the Task Force contact: market@gsa.europa.eu.

You can check the agenda here and register to the workshop here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop provides a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.

Third GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop - Register now!

15.5.2019 12:56  
The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop provides a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.

Registration is now open for the third GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop, which will take place on 26 June 2019 at the GSA Headquarters in Prague. Participants in the workshop will gain access to the Task Force’s wealth of experience and learn about progress around the use of raw measurements in Android devices, so register now!

In 2017, the European GNSS agency published a White Paper on Using GNSS Raw Measurements on Android devices and launched the Raw Measurements Task Force to bridge the existing knowledge gap among potential raw measurement users. The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshops play a major role in these efforts by providing a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.

Proposed agenda

The workshop agenda is not yet finalised, however you can already look forward to a keynote presentation from Google`s Frank Van Diggelen, focusing on innovations expected soon from Android. 

Furthermore, selected Task Force members will present summaries of their activities, be it in the testing, education, authentication, high accuracy or other domains using Android raw measurements and already delivering clear benefits or with promising results anticipated in the near future.

Finally, the GSA will present how two Galileo differentiators, Open Service Navigation Message Authentication (OS-NMA) and Integrity Navigation Message (I/NAV) improvements, can be exploited thanks to raw measurements, in addition to other interesting presentations.

Numerous advantages

There are several advantages to using GNSS raw measurements in smartphones and IoT devices. Use of these measurements can lead to increased GNSS performance, as they open the door to more advanced GNSS processing techniques that were previously restricted to more professional receivers.

Read this: FLAMINGO unveils high-accuracy solution for smartphones

What’s more, dual-frequency smartphones are starting to come on the market following the launch of the first dual-frequency phone, the Xiaomi Mi8, in June last year. Combined with access to raw measurements, dual frequency capability is delivering significant benefits in terms of ubiquity and accuracy. 

Several applications stand to profit from this increased accuracy, such as augmented reality, location-based advertising, mobile health and asset management. The raw measurements also make it possible to optimise multi-GNSS solutions and to select satellites or constellations based on their performances or differentiators.

Join the Task Force

The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force is dedicated to promoting the wider use of GNSS raw measurements. Task Force members have access to a dedicated discussion forum, and to the raw measurement database, where they can upload data logs and relevant documents.

Since its launch in 2017, the Task Force has expanded from a handful of experts to a community of over 100 agencies, universities, research institutes and companies. Membership is open to anybody interested in GNSS raw measurements. To join the Task Force contact: market@gsa.europa.eu.

To register to take part in the workshop, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop provides a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.

Third GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop - Register now!

15.5.2019 12:56  
The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop provides a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.
Published: 
15 May 2019

Registration is now open for the third GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop, which will take place on 26 June 2019 at the GSA Headquarters in Prague. Participants in the workshop will gain access to the Task Force’s wealth of experience and learn about progress around the use of raw measurements in Android devices, so register now!

In 2017, the European GNSS agency published a White Paper on Using GNSS Raw Measurements on Android devices and launched the Raw Measurements Task Force to bridge the existing knowledge gap among potential raw measurement users. The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshops play a major role in these efforts by providing a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.

Workshop agenda

The workshop agenda can be found here. You can already look forward to a keynote presentation from Google`s Frank Van Diggelen, focusing on upcoming disrupting innovations soon available for Android users.
Furthermore, selected Task Force members will present summaries of their activities around analyses and development trends that are driving the interest of the community, be it in the high accuracy, authentication, testing, education and other domains benefitting from Android raw measurements.

Finally, a discussion will be held on how to make good use of the Android raw measurements to best leverage the latest announced services and enhancements, focusing on Open Service Navigation Message Authentication (OS-NMA) that will be offered for free to all users worldwide.

Users` benefits

There are several advantages to using GNSS raw measurements in smartphones and IoT devices. Use of these measurements can lead to greater flexibility when building multi-GNSS solutions (e.g. selection of the satellites or constellations based on their performances or differentiators) and increased GNSS performance, as they open the door to more advanced GNSS processing techniques that were previously restricted to more professional receivers.

Read this: FLAMINGO unveils high-accuracy solution for smartphones

What’s more, dual-frequency smartphones are starting to come on the market following the launch of the first dual-frequency phone, the Xiaomi Mi8, in June last year. Combined with access to raw measurements, dual frequency capability is delivering significant benefits in terms of ubiquity and accuracy.

In addition, the recent announcement of the upcoming Open Service Navigation Message Authentication service is generating great interest in the application developers` community and its pioneering through raw measurements is being assessed.

Several applications stand to profit from increased accuracy and authentication, such as augmented reality, blockchain, location-based advertising, mobile health and asset management.

Don’t miss this opportunity to get more insights on this and exchange ideas with the major experts in the sector!

Join the Task Force

The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force is dedicated to promoting a better and wider use of GNSS raw measurements. Task Force members have access to a dedicated discussion forum, and to the raw measurement database, where they can upload data logs and relevant documents.

Since its launch in 2017, the Task Force has expanded from a handful of experts to a community of over 100 agencies, universities, research institutes and companies. Membership is open to anybody interested in GNSS raw measurements. To join the Task Force contact: market@gsa.europa.eu.

You can check the agenda here and register to the workshop here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop provides a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.

Third GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop - Register now!

15.5.2019 12:56  
The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop provides a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.
Published: 
15 May 2019

Registration is now open for the third GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop, which will take place on 26 June 2019 at the GSA Headquarters in Prague. Participants in the workshop will gain access to the Task Force’s wealth of experience and learn about progress around the use of raw measurements in Android devices, so register now!

In 2017, the European GNSS agency published a White Paper on Using GNSS Raw Measurements on Android devices and launched the Raw Measurements Task Force to bridge the existing knowledge gap among potential raw measurement users. The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshops play a major role in these efforts by providing a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.

Proposed agenda

The workshop agenda is not yet finalised, however you can already look forward to a keynote presentation from Google`s Frank Van Diggelen, focusing on innovations expected soon from Android. 

Furthermore, selected Task Force members will present summaries of their activities, be it in the testing, education, authentication, high accuracy or other domains using Android raw measurements and already delivering clear benefits or with promising results anticipated in the near future.

Finally, the GSA will present how two Galileo differentiators, Open Service Navigation Message Authentication (OS-NMA) and Integrity Navigation Message (I/NAV) improvements, can be exploited thanks to raw measurements, in addition to other interesting presentations.

Numerous advantages

There are several advantages to using GNSS raw measurements in smartphones and IoT devices. Use of these measurements can lead to increased GNSS performance, as they open the door to more advanced GNSS processing techniques that were previously restricted to more professional receivers.

Read this: FLAMINGO unveils high-accuracy solution for smartphones

What’s more, dual-frequency smartphones are starting to come on the market following the launch of the first dual-frequency phone, the Xiaomi Mi8, in June last year. Combined with access to raw measurements, dual frequency capability is delivering significant benefits in terms of ubiquity and accuracy. 

Several applications stand to profit from this increased accuracy, such as augmented reality, location-based advertising, mobile health and asset management. The raw measurements also make it possible to optimise multi-GNSS solutions and to select satellites or constellations based on their performances or differentiators.

Join the Task Force

The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force is dedicated to promoting the wider use of GNSS raw measurements. Task Force members have access to a dedicated discussion forum, and to the raw measurement database, where they can upload data logs and relevant documents.

Since its launch in 2017, the Task Force has expanded from a handful of experts to a community of over 100 agencies, universities, research institutes and companies. Membership is open to anybody interested in GNSS raw measurements. To join the Task Force contact: market@gsa.europa.eu.

To register to take part in the workshop, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop provides a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.

Third GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop - Register now!

15.5.2019 12:56  
The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop provides a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.
Published: 
15 May 2019

Registration is now open for the third GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop, which will take place on 26 June 2019 at the GSA Headquarters in Prague. Participants in the workshop will gain access to the Task Force’s wealth of experience and learn about progress around the use of raw measurements in Android devices, so register now!

In 2017, the European GNSS agency published a White Paper on Using GNSS Raw Measurements on Android devices and launched the Raw Measurements Task Force to bridge the existing knowledge gap among potential raw measurement users. The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshops play a major role in these efforts by providing a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.

Workshop agenda

The workshop agenda is being finalised, however you can already look forward to a keynote presentation from Google`s Frank Van Diggelen, focusing on upcoming disrupting innovations soon available for Android users.
Furthermore, selected Task Force members will present summaries of their activities around analyses and development trends that are driving the interest of the community, be it in the high accuracy, authentication, testing, education and other domains benefitting from Android raw measurements.

Finally, a discussion will be held on how to make good use of the Android raw measurements to best leverage the latest announced services and enhancements, focusing on Open Service Navigation Message Authentication (OS-NMA) that will be offered for free to all users worldwide.

Users` benefits

There are several advantages to using GNSS raw measurements in smartphones and IoT devices. Use of these measurements can lead to greater flexibility when building multi-GNSS solutions (e.g. selection of the satellites or constellations based on their performances or differentiators) and increased GNSS performance, as they open the door to more advanced GNSS processing techniques that were previously restricted to more professional receivers.

Read this: FLAMINGO unveils high-accuracy solution for smartphones

What’s more, dual-frequency smartphones are starting to come on the market following the launch of the first dual-frequency phone, the Xiaomi Mi8, in June last year. Combined with access to raw measurements, dual frequency capability is delivering significant benefits in terms of ubiquity and accuracy.

In addition, the recent announcement of the upcoming Open Service Navigation Message Authentication service is generating great interest in the application developers` community and its pioneering through raw measurements is being assessed.

Several applications stand to profit from increased accuracy and authentication, such as augmented reality, blockchain, location-based advertising, mobile health and asset management.

Don’t miss this opportunity to get more insights on this and exchange ideas with the major experts in the sector!

Join the Task Force

The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force is dedicated to promoting a better and wider use of GNSS raw measurements. Task Force members have access to a dedicated discussion forum, and to the raw measurement database, where they can upload data logs and relevant documents.

Since its launch in 2017, the Task Force has expanded from a handful of experts to a community of over 100 agencies, universities, research institutes and companies. Membership is open to anybody interested in GNSS raw measurements. To join the Task Force contact: market@gsa.europa.eu.

To register to take part in the workshop, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop provides a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.

Third GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop - Register now!

15.5.2019 12:56  
The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop provides a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.
Published: 
15 May 2019

Registration is now open for the third GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop, which will take place on 26 June 2019 at the GSA Headquarters in Prague. Participants in the workshop will gain access to the Task Force’s wealth of experience and learn about progress around the use of raw measurements in Android devices, so register now!

In 2017, the European GNSS agency published a White Paper on Using GNSS Raw Measurements on Android devices and launched the Raw Measurements Task Force to bridge the existing knowledge gap among potential raw measurement users. The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshops play a major role in these efforts by providing a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.

Workshop agenda

The workshop agenda is being finalised, however you can already look forward to a keynote presentation from Google`s Frank Van Diggelen, focusing on upcoming disrupting innovations soon available for Android users.
Furthermore, selected Task Force members will present summaries of their activities around analyses and development trends that are driving the interest of the community, be it in the high accuracy, authentication, testing, education and other domains benefitting from Android raw measurements.

Finally, a discussion will be held on how to make good use of the Android raw measurements to best leverage the latest announced services and enhancements, focusing on Open Service Navigation Message Authentication (OS-NMA) that will be offered for free to all users worldwide.

Users` benefits

There are several advantages to using GNSS raw measurements in smartphones and IoT devices. Use of these measurements can lead to greater flexibility when building multi-GNSS solutions (e.g. selection of the satellites or constellations based on their performances or differentiators) and increased GNSS performance, as they open the door to more advanced GNSS processing techniques that were previously restricted to more professional receivers.

Read this: FLAMINGO unveils high-accuracy solution for smartphones

What’s more, dual-frequency smartphones are starting to come on the market following the launch of the first dual-frequency phone, the Xiaomi Mi8, in June last year. Combined with access to raw measurements, dual frequency capability is delivering significant benefits in terms of ubiquity and accuracy.

In addition, the recent announcement of the upcoming Open Service Navigation Message Authentication service is generating great interest in the application developers` community and its pioneering through raw measurements is being assessed.

Several applications stand to profit from increased accuracy and authentication, such as augmented reality, blockchain, location-based advertising, mobile health and asset management.

Don’t miss this opportunity to get more insights on this and exchange ideas with the major experts in the sector!

Join the Task Force

The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force is dedicated to promoting a better and wider use of GNSS raw measurements. Task Force members have access to a dedicated discussion forum, and to the raw measurement database, where they can upload data logs and relevant documents.

Since its launch in 2017, the Task Force has expanded from a handful of experts to a community of over 100 agencies, universities, research institutes and companies. Membership is open to anybody interested in GNSS raw measurements. To join the Task Force contact: market@gsa.europa.eu.

To register to the workshop, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop provides a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.

Third GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop - Register now!

15.5.2019 12:56  
The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop provides a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.
Published: 
15 May 2019

Registration is now open for the third GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop, which will take place on 26 June 2019 at the GSA Headquarters in Prague. Participants in the workshop will gain access to the Task Force’s wealth of experience and learn about progress around the use of raw measurements in Android devices, so register now!

In 2017, the European GNSS agency published a White Paper on Using GNSS Raw Measurements on Android devices and launched the Raw Measurements Task Force to bridge the existing knowledge gap among potential raw measurement users. The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshops play a major role in these efforts by providing a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.

Workshop agenda

The workshop agenda is being finalised, however you can already look forward to a keynote presentation from Google`s Frank Van Diggelen, focusing on upcoming disrupting innovations soon available for Android users.
Furthermore, selected Task Force members will present summaries of their activities around analyses and development trends that are driving the interest of the community, be it in the high accuracy, authentication, testing, education and other domains benefitting from Android raw measurements.

Finally, a discussion will be held on how to make good use of the Android raw measurements to best leverage the latest announced services and enhancements, focusing on Open Service Navigation Message Authentication (OS-NMA) that will be offered for free to all users worldwide.

Users` benefits

There are several advantages to using GNSS raw measurements in smartphones and IoT devices. Use of these measurements can lead to greater flexibility when building multi-GNSS solutions (e.g. selection of the satellites or constellations based on their performances or differentiators) and increased GNSS performance, as they open the door to more advanced GNSS processing techniques that were previously restricted to more professional receivers.

Read this: FLAMINGO unveils high-accuracy solution for smartphones

What’s more, dual-frequency smartphones are starting to come on the market following the launch of the first dual-frequency phone, the Xiaomi Mi8, in June last year. Combined with access to raw measurements, dual frequency capability is delivering significant benefits in terms of ubiquity and accuracy.

In addition, the recent announcement of the upcoming Open Service Navigation Message Authentication service is generating great interest in the application developers` community and its pioneering through raw measurements is being assessed.

Several applications stand to profit from increased accuracy and authentication, such as augmented reality, blockchain, location-based advertising, mobile health and asset management.

Don’t miss this opportunity to get more insights on this and exchange ideas with the major experts in the sector!

Join the Task Force

The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force is dedicated to promoting a better and wider use of GNSS raw measurements. Task Force members have access to a dedicated discussion forum, and to the raw measurement database, where they can upload data logs and relevant documents.

Since its launch in 2017, the Task Force has expanded from a handful of experts to a community of over 100 agencies, universities, research institutes and companies. Membership is open to anybody interested in GNSS raw measurements. To join the Task Force contact: market@gsa.europa.eu.

You can check the agenda here and register to the workshop here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop provides a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.

Third GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop - Register now!

15.5.2019 12:56  
The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop provides a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.
Published: 
15 May 2019

Registration is now open for the third GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop, which will take place on 26 June 2019 at the GSA Headquarters in Prague. Participants in the workshop will gain access to the Task Force’s wealth of experience and learn about progress around the use of raw measurements in Android devices, so register now!

In 2017, the European GNSS agency published a White Paper on Using GNSS Raw Measurements on Android devices and launched the Raw Measurements Task Force to bridge the existing knowledge gap among potential raw measurement users. The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshops play a major role in these efforts by providing a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.

Workshop agenda

The workshop agenda can be found here. You can already look forward to a keynote presentation from Google`s Frank Van Diggelen, focusing on upcoming disrupting innovations soon available for Android users.
Furthermore, selected Task Force members will present summaries of their activities around analyses and development trends that are driving the interest of the community, be it in the high accuracy, authentication, testing, education and other domains benefitting from Android raw measurements.

Finally, a discussion will be held on how to make good use of the Android raw measurements to best leverage the latest announced services and enhancements, focusing on Open Service Navigation Message Authentication (OS-NMA) that will be offered for free to all users worldwide.

Users` benefits

There are several advantages to using GNSS raw measurements in smartphones and IoT devices. Use of these measurements can lead to greater flexibility when building multi-GNSS solutions (e.g. selection of the satellites or constellations based on their performances or differentiators) and increased GNSS performance, as they open the door to more advanced GNSS processing techniques that were previously restricted to more professional receivers.

Read this: FLAMINGO unveils high-accuracy solution for smartphones

What’s more, dual-frequency smartphones are starting to come on the market following the launch of the first dual-frequency phone, the Xiaomi Mi8, in June last year. Combined with access to raw measurements, dual frequency capability is delivering significant benefits in terms of ubiquity and accuracy.

In addition, the recent announcement of the upcoming Open Service Navigation Message Authentication service is generating great interest in the application developers` community and its pioneering through raw measurements is being assessed.

Several applications stand to profit from increased accuracy and authentication, such as augmented reality, blockchain, location-based advertising, mobile health and asset management.

Don’t miss this opportunity to get more insights on this and exchange ideas with the major experts in the sector!

Join the Task Force

The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force is dedicated to promoting a better and wider use of GNSS raw measurements. Task Force members have access to a dedicated discussion forum, and to the raw measurement database, where they can upload data logs and relevant documents.

Since its launch in 2017, the Task Force has expanded from a handful of experts to a community of over 100 agencies, universities, research institutes and companies. Membership is open to anybody interested in GNSS raw measurements. To join the Task Force contact: market@gsa.europa.eu.

Workshop agenda

The workshop agenda is being finalised, however you can already look forward to a keynote presentation from Google`s Frank Van Diggelen, focusing on upcoming disrupting innovations soon available for Android users.

Furthermore, selected Task Force members will present summaries of their activities around analyses and development trends that are driving the interest of the community, be it in the high accuracy, authentication, testing, education and other domains benefitting from Android raw measurements.

Finally, a discussion will be held on how to make good use of the Android raw measurements to best leverage the latest announced services and enhancements, focusing on Open Service Navigation Message Authentication (OS-NMA) that will be offered for free to all users worldwide.

You can check the agenda here and register to the workshop here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop provides a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.

Third GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop – Register now!

15.5.2019 12:52  
The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop provides a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.
Published: 
15 May 2019

Registration is now open for the third GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop, which will take place on 26 June 2019 at the GSA Headquarters in Prague. Participants in the workshop will gain access to the Task Force’s wealth of experience and learn about progress around the use of raw measurements in Android devices, so register now.

In 2017, the European GNSS agency published a White Paper on Using GNSS Raw Measurements on Android devices and launched the Raw Measurements Task Force to bridge the existing knowledge gap among potential raw measurement users. The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshops play a major role in these efforts by providing a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.

Proposed agenda

The workshop agenda is not yet finalised, however you can already look forward to a keynote presentation from Google`s Frank Van Diggelen, focusing on innovations expected soon from Android. 

Furthermore, selected Task Force members will present summaries of their activities, be it in the testing, education, authentication, high accuracy or other domains using Android raw measurements and already delivering clear benefits or with promising results anticipated in the near future.

Finally, the GSA will present how two Galileo differentiators, Open Service Navigation Message Authentication (OS-NMA) and Integrity Navigation Message (I/NAV) improvements, can be exploited thanks to raw measurements, in addition to other interesting presentations.

Numerous advantages

There are several advantages to using GNSS raw measurements in smartphones and IoT devices. Use of these measurements can lead to increased GNSS performance, as they open the door to more advanced GNSS processing techniques that were previously restricted to more professional receivers.

Read this: FLAMINGO unveils high-accuracy solution for smartphones

What’s more, dual-frequency smartphones are starting to come on the market following the launch of the first dual-frequency phone, the Xiaomi Mi8, in June last year. Combined with access to raw measurements, dual frequency capability is delivering significant benefits in terms of ubiquity and accuracy. 

Several applications stand to profit from this increased accuracy, such as augmented reality, location-based advertising, mobile health and asset management. The raw measurements also make it possible to optimise multi-GNSS solutions and to select satellites or constellations based on their performances or differentiators.

Join the Task Force

The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force is dedicated to promoting the wider use of GNSS raw measurements. Task Force members have access to a dedicated discussion forum, and to the raw measurement database, where they can upload data logs and relevant documents.

Since its launch in 2017, the Task Force has expanded from a handful of experts to a community of over 100 agencies, universities, research institutes and companies. Membership is open to anybody interested in GNSS raw measurements. To join the Task Force contact: market@gsa.europa.eu.

To register to take part in the workshop, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The Raw Measurements Task Force Workshop provides a forum to share experiences around raw measurements use.

Do eCall devices conform?

13.5.2019 15:13  
The report summarises the results of a GSA-JRC testing campaign for eCall devices, in which device manufacturers provided samples for conformity assessment.
Published: 
13 May 2019

Since 31 March 2018, all new car and light vehicle models sold in the EU must be fitted with an eCall device that can automatically alert emergency services in the event of an accident and transmit the position of the vehicle. In parallel with the launch of this life-saving service, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) launched a testing campaign for eCall devices, inviting all device manufacturers to provide samples for conformity assessment by the European Commission’s science service: the Joint Research Centre (JRC). A summary report of the results has just been published.

The GSA received a large number of positive expressions of interest from the main manufacturers of eCall On-Board Units from Europe, USA, and Asia and devices were delivered to the EU Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) testing facilities at the JRC site at Ispra in Italy, where the testing campaign was carried out.

"We set up a dedicated GNSS laboratory test-bed for the eCall testing. It includes a suite of test scenarios to evaluate the performance of the eCall devices. For instance, we looked at their positioning accuracy in different types of conditions as well as the receiver sensitivity", explains JRC researcher Joaquim Fortuny. 

The test scenarios corresponded to those outlined in the eCall Implementation Guidelines Report and were designed to assess the eCall Devices Under Test (DUT) compatibility with EGNOS (European Geostationary Navigation Overlay System) and Galileo.

The assessment campaign started in March 2017 and was concluded in September 2018, and covered 15 DUTs from a range of manufacturers. The performance of the DUT receivers was thoroughly assessed with respect to a number of key performance indicators (KPIs) including their use of SBAS/ EGNOS corrections; their positioning accuracy under static, dynamic and dynamic with shadow areas (i.e. ‘urban canyon’ type) conditions, the Cold Start Time-To-First-Fix (CSTTFF) at two different signal power levels, the re-acquisition time of tracking signals after a block out of 60 seconds, and the receiver sensitivity in cold start mode, tracking mode and re-acquisition scenario.

Reports generated

Two sets of reports were generated by the campaign. 

Firstly, an individual test report for each DUT was produced which includes the full-set of detailed results for the specific unit. These reports have been provided only to the relevant DUT manufacturer and are subject to confidentiality agreements between the manufacturer, GSA and JRC.

Secondly, an overall eCall DUT assessment report has just been published, which describes the test campaign and details the main and significant results obtained on the 15 DUTs. Both the aggregate and individual results are provided, but given the sensitive commercial nature of the results, they are presented without disclosing the identity of the individual device manufacturers.

Overall, all DUTs performed well within specification in terms of positioning in all test scenarios.

Only four of the test units were found to be not compliant in terms of the use of SBAS/ EGNOS corrections and it was concluded that SBAS corrections were not used in these cases because of the high latitude of the geographical location used for the tests.

The sensitivity test was perhaps the most demanding test cases for the eCall units, but the majority of them successfully passed. 

“This first of its kind testing campaign has strengthened mutual trust and cooperation with the on-board unit manufacturers and the test/simulator solution vendors and has opened a direct communication channel with the manufacturers. This can provide a deeper insight into their products’ maturity and help them to address issues before devices are submitted for type-approval” said GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides.

eCall: life saver

Over 25 500 people were killed and 135 000 people seriously injured in road accidents across the EU in 2016. In addition to the tragedy of loss of life and injury, this also represents an annual economic burden of around EUR 130 billion to society.

It is estimated that eCall can speed up emergency response times by 40% in urban areas and 50% in the countryside and could reduce the number of fatalities in road traffic accidents by at least 4% and the number of severe injuries by 6%.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The report summarises the results of a GSA-JRC testing campaign for eCall devices, in which device manufacturers provided samples for conformity assessment.

2019 CLGE Students’ Contest is scouting for ideas

9.5.2019 14:05  
Students of topography, GIS, geodesy, mapping and related studies are invited to submit unique and innovative ideas.
Published: 
09 May 2019

The eighth edition of the CLGE Students’ Contest, organised by the Council of European Geodetic Surveyors (CLGE) in partnership with the European GNSS Agency (GSA), is now open for submissions. The deadline for applications is 23:00 on 29 July 2019.

For the eighth consecutive year, the CLGE Students’ Contest is inviting students of topography, GIS, geodesy, mapping and related studies to submit their innovative ideas. Each winner or winning team stands to win a prize of EUR 1000.

There are five categories in the competition: 

Geodesy, topography,

Galileo, EGNOS, Copernicus,

GIS, mapping,

Cadastre and property surveying,

Student and youngster engagement.

The first four are open to all Bachelor and Masters students in the surveying sector or a related field from all European countries. PhD students are not currently allowed to participate with their PhD thesis, but this may change in the future. However, they can participate with their Bachelor or Master’s thesis, if it meets other requirements. The fifth category is open to surveyors under the age of 35 or those who have been registered as surveyors for less than 10 years.

Read this: Galileo high accuracy in focus at INTERGEO 2018

Proposals in the final category should include a paper describing how CLGE can motivate young surveyors to be more active and engaged in the association; how CLGE can provide increased added value to its members; or what CLGE can do to motivate youngsters to study surveying and enter the surveying profession.

GSA Special Prize

As in previous years, the GSA is sponsoring the Galileo, EGNOS, Copernicus category. Applicants for the GSA special prize should submit a paper describing how their project leverages Galileo, EGNOS or Copernicus for use in professional receivers, mobile phones, drones, etc. All applications using Copernicus should also include at least one EGNSS service (Galileo, EGNOS or both).

Last year’s prize in the Galileo section went to Iuliana Constantinov, from the Technical University of Moldova, who won with the paper "Adjustment of GNSS permanent stations network MOLDPOS". Iuliana was awarded her prize at the INTERGEO exhibition in Frankfurt last October.

What should you do?

Applicants should submit a paper, written in English, of not more than 4000 words, including an abstract of 300 words. The paper should describe the student’s or young surveyor’s work, findings and conclusions and should be submitted before 23.00 CET on 29 July 2019, to the following address: contest@clge.eu (please CC Mairolt.Kakko@clge.eu and Jean-Yves.Pirlot@clge.eu). 

The award ceremony for the 2019 edition of the competition will also take place during the INTERGEO exhibition, which this year will take place in Stuttgart on 18 September 2019. Participants should save this date in case they win. For more details, please click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Students of topography, GIS, geodesy, mapping and related studies are invited to submit unique and innovative ideas.

2019 CLGE Students’ Contest is scouting for ideas

9.5.2019 14:05  
Students of topography, GIS, geodesy, mapping and related studies are invited to submit unique and innovative ideas.
Published: 
09 May 2019

The eighth edition of the CLGE Students’ Contest, organised by the Council of European Geodetic Surveyors (CLGE) in partnership with the European GNSS Agency (GSA), is now open for submissions. The deadline for applications is 23:00 on 29 July 2019.

For the eighth consecutive year, the CLGE Students’ Contest is inviting students of topography, GIS, geodesy, mapping and related studies to submit their innovative ideas. Each winner or winning team stands to win a prize of EUR 1000.

There are five categories in the competition: 

Geodesy, topography,

Galileo, EGNOS, Copernicus,

GIS, mapping,

Cadastre and property surveying,

Student and youngster engagement.

The first four are open to all Bachelor and Masters students in the surveying sector or a related field from all European countries. PhD students are not currently allowed to participate with their PhD thesis, but this may change in the future. However, they can participate with their Bachelor or Master’s thesis, if it meets other requirements. The fifth category is open to surveyors under the age of 35 or those who have been registered as surveyors for less than 10 years.

Read this: Galileo high accuracy in focus at INTERGEO 2018

Proposals in the final category should include a paper describing how CLGE can motivate young surveyors to be more active and engaged in the association; how CLGE can provide increased added value to its members; or what CLGE can do to motivate youngsters to study surveying and enter the surveying profession.

GSA Special Prize

As in previous years, the GSA is sponsoring the Galileo, EGNOS, Copernicus category. Applicants for the GSA special prize should submit a paper describing how their project leverages Galileo, EGNOS or Copernicus for use in professional receivers, mobile phones, drones, etc. All applications using Copernicus should also include at least one EGNSS service (Galileo, EGNOS or both).

Last year’s prize in the Galileo section went to Iuliana Constantinov, from the Technical University of Moldova, who won with the paper "Adjustment of GNSS permanent stations network MOLDPOS". Iuliana was awarded her prize at the INTERGEO exhibition in Frankfurt last October.

What should you do?

Applicants should submit a paper, written in English, of not more than 4000 words, including an abstract of 300 words. The paper should describe the student’s or young surveyor’s work, findings and conclusions and should be submitted before 23.00 CET on 29 July 2019, to the following address: contest@clge.eu (please CC Mairolt.Kakko@clge.eu and Jean-Yves.Pirlot@clge.eu). 

The award ceremony for the 2019 edition of the competition will also take place during the INTERGEO exhibition, which this year will take place in Stuttgart on 18 September 2019. Participants should save this date in case they win. For more details, please click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Students of topography, GIS, geodesy, mapping and related studies are invited to submit unique and innovative ideas.

Have your say on Horizon Europe

8.5.2019 11:38  
The GSA workshop will review Horizon Europe EGNSS Downstream R&D priorities.
Published: 
08 May 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is to host a workshop at its Prague headquarters on 4 June 2019 to consult with industry and academia on Horizon Europe EGNSS Downstream R&D. At the workshop, participants will discuss priorities for EGNSS downstream applications, receivers, and market uptake in Horizon Europe – the European Commission’s ambitious €100 billion research and innovation programme that will succeed Horizon 2020.

In June 2018 the Commission published its proposal for the Horizon Europe programme, which is currently being negotiated in the European Council and the European Parliament, after which it should be launched on 1 January 2021. In the programme, EGNSS related activities are currently covered within the Digital Industry cluster, Pillar 2: Global Challenges and Industrial Competitiveness, but there is a proposal from the Parliament and Council to have a dedicated Digital-Industry-Space cluster.

Fostering adoption, underpinning competitiveness

EGNSS activities such as innovative applications; global uptake; solutions improving robustness; authentication; integrity of services; and development of fundamental elements such as chipsets, receivers and antennas, are covered under the Digital Industry pillar. Other EGNSS activities in the area of sustainability of supply chains, new technologies, work targeting solutions for societal challenges, and the development of next generation systems for emerging security threats or applications such as autonomous driving, can also be addressed in other Horizon Europe clusters and pillars.

Read this Innovation procurement opportunities explored at Prague workshop

As the programme is currently being negotiated, now is the time to consult with stakeholders and agree on the EGNSS downstream R&D priorities for the next framework programme and to exploit new funding tools to increase the business impact of EGNSS. Moreover, the budget for EGNSS downstream applications in Horizon Europe needs to be secured in order to foster wide-scale EGNSS adoption and underpin the competitiveness of EU industry.

Review of requirements

The upcoming GSA workshop will provide a forum for this consultation, offering representatives from industry and academia the opportunity to discuss high-level EGNSS downstream R&D priorities. The workshop will kick off by taking a look at the status quo of the Horizon 2020 and Fundamental Elements funding mechanisms and then present how EGNSS downstream R&D is reflected in Horizon Europe. This will be followed by a discussion of EGNSS R&D User Requirements, with a review of inputs from the 2018 EGNSS User Consultation Platform by market segment. Finally, there will be an open discussion on high-level priorities for Horizon Europe.

You can now register to the workshop here. To help participants to prepare for the workshop, the GSA has prepared a questionnaire, which you can access here, along with the agenda for the workshop. For more information contact: com@gsa.europa.eu

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GSA workshop will review Horizon Europe EGNSS Downstream R&D priorities.

Have your say on Horizon Europe

8.5.2019 11:38  
The GSA workshop will review Horizon Europe EGNSS Downstream R&D priorities.
Published: 
08 May 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is to host a workshop at its Prague headquarters on 4 June 2019 to consult with industry and academia on Horizon Europe EGNSS Downstream R&D. At the workshop, participants will discuss priorities for EGNSS downstream applications, receivers, and market uptake in Horizon Europe – the European Commission’s ambitious €100 billion research and innovation programme that will succeed Horizon 2020.

In June 2018 the Commission published its proposal for the Horizon Europe programme, which is currently being negotiated in the European Council and the European Parliament, after which it should be launched on 1 January 2021. In the programme, EGNSS related activities are currently covered within the Digital Industry cluster, Pillar 2: Global Challenges and Industrial Competitiveness, but there is a proposal from the Parliament and Council to have a dedicated Digital-Industry-Space cluster.

Fostering adoption, underpinning competitiveness

Within the Digital Industry pillar, EGNSS activities are structured as follows: innovative applications; global uptake; solutions improving robustness; authentication; integrity of services; and development of fundamental elements such as chipsets, receivers and antennas. Other activities focus on sustainability of supply chains, new technologies, work targeted at sustained exploitation of services to tackle societal challenges, and the development of next generation systems for new challenges such as security or autonomous driving. EGNSS related activities could also be covered in other Horizon Europe clusters and pillars.

Read this: Innovation procurement opportunities explored at Prague workshop 

As the programme is currently being negotiated, now is the time to consult with stakeholders and agree on the EGNSS downstream R&D priorities for the next framework programme and to exploit new funding tools to increase the business impact of EGNSS. Moreover, the budget for EGNSS downstream applications in Horizon Europe needs to be secured in order to foster wide-scale EGNSS adoption and underpin the competitiveness of EU industry.

Review of requirements

The upcoming GSA workshop will provide a forum for this consultation, offering representatives from industry and academia the opportunity to discuss high-level EGNSS downstream R&D priorities. The workshop will kick off by taking a look at the status quo of the Horizon 2020 and Fundamental Elements funding mechanisms and then present how EGNSS downstream R&D is reflected in Horizon Europe. This will be followed by a discussion of EGNSS R&D User Requirements, with a review of inputs from the 2018 EGNSS User Consultation Platform by market segment. Finally, there will be an open discussion on high-level priorities for Horizon Europe.

To help participants to prepare for the workshop, the GSA has prepared a questionnaire, which you can access here, along with the agenda for the workshop. For more information contact: com@gsa.europa.eu 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GSA workshop will review Horizon Europe EGNSS Downstream R&D priorities.

Have your say on Horizon Europe

8.5.2019 11:38  
The GSA workshop will review Horizon Europe EGNSS Downstream R&D priorities.
Published: 
08 May 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is to host a workshop at its Prague headquarters on 4 June 2019 to consult with industry and academia on Horizon Europe EGNSS Downstream R&D. At the workshop, participants will discuss priorities for EGNSS downstream applications, receivers, and market uptake in Horizon Europe – the European Commission’s ambitious €100 billion research and innovation programme that will succeed Horizon 2020.

In June 2018 the Commission published its proposal for the Horizon Europe programme, which is currently being negotiated in the European Council and the European Parliament, after which it should be launched on 1 January 2021. In the programme, EGNSS related activities are currently covered within the Digital Industry cluster, Pillar 2: Global Challenges and Industrial Competitiveness, but there is a proposal from the Parliament and Council to have a dedicated Digital-Industry-Space cluster.

Fostering adoption, underpinning competitiveness

Within the Digital Industry pillar, EGNSS activities are structured as follows: innovative applications; global uptake; solutions improving robustness; authentication; integrity of services; and development of fundamental elements such as chipsets, receivers and antennas. Other activities focus on sustainability of supply chains, new technologies, work targeted at sustained exploitation of services to tackle societal challenges, and the development of next generation systems for new challenges such as security or autonomous driving. EGNSS related activities could also be covered in other Horizon Europe clusters and pillars.

Read thisInnovation procurement opportunities explored at Prague workshop

As the programme is currently being negotiated, now is the time to consult with stakeholders and agree on the EGNSS downstream R&D priorities for the next framework programme and to exploit new funding tools to increase the business impact of EGNSS. Moreover, the budget for EGNSS downstream applications in Horizon Europe needs to be secured in order to foster wide-scale EGNSS adoption and underpin the competitiveness of EU industry.

Review of requirements

The upcoming GSA workshop will provide a forum for this consultation, offering representatives from industry and academia the opportunity to discuss high-level EGNSS downstream R&D priorities. The workshop will kick off by taking a look at the status quo of the Horizon 2020 and Fundamental Elements funding mechanisms and then present how EGNSS downstream R&D is reflected in Horizon Europe. This will be followed by a discussion of EGNSS R&D User Requirements, with a review of inputs from the 2018 EGNSS User Consultation Platform by market segment. Finally, there will be an open discussion on high-level priorities for Horizon Europe.

You can now register to the workshop here. To help participants to prepare for the workshop, the GSA has prepared a questionnaire, which you can access here, along with the agenda for the workshop. For more information contact: com@gsa.europa.eu

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GSA workshop will review Horizon Europe EGNSS Downstream R&D priorities.

Galileo Masters 2019 open for submissions!

7.5.2019 10:26  
Published: 
07 May 2019

 

The 2019 edition of the Galileo Masters opened for submissions on May 1. Since it began in 2004, the Galileo Masters has scouted for the most forward‐thinking applications based on Galileo and EGNOS. Innovators and entrepreneurs are now invited to submit their innovative solutions to the competition by 31 July.

The Galileo Masters seeks to award applications, services and new ideas that use Galileo and EGNOS to respond to pressing challenges facing business and society. The most innovative solutions will be able to share in more than EUR 1 million worth of cash prizes. Sounds interesting? Then why not apply for this year’s competition? To register, click here.

In addition to the cash prizes, the winners will be able to take advantage of business development opportunities, tailored E-GNSS Accelerator business support packages worth EUR 62,000, a crowd funding campaign worth EUR 35,000, and much more.

Powered by GSA

New in the 2019 edition is a synergy challenge by the European GNSS Agency (GSA) and the European Commission, targeting solutions using Earth observation data combined with Galileo/EGNOS georeferenced data. In another new development, this year the competition is structured in two class categories– ‘Start-up of the Year’ and ‘Idea of the Year’ - both of which are sponsored by the GSA. The start-up category aims to identify the year’s best GNSS-enabled prototype, product or product idea by start-ups from around the world and help them to scale up; while the ideas class will encourage innovative solutions and help turn their ideas into reality.

“The GSA has been a partner of the Galileo Masters for 11 years already, and during this time the competition has consistently generated exciting ideas that leverage European GNSS to create economic opportunities and improve people’s lives. I am very interested to see what this year’s competition delivers, not only in terms of innovative EGNSS-based solutions, but also ideas that exploit the synergies between Galileo and Copernicus,” said GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides.

Special Prizes

In addition to the two general categories, participants also submit their solutions to be eligible for one of six special prizes:

  • Galileo-Copernicus Synergy Challenge;
  • Galileo 5G IoT Challenge;
  • DLR Artificial Intelligence Navigation Challenge;
  • University Challenge;
  • BMVI Special Prize; and
  • GNSS Living Lab Prize.

There is also a Regional Challenge, where participants can choose a challenge set by a regional partner from around the world that best matches their business case. The regional partner organisations include national space agencies, ministries, space clusters, universities, and incubators.

Make sure to register now, even if your idea is not fully formed - that way you can receive information about all the great support activities and additional opportunities that arise throughout the submission phase. Registration is free and available to participants all around the world. To find out more, click here.

  

Check out some previous winners of the Galileo Masters GSA Special Prize:

  

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

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