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Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS precise positioning can be used to effectively track and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Precise location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS precise location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS precise positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Precise positioning is key

The requirement for highly accurate and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the high-accuracy positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Apps leveraging GNSS precise positioning can be used to effectively track and map the spread of the virus.

Calling for GNSS apps supporting authorities and citizens in the COVID-19 emergency response and recovery

27.3.2020 11:29  
Apps leveraging GNSS precise positioning can be used to effectively track and map the spread of the virus.
Published: 
27 March 2020

Precise location is a key requirement when attempting to monitor and map the spread of a disease and GNSS is one of the main tools supporting this. Galileo, currently embedded in over 1.3 billion smartphones and devices worldwide, is helping to increase GNSS accuracy and availability, especially in urban areas. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this year, many apps have been developed that use GNSS precise location to monitor the global spread of the virus and to map outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. GNSS-apps are also proving their usefulness by helping people to implement social distancing in queues and other public spaces.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is compiling a repository of these apps as a knowledge bank of solutions that are being used to fight the pandemic. If you have developed an app that is already working and being used to map the spread of the coronavirus, to monitor incidences of the disease, or to alert users about possible risky contacts, tell us about it and we will include it in our database. We are also looking for practical apps that facilitate the daily lives of citizens, such as by helping them to manage queues in supermarkets, pharmacies and public spaces or by facilitating the logistics of goods, which has become more complicated in the current situation. 

We are looking for apps that are already working and available in app stores. Submit details of your solutions in writing to market@gsa.europa.eu and we will feature them on  www.useGalileo.eu/GNSS4Crisis. The goal is for this page to become a toolbox to help authorities, emergency response services, citizens and app developers to understand what resources are currently available and what needs remain unmet. 

Watch this: European GNSS Agency: Linking space to user needs 

“The coronavirus pandemic is one of the greatest challenges that we are facing as a global society and any effective response will require the use of all available tools. GNSS and apps that leverage GNSS precise positioning, including Galileo, our ‘made in Europe’ global navigation system, have a key role to play,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “It has always been a core function of the GSA to connect space applications to innovative ideas for the benefit of society. The database we are building now will become a resource for everybody to use, from citizens to organisations and authorities,” she said. 

Risk alert

Some examples of apps currently in use include Mapy.cz, a mapping application that has been updated to alert citizens to potential risky encounters through location sharing. User location data is anonymous and the developers are also working to obtain anonymous data about people who tested positive and compare it with the location of users. Advanced algorithms will then make it possible to identify cases of probable contacts with an infected person. 

Read this: Space is an enabler of security and defence 

Helping people deal with the constraints of lockdown, the Filaindiana (Italian for “single file) web app, which is currently operating only in Lombardy, allows users to check the length of queues in local supermarkets by using real-time crowd-sourced location data from users waiting to enter the supermarkets. This information allows citizens to plan their shopping responsibly and to avoid creating crowds and traffic bottlenecks in certain areas of the city. 

Precise positioning is key

The requirement for highly accurate and robust positioning in these and in similar apps is clear. Various approaches can be used to increase the robustness and precision of the solution. Dual frequency capability, a key Galileo differentiator, enables GNSS receivers to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. This provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. Other benefits include a reduced signal acquisition time, increased resistance to multipath interference, and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. 

Developers working in Android also have access to GNSS raw measurements. With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to users and these raw measurements can be used by developers to improve the positioning accuracy of their solutions. 

Share with us your apps and services that leverage these and other benefits of GNSS to provide the high-accuracy positioning needed to map, track, cope with and, hopefully, help halt the spread of this disease. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Apps leveraging GNSS precise positioning can be used to effectively track and map the spread of the virus.

Hackers take on Raw Galileo challenge

23.3.2020 12:24  
Raw Galileo targeted the use of GNSS raw measurements and high accuracy to produce innovative solutions.
Published: 
23 March 2020

Hackers came together online at the Raw Galileo 24-hour hackathon over the weekend to develop innovative solutions that leverage Galileo raw measurements for use on Android-based mobile devices. Organized by the University of Nottingham and the European GNSS Agency (GSA) as a part of the FLAMINGO project, the hackathon challenged the participants to develop solutions addressing two key challenges, enticing them with a prize pot of EUR 6000.

In the first of these, the FLAMINGO Navigation Challenge, the hackers were tasked with developing solutions that use Galileo and the high accuracy positioning and navigation services provided by FLAMINGO on an Android-based mobile device to enhance their existing applications or to develop new ones. 

First prize of EUR 1 800 in this challenge went to #VastMapping, an app that leverages Galileo and FLAMINGO accuracy to provide real time computer vision for asset mapping and management. Targeted at construction sites, the app will reduce costs due to loss of materials, support sharing of equipment and optimise on-site resource use.

While working on this challenge, the developers had access to the FLAMINGO API, which is designed to improve the accuracy of GNSS positioning in smartphones and IoT devices by utilising FLAMINGO services. 

Raw drive to innovation

“Access to raw measurements and advanced positioning solutions, like the FLAMINGO API, means that developers are now able to utilize services that were up until very recently available only in professional receivers,” said GSA Market Development Innovation Officer Martin Šunkevič. “The drive towards innovation that this access generates was very much in evidence at the Raw Galileo hackathon, and we were very impressed with the ideas and solutions that were developed,” he said.

Read this: Harnessing Galileo to shape the future of IoT

The second track – the FLAMINGO Verified Location Challenge – was oriented at demonstrating non-navigation use of GNSS raw measurements. This challenge targeted experienced programmers with no particular GNSS experience, with a view to seeing how they utilise raw measurements in a more complex ecosystem. The goal for the teams was to create their own system (user terminals + backend) that use GNSS raw measurements to verify position, using freely available tools and source code. 

First prize of EUR 1200 in this challenge went to the ClaimR app – a verified location signing service. Service providers currently request customers to verify their location when providing a service. This app verifies the customer’s location for the service provider and might be a useful tool against apps providing fake location.

And this: Looking for funding? The EIC may have something for you!

The Horizon 2020 FLAMINGO project is addressing the current trend for high precision positioning and navigation in the mass market and is working to achieve 50 cm accuracy on smartphones and wearables using PPP/RTK correction techniques applied to GNSS raw measurements. Within the project a special application interface (API) was developed for mobile developers, who can use it to test and use this increased accuracy. 

GNSS raw measurements

With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to smartphone users, allowing them to improve their positioning accuracy. Aware of the benefits to developers that these raw measurements offer, in June 2017 the GSA launched a GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force to share knowledge and expertise on Android raw measurements and their use, including their potential for robustness and high accuracy positioning techniques relevant to mass market applications. 

The Task Force includes more than 150 international GNSS experts, scientists and market players, all of whom are dedicated to promoting a wider use of these raw measurements. For more information on the Task Force, its members and their work, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Raw Galileo targeted the use of GNSS raw measurements and high accuracy to produce innovative solutions.

Hackers take on Raw Galileo challenge

23.3.2020 12:24  
Raw Galileo targeted the use of GNSS raw measurements and high accuracy to produce innovative solutions.
Published: 
23 March 2020

Hackers came together online at the Raw Galileo 24-hour hackathon over the weekend to develop innovative solutions that leverage Galileo raw measurements for use on Android-based mobile devices. Organized by the University of Nottingham and the European GNSS Agency (GSA) as a part of the FLAMINGO project, the hackathon challenged the participants to develop solutions addressing two key challenges, enticing them with a prize pot of EUR 6000.

In the first of these, the FLAMINGO Navigation Challenge, the hackers were tasked with developing solutions that use Galileo and the high accuracy positioning and navigation services provided by FLAMINGO on an Android-based mobile device to enhance their existing applications or to develop new ones. 

First prize of EUR 1 800 in this challenge went to #VastMapping, an app that leverages Galileo and FLAMINGO accuracy to provide real time computer vision for asset mapping and management. Targeted at construction sites, the app will reduce costs due to loss of materials, support sharing of equipment and optimise on-site resource use.

While working on this challenge, the developers had access to the FLAMINGO API, which is designed to improve the accuracy of GNSS positioning in smartphones and IoT devices by utilising FLAMINGO services. 

Raw drive to innovation

“Access to raw measurements and advanced positioning solutions, like the FLAMINGO API, means that developers are now able to utilize services that were up until very recently available only in professional receivers,” said GSA Market Development Innovation Officer Martin Šunkevič. “The drive towards innovation that this access generates was very much in evidence at the Raw Galileo hackathon, and we were very impressed with the ideas and solutions that were developed,” he said.

Read this: Harnessing Galileo to shape the future of IoT

The second track – the FLAMINGO Verified Location Challenge – was oriented at demonstrating non-navigation use of GNSS raw measurements. This challenge targeted experienced programmers with no particular GNSS experience, with a view to seeing how they utilise raw measurements in a more complex ecosystem. The goal for the teams was to create their own system (user terminals + backend) that use GNSS raw measurements to verify position, using freely available tools and source code. 

First prize of EUR 1200 in this challenge went to the ClaimR app – a verified location signing service. Service providers currently request customers to verify their location when providing a service. This app verifies the customer’s location for the service provider and might be a useful tool against apps providing fake location.

And this: Looking for funding? The EIC may have something for you!

The Horizon 2020 FLAMINGO project is addressing the current trend for high precision positioning and navigation in the mass market and is working to achieve 50 cm accuracy on smartphones and wearables using PPP/RTK correction techniques applied to GNSS raw measurements. Within the project a special application interface (API) was developed for mobile developers, who can use it to test and use this increased accuracy. 

GNSS raw measurements

With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to smartphone users, allowing them to improve their positioning accuracy. Aware of the benefits to developers that these raw measurements offer, in June 2017 the GSA launched a GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force to share knowledge and expertise on Android raw measurements and their use, including their potential for robustness and high accuracy positioning techniques relevant to mass market applications. 

The Task Force includes more than 150 international GNSS experts, scientists and market players, all of whom are dedicated to promoting a wider use of these raw measurements. For more information on the Task Force, its members and their work, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Raw Galileo targeted the use of GNSS raw measurements and high accuracy to produce innovative solutions.

Hackers take on Raw Galileo challenge

23.3.2020 12:24  
Raw Galileo targeted the use of GNSS raw measurements and high accuracy to produce innovative solutions.
Published: 
23 March 2020

Hackers came together online at the Raw Galileo 24-hour hackathon over the weekend to develop innovative solutions that leverage Galileo raw measurements for use on Android-based mobile devices. Organized by the University of Nottingham and the European GNSS Agency (GSA) as a part of the FLAMINGO project, the hackathon challenged the participants to develop solutions addressing two key challenges, enticing them with a prize pot of EUR 6000.

In the first of these, the FLAMINGO Navigation Challenge, the hackers were tasked with developing solutions that use Galileo and the high accuracy positioning and navigation services provided by FLAMINGO on an Android-based mobile device to enhance their existing applications or to develop new ones. 

First prize of EUR 1 800 in this challenge went to #VastMapping, an app that leverages Galileo and FLAMINGO accuracy to provide real time computer vision for asset mapping and management. Targeted at construction sites, the app will reduce costs due to loss of materials, support sharing of equipment and optimise on-site resource use.

While working on this challenge, the developers had access to the FLAMINGO API, which is designed to improve the accuracy of GNSS positioning in smartphones and IoT devices by utilising FLAMINGO services. 

Raw drive to innovation

“Access to raw measurements and advanced positioning solutions, like the FLAMINGO API, means that developers are now able to utilize services that were up until very recently available only in professional receivers,” said GSA Market Development Innovation Officer Martin Šunkevič. “The drive towards innovation that this access generates was very much in evidence at the Raw Galileo hackathon, and we were very impressed with the ideas and solutions that were developed,” he said.

Read this: Harnessing Galileo to shape the future of IoT

The second track – the FLAMINGO Verified Location Challenge – was oriented at demonstrating non-navigation use of GNSS raw measurements. This challenge targeted experienced programmers with no particular GNSS experience, with a view to seeing how they utilise raw measurements in a more complex ecosystem. The goal for the teams was to create their own system (user terminals + backend) that use GNSS raw measurements to verify position, using freely available tools and source code. 

First prize of EUR 1200 in this challenge went to the ClaimR app – a verified location signing service. Service providers currently request customers to verify their location when providing a service. This app verifies the customer’s location for the service provider and might be a useful tool against apps providing fake location.

And this: Fundamental Elements call targets shipborne double-frequency receivers

The Horizon 2020 FLAMINGO project is addressing the current trend for high precision positioning and navigation in the mass market and is working to achieve 50 cm accuracy on smartphones and wearables using PPP/RTK correction techniques applied to GNSS raw measurements. Within the project a special application interface (API) was developed for mobile developers, who can use it to test and use this increased accuracy. 

GNSS raw measurements

With the release of Android 7 (Nougat) in 2016, Google made GNSS raw measurements available to smartphone users, allowing them to improve their positioning accuracy. Aware of the benefits to developers that these raw measurements offer, in June 2017 the GSA launched a GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force to share knowledge and expertise on Android raw measurements and their use, including their potential for robustness and high accuracy positioning techniques relevant to mass market applications. 

The Task Force includes more than 150 international GNSS experts, scientists and market players, all of whom are dedicated to promoting a wider use of these raw measurements. For more information on the Task Force, its members and their work, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Raw Galileo targeted the use of GNSS raw measurements and high accuracy to produce innovative solutions.

Celebrating the GNSS surveying community

20.3.2020 21:07  
Users in the geomatics community are already very aware of the benefits that EGNSS offers.
Published: 
20 March 2020

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) joins the 2020 Global Surveyors Day, to celebrate the men and women of the surveying profession and their valuable work across a wide range of geomatics applications including land surveying (cadastral, construction, mapping and GIS, mining and infrastructure monitoring) and offshore surveying. The surveying industry and community have been an early adopter of Galileo and EGNOS leveraging on the high-precision positioning to develop new services and applications. 

The geomatics community has always supported and trusted the European GNSS, and this is confirmed by the gradual penetration of Galileo in GNSS receivers for surveying and mapping. Currently around 55% of GNSS surveying receivers already support Galileo and around 90% are EGNOS-enabled. Moreover, most RTK providers in Europe have already upgraded to Galileo or are starting to do so, and major PPP and PPP-RTK providers are following their example.

The 2019 GSA GNSS Market Report highlights the benefits of GNSS for the geomatics community, noting that geomatics professionals already benefit from EGNSS in a multi-constellation environment, where it provides higher availability, continuity, reliability and better results in harsh conditions. 

Watch this: EGNOS and Galileo for Mapping

“Geomatics is a key user segment for EGNSS, in which the added accuracy and reliability that Galileo and EGNOS bring to the table are a key driver of innovative services and solutions,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “We are working continuously with this user community to understand their needs and requirements, so we can ensure that future EGNSS evolutions adequately reflect these needs,” she said.

Research and development

A number of Horizon 2020-funded research projects aim to harness the benefits of EGNSS in targeted geomatics solutions. One such project is GIMS, which is building an advanced low-cost system based on EGNSS, Copernicus Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and other in-situ sensors to monitor ground deformations, with a focus on landslides and subsidence. 

The project’s goal is to provide detailed and timely knowledge of the geophysical behaviour of parts of the Earth surface, and its impact on structures, in order to prevent injury to the public in the event of landslides, for instance, and to better plan preventative maintenance. The system will report deformations with millimetre-level accuracy and the integration of in-situ accelerometers will give real-time alerts in case of sudden movements. 

Another project, GISCAD-OV, covers the entire cadastral value chain and aims to design, develop and validate an innovative and cost-effective High Accuracy Service (HAS) for Cadastral Surveying applications, based on GPS+Galileo E6 HAS and Precise Point Positioning-Ambiguity Resolution (PPP-AR) quick convergence techniques. 

It will achieve this by upgrading commercial GNSS receivers for decoding and applying Galileo E6 corrections and integrating them into the PPP solution. It will also use PPP-RTK Multiple Constellation and Multiple Carrier Ambiguity Resolution and instantaneous fixing, along with cost effective solutions using low-cost augmentation services and receivers, paving the way for “Smartphone Surveying”.

Success stories

While ongoing research is set to deliver some exciting developments for the geomatics community, EGNSS is already being successfully used in the sector. One success story is at Eustream, the operator of a high-pressure gas transmission system in the Slovak Republic. The company operates gas pipelines with an overall length of 2,273 km, which are regularly inspected. The operator’s field operators use handheld GNSS devices to directly locate specific pipes with the required precision.

Read this: Galileo and EGNOS: supporting effective disaster management

“Our pipelines are routed through rural areas and there are sites with no GPRS coverage. EGNOS helps us to achieve the required precision and fulfil our task even without Internet connection,” said Branislav Reťkovský, head of Eustream’s GIS department. “For us, EGNOS means a reliable, open and free-of-charge back-up solution that brings confidence to our land survey practice,” he said.

The Portuguese Cycling Federation is also aware of the benefits that EGNOS has to offer and has recommended the use of EGNOS for the creation of cycling tracks and marking of paths, thanks to the higher-precision geolocation it offers, in its Regulation for the Homologation of cycling routes and ‘Cyclin’ Portugal’ Centres”.

Engaging with stakeholders

The GSA engages in a systematic process of consultation with the surveying community, and based on this consultation, it produces The Report on Surveying User Needs and Requirements, which can be downloaded here.

On the occasion of Global Surveyors Day, the GSA would like to congratulate the men and women of the surveying profession. We thank you for your dedicated service and we look forward to our ongoing mutually-beneficial cooperation in the future.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Users in the geomatics community are already very aware of the benefits that EGNSS offers.

Celebrating the GNSS surveying community

20.3.2020 21:07  
Users in the geomatics community are already very aware of the benefits that EGNSS offers.
Published: 
20 March 2020

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) joins the 2020 Global Surveyors Day, to celebrate the men and women of the surveying profession and their valuable work across a wide range of geomatics applications including land surveying (cadastral, construction, mapping and GIS, mining and infrastructure monitoring) and offshore surveying. The surveying industry and community have been an early adopter of Galileo and EGNOS leveraging on the high-precision positioning to develop new services and applications. 

The geomatics community has always supported and trusted the European GNSS, and this is confirmed by the gradual penetration of Galileo in GNSS receivers for surveying and mapping. Currently around 55% of GNSS surveying receivers already support Galileo and around 90% are EGNOS-enabled. Moreover, most RTK providers in Europe have already upgraded to Galileo or are starting to do so, and major PPP and PPP-RTK providers are following their example.

The 2019 GSA GNSS Market Report highlights the benefits of GNSS for the geomatics community, noting that geomatics professionals already benefit from EGNSS in a multi-constellation environment, where it provides higher availability, continuity, reliability and better results in harsh conditions. 

Watch this: EGNOS and Galileo for Mapping

“Geomatics is a key user segment for EGNSS, in which the added accuracy and reliability that Galileo and EGNOS bring to the table are a key driver of innovative services and solutions,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani. “We are working continuously with this user community to understand their needs and requirements, so we can ensure that future EGNSS evolutions adequately reflect these needs,” she said.

Research and development

A number of Horizon 2020-funded research projects aim to harness the benefits of EGNSS in targeted geomatics solutions. One such project is GIMS, which is building an advanced low-cost system based on EGNSS, Copernicus Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and other in-situ sensors to monitor ground deformations, with a focus on landslides and subsidence. 

The project’s goal is to provide detailed and timely knowledge of the geophysical behaviour of parts of the Earth surface, and its impact on structures, in order to prevent injury to the public in the event of landslides, for instance, and to better plan preventative maintenance. The system will report deformations with millimetre-level accuracy and the integration of in-situ accelerometers will give real-time alerts in case of sudden movements. 

Another project, GISCAD-OV, covers the entire cadastral value chain and aims to design, develop and validate an innovative and cost-effective High Accuracy Service (HAS) for Cadastral Surveying applications, based on GPS+Galileo E6 HAS and Precise Point Positioning-Ambiguity Resolution (PPP-AR) quick convergence techniques. 

It will achieve this by upgrading commercial GNSS receivers for decoding and applying Galileo E6 corrections and integrating them into the PPP solution. It will also use PPP-RTK Multiple Constellation and Multiple Carrier Ambiguity Resolution and instantaneous fixing, along with cost effective solutions using low-cost augmentation services and receivers, paving the way for “Smartphone Surveying”.

Success stories

While ongoing research is set to deliver some exciting developments for the geomatics community, EGNSS is already being successfully used in the sector. One success story is at Eustream, the operator of a high-pressure gas transmission system in the Slovak Republic. The company operates gas pipelines with an overall length of 2,273 km, which are regularly inspected. The operator’s field operators use handheld GNSS devices to directly locate specific pipes with the required precision.

Read this: Galileo and EGNOS: supporting effective disaster management

“Our pipelines are routed through rural areas and there are sites with no GPRS coverage. EGNOS helps us to achieve the required precision and fulfil our task even without Internet connection,” said Branislav Reťkovský, head of Eustream’s GIS department. “For us, EGNOS means a reliable, open and free-of-charge back-up solution that brings confidence to our land survey practice,” he said.

The Portuguese Cycling Federation is also aware of the benefits that EGNOS has to offer and has recommended the use of EGNOS for the creation of cycling tracks and marking of paths, thanks to the higher-precision geolocation it offers, in its Regulation for the Homologation of cycling routes and ‘Cyclin’ Portugal’ Centres”.

Engaging with stakeholders

The GSA engages in a systematic process of consultation with the surveying community, and based on this consultation, it produces The Report on Surveying User Needs and Requirements, which can be downloaded here.

On the occasion of Global Surveyors Day, the GSA would like to congratulate the men and women of the surveying profession. We thank you for your dedicated service and we look forward to our ongoing mutually-beneficial cooperation in the future.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Users in the geomatics community are already very aware of the benefits that EGNSS offers.

Harnessing Galileo to shape the future of IoT

16.3.2020 9:15  
Point.IoT aims to leverage Galileo to drive innovation in IoT.
Published: 
16 March 2020

Point.IoT, an exciting new programme designed to empower innovation using Galileo and IoT technologies, is offering 10 teams of ambitious entrepreneurs the chance to tackle relevant industry challenges while showcasing the use of European positioning technologies in IoT. The winning team stands to win a cash prize of EUR 20,000. Interested? Apply here!

The Point.IoT competition is centred on two challenges, which were reached following a careful study of where Galileo can make a positive impact on IoT. The first of the challenges asks the teams to design and develop the next generation of asset tracking and management solutions for industries with large-scale infrastructure, such as airports, construction sites and power stations.

As part of the second challenge, the teams are tasked with designing and developing a real-time risk and location monitoring device that can be worn on or around the body to improve personal safety in the workplace. This solution will increase safety because, when site managers can better understand the movements of their personnel, they can create a safer environment for everyone on site.

Essential tools

The Point.IoT programme kicks off with a two-day, action-packed boot camp in Paris, France, where the teams will acquire some essential tools for their work ahead. The teams will also have the opportunity to meet with industry experts who will become their lead, business and technical mentors to guide them on their solution development journey.

Read this: Looking for funding? The EIC may have something for you!

Then the teams will return home for a three-month virtual sprint, during which they will receive one-on-one coaching from industry experts to ensure their solutions are both technically robust and strategically positioned for market success. 

Exciting opportunities

Point.IoT culminates in a demo day, where the teams will have the opportunity to showcase their developments. All the teams will pitch their solutions to the jury, which will evaluate each team’s solution and decide on the overall winner and the EUR 20,000 cash prize recipient. 

Watch This: #MyGalileoApp Final

It’s not only money that’s on offer however. The jury will also select five teams to take part in a leading investor roadshow. The programme also offers excellent networking, with the teams being introduced to the programme’s corporate partners and maybe even to their first customers. So, if you have an idea for an IoT solution that harnesses Galileo, don’t miss out on this exciting opportunity and sign up before 24 May 2020.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).
Point.IoT aims to leverage Galileo to drive innovation in IoT.

Farming by Satellite 2020: on your marks, get set, applications open on 16 March

13.3.2020 9:57  
The competition aims to promote agricultural efficiency through the use of space tech.
Published: 
13 March 2020

Registration for the 5th Farming by Satellite Prize, which aims to promote the use of EGNSS and Earth observation in European and African agriculture, will open on 16 March. If you are a young innovator with an idea for using satellite technologies to enable sustainable farming practices, improve efficiency in agriculture and reduce its environmental impact, this is your chance to win some great prizes!

Innovation is crucial if the agricultural sector is to grow sustainably and meet emerging global challenges such as feeding a growing population and adapting to and mitigating the impacts of climate change. With these challenges in mind, the Farming by Satellite Prize encourages young professionals, farmers and students in Europe to create new, sustainable, and environmentally friendly solutions using Copernicus, EGNOS and Galileo. 

Special Africa Prize

The 2020 edition of the Farming by Satellite Prize includes a Special Africa Prize, which aims to encourage young Africans to develop satellite-based solutions that cater to the specific needs and resources of communities and lands in Africa. The Farming by Satellite Prize is a joint initiative between the European GNSS Agency (GSA) and the European Environmental Agency (EEA). 

“Agriculture has been an enthusiastic early adopter of satellite technologies to improve performance in the sector. The Farming by Satellite prize aims to tap into this thirst for innovation and support young innovators in delivering applications and services based on Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus that will contribute to the evolution of agriculture and to meeting some of the critical challenges facing the global community,” said GSA Acting Executive Director Pascal Claudel.

Watch this: European Satellites for Agriculture

“It is clear that we need to make food production much more sustainable and lessen its impact on the environment and climate. Satellite data, technology and innovation can support this change, which is why partnering with this initiative aligns well with the EEA’s commitment to protecting our nature, climate and human health,” said EEA Executive Director Hans Bruyninckx.

An amazing experience

Applicants can take part as individuals or as a team and are invited to register online between March 16 and June 14, 2020. The top teams selected as finalists will enter the competition’s deep dive phase. A total prize purse of EUR 10,000 will be distributed among the top four teams (three in Europe and one in Africa). 

First prize in the 2018 edition of the competition went to Teagasc, the Irish Agriculture and Food Development Authority, for FODDERApp a mobile app for grass and grazing management. Commenting at the time, Teagasc team member Gabriela Afrasinei said: “This was an amazing experience; we really enjoyed brainstorming and developing the idea back in Ireland, and meeting all the other finalists and judges was fantastic! We hope to keep these connections in the years to come.” 

The 2020 edition of the Farming by Satellite Prize is supported by industry partners such as the agricultural engineering company CLAAS. For more information on the competition, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The competition aims to promote agricultural efficiency through the use of space tech.

Farming by Satellite 2020: on your marks, get set, applications open on 16 March

13.3.2020 9:57  
The competition aims to promote agricultural efficiency through the use of space tech.
Published: 
13 March 2020

Registration for the 5th Farming by Satellite Prize, which aims to promote the use of EGNSS and Earth observation in European and African agriculture, will open on 16 March. If you are a young innovator with an idea for using satellite technologies to enable sustainable farming practices, improve efficiency in agriculture and reduce its environmental impact, this is your chance to win some great prizes!

Innovation is crucial if the agricultural sector is to grow sustainably and meet emerging global challenges such as feeding a growing population and adapting to and mitigating the impacts of climate change. With these challenges in mind, the Farming by Satellite Prize encourages young professionals, farmers and students in Europe to create new, sustainable, and environmentally friendly solutions using Copernicus, EGNOS and Galileo. 

Special Africa Prize

The 2020 edition of the Farming by Satellite Prize includes a Special Africa Prize, which aims to encourage young Africans to develop satellite-based solutions that cater to the specific needs and resources of communities and lands in Africa. The Farming by Satellite Prize is a joint initiative between the European GNSS Agency (GSA) and the European Environmental Agency (EEA). 

“Agriculture has been an enthusiastic early adopter of satellite technologies to improve performance in the sector. The Farming by Satellite prize aims to tap into this thirst for innovation and support young innovators in delivering applications and services based on Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus that will contribute to the evolution of agriculture and to meeting some of the critical challenges facing the global community,” said GSA Acting Executive Director Pascal Claudel.

Watch this: European Satellites for Agriculture

“It is clear that we need to make food production much more sustainable and lessen its impact on the environment and climate. Satellite data, technology and innovation can support this change, which is why partnering with this initiative aligns well with the EEA’s commitment to protecting our nature, climate and human health,” said EEA Executive Director Hans Bruyninckx.

An amazing experience

Applicants can take part as individuals or as a team and are invited to register online between March 16 and June 15, 2020. The top teams selected as finalists will enter the competition’s deep dive phase. A total prize purse of EUR 10,000 will be distributed among the top four teams (three in Europe and one in Africa). 

First prize in the 2018 edition of the competition went to Teagasc, the Irish Agriculture and Food Development Authority, for FODDERApp a mobile app for grass and grazing management. Commenting at the time, Teagasc team member Gabriela Afrasinei said: “This was an amazing experience; we really enjoyed brainstorming and developing the idea back in Ireland, and meeting all the other finalists and judges was fantastic! We hope to keep these connections in the years to come.” 

The 2020 edition of the Farming by Satellite Prize is supported by industry partners such as the agricultural engineering company CLAAS. For more information on the competition, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The competition aims to promote agricultural efficiency through the use of space tech.

Farming by Satellite 2020: on your marks, get set, applications open on 16 March

13.3.2020 9:57  
The competition aims to promote agricultural efficiency through the use of space tech.
Published: 
13 March 2020

Registration for the 5th Farming by Satellite Prize, which aims to promote the use of EGNSS and Earth observation in European and African agriculture, will open on 16 March. If you are a young innovator with an idea for using satellite technologies to enable sustainable farming practices, improve efficiency in agriculture and reduce its environmental impact, this is your chance to win some great prizes!

Innovation is crucial if the agricultural sector is to grow sustainably and meet emerging global challenges such as feeding a growing population and adapting to and mitigating the impacts of climate change. With these challenges in mind, the Farming by Satellite Prize encourages young professionals, farmers and students in Europe to create new, sustainable, and environmentally friendly solutions using Copernicus, EGNOS and Galileo. 

Special Africa Prize

The 2020 edition of the Farming by Satellite Prize includes a Special Africa Prize, which aims to encourage young Africans to develop satellite-based solutions that cater to the specific needs and resources of communities and lands in Africa. The Farming by Satellite Prize is a joint initiative between the European GNSS Agency (GSA) and the European Environmental Agency (EEA). 

“Agriculture has been an enthusiastic early adopter of satellite technologies to improve performance in the sector. The Farming by Satellite prize aims to tap into this thirst for innovation and support young innovators in delivering applications and services based on Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus that will contribute to the evolution of agriculture and to meeting some of the critical challenges facing the global community,” said GSA Acting Executive Director Pascal Claudel.

Watch this: European Satellites for Agriculture

“It is clear that we need to make food production much more sustainable and lessen its impact on the environment and climate. Satellite data, technology and innovation can support this change, which is why partnering with this initiative aligns well with the EEA’s commitment to protecting our nature, climate and human health,” said EEA Executive Director Hans Bruyninckx.

An amazing experience

Applicants can take part as individuals or as a team and are invited to register online between March 16 and June 15, 2020. The top teams selected as finalists will enter the competition’s deep dive phase. A total prize purse of EUR 10,000 will be distributed among the top four teams (three in Europe and one in Africa). 

First prize in the 2018 edition of the competition went to Teagasc, the Irish Agriculture and Food Development Authority, for FODDERApp a mobile app for grass and grazing management. Commenting at the time, Teagasc team member Gabriela Afrasinei said: “This was an amazing experience; we really enjoyed brainstorming and developing the idea back in Ireland, and meeting all the other finalists and judges was fantastic! We hope to keep these connections in the years to come.” 

The 2020 edition of the Farming by Satellite Prize is supported by industry partners such as the agricultural engineering company CLAAS. For more information on the competition, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The competition aims to promote agricultural efficiency through the use of space tech.

Farming by Satellite 2020: on your marks, get set, applications open on 16 March

13.3.2020 9:57  
The competition aims to promote agricultural efficiency through the use of space tech.
Published: 
13 March 2020

Registration for the 5th Farming by Satellite Prize, which aims to promote the use of EGNSS and Earth observation in European and African agriculture, will open on 16 March. If you are a young innovator with an idea for using satellite technologies to enable sustainable farming practices, improve efficiency in agriculture and reduce its environmental impact, this is your chance to win some great prizes!

Innovation is crucial if the agricultural sector is to grow sustainably and meet emerging global challenges such as feeding a growing population and adapting to and mitigating the impacts of climate change. With these challenges in mind, the Farming by Satellite Prize encourages young professionals, farmers and students in Europe to create new, sustainable, and environmentally friendly solutions using Copernicus, EGNOS and Galileo. 

Special Africa Prize

The 2020 edition of the Farming by Satellite Prize includes a Special Africa Prize, which aims to encourage young Africans to develop satellite-based solutions that cater to the specific needs and resources of communities and lands in Africa. The Farming by Satellite Prize is a joint initiative between the European GNSS Agency (GSA) and the European Environmental Agency (EEA). 

“Agriculture has been an enthusiastic early adopter of satellite technologies to improve performance in the sector. The Farming by Satellite prize aims to tap into this thirst for innovation and support young innovators in delivering applications and services based on Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus that will contribute to the evolution of agriculture and to meeting some of the critical challenges facing the global community,” said GSA Acting Executive Director Pascal Claudel.

Watch this: European Satellites for Agriculture

“It is clear that we need to make food production much more sustainable and lessen its impact on the environment and climate. Satellite data, technology and innovation can support this change, which is why partnering with this initiative aligns well with the EEA’s commitment to protecting our nature, climate and human health,” said EEA Executive Director Hans Bruyninckx.

An amazing experience

Applicants can take part as individuals or as a team and are invited to register online between March 16 and June 15, 2020. The top teams selected as finalists will enter the competition’s deep dive phase. A total prize purse of EUR 10,000 will be distributed among the top four teams (three in Europe and one in Africa). 

First prize in the 2018 edition of the competition went to Teagasc, the Irish Agriculture and Food Development Authority, for FODDERApp a mobile app for grass and grazing management. Commenting at the time, Teagasc team member Gabriela Afrasinei said: “This was an amazing experience; we really enjoyed brainstorming and developing the idea back in Ireland, and meeting all the other finalists and judges was fantastic! We hope to keep these connections in the years to come.” 

The 2020 edition of the Farming by Satellite Prize is supported by industry partners such as the agricultural engineering company CLAAS. For more information on the competition, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The competition aims to promote agricultural efficiency through the use of space tech.

Farming by Satellite 2020: on your marks, get set, applications open on 16 March

13.3.2020 9:57  
The competition aims to promote agricultural efficiency through the use of space tech.
Published: 
13 March 2020

Registration for the 5th Farming by Satellite Prize, which aims to promote the use of EGNSS and Earth observation in European and African agriculture, will open on 16 March. If you are a young innovator with an idea for using satellite technologies to enable sustainable farming practices, improve efficiency in agriculture and reduce its environmental impact, this is your chance to win some great prizes!

Innovation is crucial if the agricultural sector is to grow sustainably and meet emerging global challenges such as feeding a growing population and adapting to and mitigating the impacts of climate change. With these challenges in mind, the Farming by Satellite Prize encourages young professionals, farmers and students in Europe to create new, sustainable, and environmentally friendly solutions using Copernicus, EGNOS and Galileo. 

Special Africa Prize

The 2020 edition of the Farming by Satellite Prize includes a Special Africa Prize, which aims to encourage young Africans to develop satellite-based solutions that cater to the specific needs and resources of communities and lands in Africa. The Farming by Satellite Prize is a joint initiative between the European GNSS Agency (GSA) and the European Environmental Agency (EEA). 

“Agriculture has been an enthusiastic early adopter of satellite technologies to improve performance in the sector. The Farming by Satellite prize aims to tap into this thirst for innovation and support young innovators in delivering applications and services based on Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus that will contribute to the evolution of agriculture and to meeting some of the critical challenges facing the global community,” said GSA Acting Executive Director Pascal Claudel.

Watch this: European Satellites for Agriculture

“It is clear that we need to make food production much more sustainable and lessen its impact on the environment and climate. Satellite data, technology and innovation can support this change, which is why partnering with this initiative aligns well with the EEA’s commitment to protecting our nature, climate and human health,” said EEA Executive Director Hans Bruyninckx.

An amazing experience

Applicants can take part as individuals or as a team and are invited to register online between March 16 and June 15, 2020. The top teams selected as finalists will enter the competition’s deep dive phase. A total prize purse of EUR 10,000 will be distributed among the top four teams (three in Europe and one in Africa). 

First prize in the 2018 edition of the competition went to Teagasc, the Irish Agriculture and Food Development Authority, for FODDERApp a mobile app for grass and grazing management. Commenting at the time, Teagasc team member Gabriela Afrasinei said: “This was an amazing experience; we really enjoyed brainstorming and developing the idea back in Ireland, and meeting all the other finalists and judges was fantastic! We hope to keep these connections in the years to come.” 

The 2020 edition of the Farming by Satellite Prize is supported by industry partners such as the agricultural engineering company CLAAS. For more information on the competition, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The competition aims to promote agricultural efficiency through the use of space tech.

Harnessing Galileo to shape the future of IoT

12.3.2020 12:15  
Point.IoT aims to leverage Galileo to drive innovation in IoT.
Published: 
12 March 2020

Point.IoT, an exciting new programme designed to empower innovation using Galileo and IoT technologies, is offering 10 teams of ambitious entrepreneurs the chance to tackle relevant industry challenges while showcasing the use of European positioning technologies in IoT. The winning team stands to win a cash prize of EUR 20,000. Interested? Apply here!

The Point.IoT competition is centred on two challenges, which were reached following a careful study of where Galileo can make a positive impact on IoT. The first of the challenges asks the teams to design and develop the next generation of asset tracking and management solutions for industries with large-scale infrastructure, such as airports, construction sites and power stations.

As part of the second challenge, the teams are tasked with designing and developing a real-time risk and location monitoring device that can be worn on or around the body to improve personal safety in the workplace. This solution will increase safety because, when site managers can better understand the movements of their personnel, they can create a safer environment for everyone on site.

Essential tools

The Point.IoT programme kicks off with a two-day, action-packed boot camp in Paris, France, where the teams will acquire some essential tools for their work ahead. The teams will also have the opportunity to meet with industry experts who will become their lead, business and technical mentors to guide them on their solution development journey.

Read this: Looking for funding? The EIC may have something for you!

Then the teams will return home for a three-month virtual sprint, during which they will receive one-on-one coaching from industry experts to ensure their solutions are both technically robust and strategically positioned for market success. 

Exciting opportunities

Point.IoT culminates in a demo day, where the teams will have the opportunity to showcase their developments. All the teams will pitch their solutions to the jury, which will evaluate each team’s solution and decide on the overall winner and the EUR 20,000 cash prize recipient. 

Watch This: #MyGalileoApp Final

It’s not only money that’s on offer however. The jury will also select five teams to take part in a leading investor roadshow. The programme also offers excellent networking, with the teams being introduced to the programme’s corporate partners and maybe even to their first customers. So, if you have an idea for an IoT solution that harnesses Galileo, don’t miss out on this exciting opportunity and sign up before 24 May 2020.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).
Point.IoT aims to leverage Galileo to drive innovation in IoT.

Harnessing Galileo to shape the future of IoT

12.3.2020 12:15  
Point.IoT aims to leverage Galileo to drive innovation in IoT.
Published: 
12 March 2020

Point.IoT, an exciting new programme designed to empower innovation using Galileo and IoT technologies, is offering 10 teams of ambitious entrepreneurs the chance to tackle relevant industry challenges while showcasing the use of European positioning technologies in IoT. The winning team stands to win a cash prize of EUR 20,000. Interested? Apply here!

The Point.IoT competition is centred on two challenges, which were reached following a careful study of where Galileo can make a positive impact on IoT. The first of the challenges asks the teams to design and develop the next generation of asset tracking and management solutions for industries with large-scale infrastructure, such as airports, construction sites and power stations.

As part of the second challenge, the teams are tasked with designing and developing a real-time risk and location monitoring device that can be worn on or around the body to improve personal safety in the workplace. This solution will increase safety because, when site managers can better understand the movements of their personnel, they can create a safer environment for everyone on site.

Essential tools

The Point.IoT programme kicks off with a two-day, action-packed boot camp in Paris, France, where the teams will acquire some essential tools for their work ahead. The teams will also have the opportunity to meet with industry experts who will become their lead, business and technical mentors to guide them on their solution development journey.

Read this: Looking for funding? The EIC may have something for you!

Then the teams will return home for a three-month virtual sprint, during which they will receive one-on-one coaching from industry experts to ensure their solutions are both technically robust and strategically positioned for market success. 

Exciting opportunities

Point.IoT culminates in a demo day, where the teams will have the opportunity to showcase their developments. All the teams will pitch their solutions to the jury, which will evaluate each team’s solution and decide on the overall winner and the EUR 20,000 cash prize recipient. 

Watch This: #MyGalileoApp Final

It’s not only money that’s on offer however. The jury will also select five teams to take part in a leading investor roadshow. The programme also offers excellent networking, with the teams being introduced to the programme’s corporate partners and maybe even to their first customers. So, if you have an idea for an IoT solution that harnesses Galileo, don’t miss out on this exciting opportunity and sign up before 24 May 2020.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).
Point.IoT aims to leverage Galileo to drive innovation in IoT.

Galileo Return Link Service delivers excellent performance

11.3.2020 10:02  
The SAR/Galileo Forward and Return Link Services comfortably exceed set targets.
Published: 
11 March 2020

The first performance evaluation of the Galileo Return Link Service (RLS) following its launch has revealed excellent service provision that exceeds set targets. The Galileo RLS, which allows people in distress to receive automatic acknowledgement that their signal has been received, was declared operational at the 12th European Space Conference on January 21.

The Galileo Search and Rescue (SAR) Service locates people in distress and makes their position known to Rescue Coordination Centres worldwide. At the same time as the launch of the RLS, new targets were also set in January for the SAR/Galileo Forward Link Service, which was declared operational in December 2016. 

Excellent performance

For the Galileo Forward Link Service, the new targets aim for 99% service availability and 95% location accuracy within 5 km. Over the first month under the new regime, both parameters were comfortably exceeded reaching 99.9% and 99.8% respectively.

Read this: Successful Galileo Return Link demonstration with market-ready beacon

During the same period, the Galileo Return Link Service was available 100% of the time, above the target value of 95%. On average, the Galileo system took 37 seconds to deliver automatic acknowledgement to the beacon. This is significantly better than the target value of 15 minutes, which was achieved 99.61% of the time.

Global service

The Galileo Return Link Service (RLS) is a free-of-charge global service available to Cospas-Sarsat RLS compatible beacons. The new functionality, currently offered uniquely by Galileo, enables a communication link that relays Return Link Messages (RLM) back to the originating beacon through the Galileo Navigation Signal in Space (I/NAV E1) – for more information, see the updated SAR/Galileo Service Definition Document. The GSA in its role as service provider is continuously monitoring the services provided by the Galileo system, including the Galileo SAR service. 

Galileo SAR users that would like to receive more information about the service can send their inquiries to the European GNSS Service Centre Help Desk at: https://www.gsc-europa.eu/.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The SAR/Galileo Forward and Return Link Services comfortably exceed set targets.

GSA to host EO4AGRI workshop

2.3.2020 12:23  
EO can help improve the efficiency and of agricultural production reduce its environmental impact.
Published: 
02 March 2020

Space applications in support of more efficient agricultural operations and optimised food processing in Europe will be in focus at the EO4AGRI workshop, to be held at the European GNSS Agency’s (GSA) Prague headquarters on 16-17 March.

EO4AGRI will be structured into four main panel discussions spread across the two days of the workshop. These discussion blocks will target stakeholders from the AgriFood industry, the financial and insurance sector and the agricultural public sector, along with food and nutrition security stakeholders. 

Leveraging EU investment

EO4AGRI aims to improve Europe’s agriculture monitoring capacity based on information derived from Copernicus Earth observation and the use of geospatial and socio-economic information services. With this goal in mind, EO4AGRI is working with farmers, farmer associations and the agro-food industry to develop specifications for data-driven farming services, with a view to leveraging the EU’s investments in Copernicus Data and Information Access Services (DIAS).

In particular, EO4AGRI helps with the implementation of the EU Common Agricultural Policy (CAP), particularly in light of the planned CAP2020 reform. The project also helps farmers meet the requirements of Paying Agencies, and supports them in implementing Integrated Administration and Control System (IACS) processes. 

Read this: EGNSS and agriculture – a win-win relationship

Within the context of discussions on CAP at the workshop, the GSA will also present its EGNSS4CAP app. This is a mobile app for Android that digitises procedures for farmers in the EU, helping them to meet their reporting requirements under the current and reformed CAP. The GSA is also supporting the EC in its efforts to integrate the EGNSS4CAP app with the Farm Sustainability Tool for Nutrients (FaST), which aims to facilitate a sustainable use of fertilisers while boosting the digitisation of the agricultural sector in the EU.

Watch this: Tractor Navigator. 2nd place winner at #MyGalileoApp Competition

The conclusions and recommendations from the workshop will help shape future data and services in Earth Observation and will feed into the evolution of the next generation of Copernicus Sentinel satellites.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).
EO can help improve the efficiency and of agricultural production reduce its environmental impact.

GSA to host EO4AGRI workshop

2.3.2020 12:23  
EO can help improve the efficiency and of agricultural production reduce its environmental impact.
Published: 
02 March 2020

Space applications in support of more efficient agricultural operations and optimised food processing in Europe will be in focus at the EO4AGRI workshop, to be held at the European GNSS Agency’s (GSA) Prague headquarters on 16-17 March.

EO4AGRI will be structured into four main panel discussions spread across the two days of the workshop. These discussion blocks will target stakeholders from the AgriFood industry, the financial and insurance sector and the agricultural public sector, along with food and nutrition security stakeholders. 

Leveraging EU investment

EO4AGRI aims to improve Europe’s agriculture monitoring capacity based on information derived from Copernicus Earth observation and the use of geospatial and socio-economic information services. With this goal in mind, EO4AGRI is working with farmers, farmer associations and the agro-food industry to develop specifications for data-driven farming services, with a view to leveraging the EU’s investments in Copernicus Data and Information Access Services (DIAS).

In particular, EO4AGRI helps with the implementation of the EU Common Agricultural Policy (CAP), particularly in light of the planned CAP2020 reform. The project also helps farmers meet the requirements of Paying Agencies, and supports them in implementing Integrated Administration and Control System (IACS) processes. 

Read this: EGNSS and agriculture – a win-win relationship

Within the context of discussions on CAP at the workshop, the GSA will also present its EGNSS4CAP app. This is a mobile app for Android that digitises procedures for farmers in the EU, helping them to meet their reporting requirements under the current and reformed CAP. The GSA is also supporting the EC in its efforts to integrate the EGNSS4CAP app with the Farm Sustainability Tool for Nutrients (FaST), which aims to facilitate a sustainable use of fertilisers while boosting the digitisation of the agricultural sector in the EU.

Watch this: Tractor Navigator. 2nd place winner at #MyGalileoApp Competition

The conclusions and recommendations from the workshop will help shape future data and services in Earth Observation and will feed into the evolution of the next generation of Copernicus Sentinel satellites.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).
EO can help improve the efficiency and of agricultural production reduce its environmental impact.

GSA to host EO4AGRI workshop

2.3.2020 12:23  
Space applications can help improve the efficiency and of agricultural production reduce its environmental impact.
Published: 
02 March 2020

Space applications in support of more efficient agricultural operations and optimised food processing in Europe will be in focus at the EO4AGRI workshop, to be held at the European GNSS Agency’s (GSA) Prague headquarters on 16-17 March.

EO4AGRI will be structured into four main panel discussions spread across the two days of the workshop. These discussion blocks will target stakeholders from the AgriFood industry, the financial and insurance sector and the agricultural public sector, along with food and nutrition security stakeholders. 

Leveraging EU investment

EO4AGRI aims to improve Europe’s agriculture monitoring capacity based on information derived from Copernicus Earth observation and the use of geospatial and socio-economic information services. With this goal in mind, EO4AGRI is working with farmers, farmer associations and the agro-food industry to develop specifications for data-driven farming services, with a view to leveraging the EU’s investments in Copernicus Data and Information Access Services (DIAS).

In particular, EO4AGRI helps with the implementation of the EU Common Agricultural Policy (CAP), particularly in light of the planned CAP2020 reform. The project also helps farmers meet the requirements of Paying Agencies, and supports them in implementing Integrated Administration and Control System (IACS) processes. 

Read this: EGNSS and agriculture – a win-win relationship

Within the context of discussions on CAP at the workshop, the GSA will also present its EGNSS4CAP app. This is a mobile app for Android that digitises procedures for farmers in the EU, helping them to meet their reporting requirements under the current and reformed CAP. The GSA is also supporting the EC in its efforts to integrate the EGNSS4CAP app with the Farm Sustainability Tool for Nutrients (FaST), which aims to facilitate a sustainable use of fertilisers while boosting the digitisation of the agricultural sector in the EU.

Watch this: Tractor Navigator. 2nd place winner at #MyGalileoApp Competition

The conclusions and recommendations from the workshop will help shape future data and services in Earth Observation and will feed into the evolution of the next generation of Copernicus Sentinel satellites.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).
Space applications can help improve the efficiency and of agricultural production reduce its environmental impact.

GSA to host EO4AGRI workshop

2.3.2020 12:23  
Space applications can help improve the efficiency of agricultural production and reduce its environmental impact.
Published: 
02 March 2020

Space applications in support of more efficient agricultural operations and optimised food processing in Europe will be in focus at the EO4AGRI workshop, to be held at the European GNSS Agency’s (GSA) Prague headquarters on 16-17 March.

EO4AGRI will be structured into four main panel discussions spread across the two days of the workshop. These discussion blocks will target stakeholders from the AgriFood industry, the financial and insurance sector and the agricultural public sector, along with food and nutrition security stakeholders. 

Leveraging EU investment

EO4AGRI aims to improve Europe’s agriculture monitoring capacity based on information derived from Copernicus Earth observation and the use of geospatial and socio-economic information services. With this goal in mind, EO4AGRI is working with farmers, farmer associations and the agro-food industry to develop specifications for data-driven farming services, with a view to leveraging the EU’s investments in Copernicus Data and Information Access Services (DIAS).

In particular, EO4AGRI helps with the implementation of the EU Common Agricultural Policy (CAP), particularly in light of the planned CAP2020 reform. The project also helps farmers meet the requirements of Paying Agencies, and supports them in implementing Integrated Administration and Control System (IACS) processes. 

Read this: EGNSS and agriculture – a win-win relationship

Within the context of discussions on CAP at the workshop, the GSA will also present its EGNSS4CAP app. This is a mobile app for Android that digitises procedures for farmers in the EU, helping them to meet their reporting requirements under the current and reformed CAP. The GSA is also supporting the EC in its efforts to integrate the EGNSS4CAP app with the Farm Sustainability Tool for Nutrients (FaST), which aims to facilitate a sustainable use of fertilisers while boosting the digitisation of the agricultural sector in the EU.

Watch this: Tractor Navigator. 2nd place winner at #MyGalileoApp Competition

The conclusions and recommendations from the workshop will help shape future data and services in Earth Observation and will feed into the evolution of the next generation of Copernicus Sentinel satellites.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).
Space applications can help improve the efficiency of agricultural production and reduce its environmental impact.

Fundamental Elements call targets shipborne double-frequency receivers

27.2.2020 11:17  
Published: 
27 February 2020

The European GNSS Agency’s (GSA) has recently launched a call for proposals under its Fundamental Elements funding mechanism targeting the development of a shipborne dual-frequency multi-constellation (DFMC) receiver that leverages the differentiators of European GNSS (EGNOS and Galileo).

The call for proposals is split into two lots, the first of which targets the development and testing of an E1/E5a double-frequency shipborne multi-constellation receiver based on the Galileo Open Service. The receiver should be compliant with International Maritime Organization (IMO) resolution MSC.233 and International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standard 61108-3.

The second lot in the call covers the preparation of guidelines for manufacturers for the implementation of SBAS DFMC open service and the development of firmware to process Galileo augmentation messages provided by the SBAS DFMC.

IMO standards

The IMO recognised Galileo as part of the world wide radio navigation system (WWRNS) in 2016, allowing for its use in merchant shipping. IMO resolutions MSC.401(95) and MSC.432 put in place performance standards for multi-system shipborne radio navigation receivers.

Read this: Looking for funding? The EIC may have something for you!

These resolutions state that shipborne equipment should use at least two independent GNSS recognised by IMO as part of the WWRNS and should have the capacity to process augmentation data. This requirement can be fulfilled if the GNSS receiver tracks both Galileo and GPS and uses EGNOS for augmentation in dual frequency, providing differential corrections and integrity data.

In combination with the Open Service, Galileo will provide an authentication service for the navigation message (OS-NMA). Both the authentication of the navigation message and the integrity of the computed position will contribute to the concept of resilient PNT.

At a glance

  • Publication of the call: 4 December 2019
  • Deadline for submitting applications: 31 March 2020
  • Indicative number of projects: 4 (2 per lot)
  • EU financing: EUR 2,500,000.00
  • Signature of the grant agreement: October 2020

More information

If you are interested in applying for this call, and would like more information, click here for a detailed overview of all the requirements. If, after reviewing the information, you still have questions related to the content of the call, you should address them to: gnss-grants@gsa.europa.eu, with the subject line "GSA/GRANT/02/2019 Shipborne double frequency multi-constellation receiver (E1/E5)".

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

EU financing of up to EUR 2.5 million is available under the Fundamental Elements call.

Looking for funding? The EIC may have something for you!

24.2.2020 10:19  
A number of funding opportunities are available to entrepreneurs and researchers.
Published: 
24 February 2020

The European Innovation Council (EIC) has as its goal to put Europe on top of the next wave of breakthrough and disruptive innovation that creates new markets. Space-based technology fits this profile and there are number of funding opportunities available under open EIC calls that may be of interest to space-tech innovators.

Support for deep-tech, high-risk SMEs and innovators

One such opportunity is the EIC Accelerator Pilot (previously known as the SME Instrument), which supports innovative, high-potential SMEs to develop and bring to market new products, services and business models. The EIC Accelerator supports, for example, trials, prototyping, validation, demonstration and testing in real-world conditions, and market replication.

 

Projects will receive between EUR 0.5 and EUR 2.5 million in the form of grants. The EIC Accelerator also offers blended finance in the form of an optional investment in equity in addition to the grant, to single for-profit SMEs. Grants will finance activities from Technology Readiness Levels (TRL) 6-8. Activities above TRL 8 will financed only through blended finance.  You can find a map of current EIC Accelerator companies here. The next cut-off date for applications is 18 March 2020. You can apply here.

Novel ideas for radically new technologies 

Another opportunity is the Future and Emerging Technologies (FET) Open call Novel ideas for radically new technologies, which is looking for proposals for cutting-edge, high-risk or high-impact interdisciplinary research. This research should have a radical vision and target a novel and ambitious science-to-technology breakthrough that opens up new areas of investigation.

FET Open aims to establish European leadership in the early exploration of future technologies. It looks for opportunities that are of long-term benefit for citizens, the economy and society. With this aim in mind, it strives to mobilise Europe's most creative and forward-thinking researchers from all disciplines to work together and explore possible leading technology paradigms of the future.

Cutting-edge innovation

As part of its Pathfinder pilot (FET-Proactive) Boosting emerging technologies call, the EIC looked for proposals for projects that aimed to demonstrate a new technological paradigm for human-centric Artificial Intelligence, contributing  to the wider debate on the sociotechnical, organisational and AI-ethical dimensions of these technologies and systems. Also targeted were proposals for implantable autonomous biomedical devices and materials and breakthrough solutions for zero-emissions energy generation.

Read this: Last calls for Horizon 2020, first views for Horizon Europe

FET Proactive aims to identify the future and emerging technologies with the highest economic and societal potential. It looks to establish a broad and solid European basis in terms of knowledge, key technological building blocks and interdisciplinary communities to ensure that Europe has the best 'first mover' position to capitalise rapidly and effectively on emerging societal and industrial opportunities.

EGNSS R&D White Paper

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) has gathered input from EGNSS (Galileo and EGNOS) users, confirming the importance of investing in the development of EGNSS downstream applications in order to capture economic and technological returns.

This can be achieved by identifying the priority areas for investing in downstream applications by market segment; analysing the different funding tools that could support EGNSS market uptake; and describing the desirable characteristics that define best practices for EGNSS R&D programmes.

The results of this research have been complied in a White Paper outlining recommendations for areas of focus and innovation funding for EGNSS R&D, which is available for download here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

A number of funding opportunities are available to entrepreneurs and researchers.

Looking for funding? The EIC may have something for you!

24.2.2020 10:19  
A number of funding opportunities are available to entrepreneurs and researchers.
Published: 
26 February 2020

Support for deep-tech, high-risk SMEs and innovators

One such opportunity is the EIC Accelerator Pilot (previously known as the SME Instrument), which supports innovative, high-potential SMEs to develop and bring to market new products, services and business models. The EIC Accelerator supports, for example, trials, prototyping, validation, demonstration and testing in real-world conditions, and market replication.

Projects will receive between EUR 0.5 and EUR 2.5 million in the form of grants. The EIC Accelerator also offers blended finance in the form of an optional investment in equity in addition to the grant, to single for-profit SMEs. Grants will finance activities from Technology Readiness Levels (TRL) 6-8. Activities above TRL 8 will financed only through blended finance.  You can find a map of current EIC Accelerator companies here. The next cut-off date for applications is 18 March 2020. You can apply here.

Novel ideas for radically new technologies

Another opportunity is the Future and Emerging Technologies (FET) Open call Novel ideas for radically new technologies, which is looking for proposals for cutting-edge, high-risk or high-impact interdisciplinary research. This research should have a radical vision and target a novel and ambitious science-to-technology breakthrough that opens up new areas of investigation.

FET Open aims to establish European leadership in the early exploration of future technologies. It looks for opportunities that are of long-term benefit for citizens, the economy and society. With this aim in mind, it strives to mobilise Europe's most creative and forward-thinking researchers from all disciplines to work together and explore possible leading technology paradigms of the future.

Cutting-edge innovation

As part of its Pathfinder pilot (FET-Proactive) Boosting emerging technologies call, the EIC looked for proposals for projects that aimed to demonstrate a new technological paradigm for human-centric Artificial Intelligence, contributing  to the wider debate on the sociotechnical, organisational and AI-ethical dimensions of these technologies and systems. Also targeted were proposals for implantable autonomous biomedical devices and materials and breakthrough solutions for zero-emissions energy generation.

Read this: Last calls for Horizon 2020, first views for Horizon Europe

FET Proactive aims to identify the future and emerging technologies with the highest economic and societal potential. It looks to establish a broad and solid European basis in terms of knowledge, key technological building blocks and interdisciplinary communities to ensure that Europe has the best 'first mover' position to capitalise rapidly and effectively on emerging societal and industrial opportunities.

EGNSS R&D White Paper

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) has gathered input from EGNSS (Galileo and EGNOS) users, confirming the importance of investing in the development of EGNSS downstream applications in order to capture economic and technological returns.

This can be achieved by identifying the priority areas for investing in downstream applications by market segment; analysing the different funding tools that could support EGNSS market uptake; and describing the desirable characteristics that define best practices for EGNSS R&D programmes.

The results of this research have been complied in a White Paper outlining recommendations for areas of focus and innovation funding for EGNSS R&D, which is available for download here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

A number of funding opportunities are available to entrepreneurs and researchers.

Looking for funding? The EIC may have something for you!

24.2.2020 10:19  
A number of funding opportunities are available to entrepreneurs and researchers.
Published: 
26 February 2020

The European Innovation Council (EIC) has as its goal to put Europe on top of the next wave of breakthrough and disruptive innovation that creates new markets. Space-based technology fits this profile and there are number of funding opportunities available under open EIC calls that may be of interest to space-tech innovators.

Support for deep-tech, high-risk SMEs and innovators

One such opportunity is the EIC Accelerator Pilot (previously known as the SME Instrument), which supports innovative, high-potential SMEs to develop and bring to market new products, services and business models. The EIC Accelerator supports, for example, trials, prototyping, validation, demonstration and testing in real-world conditions, and market replication.

Projects will receive between EUR 0.5 and EUR 2.5 million in the form of grants. The EIC Accelerator also offers blended finance in the form of an optional investment in equity in addition to the grant, to single for-profit SMEs. Grants will finance activities from Technology Readiness Levels (TRL) 6-8. Activities above TRL 8 will financed only through blended finance.  You can find a map of current EIC Accelerator companies here. The next cut-off date for applications is 18 March 2020. You can apply here.

Novel ideas for radically new technologies 

Another opportunity is the Future and Emerging Technologies (FET) Open call Novel ideas for radically new technologies, which is looking for proposals for cutting-edge, high-risk or high-impact interdisciplinary research. This research should have a radical vision and target a novel and ambitious science-to-technology breakthrough that opens up new areas of investigation.

FET Open aims to establish European leadership in the early exploration of future technologies. It looks for opportunities that are of long-term benefit for citizens, the economy and society. With this aim in mind, it strives to mobilise Europe's most creative and forward-thinking researchers from all disciplines to work together and explore possible leading technology paradigms of the future.

Other funding is available

If your profile does not fit any of the above opportunities, take a look at this Guide to European GNSS Funding Mechanisms, recently published by the GSA. This funding guide provides a snapshot of the various funding mechanisms available to any team or individual working on an EGNOS/Galileo technology or application. 

The guide illustrates the nature of the various funding mechanisms, explains their target applicants, the markets in which they operate, and the funding envelopes they can be expected to provide. It also highlights the eligibility criteria, if any, and the additional support mechanisms for each project.

Cutting-edge innovation

Last year, as part of its Pathfinder pilot (FET-Proactive) Boosting emerging technologies call, the EIC looked for proposals for projects that aimed to demonstrate a new technological paradigm for human-centric Artificial Intelligence, contributing  to the wider debate on the sociotechnical, organisational and AI-ethical dimensions of these technologies and systems. Also targeted were proposals for implantable autonomous biomedical devices and materials and breakthrough solutions for zero-emissions energy generation.

Read this: Last calls for Horizon 2020, first views for Horizon Europe

FET Proactive aimed to identify the future and emerging technologies with the highest economic and societal potential. It looked to establish a broad and solid European basis in terms of knowledge, key technological building blocks and interdisciplinary communities to ensure that Europe has the best 'first mover' position to capitalise rapidly and effectively on emerging societal and industrial opportunities.

EGNSS R&D White Paper

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) has gathered input from EGNSS (Galileo and EGNOS) users, confirming the importance of investing in the development of EGNSS downstream applications in order to capture economic and technological returns.

This can be achieved by identifying the priority areas for investing in downstream applications by market segment; analysing the different funding tools that could support EGNSS market uptake; and describing the desirable characteristics that define best practices for EGNSS R&D programmes.

The results of this research have been complied in a White Paper outlining recommendations for areas of focus and innovation funding for EGNSS R&D, which is available for download here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

A number of funding opportunities are available to entrepreneurs and researchers.

Looking for funding? The EIC may have something for you!

24.2.2020 10:19  
A number of funding opportunities are available to entrepreneurs and researchers.
Published: 
26 February 2020

The European Innovation Council (EIC) has as its goal to put Europe on top of the next wave of breakthrough and disruptive innovation that creates new markets. Space-based technology fits this profile and there are number of funding opportunities available under open EIC calls that may be of interest to space-tech innovators.

Support for deep-tech, high-risk SMEs and innovators

One such opportunity is the EIC Accelerator Pilot (previously known as the SME Instrument), which supports innovative, high-potential SMEs to develop and bring to market new products, services and business models. The EIC Accelerator supports, for example, trials, prototyping, validation, demonstration and testing in real-world conditions, and market replication.

Projects will receive between EUR 0.5 and EUR 2.5 million in the form of grants. The EIC Accelerator also offers blended finance in the form of an optional investment in equity in addition to the grant, to single for-profit SMEs. Grants will finance activities from Technology Readiness Levels (TRL) 6-8. Activities above TRL 8 will financed only through blended finance.  You can find a map of current EIC Accelerator companies here. The next cut-off date for applications is 18 March 2020. You can apply here.

Novel ideas for radically new technologies 

Another opportunity is the Future and Emerging Technologies (FET) Open call Novel ideas for radically new technologies, which is looking for proposals for cutting-edge, high-risk or high-impact interdisciplinary research. This research should have a radical vision and target a novel and ambitious science-to-technology breakthrough that opens up new areas of investigation.

FET Open aims to establish European leadership in the early exploration of future technologies. It looks for opportunities that are of long-term benefit for citizens, the economy and society. With this aim in mind, it strives to mobilise Europe's most creative and forward-thinking researchers from all disciplines to work together and explore possible leading technology paradigms of the future.

Cutting-edge innovation

As part of its Pathfinder pilot (FET-Proactive) Boosting emerging technologies call, the EIC looked for proposals for projects that aimed to demonstrate a new technological paradigm for human-centric Artificial Intelligence, contributing  to the wider debate on the sociotechnical, organisational and AI-ethical dimensions of these technologies and systems. Also targeted were proposals for implantable autonomous biomedical devices and materials and breakthrough solutions for zero-emissions energy generation.

Read this: Last calls for Horizon 2020, first views for Horizon Europe

FET Proactive aims to identify the future and emerging technologies with the highest economic and societal potential. It looks to establish a broad and solid European basis in terms of knowledge, key technological building blocks and interdisciplinary communities to ensure that Europe has the best 'first mover' position to capitalise rapidly and effectively on emerging societal and industrial opportunities.

EGNSS R&D White Paper

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) has gathered input from EGNSS (Galileo and EGNOS) users, confirming the importance of investing in the development of EGNSS downstream applications in order to capture economic and technological returns.

This can be achieved by identifying the priority areas for investing in downstream applications by market segment; analysing the different funding tools that could support EGNSS market uptake; and describing the desirable characteristics that define best practices for EGNSS R&D programmes.

The results of this research have been complied in a White Paper outlining recommendations for areas of focus and innovation funding for EGNSS R&D, which is available for download here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

A number of funding opportunities are available to entrepreneurs and researchers.

Looking for funding? The EIC may have something for you!

24.2.2020 10:19  
A number of funding opportunities are available to entrepreneurs and researchers.
Published: 
26 February 2020

The European Innovation Council (EIC) has as its goal to put Europe on top of the next wave of breakthrough and disruptive innovation that creates new markets. Space-based technology fits this profile and there are number of funding opportunities available under open EIC calls that may be of interest to space-tech innovators.

Support for deep-tech, high-risk SMEs and innovators

One such opportunity is the EIC Accelerator Pilot (previously known as the SME Instrument), which supports innovative, high-potential SMEs to develop and bring to market new products, services and business models. The EIC Accelerator supports, for example, trials, prototyping, validation, demonstration and testing in real-world conditions, and market replication.

Projects will receive between EUR 0.5 and EUR 2.5 million in the form of grants. The EIC Accelerator also offers blended finance in the form of an optional investment in equity in addition to the grant, to single for-profit SMEs. Grants will finance activities from Technology Readiness Levels (TRL) 6-8. Activities above TRL 8 will financed only through blended finance.  You can find a map of current EIC Accelerator companies here. The next cut-off date for applications is 18 March 2020. You can apply here.

Novel ideas for radically new technologies 

Another opportunity is the Future and Emerging Technologies (FET) Open call Novel ideas for radically new technologies, which is looking for proposals for cutting-edge, high-risk or high-impact interdisciplinary research. This research should have a radical vision and target a novel and ambitious science-to-technology breakthrough that opens up new areas of investigation.

FET Open aims to establish European leadership in the early exploration of future technologies. It looks for opportunities that are of long-term benefit for citizens, the economy and society. With this aim in mind, it strives to mobilise Europe's most creative and forward-thinking researchers from all disciplines to work together and explore possible leading technology paradigms of the future.

Cutting-edge innovation

Last year, as part of its Pathfinder pilot (FET-Proactive) Boosting emerging technologies call, the EIC looked for proposals for projects that aimed to demonstrate a new technological paradigm for human-centric Artificial Intelligence, contributing  to the wider debate on the sociotechnical, organisational and AI-ethical dimensions of these technologies and systems. Also targeted were proposals for implantable autonomous biomedical devices and materials and breakthrough solutions for zero-emissions energy generation.

Read this: Last calls for Horizon 2020, first views for Horizon Europe

FET Proactive aimed to identify the future and emerging technologies with the highest economic and societal potential. It looked to establish a broad and solid European basis in terms of knowledge, key technological building blocks and interdisciplinary communities to ensure that Europe has the best 'first mover' position to capitalise rapidly and effectively on emerging societal and industrial opportunities.

EGNSS R&D White Paper

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) has gathered input from EGNSS (Galileo and EGNOS) users, confirming the importance of investing in the development of EGNSS downstream applications in order to capture economic and technological returns.

This can be achieved by identifying the priority areas for investing in downstream applications by market segment; analysing the different funding tools that could support EGNSS market uptake; and describing the desirable characteristics that define best practices for EGNSS R&D programmes.

The results of this research have been complied in a White Paper outlining recommendations for areas of focus and innovation funding for EGNSS R&D, which is available for download here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

A number of funding opportunities are available to entrepreneurs and researchers.

Galileo gives major backing to SuperHalfs Series

18.2.2020 10:24  
The SuperHalfs is a series of the world’s leading half marathons, including races in Lisbon, Prague, Copenhagen, Cardiff and Valencia.
Published: 
18 February 2020

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) and SuperHalfs are delighted to announce that Galileo has thrown its support behind the international half marathon series and will become the Presenting Partner. The news comes as thousands prepare to plot their running journey across the continent.

The SuperHalfs series will welcome thousands of runners and millions of spectators, both attending the races and viewing the global coverage from their homes when the series kicks off in Lisbon next month. Prague hosts the second leg before it heads to Copenhagen, across the North Sea to Cardiff and finishes up in the warm climes of Valencia in October. 

“One of the core values of SuperHalfs is to open up new horizons to runners, just as Europe is doing by providing timing and positioning services through Galileo, Europe’s civilian Global Navigation Satellite System,” said SuperHalfs Founding Member Carlo Capalbo.

The Galileo constellation is the result of unprecedented cooperation and innovation between European Member States, industries, SMEs and user communities. Through SuperHalfs, a similar innovative and collaborative partnership has begun between the European cities of Lisbon, Prague, Copenhagen, Cardiff and Valencia. 

Win with Galileo

“The SuperHalfs series gathers people who already understand the importance of accurate positioning and timing in monitoring sports performance, and to whom we want to pass the message that this accuracy is also being provided by Galileo, Europe’s global navigation satellite system, and is already available in their watches, smartphones or wearables. We are looking forward to seeing SuperHalfs runners run, and win, with Galileo,” said Pascal Claudel, Acting Executive Officer of the European GNSS Agency.

 

Read this: SARA scores at football match

 

The flourishing market for wearable sports tracking devices, for example fitness trackers or smartwatches and eHealth apps, is clear evidence that runners are already benefitting from the precise positioning, timing and navigation provided by Galileo. According to the GSA GNSS Market Report 2019, wearables are the second most sold GNSS device after smartphones, reaching 70 million shipments globally in 2019, and the market is expected to grow 13% annually to reach 240 million shipments by 2029.

The appetite for the SuperHalfs series has exceeded all expectations, with three of the five events already sold out and the other two very close, after an influx of international participants chasing SuperRunner status. Thousands of runners from around the world have created a virtual passport and started planning their journey ahead of the first race in Lisbon on 22 March. Many will be using Galileo-enabled devices as they plan their participation, using mapping apps or tracking their progress in training with a location-based fitness tracker.

While general entries to the EDP Lisbon Half Marathon, Sportisimo Prague Half Marathon and Cardiff University Cardiff Half Marathon have sold-out, runners can still secure a place through the events’ charity partners. For more information, click here.

About the Series

The SuperHalfs is a series of the world’s leading half marathons, including races in Lisbon, Prague, Copenhagen, Cardiff and Valencia. It offers running enthusiasts the opportunity to embark on their own running adventure whilst being rewarded for their efforts with exclusive benefits such as guaranteed entry, merchandise, stamps in a SuperPassport and a SuperMedal for completing the five-race circuit within 36 months.

All of the events are World Athletics' Gold Label races or are run on World Athletics (IAAF) World Championship courses. They are certified by AIMS or have been awarded a 5 Star Road Race standard by European Athletics. What's more, several races in the SuperHalfs group have played host to World Record performances.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The SuperHalfs is a series of the world’s leading half marathons, including races in Lisbon, Prague, Copenhagen, Cardiff and Valencia.

Galileo gives major backing to SuperHalfs Series

18.2.2020 10:24  
The SuperHalfs is a series of the world’s leading half marathons, including races in Lisbon, Prague, Copenhagen, Cardiff and Valencia.
Published: 
18 February 2020

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) and SuperHalfs are delighted to announce that Galileo has thrown its support behind the international half marathon series and will become the Presenting Partner. The news comes as thousands prepare to plot their running journey across the continent.

The SuperHalfs series will welcome thousands of runners and millions of spectators, both attending the races and viewing the global coverage from their homes when the series kicks off in Lisbon next month, moving then to Prague hosting the second leg before it heads to Copenhagen.

“One of the core values of SuperHalfs is to open up new horizons to runners, just as Europe is doing by providing timing and positioning services through Galileo, Europe’s civilian Global Navigation Satellite System,” said SuperHalfs Founding Member Carlo Capalbo.

The Galileo constellation is the result of unprecedented cooperation and innovation between European Member States, industries, SMEs and user communities. Through SuperHalfs, a similar innovative and collaborative partnership has begun between European cities. 

Win with Galileo

“The SuperHalfs series gathers people who already understand the importance of accurate positioning and timing in monitoring sports performance, and to whom we want to pass the message that this accuracy is also being provided by Galileo, Europe’s global navigation satellite system, and is already available in their watches, smartphones or wearables. We are looking forward to seeing SuperHalfs runners run, and win, with Galileo,” said Pascal Claudel, Acting Executive Officer of the European GNSS Agency.

 

Read this: SARA scores at football match

 

The flourishing market for wearable sports tracking devices, for example fitness trackers or smartwatches and eHealth apps, is clear evidence that runners are already benefitting from the precise positioning, timing and navigation provided by Galileo. According to the GSA GNSS Market Report 2019, wearables are the second most sold GNSS device after smartphones, reaching 70 million shipments globally in 2019, and the market is expected to grow 13% annually to reach 240 million shipments by 2029.

The appetite for the SuperHalfs series has exceeded all expectations, with three of the five events already sold out and the other two very close, after an influx of international participants chasing SuperRunner status. Thousands of runners from around the world have created a virtual passport and started planning their journey ahead of the first race in Lisbon on 22 March. Many will be using Galileo-enabled devices as they plan their participation, using mapping apps or tracking their progress in training with a location-based fitness tracker.

While general entries to the EDP Lisbon Half Marathon, Sportisimo Prague Half Marathon and Cardiff University Cardiff Half Marathon have sold-out, runners can still secure a place through the events’ charity partners. For more information, click here.

About the Series

The SuperHalfs is a series of the world’s leading half marathons, including races in Lisbon, Prague, Copenhagen, Cardiff and Valencia. It offers running enthusiasts the opportunity to embark on their own running adventure whilst being rewarded for their efforts with exclusive benefits such as guaranteed entry, merchandise, stamps in a SuperPassport and a SuperMedal for completing the five-race circuit within 36 months.

All of the events are World Athletics' Gold Label races or are run on World Athletics (IAAF) World Championship courses. They are certified by AIMS or have been awarded a 5 Star Road Race standard by European Athletics. What's more, several races in the SuperHalfs group have played host to World Record performances.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The SuperHalfs is a series of the world’s leading half marathons, including races in Lisbon, Prague, Copenhagen, Cardiff and Valencia.

Galileo gives major backing to SuperHalfs Series

18.2.2020 10:24  
The SuperHalfs is a series of the world’s leading half marathons.
Published: 
18 February 2020

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) and SuperHalfs are delighted to announce that Galileo has thrown its support behind the international half marathon series and will become the Presenting Partner. The news comes as thousands prepare to plot their running journey across the continent.

The SuperHalfs series will welcome thousands of runners and millions of spectators, both attending the races and viewing the global coverage from their homes when the series kicks off in Lisbon next month, moving then to Prague hosting the second leg before it heads to Copenhagen.

“One of the core values of SuperHalfs is to open up new horizons to runners, just as Europe is doing by providing timing and positioning services through Galileo, Europe’s civilian Global Navigation Satellite System,” said SuperHalfs Founding Member Carlo Capalbo.

The Galileo constellation is the result of unprecedented cooperation and innovation between European Member States, industries, SMEs and user communities. Through SuperHalfs, a similar innovative and collaborative partnership has begun between European cities. 

Win with Galileo

“The SuperHalfs series gathers people who already understand the importance of accurate positioning and timing in monitoring sports performance, and to whom we want to pass the message that this accuracy is also being provided by Galileo, Europe’s global navigation satellite system, and is already available in their watches, smartphones or wearables. We are looking forward to seeing SuperHalfs runners run, and win, with Galileo,” said Pascal Claudel, Acting Executive Officer of the European GNSS Agency.

 

Read this: SARA scores at football match

 

The flourishing market for wearable sports tracking devices, for example fitness trackers or smartwatches and eHealth apps, is clear evidence that runners are already benefitting from the precise positioning, timing and navigation provided by Galileo. According to the GSA GNSS Market Report 2019, wearables are the second most sold GNSS device after smartphones, reaching 70 million shipments globally in 2019, and the market is expected to grow 13% annually to reach 240 million shipments by 2029.

The appetite for the SuperHalfs series has exceeded all expectations, with three of the five events already sold out and the other two very close, after an influx of international participants chasing SuperRunner status. Thousands of runners from around the world have created a virtual passport and started planning their journey ahead of the first race in Lisbon on 22 March. Many will be using Galileo-enabled devices as they plan their participation, using mapping apps or tracking their progress in training with a location-based fitness tracker.

While most of the general entries to some of the Half Marathons have sold-out, runners can still secure a place through the events’ charity partners. For more information, click here.

About the Series

The SuperHalfs is a series of the world’s leading half marathons, including races in Lisbon, Prague, Copenhagen, Cardiff and Valencia. It offers running enthusiasts the opportunity to embark on their own running adventure whilst being rewarded for their efforts with exclusive benefits such as guaranteed entry, merchandise, stamps in a SuperPassport and a SuperMedal for completing the five-race circuit within 36 months.

All of the events are World Athletics' Gold Label races or are run on World Athletics (IAAF) World Championship courses. They are certified by AIMS or have been awarded a 5 Star Road Race standard by European Athletics. What's more, several races in the SuperHalfs group have played host to World Record performances.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The SuperHalfs is a series of the world’s leading half marathons.

Galileo gives major backing to SuperHalfs Series

18.2.2020 10:24  
The SuperHalfs is a series of the world’s leading half marathons.
Published: 
18 February 2020

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) and SuperHalfs are delighted to announce that Galileo has thrown its support behind the international half marathon series and will become the Presenting Partner. The news comes as thousands prepare to plot their running journey across the continent.

The SuperHalfs series will welcome thousands of runners and millions of spectators, both attending the races and viewing the global coverage from their homes when the series kicks off in Lisbon next month, moving then to Prague hosting the second leg before it heads to Copenhagen.

“One of the core values of SuperHalfs is to open up new horizons to runners, just as Europe is doing by providing timing and positioning services through Galileo, Europe’s civilian Global Navigation Satellite System,” said SuperHalfs Founding Member Carlo Capalbo.

The Galileo constellation is the result of unprecedented cooperation and innovation between European Member States, industries, SMEs and user communities. Through SuperHalfs, a similar innovative and collaborative partnership has begun between European cities. 

Win with Galileo

“The SuperHalfs series gathers people who already understand the importance of accurate positioning and timing in monitoring sports performance, and to whom we want to pass the message that this accuracy is also being provided by Galileo, Europe’s global navigation satellite system, and is already available in their watches, smartphones or wearables. We are looking forward to seeing SuperHalfs runners run, and win, with Galileo,” said Pascal Claudel, Acting Executive Director of the European GNSS Agency.

 

Read this: SARA scores at football match

 

The flourishing market for wearable sports tracking devices, for example fitness trackers or smartwatches and eHealth apps, is clear evidence that runners are already benefitting from the precise positioning, timing and navigation provided by Galileo. According to the GSA GNSS Market Report 2019, wearables are the second most sold GNSS device after smartphones, reaching 70 million shipments globally in 2019, and the market is expected to grow 13% annually to reach 240 million shipments by 2029.

The appetite for the SuperHalfs series has exceeded all expectations, with three of the five events already sold out and the other two very close, after an influx of international participants chasing SuperRunner status. Thousands of runners from around the world have created a virtual passport and started planning their journey ahead of the first race in Lisbon on 22 March. Many will be using Galileo-enabled devices as they plan their participation, using mapping apps or tracking their progress in training with a location-based fitness tracker.

While most of the general entries to some of the Half Marathons have sold-out, runners can still secure a place through the events’ charity partners. For more information, click here.

About the Series

The SuperHalfs is a series of the world’s leading half marathons, including races in Lisbon, Prague, Copenhagen, Cardiff and Valencia. It offers running enthusiasts the opportunity to embark on their own running adventure whilst being rewarded for their efforts with exclusive benefits such as guaranteed entry, merchandise, stamps in a SuperPassport and a SuperMedal for completing the five-race circuit within 36 months.

All of the events are World Athletics' Gold Label races or are run on World Athletics (IAAF) World Championship courses. They are certified by AIMS or have been awarded a 5 Star Road Race standard by European Athletics. What's more, several races in the SuperHalfs group have played host to World Record performances.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The SuperHalfs is a series of the world’s leading half marathons.

Galileo gives major backing to SuperHalfs Series

18.2.2020 10:24  
The SuperHalfs is a series of the world’s leading half marathons, including races in Lisbon, Prague, Copenhagen, Cardiff and Valencia.
Published: 
18 February 2020

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) and SuperHalfs are delighted to announce that Galileo has thrown its support behind the international half marathon series and will become the Presenting Partner. The news comes as thousands prepare to plot their running journey across the continent.

The SuperHalfs series will welcome thousands of runners and millions of spectators, both attending the races and viewing the global coverage from their homes when the series kicks off in Lisbon next month. Prague hosts the second leg before it heads to Copenhagen, across the North Sea to Cardiff and finishes up in the warm climes of Valencia in October. 

“One of the core values of SuperHalfs is to open up new horizons to runners, just as Europe is doing by providing timing and positioning services through Galileo, Europe’s civilian Global Navigation Satellite System,” said SuperHalfs Founding Member Carlo Capalbo.

The Galileo constellation is the result of unprecedented cooperation and innovation between European Member States, industries, SMEs and user communities. Through SuperHalfs, a similar innovative and collaborative partnership has begun between the European cities of Lisbon, Prague, Copenhagen, Cardiff and Valencia. 

Win with Galileo

“The SuperHalfs series gathers people who already understand the importance of accurate positioning and timing in monitoring sports performance, and to whom we want to pass the message that this accuracy is also being provided by Galileo, Europe’s global navigation satellite system, and is already available in their watches, smartphones or wearables. We are looking forward to seeing SuperHalfs runners run, and win, with Galileo,” said Pascal Claudel, Acting Executive Officer of the European GNSS Agency.

 

Read this: SARA scores at football match

 

The flourishing market for wearable sports tracking devices, for example fitness trackers or smartwatches and eHealth apps, is clear evidence that runners are already benefitting from the precise positioning, timing and navigation provided by Galileo. According to the GSA GNSS Market Report 2019, wearables are the second most sold GNSS device after smartphones, reaching 70 million shipments globally in 2019, and the market is expected to grow 13% annually to reach 240 million shipments by 2029.

The appetite for the SuperHalfs series has exceeded all expectations, with three of the five events already sold out and the other two very close, after an influx of international participants chasing SuperRunner status. Thousands of runners from around the world have created a virtual passport and started planning their journey ahead of the first race in Lisbon on 22 March. Many will be using Galileo-enabled devices as they plan their participation, using mapping apps or tracking their progress in training with a location-based fitness tracker.

While general entries to the EDP Lisbon Half Marathon, Sportisimo Prague Half Marathon and Cardiff University Cardiff Half Marathon have sold-out, runners can still secure a place through the events’ charity partners. For more information, click here.

About the Series

The SuperHalfs is a series of the world’s leading half marathons, including races in Lisbon, Prague, Copenhagen, Cardiff and Valencia. It offers running enthusiasts the opportunity to embark on their own running adventure whilst being rewarded for their efforts with exclusive benefits such as guaranteed entry, merchandise, stamps in a SuperPassport and a SuperMedal for completing the five-race circuit within 36 months.

All of the events are World Athletics' Gold Label races or are run on World Athletics (IAAF) World Championship courses. They are certified by AIMS or have been awarded a 5 Star Road Race standard by European Athletics. What's more, several races in the SuperHalfs group have played host to World Record performances.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The SuperHalfs is a series of the world’s leading half marathons, including races in Lisbon, Prague, Copenhagen, Cardiff and Valencia.

EGNOS payload enters service on EUTELSAT 5 West B

14.2.2020 12:36  
The next generation of EGNOS will support a growing user base in the EU and beyond
Published: 
14 February 2020

The GEO-3 payload of the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay System (EGNOS), hosted aboard the EUTELSAT 5 West B satellite, has successfully entered into service. The satellite was successfully launched on a Proton M/Breeze M launch vehicle from Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, on 9 October last year.

EUTELSAT 5 West B is hosting the Eutelsat-procured EGNOS payload under an 18-year agreement with the European GNSS Agency (GSA). The contract also includes technical services and European ground infrastructure, including two gateways installed at Eutelsat’s Rambouillet and Cagliari teleports.  

Essential services

“With this new payload in service, EGNOS is moving on towards the transition to its new generation,” said Pascal Claudel, GSA Acting Executive Director and Chief Operating Officer. “Delivery and continuity of satellite service are part of our mission as delegated by the European Commission. It is essential that we, at the GSA, are providing these services to support economic growth and to ensure that the European Union’s citizens and companies can benefit from the latest GNSS technology,” he said.

Watch this: EGNOS – How does it work?

The next generation of EGNOS - EGNOS V3 - will augment both GPS and Galileo in the L1 and L5 bands. It will also provide additional satellite-based augmentation system (SBAS) service capabilities through a new SBAS channel on L5 and will deliver increased EGNOS service availability within and beyond the EU, supporting a growing number of users.

Enhanced performance

"Eutelsat is proud of its collaboration with its customer GSA, its partners including the European Space Agency, and its suppliers, culminating in the entry into service of this next generation technology of EGNOS on EUTELSAT 5 West B,” said Eutelsat’s Deputy CEO and Chief Technical Officer Yohann Leroy. “We are delighted to host this payload, which will significantly enhance the performance of global navigation satellite systems across Europe, notably Galileo, in the coming years.”

Read this: Instrument flying supported by EGNOS for General Aviation

The GSA signed a contract with Eutelsat Communications in March 2017 for the development, integration and operation of the next-generation EGNOS payload. The contract covers the preparation and service provision phases of EGNOS GEO-3 and ensures the continuous availability of the EGNOS Signal in Space (SIS) and a smooth transition from EGNOS V2.

About EGNOS

EGNOS is Europe's regional satellite-based augmentation system (SBAS). It is currently used to improve the performance of GPS and will augment Galileo from 2025 onwards. EGNOS was deployed to provide safety of life navigation services to aviation, maritime and land-based users.

EGNOS uses GNSS measurements taken by reference stations deployed mainly across Europe and North Africa. These measurements are transferred to a central computing centre where differential corrections and integrity messages are calculated. These calculations are then broadcast over the covered area using geostationary satellites that serve as an augmentation, or overlay, to the original GNSS message. 

The information provided by EGNOS improves the accuracy and reliability of GNSS positioning information while also providing a crucial integrity message. EGNOS also transmits an accurate time signal.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The next generation of EGNOS will support a growing user base in the EU and beyond

Space is an enabler of security and defence

7.2.2020 10:45  
Both Galileo and Copernicus have a role to play in Europe’s security and defence.
Published: 
07 February 2020

Although it has been a taboo at the European level up to now, the time has come to break this taboo and to recognise that space is an enabler of security and defence, with a defence dimension for Galileo and a security element for Copernicus, Internal Market Commissioner Thierry Breton said at the 12th Space Policy Conference in Brussels on 22 January.

In his address at the Conference, the Commissioner stressed that the security and defence element of the space programmes would be strengthened with the progressive launch of two new initiatives – a Space Situational Awareness (SSA) system to monitor space debris, and a Governmental Satellite Communication (GovSatCom) initiative to provide Member States with reliable and secure satellite communication to support police, border protection and civil defence.

GSA ready for EUSPA

These programmes will be partly under the responsibility of the European GNSS Agency (GSA) as its mandate expands with the creation of the new European Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA). Speaking at the conference, GSA Chief Operating Officer Pascal Claudel noted that, while some of the elements in the EUSPA mandate had yet to be finalised, the GSA was already preparing to take it up and, in particular, has started preparatory activities for GovSatCom.

Read this: EU space infrastructure guarantees leadership in security and defence

Commissioner Thierry Breton outlined his objectives for the Galileo programme, one of which is to ensure the smooth development of the Public Regulated Service (PRS). “Galileo is also a strategic asset, designed to be used for military and civil security purposes,” he said. In turn, Claudel noted that the GSA’s experience with the PRS had been of particular value in setting up the project aiming at identifying GovSatCom user needs and technological requirements.

In addition to the PRS, Commissioner Breton’s other objectives for Galileo include continuing deploying the programme in order to reach the Full Operational Capability as soon as possible; continuing to improve precision - with a target of 20 cm; and preparing already for the second generation of Galileo, to stay ahead in the technological race.

Space awareness

As regards Space Situational Awareness and Space Surveillance and Tracking (SSA/SST), P. Claudel said that EUSPA would benefit from the GSA’s security-oriented approach and experience of working with Member States as users of the PRS service and handling classified information with multiple stakeholders. The experience that the GSA has in the operations of the Galileo Security Monitoring Centre would be beneficial for the SSA, he said.

Reference to the cyber security aspect of the Galileo programme was also made. “This is taken very seriously by the GSA. In recent years, new specific cyber security requirements have been defined and taken into account in the development of the Galileo system and its operations,” said the GSA COO.

And this: PRS – the future is bright!

The GSA puts measures in place based on regular monitoring and analysis of threats to the system. “Vulnerabilities are analysed regularly and security measures are set up,” said P. Claudel, adding that while the complexity of the GNSS systems makes this task very complex, the GSA has processes in place to handle this activity.

Working together for success

In his speech, Commissioner Thierry Breton stressed the importance of governance. He said that to develop his strategy and vision for the space programmes, it would be necessary to work efficiently together. “Governance is central to any successful strategy and project, political or industrial. ... When governance is not clear, mistakes happen or issues appear,” he said.

The Commissioner said he had the impression that, in Europe, a lot of time is spent discussing who does what – especially between public actors – rather than actually doing it. “Let me be loud and clear: This is not possible anymore. If we are to be successful and invest efficiently our citizens’ taxpayer money, we have to … work as a team,” he said, adding that this team includes the European Commission, National Space Agencies, the European Space Agency (ESA), the GSA, and industry.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Both Galileo and Copernicus have a role to play in Europe’s security and defence.

Space is an enabler of security and defence

7.2.2020 10:45  
Both Galileo and Copernicus have a role to play in Europe’s security and defence.
Published: 
07 February 2020

Although it has been a taboo at the European level up to now, the time has come to break this taboo and to recognise that space is an enabler of security and defence, with a defence dimension for Galileo and a security element for Copernicus, Internal Market Commissioner Thierry Breton said at the 12th Space Policy Conference in Brussels on 22 January.

In his address at the Conference, the Commissioner stressed that the security and defence element of the space programmes would be strengthened with the progressive launch of two new initiatives – a Space Situational Awareness (SSA) system to monitor space debris, and a Governmental Satellite Communication (GovSatCom) initiative to provide Member States with reliable and secure satellite communication to support police, border protection and civil defence.

GSA ready for EUSPA

These programmes will be partly under the responsibility of the European GNSS Agency (GSA) as its mandate expands with the creation of the new European Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA). Speaking at the conference, GSA Chief Operating Officer Pascal Claudel noted that, while some of the elements in the EUSPA mandate had yet to be finalised, the GSA was already preparing to take it up and, in particular, has started preparatory activities for GovSatCom.

Read this: EU space infrastructure guarantees leadership in security and defence

Commissioner Thierry Breton outlined his objectives for the Galileo programme, one of which is to ensure the smooth development of the Public Regulated Service (PRS). “Galileo is also a strategic asset, designed to be used for military and civil security purposes,” he said. In turn, Claudel noted that the GSA’s experience with the PRS had been of particular value in setting up the project aiming at identifying GovSatCom user needs and technological requirements.

In addition to the PRS, Commissioner Breton’s other objectives for Galileo include continuing deploying the programme in order to reach the Full Operational Capability as soon as possible; continuing to improve precision - with a target of 20 cm; and preparing already for the second generation of Galileo, to stay ahead in the technological race.

Space awareness

As regards Space Situational Awareness and Space Surveillance and Tracking (SSA/SST), P. Claudel said that EUSPA would benefit from the GSA’s security-oriented approach and experience of working with Member States as users of the PRS service and handling classified information with multiple stakeholders. The experience that the GSA has in the operations of the Galileo Security Monitoring Centre would be beneficial for the SSA, he said.

Reference to the cyber security aspect of the Galileo programme was also made. “This is taken very seriously by the GSA. In recent years, new specific cyber security requirements have been defined and taken into account in the development of the Galileo system and its operations,” said the GSA COO.

And this: PRS – the future is bright!

The GSA puts measures in place based on regular monitoring and analysis of threats to the system. “Vulnerabilities are analysed regularly and security measures are set up,” said P. Claudel, adding that while the complexity of the GNSS systems makes this task very complex, the GSA has processes in place to handle this activity.

Working together for success

In his speech, Commissioner Thierry Breton stressed the importance of governance. He said that to develop his strategy and vision for the space programmes, it would be necessary to work efficiently together. “Governance is central to any successful strategy and project, political or industrial. ... When governance is not clear, mistakes happen or issues appear,” he said.

The Commissioner said he had the impression that, in Europe, a lot of time is spent discussing who does what – especially between public actors – rather than actually doing it. “Let me be loud and clear: This is not possible anymore. If we are to be successful and invest efficiently our citizens’ taxpayer money, we have to … work as a team,” he said, adding that this team includes the European Commission, National Space Agencies, the European Space Agency (ESA), the GSA, and industry.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Both Galileo and Copernicus have a role to play in Europe’s security and defence.

Successful Galileo Return Link demonstration with market-ready beacon

5.2.2020 11:30  
The RLS was successfully tested with a Kannad SafePro emergency position indicating radio beacon.
Published: 
05 February 2020

The recent successful activation of the Galileo Search and Rescue (SAR) Return Link Service was very much in the spotlight at a press event held at the European GNSS Agency’s (GSA) Prague headquarters on February 3. At the ‘GNSS for #EUProtect’ event, which focused on the contribution of European GNSS to emergency response and civil protection in Europe, the SAR Return Link was successfully tested, demonstrating an impressive response time.

The Galileo Return Link Service (RLS), which allows people in distress to receive automatic acknowledgement that their distress signal has been received, was officially declared operational on January 21. The new functionality, currently offered uniquely by Galileo, enables a communication link that relays Return Link Messages (RLM) back to the originating beacon through the Galileo Navigation Signal in Space (I/NAV E1B).

Game changer

The RLS was successfully demonstrated during the Prague event, at which an end-to-end test of the forward and the return link was carried out with a ready-to-market beacon. With only 4.5 minutes between the activation of the beacon and the reception of the return link, the demonstration clearly showed the advantages of this service in a real life emergency situation. 

For someone in distress, receiving such acknowledgment in just over four minutes will provide a significant psychological boost and reduce panic, while allowing the rescue crew to improve the on-board logistics and planning of the rescue mission, thereby helping to save more lives. As such, the RLS is a real game changer for search and rescue services.

Read this: Galileo Return Link Service declared at European Space Conference

Speaking at the event, Rodrigo da Costa, Galileo Services Programme Manager at the GSA, said that a new Galileo facility – the Return Link Service Provider – had just been deployed in Toulouse, France to act as an interface between Galileo and Cospas-Sarsat, the international satellite-based search and rescue system. 

Da Costa summarised some of the RLS performance indicators: “The Galileo system loop latency is less than 15 minutes 99% of the time, with an end-to-end loop latency of less than 30 minutes,” he said, adding that this is typically less than 10 minutes as demonstrated during the Prague event, depending largely on the time it takes for Cospas-Sarsat to detect and locate the alert.

Saving lives

GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani spoke more generally about the contribution of EGNSS to the European economy and to emergency response, highlighting Galileo’s contribution to the eCall and E112 emergency response systems and the benefits of EGNOS for helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS). 

 “Galileo and EGNOS will contribute to saving at least 10,000 lives in the 2020-2025 timeframe. For example, with the Galileo-compatible eCall, by speeding up emergency response times by up to 50%, we can reduce the number of fatalities by 4% and the number of severe injuries by 6%-10%,” Diani said.

And this: Market understands value of dual frequency

“In the case of the Search and Rescue service we are demonstrating today, it is required to have a specialised beacon, as the users are normally outside the cellular network coverage, for example in the middle of the sea, while eCall and E112 are designed for our daily lives and can work directly from our cars and smartphones. They permit the emergency services to locate us quickly in case of accident or when we call the emergency number, without the need to explain where we are, which is often difficult or impossible when we are in distressful situations,” she said.

Following the launch of the RLS, the SAR/Galileo Service Definition Document (SDD) was updated to include information about new service, including details on the characteristics of the service and the infrastructure underpinning it, and also the Minimum Performance Levels (MPLs) that the SAR/Galileo Services users shall experience, as well as the main limitations and conditions of use. The latest version can be found here.

Galileo SAR RLS users that would like to receive more information can send their inquiries to the European GNSS Service Centre Help Desk at: www.gsc-europa.eu/helpdesk.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The RLS was successfully tested with a Kannad SafePro emergency position indicating radio beacon.

Galileo performance assessment

31.1.2020 15:16  
Galileo performance reports, which measure the system’s performance against  Minimum Performance Levels, are published on a quarterly basis.
Published: 
31 January 2020

The Galileo performance is reported in the Galileo Initial Services – Open Service – Quarterly Performance Report, where several key performance indicators are analysed according to criteria (Minimum Performance Levels, MPLs) defined in the Galileo Service Definition document (SDD), published in the European GNSS Service Centre and last updated in May 2019.

As planned, recently the GSA published the Q3 2019 performance report. This report covers the period when a technical incident caused by an equipment malfunction in Galileo last July resulted in a six-day interruption in Galileo navigation and timing services. This had an important effect on the programme and, following the incident, an independent Inquiry Board was set up by the European Commission to investigate its causes and to make recommendations for actions to avoid another such incident in the future. 

Performance measurement: how is it done?

Measurement of service performance is one of the key activities of the GSA, the Galileo Service Provider. The GSA’s Galileo Reference Centre, located in Noordwijk, the Netherlands, plays a crucial role in monitoring the Galileo performance . 

The Galileo Reference Centre (GRC) is one of the Galileo Service Facilities and it supports the provision of services to Galileo users. The GRC is operated by the GSA, providing an independent means of evaluating the performance of the Galileo Service Operator and the quality of the signals in space. The GRC is fully independent of the system and the Galileo Service Operator with respect to both the technical solution and operations, and consists of both a core facility and contributions available in EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland. Data and products from cooperating entities in the Member States make it possible to observe the Galileo signals all over the world at all times, in support of both routine operations and specific performance assessment campaigns.

The minimum performance levels

The MPLs address several parameters of interest, and can be mainly grouped into two categories:

  • Accuracy MPLs refer to how well (accurately) the Galileo services perform, whenever the Galileo signals are usable (or “healthy”, as defined in the SDD). This includes:
    • Ranging Accuracy; related to the navigation data transmitted by the satellites which is used to calculate the distance between the satellite and the receiver;
    • Timing and Frequency Accuracy; related to the parameters that allow the receiver to obtain a precise synchronisation to either Universal Time Coordinated (UTC) or GPS time.

Accuracy MPLs are statistically defined as “95th percentile”, and calculated over a period of 30 days, using a sample of measurements taken every 5 minutes and considering only those epochs where the signals were healthy. In line with other GNSS constellation providers, timing parameters are normalised over a year by averaging the past twelve 30-day periods. For accuracy parameters, the smaller the achieved value, the better.

  • Availability MPLs refer to how much time per month (or year) a given performance level is to be met (for which the signals have to be healthy). This includes:
    • Per-Slot Availability; related to the amount of time per period that the signals from each satellite are healthy;
    • Timing Availability; related to the amount of time per period that the timing parameters are broadcast, and the time synchronisation error is within the specified target;
    • Positioning Availability; related to the amount of time per period that the users have enough satellites in view to calculate their position, and the calculated position error is within the specified target.

Availability MPLs are reported as percent, and calculated over a period of 30 days, using a sample of measurements taken every 5 minutes and considering all epochs (healthy or not). Again, in line with other GNSS constellation providers, some parameters are normalised over a year by averaging the past twelve 30-day periods (timing and per-slot availability). For availability parameters, the larger the achieved value, the better.

The Service Definition Document also describes how to assess whether the Galileo signals are healthy or not, by looking into some parameters (“flags”) transmitted by the satellites, and checking the last time when the navigation data was refreshed (it should not be older than 4 hours).

The Galileo performance in Q3 2019

The Galileo system is currently in a partial deployment stage, with some satellites still to be launched and a number of ground infrastructure upgrades on-going to provide redundancy and complete all functionalities. For this reason, the MPL commitments published in the SDD include margins that account for possible planned and unplanned outages. The quarterly performance reports provide visibility on the measured performance and compare it with the MPL. Galileo has regularly performed well above the MPL targets since the declaration of Initial Services in 2016.

The Galileo incident in July 2019 prevented the refresh of the data transmitted by the satellites, therefore eventually the signals were flagged a not healthy and/or the data became outdated. This caused an impact on the availability MPLs that are calculated monthly. These parameters went well below the values typically provided by Galileo, yet in most of the cases (all but two) they stayed above the committed figure, which includes margins for the reasons explained above. The performance report, therefore, displays them as “green” in the dashboard, however the trend chart clearly shows the difference with the months of June and August and the margin with the MPL. 

An example is provided below (Figure 12 of the Quarterly Performance Report Q3 2019, page 19) for the positioning availability:

 

The committed value (MPL) is 77%. Due to the incident in July, the signals were not available for some days and the parameter was only met 81% of the time, whereas in August and September it was met well above 99%. Still, all values are above the target.

Another example (Figure 16 of the Quarterly Performance Report Q3 2019, page 13) for the time determination availability:

 

In this case, the committed value (MPL) is 87%. Due to the incident in July, the parameter was only met 81% of the time therefore not fulfilling the target, whereas in August and September it was met 100%.

During the 3rd quarter of 2019, whenever the signals were Healthy, they provided good performance. Therefore, the accuracy MPLs were fulfilled despite the incident.

An example is provided below (Figure 2 of the Quarterly Performance Report Q3 2019, page 10) for the ranging accuracy:

 

The committed value (MPL) is 7 meters, 95%. During July, August and September, 95% of the time where the signals were healthy the error was below 0.5 meters for all satellites. Therefore, the target was largely met.

Next steps

Regardless of the fact that the published MPLs were mostly met due to a proper estimation of the margins associated to the current deployment status, the programme fully recognises the magnitude of the service outage, and is working consistently on actions to increase Galileo’s stability, robustness and resilience. This will translate into a future update of the Service Definition Document, including more stringent commitments with lower margins, and the reporting of the delivered performance according to the new MPLs.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Galileo performance reports, which measure the system’s performance against Minimum Performance Levels, are published on a quarterly basis.

Galileo performance assessment

31.1.2020 15:16  
Galileo performance reports, which measure the system’s performance against  Minimum Performance Levels, are published on a quarterly basis.
Published: 
31 January 2020

The Galileo performance is reported in the Galileo Initial Services – Open Service – Quarterly Performance Report, where several key performance indicators are analysed according to criteria (Minimum Performance Levels, MPLs) defined in the Galileo Service Definition document (SDD), published in the European GNSS Service Centre and last updated in May 2019.

As planned, recently the GSA published the Q3 2019 performance report. This report covers the period when a technical incident caused by an equipment malfunction in Galileo last July resulted in a six-day interruption in Galileo navigation and timing services. This had an important effect on the programme and, following the incident, an independent Inquiry Board was set up by the European Commission to investigate its causes and to make recommendations for actions to avoid another such incident in the future. 

Performance measurement: how is it done?

Measurement of service performance is one of the key activities of the GSA, the Galileo Service Provider. The GSA’s Galileo Reference Centre, located in Noordwijk, the Netherlands, plays a crucial role in monitoring the Galileo performance . 

The Galileo Reference Centre (GRC) is one of the Galileo Service Facilities and it supports the provision of services to Galileo users. The GRC is operated by the GSA, providing an independent means of evaluating the performance of the Galileo Service Operator and the quality of the signals in space. The GRC is fully independent of the system and the Galileo Service Operator with respect to both the technical solution and operations, and consists of both a core facility and contributions available in EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland. Data and products from cooperating entities in the Member States make it possible to observe the Galileo signals all over the world at all times, in support of both routine operations and specific performance assessment campaigns.

The minimum performance levels

The MPLs address several parameters of interest, and can be mainly grouped into two categories:

  • Accuracy MPLs refer to how well (accurately) the Galileo services perform, whenever the Galileo signals are usable (or “healthy”, as defined in the SDD). This includes:
    • Ranging Accuracy; related to the navigation data transmitted by the satellites which is used to calculate the distance between the satellite and the receiver;
    • Timing and Frequency Accuracy; related to the parameters that allow the receiver to obtain a precise synchronisation to either Universal Time Coordinated (UTC) or GPS time.

Accuracy MPLs are statistically defined as “95th percentile”, and calculated over a period of 30 days, using a sample of measurements taken every 5 minutes and considering only those epochs where the signals were healthy. In line with other GNSS constellation providers, timing parameters are normalised over a year by averaging the past twelve 30-day periods. For accuracy parameters, the smaller the achieved value, the better.

  • Availability MPLs refer to how much time per month (or year) a given performance level is to be met (for which the signals have to be healthy). This includes:
    • Per-Slot Availability; related to the amount of time per period that the signals from each satellite are healthy;
    • Timing Availability; related to the amount of time per period that the timing parameters are broadcast, and the time synchronisation error is within the specified target;
    • Positioning Availability; related to the amount of time per period that the users have enough satellites in view to calculate their position, and the calculated position error is within the specified target.

Availability MPLs are reported as percent, and calculated over a period of 30 days, using a sample of measurements taken every 5 minutes and considering all epochs (healthy or not). Again, in line with other GNSS constellation providers, some parameters are normalised over a year by averaging the past twelve 30-day periods (timing and per-slot availability). For availability parameters, the larger the achieved value, the better.

The Service Definition Document also describes how to assess whether the Galileo signals are healthy or not, by looking into some parameters (“flags”) transmitted by the satellites, and checking the last time when the navigation data was refreshed (it should not be older than 4 hours).

The Galileo performance in Q3 2019

The Galileo system is currently in a partial deployment stage, with some satellites still to be launched and a number of ground infrastructure upgrades on-going to provide redundancy and complete all functionalities. For this reason, the MPL commitments published in the SDD include margins that account for possible planned and unplanned outages. The quarterly performance reports provide visibility on the measured performance and compare it with the MPL. Galileo has regularly performed well above the MPL targets since the declaration of Initial Services in 2016.

The Galileo incident in July 2019 prevented the refresh of the data transmitted by the satellites, therefore eventually the signals were flagged a not healthy and/or the data became outdated. This caused an impact on the availability MPLs that are calculated monthly. These parameters went well below the values typically provided by Galileo, yet in most of the cases (all but two) they stayed above the committed figure, which includes margins for the reasons explained above. The performance report, therefore, displays them as “green” in the dashboard, however the trend chart clearly shows the difference with the months of June and August and the margin with the MPL. 

An example is provided below (Figure 12 of the Quarterly Performance Report Q3 2019, page 19) for the positioning availability:

 

The committed value (MPL) is 77%. Due to the incident in July, the signals were not available for some days and the parameter was only met 81% of the time, whereas in August and September it was met well above 99%. Still, all values are above the target.

Another example (Figure 16 of the Quarterly Performance Report Q3 2019, page 13) for the time determination availability:

 

In this case, the committed value (MPL) is 87%. Due to the incident in July, the parameter was only met 81% of the time therefore not fulfilling the target, whereas in August and September it was met 100%.

During the 3rd quarter of 2019, whenever the signals were Healthy, they provided good performance. Therefore, the accuracy MPLs were fulfilled despite the incident.

An example is provided below (Figure 2 of the Quarterly Performance Report Q3 2019, page 10) for the ranging accuracy:

 

The committed value (MPL) is 7 meters, 95%. During July, August and September, 95% of the time where the signals were healthy the error was below 0.5 meters for all satellites. Therefore, the target was largely met.

Next steps

Regardless of the fact that the published MPLs were mostly met due to a proper estimation of the margins associated to the current deployment status, the programme fully recognises the magnitude of the service outage, and is working consistently on actions to increase Galileo’s stability, robustness and resilience. This will translate into a future update of the Service Definition Document, including more stringent commitments with lower margins, and the reporting of the delivered performance according to the new MPLs.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Galileo performance reports, which measure the system’s performance against Minimum Performance Levels, are published on a quarterly basis.

Galileo performance assessment

31.1.2020 15:16  
Galileo performance reports, which measure the system’s performance against  Minimum Performance Levels, are published on a quarterly basis.
Published: 
31 January 2020

The Galileo performance is reported in the Galileo Initial Services – Open Service – Quarterly Performance Report, where several key performance indicators are analysed according to criteria (Minimum Performance Levels, MPLs) defined in the Galileo Service Definition document (SDD), published in the European GNSS Service Centre and last updated in May 2019.

As planned, recently the GSA published the Q3 2019 performance report. This report covers the period when a technical incident caused by an equipment malfunction in Galileo last July resulted in a six-day interruption in Galileo navigation and timing services. This had an important effect on the programme and, following the incident, an independent Inquiry Board was set up by the European Commission to investigate its causes and to make recommendations for actions to avoid another such incident in the future. 

Performance measurement: how is it done?

Measurement of service performance is one of the key activities of the GSA, the Galileo Service Provider. The GSA’s Galileo Reference Centre, located in Noordwijk, the Netherlands, plays a crucial role in monitoring the Galileo performance . 

The Galileo Reference Centre (GRC) is one of the Galileo Service Facilities and it supports the provision of services to Galileo users. The GRC is operated by the GSA, providing an independent means of evaluating the performance of the Galileo Service Operator and the quality of the signals in space. The GRC is fully independent of the system and the Galileo Service Operator with respect to both the technical solution and operations, and consists of both a core facility and contributions available in EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland. Data and products from cooperating entities in the Member States make it possible to observe the Galileo signals all over the world at all times, in support of both routine operations and specific performance assessment campaigns.

The minimum performance levels

The MPLs address several parameters of interest, and can be mainly grouped into two categories:

  • Accuracy MPLs refer to how well (accurately) the Galileo services perform, whenever the Galileo signals are usable (or “healthy”, as defined in the SDD). This includes:
    • Ranging Accuracy; related to the navigation data transmitted by the satellites which is used to calculate the distance between the satellite and the receiver;
    • Timing and Frequency Accuracy; related to the parameters that allow the receiver to obtain a precise synchronisation to either Universal Time Coordinated (UTC) or GPS time.

Accuracy MPLs are statistically defined as “95th percentile”, and calculated over a period of 30 days, using a sample of measurements taken every 5 minutes and considering only those epochs where the signals were healthy. In line with other GNSS constellation providers, timing parameters are normalised over a year by averaging the past twelve 30-day periods. For accuracy parameters, the smaller the achieved value, the better.

  • Availability MPLs refer to how much time per month (or year) a given performance level is to be met (for which the signals have to be healthy). This includes:
    • Per-Slot Availability; related to the amount of time per period that the signals from each satellite are healthy;
    • Timing Availability; related to the amount of time per period that the timing parameters are broadcast, and the time synchronisation error is within the specified target;
    • Positioning Availability; related to the amount of time per period that the users have enough satellites in view to calculate their position, and the calculated position error is within the specified target.

Availability MPLs are reported as percent, and calculated over a period of 30 days, using a sample of measurements taken every 5 minutes and considering all epochs (healthy or not). Again, in line with other GNSS constellation providers, some parameters are normalised over a year by averaging the past twelve 30-day periods (timing and per-slot availability). For availability parameters, the larger the achieved value, the better.

The Service Definition Document also describes how to assess whether the Galileo signals are healthy or not, by looking into some parameters (“flags”) transmitted by the satellites, and checking the last time when the navigation data was refreshed (it should not be older than 4 hours).

The Galileo performance in Q3 2019

The Galileo system is currently in a partial deployment stage, with some satellites still to be launched and a number of ground infrastructure upgrades on-going to provide redundancy and complete all functionalities. For this reason, the MPL commitments published in the SDD include margins that account for possible planned and unplanned outages. The quarterly performance reports provide visibility on the measured performance and compare it with the MPL. Galileo has regularly performed well above the MPL targets since the declaration of Initial Services in 2016.

The Galileo incident in July 2019 prevented the refresh of the data transmitted by the satellites, therefore eventually the signals were flagged as not healthy and/or the data became outdated. This caused an impact on the availability MPLs that are calculated monthly. These parameters went well below the values typically provided by Galileo, yet in most of the cases (all but two) they stayed above the committed figure, which includes margins for the reasons explained above. The performance report, therefore, displays them as “green” in the dashboard, however the trend chart clearly shows the difference with the months of June and August and the margin with the MPL. 

An example is provided below (Figure 12 of the Quarterly Performance Report Q3 2019, page 19) for the positioning availability:

 

The committed value (MPL) is 77%. Due to the incident in July, the signals were not available for some days and the parameter was only met 81% of the time, whereas in August and September it was met well above 99%. Still, all values are above the target.

Another example (Figure 16 of the Quarterly Performance Report Q3 2019, page 13) for the time determination availability:

 

In this case, the committed value (MPL) is 87%. Due to the incident in July, the parameter was only met 81% of the time therefore not fulfilling the target, whereas in August and September it was met 100%.

During the 3rd quarter of 2019, whenever the signals were Healthy, they provided good performance. Therefore, the accuracy MPLs were fulfilled despite the incident.

An example is provided below (Figure 2 of the Quarterly Performance Report Q3 2019, page 10) for the ranging accuracy:

 

The committed value (MPL) is 7 meters, 95%. During July, August and September, 95% of the time where the signals were healthy the error was below 0.5 meters for all satellites. Therefore, the target was largely met.

Next steps

Regardless of the fact that the published MPLs were mostly met due to a proper estimation of the margins associated to the current deployment status, the programme fully recognises the magnitude of the service outage, and is working consistently on actions to increase Galileo’s stability, robustness and resilience. This will translate into a future update of the Service Definition Document, including more stringent commitments with lower margins, and the reporting of the delivered performance according to the new MPLs.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Galileo performance reports, which measure the system’s performance against Minimum Performance Levels, are published on a quarterly basis.

‘I am a true believer in the European project’ - Carlo des Dorides talks about his time at GSA

28.1.2020 14:19  
Carlo des Dorides and his team at GSA headquarters in Prague
Published: 
30 January 2020

Carlo des Dorides took up his position as executive director of the European GNSS Agency (GSA) on February 1, 2011. In the nine years since then, the Galileo programme has progressed from a project on paper to an operational programme with over a billion users around the globe. As his term at the helm of the Agency draws to an end, the GSA executive director looks back at the successes and challenges of the past nine years and speaks about his hopes for the future.

During your nine years at the head of the GSA there have been significant advances in the European GNSS programme. What do you see as the greatest achievement during your term?

When I first took up my position as executive director of the GSA, the Galileo programme only existed on paper and EGNOS had yet to be certified for use in civil aviation. Since then, we have achieved the remarkable figures of over 1 billion Galileo-enabled smartphones on the market and EGNOS present at more than 350 airports in Europe. These figures represent the culmination of the two programmes, but they also represent a remarkable path. On one hand, we built a performing system for both Galileo and EGNOS. But having a performing system is not enough - you also need to have the confidence of users. The GSA played a crucial role in building this confidence.

EGNOS is the first pan-European infrastructure for civil aviation, and in offering it to the market we were faced with many questions. There were questions about certification, about the liability chain, about the updating of avionics. The GSA worked consistently with all stakeholders and brought all of these elements together, and the result is that we now have EGNOS present at so many airports. After nine years of hard work, the figures bear testament to the fact that we have truly created a success story.

As with any venture on this scale, there have been ups and downs in building the European GNSS over the years. What have been the greatest challenges, and how were they overcome?

One difficult decision that we had to face was the decision to take over operational management of the Galileo programme in January 2017. Why was this difficult? Well, there were diverging views about operational readiness, and different assessments of the risks involved. Even though we had declared Initial Services in December 2016, the system was not complete at the time. In a sense, we were taking the wheel of a car that had not yet been fully built, which was not an easy thing to do. At the same time, the GSA itself was not fully formed – it was still a house under construction. To continue with the car analogy, we were a skilled driver, but still a young and untested driver. It was a challenge to manage this uncertainty while still building the system. 

Another difficult choice was the decision to declare Initial Services, as this meant that there was now greater public scrutiny of the programme in what was essentially a period of testing and fine-tuning in preparation for the launch of Full Operating Capability. This was a blessing and a curse – while the programme’s successes were celebrated, all technical glitches were very much in the public eye. This was the case with the technical incident last year that resulted in a temporary interruption of the Galileo signal. While this incident was a setback, we learned valuable lessons and are stronger as a result.

Another challenge was when the GSA moved to Prague. At the beginning it was difficult to build the team and to attract the right profiles, as there was uncertainty about the future of the GSA and people didn’t know what to expect in Prague. A mere nine years later the Agency has grown tremendously, both in terms of staff numbers and in prestige, and Prague is one of the top-rated European capitals for quality of life. Now that GSA is expanding into the European Union Agency for the Space Programme, I don’t anticipate any problems with our capacity to attract talented professionals.

During your term, the GSA managed to bring Galileo to over 1 bln smartphones, moving the programme from paper to space and back to Earth to devices and users, what triggered this progress?

In achieving this milestone, the work of the Agency in liaising with user communities has been of fundamental importance. Our constant interaction with users through our User Consultation Platforms has given us a unique understanding of the dynamics of the GNSS market and of the needs of the various user segments. We have also compiled, in alternate years, GNSS Market Reports and GNSS User Technology Reports, which has deepened our understanding of market needs. This understanding has allowed us to effectively meet these needs – and the market has been quick to respond. The work of our Market Development Department has been important in this regard, thanks to their ongoing interaction with all the market segments. 

We have also been active in communicating, both to industry and to the general public, about the benefits that Galileo offers in terms of increased accuracy, availability and robustness of the positioning, navigation and timing signal. Manufacturers have been quick to understand these benefits and have been eager to pass them on to their customers. These customers, in turn, are becoming increasingly aware of the accuracy and availability gains that Galileo offers, and this is reflected in the 1 billion smartphone milestone. This was a remarkable achievement for the Galileo programme, and the fact that it occurred in the same week that we celebrated the 15th anniversary of the Agency made it especially gratifying. 

You have been leading one of the fastest growing European agencies, linking space to user needs, with assets and teams spread across Europe. What are the key elements of your leadership?

Building the right team for the job was key to my success at the head of the GSA and key to the success of the Agency in building Galileo and EGNOS. In my position as GSA executive director I had to wear many hats to understand and respond to the needs of the Agency and its growing team, along with our stakeholders and user communities. As a leader, you are responsible for guiding the team and creating the right mind-set among the team members. You need to lead by example, but you also need to play as a team member, know when to take the stage and when let others shine, and be ready to serve and do what is required of you. I am proud of the team that we have built at the GSA. I believe that GSA has a key role to play in making the EU Space programme grow and thrive both at the European and Global level.

On a more personal level, when you look back at your term as the executive director of the GSA, what gives you the most pride or satisfaction?

There are a number of things that come to mind when I look back at my term at the GSA. First of all, by helping to establish the Galileo programme, I feel that I have made a contribution to building Europe. I am a true believer in the European project. My position at the GSA gave me a wonderful opportunity to work on a concrete project that shows what the EU can achieve by working together. The European space programmes would not have been possible for any individual Member State to accomplish alone – it was only by coming together as Europeans that this became possible. 

Secondly, I am proud to have helped create a future for all the staff that believed in our project and put their trust in me and in the Agency. Thanks to their dedication, the future of the Agency looks bright. I was approached by an Agency employee recently who told me that they had really enjoyed working at the GSA because of the positive working atmosphere that exists here, based on a common motivation and shared values. It takes time to build this, but it is fundamentally important. Building the GSA team was difficult in the beginning but it was an important achievement and it is one of which I am particularly proud. 

What does the future look like for the European space programme and for the GSA, and do you have any ‘words of wisdom’ for your successor?

The future looks promising, both for the EU Space Programme and for the GSA. The recently approved Regulation on the EU Space Programme and on setting up the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) paves the way for the expansion of the programme, with an increased budget and expanded responsibilities. The approval of the Regulation shows that we have earned the confidence of the Member States. They can see that the space programme is creating economic opportunities and jobs, and understand the benefits that it offers for their citizens and for European growth.

In terms of ‘words of wisdom’ for my successor – I would just say that it is important to embrace change. We live in a dynamic world and change is an important part of our daily work. That said; change should be approached with caution. What we have built here at the GSA is the result of maturity gained over the years. I would advise that change should be preceded by careful listening to all stakeholders and careful consideration of all possible outcomes. Otherwise we could stand to lose what we have built. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).
Carlo des Dorides and his team at GSA headquarters in Prague

Market understands value of dual frequency

28.1.2020 11:32  
5G is set to act as an engine for growth in dual frequency uptake
Published: 
28 January 2020

Chip manufacturers are very aware of the opportunities that dual frequency offers and, correspondingly, the market has witnessed the launch of a range of mass-market dual-frequency chips targeted at various applications. In turn, smartphone manufacturers also understand the benefits that these chips provide in terms of positioning accuracy for location based services and are eager to pass on these benefits to their users.

To date, there are 41 smartphone models on the market, from 10 manufacturers, offering dual-frequency capability. One of the most recent launches by a major manufacturer was the Galaxy Note10 and Galaxy Note10+ from Samsung Electronics, which hit the market in the second half of last year. Fitted with the Broadcom BCM47755 chip, these smartphones are the first from the South Korean multinational to provide dual-frequency GNSS capability. 

Users of these and other dual-frequency smartphones are able to benefit from the increased accuracy and robustness of the GNSS signal, particularly in urban environments, as dual-frequency phones are more resistant to multipath errors. Developers too are able to leverage the enhanced accuracy offered by this dual-frequency capability to create new applications requiring high accuracy, robust positioning. Check on the UseGalileo site, to see if your smartphone has dual-frequency capability.

Read this: MyGalileoApp – an ecosystem of innovation

The growing number of dual-frequency smartphones on the market clearly shows that the major electronics manufacturers understand the opportunities that this capability provides in terms of enabling a new generation of location based services. But there is one area in particular that will spark growing demand for dual frequency.

Dual-frequency – Galileo leads the way

According to the latest GNSS Market Report, published in October last year, for the 5G market in particular, the availability of accurate, cost effective and robust, dual-frequency GNSS systems will be critical in providing business opportunities. With the increased rollout of 5G internationally in the coming years, dual-frequency capability will be a key factor and we are likely to see an even greater number of compatible devices on the market.

And this: EU Space Week 2019: Investors meet innovation

This is good news for the Galileo system – dual-frequency capacity is a key Galileo differentiator, as the Galileo constellation has the highest number of dual-frequency satellites of any GNSS system. “Since the first dual-frequency GNSS smartphone hit the market back in June 2018, the trend has been towards increased implementation of dual-frequency capability in consumer platforms, allowing them to improve their location performance,” said European GNSS Agency (GSA) Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani, adding that Galileo stands ready to support this trend.

Why is it important?

Dual-frequency capability means that the GNSS receivers are able to receive two GNSS signals at different frequencies from a satellite. In the case of Galileo, these frequencies are E1 and E5a. Dual frequency provides increased reliability to users – if one of the frequency bands fails, the other can be used as backup. 

Other advantages of dual-frequency capability include a reduced signal acquisition time and improved accuracy of positioning and timing. Dual frequency also reduces problems caused by obstructions such as buildings and other obstacles, thanks to the fact that the L5/E5a signals are lower in frequency, making them are less prone to multipath interference errors.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

5G is set to act as an engine for growth in dual frequency uptake

Want to know more about EGNSS for geomatics?

22.1.2020 15:07  
The webinar will cover everything EGNSS has to offer for geomatics.
Published: 
22 January 2020

Many promising geomatics applications benefit from the European navigation programmes Galileo and EGNOS. Land, marine and mine surveying, infrastructure monitoring and mapping and GIS applications that require high precision GNSS are all enabled by both the EU satellite navigation systems. The European GNSS Agency (GSA), together with Geospatial Media, invites you to participate in a free webinar - EGNSS for Geomatics – where you can learn about everything that EGNSS has to offer for geomatics.

GNSS is one of the key Geomatics technologies along with GIS, Earth Observation and Remote Sensing, to help with the geospatial data acquisition. Geomatics disciplines include the geo-data collection means and techniques used in land surveying (including cadastral, construction, mapping and GIS, mining or infrastructure monitoring), photogrammetry, remote sensing, marine surveying and other emerging tools such as drones or mobile mapping, for which high-precision GNSS is either paramount, or a key enabler. EGNOS and Galileo are the two EU satellite navigation systems that provide high-quality positioning, navigation and timing services to users across the whole world.

In the webinar EGNSS for Geomatics experts in navigation and geomatics will guide you through the Galileo and EGNOS programmes, the use, the benefits, the added value for the geomatics user community, and the applications already available as well as the innovation potential.

Save the date in your calendar: Thursday, 23 January at 14:00 CET.  

 

Don´t miss out - REGISTER NOW!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The webinar will cover everything EGNSS has to offer for geomatics.

Want to know more about EGNSS for geomatics?

22.1.2020 15:07  
The webinar will cover everything EGNSS has to offer for geomatics.
Published: 
22 January 2020

Many promising geomatics applications benefit from the European navigation programmes Galileo and EGNOS. Land, marine and mine surveying, infrastructure monitoring and mapping and GIS applications that require high precision GNSS are all enabled by both the EU satellite navigation systems. The European GNSS Agency (GSA), together with Geospatial Media, invites you to participate in a free webinar - EGNSS for Geomatics – where you can learn about everything that EGNSS has to offer for geomatics.

GNSS is one of the key Geomatics technologies along with GIS, Earth Observation and Remote Sensing, to help with the geospatial data acquisition. Geomatics disciplines include the geo-data collection means and techniques used in land surveying (including cadastral, construction, mapping and GIS, mining or infrastructure monitoring), photogrammetry, remote sensing, marine surveying and other emerging tools such as drones or mobile mapping, for which high-precision GNSS is either paramount, or a key enabler. EGNOS and Galileo are the two EU satellite navigation systems that provide high-quality positioning, navigation and timing services to users across the whole world.

In the webinar EGNSS for Geomatics experts in navigation and geomatics will guide you through the Galileo and EGNOS programmes, the use, the benefits, the added value for the geomatics user community, and the applications already available as well as the innovation potential.

Save the date in your calendar: Thursday, 23 January at 14:00 CET.  

Don´t miss out - REGISTER NOW!

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The webinar will cover everything EGNSS has to offer for geomatics.

Galileo Return Link Service presented at European Space Conference

21.1.2020 11:21  
The Galileo Return Link Service will boost survival rates by giving an important psychological boost to people in distress.
Published: 
21 January 2020

The Galileo Return Link Service, which allows people in distress to receive automatic acknowledgement that their signal has been received, was presented at the 12th European Space Conference, in the Egmont Palace in Brussels on January 21.

The Galileo Return Link Service (RLS) is a free-of-charge global service available to Cospas-Sarsat RLS compatible beacons. The new functionality, currently offered uniquely by Galileo, enables a communication link that relays Return Link Messages (RLM) back to the originating beacon through the Galileo Navigation Signal in Space (I/NAV E1).

Joint effort

The RLS is a joint effort between Cospas-Sarsat and the Galileo programme, supported on one hand by the existing Cospas-Sarsat system and, on the other, by a new Galileo Service Facility called the Return Link Service Provider (RLSP). The RLSP is in charge of securely providing the ground segment interface between the French Mission Control Centre and the Galileo core infrastructure, enabling the transmission of RLM requests to Galileo satellites in view of the beacon.

“The GSA, as the Galileo Search and Rescue Service Authority, has contributed tremendously to the development of the Return Link,” said GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. “The GSA has also supported the development of Galileo Return Link-enabled beacons in recent years. Today, there are several beacon manufacturers worldwide ready to sell Galileo SAR Return Link-compatible beacons, including 5 in Europe,” he said.

Read this: Remote beacon activation with Galileo return link successfully tested

By sending a confirmation to the user that the distress signal from the beacon has been localised by the Cospas-Sarsat system and the information relayed to the relevant Search and Rescue governmental authorities, the Return Link Service (RLS) will help save more lives. Receiving reassurance that their distress alert has been well received will deliver a valuable psychological lift to victims and further boost survival rates by reducing panic.

“The contributions to Cospas-Sarsat from France and the CNES, as the Galileo SAR Operator, have been of paramount importance in transforming the Galileo SAR Return Link Service into a success,” said French Space Agency (CNES) President and GSA Administrative Board Chair Jean-Yves Le Gall.

Unique differentiator

The end-to-end RLM delivery time is expected to be about 10 minutes, but in some cases it may take longer, possibly up to 30 minutes from the moment the beacon is activated until the notification is sent via the Galileo Signal in Space. A total of 15 minutes are allocated to the Cospas-Sarsat system for the localisation and routing of the alert and 15 minutes to the Galileo System for the Return Link message broadcast. However, measured results generally achieve a much faster message delivery time.

And this: Operation Shark Bait: Galileo SAR will save lives!

“Today with its unique differentiator, Galileo SAR is demonstrating how Europe is at the forefront of high technology for the good of European citizens. This wouldn’t have been possible without the strong support of the international community - Cospas-Sarsat, CNES, the International Maritime Organization  and the International Civil Aviation Organization - and the main beacon manufacturers, all of which have contributed to the provision of an end-to-end solution for people in distress,” said Thierry Breton, European Commissioner for the Internal Market. 

A Return Link capability was first introduced by the Galileo Programme back in 2005. The SAR community soon expressed interest and, in 2008, the Return Link Service was adopted in the Cospas-Sarsat Strategic Plan. Following a great deal of effort by the Galileo Programme, Cospas-Sarsat and beacon manufacturers, a dedicated transmission protocol for Return Link-enabled beacons was established in 2010 and successfully verified during the Galileo In-Orbit Validation Phase in 2013. In 2019, deployment of the required infrastructure was completed and the Return Link Service underwent a thorough System and Service validation that concluded in November 2019.

The SAR Service Definition Document (SAR SDD), available in the European GNSS Service Centre electronic library, is aimed at Galileo SAR users, and describes in detail the characteristics and performance of the Galileo SAR Services. The document presents the relevant system infrastructure and introduces the Minimum Performance Levels that represent Galileo’s commitment to its users during the Galileo SAR Service provision phase. 

Galileo SAR RLS users that would like to receive more information can send their inquiries to the European GNSS Service Centre Help Desk at: www.gsc-europa.eu/helpdesk.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The Galileo Return Link Service will boost survival rates by giving an important psychological boost to people in distress.

Galileo Return Link Service presented at European Space Conference

21.1.2020 11:21  
The Galileo Return Link Service will boost survival rates by giving an important psychological boost to people in distress.
Published: 
21 January 2020

The Galileo Return Link Service, which allows people in distress to receive automatic acknowledgement that their signal has been received, was declared operational at the 12th European Space Conference, in the Egmont Palace in Brussels on January 21.

The Galileo Return Link Service (RLS) is a free-of-charge global service available to Cospas-Sarsat RLS compatible beacons. The new functionality, currently offered uniquely by Galileo, enables a communication link that relays Return Link Messages (RLM) back to the originating beacon through the Galileo Navigation Signal in Space (I/NAV E1).

Joint effort

The RLS is a joint effort between Cospas-Sarsat and the Galileo programme, supported on one hand by the existing Cospas-Sarsat system and, on the other, by a new Galileo Service Facility called the Return Link Service Provider (RLSP). The RLSP is in charge of securely providing the ground segment interface between the French Mission Control Centre and the Galileo core infrastructure, enabling the transmission of RLM requests to Galileo satellites in view of the beacon.

“The GSA, as the Galileo Search and Rescue Service Authority, has contributed tremendously to the development of the Return Link,” said GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. “The GSA has also supported the development of Galileo Return Link-enabled beacons in recent years. Today, there are several beacon manufacturers worldwide ready to sell Galileo SAR Return Link-compatible beacons, including 5 in Europe,” he said.

Read this: Remote beacon activation with Galileo return link successfully tested

By sending a confirmation to the user that the distress signal from the beacon has been localised by the Cospas-Sarsat system and the information relayed to the relevant Search and Rescue governmental authorities, the Return Link Service (RLS) will help save more lives. Receiving reassurance that their distress alert has been well received will deliver a valuable psychological lift to victims and further boost survival rates by reducing panic.

“The contributions to Cospas-Sarsat from France and the CNES, as the Galileo SAR Operator, have been of paramount importance in transforming the Galileo SAR Return Link Service into a success,” said French Space Agency (CNES) President and GSA Administrative Board Chair Jean-Yves Le Gall.

Unique differentiator

The end-to-end RLM delivery time is expected to be about 10 minutes, but in some cases it may take longer, possibly up to 30 minutes from the moment the beacon is activated until the notification is sent via the Galileo Signal in Space. A total of 15 minutes are allocated to the Cospas-Sarsat system for the localisation and routing of the alert and 15 minutes to the Galileo System for the Return Link message broadcast. However, measured results generally achieve a much faster message delivery time.

And this: Operation Shark Bait: Galileo SAR will save lives!

“Today with its unique differentiator, Galileo SAR is demonstrating how Europe is at the forefront of high technology for the good of European citizens. This wouldn’t have been possible without the strong support of the international community - Cospas-Sarsat, CNES, the International Maritime Organization  and the International Civil Aviation Organization - and the main beacon manufacturers, all of which have contributed to the provision of an end-to-end solution for people in distress,” said Thierry Breton, European Commissioner for the Internal Market. 

A Return Link capability was first introduced by the Galileo Programme back in 2005. The SAR community soon expressed interest and, in 2008, the Return Link Service was adopted in the Cospas-Sarsat Strategic Plan. Following a great deal of effort by the Galileo Programme, Cospas-Sarsat and beacon manufacturers, a dedicated transmission protocol for Return Link-enabled beacons was established in 2010 and successfully verified during the Galileo In-Orbit Validation Phase in 2013. In 2019, deployment of the required infrastructure was completed and the Return Link Service underwent a thorough System and Service validation that concluded in November 2019.

The SAR Service Definition Document (SAR SDD), available in the European GNSS Service Centre electronic library, is aimed at Galileo SAR users, and describes in detail the characteristics and performance of the Galileo SAR Services. The document presents the relevant system infrastructure and introduces the Minimum Performance Levels that represent Galileo’s commitment to its users during the Galileo SAR Service provision phase. 

Galileo SAR RLS users that would like to receive more information can send their inquiries to the European GNSS Service Centre Help Desk at: www.gsc-europa.eu/helpdesk.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The Galileo Return Link Service will boost survival rates by giving an important psychological boost to people in distress.

Galileo Return Link Service presented at European Space Conference

21.1.2020 11:21  
The Galileo Return Link Service will boost survival rates by giving an important psychological boost to people in distress.
Published: 
21 January 2020

The Galileo Return Link Service, which allows people in distress to receive automatic acknowledgement that their signal has been received, was declared operational at the 12th European Space Conference, in the Egmont Palace in Brussels on January 21.

The Galileo Return Link Service (RLS) is a free-of-charge global service available to Cospas-Sarsat RLS compatible beacons. The new functionality, currently offered uniquely by Galileo, enables a communication link that relays Return Link Messages (RLM) back to the originating beacon through the Galileo Navigation Signal in Space (I/NAV E1).

Joint effort

The RLS is a joint effort between Cospas-Sarsat and the Galileo programme, supported on one hand by the existing Cospas-Sarsat system and, on the other, by a new Galileo Service Facility called the Return Link Service Provider (RLSP). The RLSP is in charge of securely providing the ground segment interface between the French Mission Control Centre and the Galileo core infrastructure, enabling the transmission of RLM requests to Galileo satellites in view of the beacon.

“The GSA, as the Galileo Search and Rescue Service Authority, has contributed tremendously to the development of the Return Link,” said GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. “The GSA has also supported the development of Galileo Return Link-enabled beacons in recent years. Today, there are several beacon manufacturers worldwide ready to sell Galileo SAR Return Link-compatible beacons, including 5 in Europe,” he said.

Read this: Remote beacon activation with Galileo return link successfully tested

By sending a confirmation to the user that the distress signal from the beacon has been localised by the Cospas-Sarsat system and the information relayed to the relevant Search and Rescue governmental authorities, the Return Link Service (RLS) will help save more lives. Receiving reassurance that their distress alert has been well received will deliver a valuable psychological lift to victims and further boost survival rates by reducing panic.

“The contributions to Cospas-Sarsat from France and the CNES, as the Galileo SAR Operator, have been of paramount importance in transforming the Galileo SAR Return Link Service into a success,” said French Space Agency (CNES) President and GSA Administrative Board Chair Jean-Yves Le Gall.

Unique differentiator

The end-to-end RLM delivery time is expected to be about 10 minutes, but in some cases it may take longer, possibly up to 30 minutes from the moment the beacon is activated until the notification is sent via the Galileo Signal in Space. A total of 15 minutes are allocated to the Cospas-Sarsat system for the localisation and routing of the alert and 15 minutes to the Galileo System for the Return Link message broadcast. However, measured results generally achieve a much faster message delivery time.

And this: Operation Shark Bait: Galileo SAR will save lives!

“Today with its unique differentiator, Galileo SAR is demonstrating how Europe is at the forefront of high technology for the good of European citizens. This wouldn’t have been possible without the strong support of the international community - Cospas-Sarsat, CNES, the International Maritime Organization  and the International Civil Aviation Organization - and the main beacon manufacturers, all of which have contributed to the provision of an end-to-end solution for people in distress,” said Thierry Breton, European Commissioner for the Internal Market. 

A Return Link capability was first introduced by the Galileo Programme back in 2005. The SAR community soon expressed interest and, in 2008, the Return Link Service was adopted in the Cospas-Sarsat Strategic Plan. Following a great deal of effort by the Galileo Programme, Cospas-Sarsat and beacon manufacturers, a dedicated transmission protocol for Return Link-enabled beacons was established in 2010 and successfully verified during the Galileo In-Orbit Validation Phase in 2013. In 2019, deployment of the required infrastructure was completed and the Return Link Service underwent a thorough System and Service validation that concluded in November 2019.

The SAR Service Definition Document (SAR SDD), available in the European GNSS Service Centre electronic library, is aimed at Galileo SAR users, and describes in detail the characteristics and performance of the Galileo SAR Services. The document presents the relevant system infrastructure and introduces the Minimum Performance Levels that represent Galileo’s commitment to its users during the Galileo SAR Service provision phase. 

Galileo SAR RLS users that would like to receive more information can send their inquiries to the European GNSS Service Centre Help Desk at: www.gsc-europa.eu/helpdesk.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The Galileo Return Link Service will boost survival rates by giving an important psychological boost to people in distress.

Galileo Return Link Service presented at European Space Conference

21.1.2020 11:21  
The Galileo Return Link Service will increase survival rates by giving an important psychological boost to people in distress.
Published: 
21 January 2020

The Galileo Return Link Service, which allows people in distress to receive automatic acknowledgement that their signal has been received, was declared operational at the 12th European Space Conference, in the Egmont Palace in Brussels on January 21.

The Galileo Return Link Service (RLS) is a free-of-charge global service available to Cospas-Sarsat RLS compatible beacons. The new functionality, currently offered uniquely by Galileo, enables a communication link that relays Return Link Messages (RLM) back to the originating beacon through the Galileo Navigation Signal in Space (I/NAV E1).

Joint effort

The RLS is a joint effort between Cospas-Sarsat and the Galileo programme, supported on one hand by the existing Cospas-Sarsat system and, on the other, by a new Galileo Service Facility called the Return Link Service Provider (RLSP). The RLSP is in charge of securely providing the ground segment interface between the French Mission Control Centre and the Galileo core infrastructure, enabling the transmission of RLM requests to Galileo satellites in view of the beacon.

“The GSA, as the Galileo Search and Rescue Service Authority, has contributed tremendously to the development of the Return Link,” said GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. “The GSA has also supported the development of Galileo Return Link-enabled beacons in recent years. Today, there are several beacon manufacturers worldwide ready to sell Galileo SAR Return Link-compatible beacons, including 5 in Europe,” he said.

Read this: Remote beacon activation with Galileo return link successfully tested

By sending a confirmation to the user that the distress signal from the beacon has been localised by the Cospas-Sarsat system and the information relayed to the relevant Search and Rescue governmental authorities, the Return Link Service (RLS) will help save more lives. Receiving reassurance that their distress alert has been well received will deliver a valuable psychological lift to victims and further boost survival rates by reducing panic.

“The contributions to Cospas-Sarsat from France and the CNES, as the Galileo SAR Operator, have been of paramount importance in transforming the Galileo SAR Return Link Service into a success,” said French Space Agency (CNES) President and GSA Administrative Board Chair Jean-Yves Le Gall.

Unique differentiator

The end-to-end RLM delivery time is expected to be about 10 minutes, but in some cases it may take longer, possibly up to 30 minutes from the moment the beacon is activated until the notification is sent via the Galileo Signal in Space. A total of 15 minutes are allocated to the Cospas-Sarsat system for the localisation and routing of the alert and 15 minutes to the Galileo System for the Return Link message broadcast. However, measured results generally achieve a much faster message delivery time.

And this: Operation Shark Bait: Galileo SAR will save lives!

“Today with its unique differentiator, Galileo SAR is demonstrating how Europe is at the forefront of high technology for the good of European citizens. This wouldn’t have been possible without the strong support of the international community - Cospas-Sarsat, CNES, the International Maritime Organization  and the International Civil Aviation Organization - and the main beacon manufacturers, all of which have contributed to the provision of an end-to-end solution for people in distress,” said Thierry Breton, European Commissioner for the Internal Market. 

A Return Link capability was first introduced by the Galileo Programme back in 2005. The SAR community soon expressed interest and, in 2008, the Return Link Service was adopted in the Cospas-Sarsat Strategic Plan. Following a great deal of effort by the Galileo Programme, Cospas-Sarsat and beacon manufacturers, a dedicated transmission protocol for Return Link-enabled beacons was established in 2010 and successfully verified during the Galileo In-Orbit Validation Phase in 2013. In 2019, deployment of the required infrastructure was completed and the Return Link Service underwent a thorough System and Service validation that concluded in November 2019.

The SAR Service Definition Document (SAR SDD), available in the European GNSS Service Centre electronic library, is aimed at Galileo SAR users, and describes in detail the characteristics and performance of the Galileo SAR Services. The document presents the relevant system infrastructure and introduces the Minimum Performance Levels that represent Galileo’s commitment to its users during the Galileo SAR Service provision phase. 

Galileo SAR RLS users that would like to receive more information can send their inquiries to the European GNSS Service Centre Help Desk at: www.gsc-europa.eu/helpdesk.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The Galileo Return Link Service will increase survival rates by giving an important psychological boost to people in distress.

Galileo Return Link Service declared at European Space Conference

21.1.2020 11:21  
The Galileo Return Link Service will increase survival rates by giving an important psychological boost to people in distress.
Published: 
21 January 2020

The Galileo Return Link Service, which allows people in distress to receive automatic acknowledgement that their signal has been received, was declared operational at the 12th European Space Conference, in the Egmont Palace in Brussels on January 21.

The Galileo Return Link Service (RLS) is a free-of-charge global service available to Cospas-Sarsat RLS compatible beacons. The new functionality, currently offered uniquely by Galileo, enables a communication link that relays Return Link Messages (RLM) back to the originating beacon through the Galileo Navigation Signal in Space (I/NAV E1).

Joint effort

The RLS is a joint effort between Cospas-Sarsat and the Galileo programme, supported on one hand by the existing Cospas-Sarsat system and, on the other, by a new Galileo Service Facility called the Return Link Service Provider (RLSP). The RLSP is in charge of securely providing the ground segment interface between the French Mission Control Centre and the Galileo core infrastructure, enabling the transmission of RLM requests to Galileo satellites in view of the beacon.

“The GSA, as the Galileo Search and Rescue Service Authority, has contributed tremendously to the development of the Return Link,” said GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. “The GSA has also supported the development of Galileo Return Link-enabled beacons in recent years. Today, there are several beacon manufacturers worldwide ready to sell Galileo SAR Return Link-compatible beacons, including 5 in Europe,” he said.

Read this: Remote beacon activation with Galileo return link successfully tested

By sending a confirmation to the user that the distress signal from the beacon has been localised by the Cospas-Sarsat system and the information relayed to the relevant Search and Rescue governmental authorities, the Return Link Service (RLS) will help save more lives. Receiving reassurance that their distress alert has been well received will deliver a valuable psychological lift to victims and further boost survival rates by reducing panic.

“The contributions to Cospas-Sarsat from France and the CNES, as the Galileo SAR Operator, have been of paramount importance in transforming the Galileo SAR Return Link Service into a success,” said French Space Agency (CNES) President and GSA Administrative Board Chair Jean-Yves Le Gall.

Unique differentiator

The end-to-end RLM delivery time is expected to be about 10 minutes, but in some cases it may take longer, possibly up to 30 minutes from the moment the beacon is activated until the notification is sent via the Galileo Signal in Space. A total of 15 minutes are allocated to the Cospas-Sarsat system for the localisation and routing of the alert and 15 minutes to the Galileo System for the Return Link message broadcast. However, measured results generally achieve a much faster message delivery time.

And this: Operation Shark Bait: Galileo SAR will save lives!

“Today with its unique differentiator, Galileo SAR is demonstrating how Europe is at the forefront of high technology for the good of European citizens. This wouldn’t have been possible without the strong support of the international community - Cospas-Sarsat, CNES, the International Maritime Organization  and the International Civil Aviation Organization - and the main beacon manufacturers, all of which have contributed to the provision of an end-to-end solution for people in distress,” said Thierry Breton, European Commissioner for the Internal Market. 

A Return Link capability was first introduced by the Galileo Programme back in 2005. The SAR community soon expressed interest and, in 2008, the Return Link Service was adopted in the Cospas-Sarsat Strategic Plan. Following a great deal of effort by the Galileo Programme, Cospas-Sarsat and beacon manufacturers, a dedicated transmission protocol for Return Link-enabled beacons was established in 2010 and successfully verified during the Galileo In-Orbit Validation Phase in 2013. In 2019, deployment of the required infrastructure was completed and the Return Link Service underwent a thorough System and Service validation that concluded in November 2019.

The SAR Service Definition Document (SAR SDD), available in the European GNSS Service Centre electronic library, is aimed at Galileo SAR users, and describes in detail the characteristics and performance of the Galileo SAR Services. The document presents the relevant system infrastructure and introduces the Minimum Performance Levels that represent Galileo’s commitment to its users during the Galileo SAR Service provision phase. 

Galileo SAR RLS users that would like to receive more information can send their inquiries to the European GNSS Service Centre Help Desk at: www.gsc-europa.eu/helpdesk.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The Galileo Return Link Service will increase survival rates by giving an important psychological boost to people in distress.

EC project showcases benefits of EGNSS for drones

16.1.2020 11:22  
EGNSS-enabled drone flying in the urban environment of Villacarrillo, Spain
Published: 
16 January 2020

A recent project funded by the European Commission has carried out technical and financial studies aiming at supporting the standardisation process for EGNSS in drones (also known as UAS or RPAS), in line with the Space Strategy for Europe regarding fostering the use of EGNSS in aviation.

As part of the EGNSS4RPAS project, dedicated flight trials were performed to understand how EGNSS can contribute to safer and more efficient drone operations in real-life scenarios in the future U-Space. The outcomes of the trials will contribute to ongoing standardisation efforts, notably by EUROCAE and ASD-STAN.

The first and second trials were organized at the ATLAS drone test facility in Villacarrillo, Spain. The first test involved one X-UAV Clouds fixed-wing drone with a 1.85-metre wingspan and two DJI multicopters performing several operations in visual line of sight (VLOS) conditions. The second test used the same fixed-wing drone which flew various flight plans in VLOS and beyond visual line of sight (BVLOS) conditions. Moreover, dynamic geo-fencing and geo-caging demonstrations were performed as well as a scenario where the drone lost the Command & Control link and was required to return autonomously to the Home Point.

Watch the video: EGNSS4RPAS Project demonstration

Citizen safety guaranteed

A third trial took place in the urban environment of Villacarrillo, placing a DJI S1000 multicopter drone in a more challenging environment for the reception of GNSS signals. This trial performed regular use cases such as building inspection or parcel delivery. Remarkably, it was the first experimental drone operation in an urban environment ever approved by the national civil aviation authority AESA, and one of the few examples of real urban operations in Europe. For this reason, a safety analysis following the Specific Operations Risk Assessment (SORA) methodology was undertaken to guarantee the safety of citizens.

Read this: Instrument flying supported by EGNOS for General Aviation

In all the trials, the drones were equipped with a multi-constellation and multi-frequency receiver called MagicUT which was used to compute the EGNSS solutions and the reference trajectory using PPP. Dedicated multi-constellation and multi-frequency antennas tailored for drone missions were also installed.

Galileo improves accuracy

In open visibility conditions, the results clearly show that the use of Galileo in dual constellation with GPS significantly improves accuracy compared to GPS-only for both the horizontal and vertical dimension. The introduction of EGNOS significantly enhances the GPS-only accuracy. Looking at integrity, the protection levels are well below the requirements defined for LPV-200 in manned aviation and the availability and continuity percentages reached very high values for all EGNSS solutions during the missions.

The urban environment poses several challenges to the reception of GNSS signals. Despite having fewer satellites available, the Galileo-only solution still provides significantly better performances than the GPS-only solution. As envisaged, the performances for the combined GPS and Galileo solution yield an even greater improvement versus the GPS-only solution. 

And this: White Paper on EGNSS for drones now available

Performance are in general very stable for the in-flight phase and error glitches correspond to the take-off and landing phases, where the multipath and satellite visibility may impact the navigation solution. It is demonstrated that the combination of Galileo with GPS is a very robust solution for the urban scenario, achieving 100% of availability for all flight plans. For the in-flight phase, protections levels provided by EGNOS are a differentiator vis-à-vis other GNSS solutions and a potential enabler of critical applications requiring high levels of integrity.

European GNSS solutions – EGNOS and Galileo - were demonstrated to be a pivotal element for the safety and efficiency of drone operations even in cities. As such, EGNSS has the capability to boost the drone market and facilitate public acceptance of these new entrants. The European Commission and the GSA will continue to demonstrate the added value of EGNSS for drones and support the uptake of EGNSS-based standards in this user community.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

EGNSS-enabled drone flying in the urban environment of Villacarrillo, Spain

EC project showcases benefits of EGNSS for drones

16.1.2020 11:22  
EGNSS-enabled drone flying in the urban environment of Villacarrillo, Spain
Published: 
16 January 2020

A recent project funded by the European Commission has carried out technical and financial studies aiming at supporting the standardisation process for EGNSS in drones (also known as UAS or RPAS), in line with the Space Strategy for Europe regarding fostering the use of EGNSS in aviation.

As part of the EGNSS4RPAS project, dedicated flight trials were performed to understand how EGNSS can contribute to safer and more efficient drone operations in real-life scenarios in the future U-Space. The outcomes of the trials will contribute to ongoing standardisation efforts, notably by EUROCAE and ASD-STAN.

The first and second trials were organized at the ATLAS drone test facility in Villacarrillo, Spain. The first test involved one X-UAV Clouds fixed-wing drone with a 1.85-metre wingspan and two DJI multicopters performing several operations in visual line of sight (VLOS) conditions. The second test used the same fixed-wing drone which flew various flight plans in VLOS and beyond visual line of sight (BVLOS) conditions. Moreover, dynamic geo-fencing and geo-caging demonstrations were performed as well as a scenario where the drone lost the Command & Control link and was required to return autonomously to the Home Point.

Watch the video: EGNSS4RPAS Project demonstration

Citizen safety guaranteed

A third trial took place in the urban environment of Villacarrillo, placing a DJI S1000 multicopter drone in a more challenging environment for the reception of GNSS signals. This trial performed regular use cases such as building inspection or parcel delivery. Remarkably, it was the first experimental drone operation in an urban environment ever approved by the national civil aviation authority AESA, and one of the few examples of real urban operations in Europe. For this reason, a safety analysis following the Specific Operations Risk Assessment (SORA) methodology was undertaken to guarantee the safety of citizens.

Read this: Instrument flying supported by EGNOS for General Aviation

In all the trials, the drones were equipped with a multi-constellation and multi-frequency receiver called MagicUT which was used to compute the EGNSS solutions and the reference trajectory using PPP. Dedicated multi-constellation and multi-frequency antennas tailored for drone missions were also installed.

Galileo improves accuracy

In open visibility conditions, the results clearly show that the use of Galileo in dual constellation with GPS significantly improves accuracy compared to GPS-only for both the horizontal and vertical dimension. The introduction of EGNOS significantly enhances the GPS-only accuracy. Looking at integrity, the protection levels are well below the requirements defined for LPV-200 in manned aviation and the availability and continuity percentages reached very high values for all EGNSS solutions during the missions.

The urban environment poses several challenges to the reception of GNSS signals. Despite having fewer satellites available, the Galileo-only solution still provides significantly better performances than the GPS-only solution. As envisaged, the performances for the combined GPS and Galileo solution yield an even greater improvement versus the GPS-only solution. 

And this: White Paper on EGNSS for drones now available

Performance are in general very stable for the in-flight phase and error glitches correspond to the take-off and landing phases, where the multipath and satellite visibility may impact the navigation solution. It is demonstrated that the combination of Galileo with GPS is a very robust solution for the urban scenario, achieving 100% of availability for all flight plans. For the in-flight phase, protections levels provided by EGNOS are a differentiator vis-à-vis other GNSS solutions and a potential enabler of critical applications requiring high levels of integrity.

European GNSS solutions – EGNOS and Galileo - were demonstrated to be a pivotal element for the safety and efficiency of drone operations even in cities. As such, EGNSS has the capability to boost the drone market and facilitate public acceptance of these new entrants. The European Commission and the GSA will continue to demonstrate the added value of EGNSS for drones and support the uptake of EGNSS-based standards in this user community.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

EGNSS-enabled drone flying in the urban environment of Villacarrillo, Spain

Users in focus at EU Space Week 2019

14.1.2020 10:02  
Users are at the centre of Galileo and EGNOS service provision.
Published: 
14 January 2020

With the declaration of Galileo Initial Services in December 2016, Galileo officially moved to the provision of live services and EGNOS has been operating successfully since 2009, European Global Navigation Satellite Systems (EGNSS) services are now experiencing an unprecedented acceleration in market uptake. During EU Space Week 2019 in Helsinki the European GNSS Agency (GSA) presented the latest developments for both services, and sought feedback from users of position, navigation and time (PNT) solutions and the organisations and institutions involved in the management, service provision and security of EGNSS, to build better services.

The first full day of EU Space Week 2019 on 3 December saw the EGNSS Service Provision Workshop and EGNSS User Assembly. These two sessions reviewed the current status and future plans for Galileo and EGNOS services, market uptake initiatives and an overview of user needs and requirements for EGNSS.

Welcoming participants to the workshop session, Pascal Claudel Chief Operating Officer at the GSA emphasised that “Users are at the centre of the game from the GSA’s point of view.” He also noted that Galileo is central to the provision of current EU policy priorities such as circular economy, smart cities and zero hunger.

Following a review of Galileo services performance and operations during the year from Rodrigo da Costa, Galileo Service Manager at the GSA and Pierluigi Fedele, Galileo Services Delivery Manager of Spaceopal GmbH, the European Commission presented some insights on the future evolution of Galileo and some initial thoughts on possible services that might be offered by Galileo 2nd Generation (G2G). 

A vision document to 2035 was the contextual background for planning. By then there are likely to be over 120 broadcasting GNSS satellites available in medium Earth orbit grouped in four constellations. “GNSS will be the fifth utility,” stated the EC representative “And massive usage will not tolerate and service downtime.” He foresaw emerging new requirements including authentication, indoor capability, and high accuracy for all. A significant new capability would be a robust signal for users in space and remote activation of emergency beacons. The transition to G2G could start as early as 2024 with the first launch of test satellites.

User viewpoint

The EGNSS User Assembly covered an update on user needs and requirements; the results of user satisfaction surveys – the latest of which has just been published; and highlights from the latest GNSS Market Report 2019 that was published in mid-October. Fiammetta Diani, Head of Market Development at GSA described the process for assessing user inputs from the first two User Consultations Platforms held in Madrid and Marseille in 2017 and 2018 respectively. “This is a cyclic process open to all users to voice their needs and future requirements,” she said. “GSA is a pioneer in this type of open consultation - no other GNSS does this.”

The user inputs are used to compile a report on user needs that are then subject to an engineering assessment and fed back to the consultation platform. The second edition of the User Report is now available on the GSA website. Diani announced that the consultation system had been modified to be a bi-annual process with a User Assembly alternating with the full User Consultation Platform.

Carmen Aguilera Rios, Operational Market Development Manager at GSA, said that GSA wanted to hear from users to make Galileo and EGNOS even better. “We want to help you deliver better service and boost your business based on EGNSS,” she said. “We want to know if the performance perceived satisfies your needs. Do we help when you need it? Do you need more from EGNSS?” 

She also announced the launch of the 2019 edition of Galileo and EGNOS User Satisfaction Surveys. These surveys aim to gain a better understanding of the needs and requirements of Galileo and EGNOS end users and to ensure that these needs are taken into consideration in future evolutions of the programmes. To take part in the Galileo survey, click here; and here for the EGNOS survey.

The users presented and shared the latest trends and applications. Their presentations are now available here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Users are at the centre of Galileo and EGNOS service provision.

Users in focus at EU Space Week 2019

14.1.2020 10:02  
Users are at the centre of Galileo and EGNOS service provision.
Published: 
14 January 2020

With the declaration of Galileo Initial Services in December 2016, Galileo officially moved to the provision of live services and EGNOS has been operating successfully since 2009, European Global Navigation Satellite Systems (EGNSS) services are now experiencing an unprecedented acceleration in market uptake. During EU Space Week 2019 in Helsinki the European GNSS Agency (GSA) presented the latest developments for both services, and sought feedback from users of position, navigation and time (PNT) solutions and the organisations and institutions involved in the management, service provision and security of EGNSS, to build better services.

The first full day of EU Space Week 2019 on 3 December saw the EGNSS Service Provision Workshop and EGNSS User Assembly. These two sessions reviewed the current status and future plans for Galileo and EGNOS services, market uptake initiatives and an overview of user needs and requirements for EGNSS.

Welcoming participants to the workshop session, Pascal Claudel Chief Operating Officer at the GSA emphasised that “Users are at the centre of the game from the GSA’s point of view.” He also noted that Galileo is central to the provision of current EU policy priorities such as circular economy, smart cities and zero hunger.

Following a review of Galileo services performance and operations during the year from Rodrigo da Costa, Galileo Service Manager at the GSA and Pierluigi Fedele, Galileo Services Delivery Manager of Spaceopal GmbH, the European Commission presented some insights on the future evolution of Galileo and some initial thoughts on possible services that might be offered by Galileo 2nd Generation (G2G). 

A vision document to 2035 was the contextual background for planning. By then there are likely to be over 120 broadcasting GNSS satellites available in medium Earth orbit grouped in four constellations. “GNSS will be the fifth utility,” stated the EC representative “And massive usage will not tolerate and service downtime.” He foresaw emerging new requirements including authentication, indoor capability, and high accuracy for all. A significant new capability would be a robust signal for users in space and remote activation of emergency beacons. The transition to G2G could start as early as 2024 with the first launch of test satellites.

User viewpoint

The EGNSS User Assembly covered an update on user needs and requirements; the results of user satisfaction surveys – the latest of which has just been published; and highlights from the latest GNSS Market Report 2019 that was published in mid-October. Fiammetta Diani, Head of Market Development at GSA described the process for assessing user inputs from the first two User Consultations Platforms held in Madrid and Marseille in 2017 and 2018 respectively. “This is a cyclic process open to all users to voice their needs and future requirements,” she said. “GSA is a pioneer in this type of open consultation - no other GNSS does this.”

The user inputs are used to compile a report on user needs that are then subject to an engineering assessment and fed back to the consultation platform. The second edition of the User Report is now available on the GSA website. Diani announced that the consultation system had been modified to be a bi-annual process with a User Assembly alternating with the full User Consultation Platform.

Carmen Aguilera Rios, Operational Market Development Manager at GSA, said that GSA wanted to hear from users to make Galileo and EGNOS even better. “We want to help you deliver better service and boost your business based on EGNSS,” she said. “We want to know if the performance perceived satisfies your needs. Do we help when you need it? Do you need more from EGNSS?” 

She also announced the launch of the 2019 edition of Galileo and EGNOS User Satisfaction Surveys. These surveys aim to gain a better understanding of the needs and requirements of Galileo and EGNOS end users and to ensure that these needs are taken into consideration in future evolutions of the programmes. To take part in the Galileo survey, click here; and here for the EGNOS survey.

The users presented and shared the latest trends and applications. Their presentations are now available here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Users are at the centre of Galileo and EGNOS service provision.

Users in focus at EU Space Week 2019

14.1.2020 10:02  
Users are at the centre of Galileo and EGNOS service provision.
Published: 
14 January 2020

With the declaration of Galileo Initial Services in December 2016, Galileo officially moved to the provision of live services and EGNOS has been operating successfully since 2009, European Global Navigation Satellite Systems (EGNSS) services are now experiencing an unprecedented acceleration in market uptake. During EU Space Week 2019 in Helsinki the European GNSS Agency (GSA) presented the latest developments for both services, and sought feedback from users of position, navigation and time (PNT) solutions and the organisations and institutions involved in the management, service provision and security of EGNSS, to build better services.

The first full day of EU Space Week 2019 on 3 December saw the EGNSS Service Provision Workshop and EGNSS User Assembly. These two sessions reviewed the current status and future plans for Galileo and EGNOS services, market uptake initiatives and an overview of user needs and requirements for EGNSS.

Welcoming participants to the workshop session, Pascal Claudel Chief Operating Officer at the GSA emphasised that “Users are at the centre of the game from the GSA’s point of view.” He also noted that Galileo is central to the provision of current EU policy priorities such as circular economy, smart cities and zero hunger.

Following a review of Galileo services performance and operations during the year from Rodrigo da Costa, Galileo Service Manager at the GSA and Pierluigi Fedele, Galileo Services Delivery Manager of Spaceopal GmbH, the European Commission presented some insights on the future evolution of Galileo and some initial thoughts on possible services that might be offered by Galileo 2nd Generation (G2G). 

A vision document to 2035 was the contextual background for planning. By then there are likely to be over 120 broadcasting GNSS satellites available in medium Earth orbit grouped in four constellations. “GNSS will be the fifth utility,” stated the EC representative “And massive usage will not tolerate and service downtime.” He foresaw emerging new requirements including authentication, indoor capability, and high accuracy for all. A significant new capability would be a robust signal for users in space and remote activation of emergency beacons. The transition to G2G could start as early as 2024 with the first launch of test satellites.

User viewpoint

The EGNSS User Assembly covered an update on user needs and requirements; the results of user satisfaction surveys – the latest of which has just been published; and highlights from the latest GNSS Market Report 2019 that was published in mid-October. Fiammetta Diani, Head of Market Development at GSA described the process for assessing user inputs from the first two User Consultations Platforms held in Madrid and Marseille in 2017 and 2018 respectively. “This is a cyclic process open to all users to voice their needs and future requirements,” she said. “GSA is a pioneer in this type of open consultation - no other GNSS does this.”

The user inputs are used to compile a report on user needs that are then subject to an engineering assessment and fed back to the consultation platform. The second edition of the User Report is now available on the GSA website. Diani announced that the consultation system had been modified to be a bi-annual process with a User Assembly alternating with the full User Consultation Platform.

Carmen Aguilera Rios, Operational Market Development Manager at GSA, said that GSA wanted to hear from users to make Galileo and EGNOS even better. “We want to help you deliver better service and boost your business based on EGNSS,” she said. “We want to know if the performance perceived satisfies your needs. Do we help when you need it? Do you need more from EGNSS?” 

She also announced the launch of the 2019 edition of Galileo and EGNOS User Satisfaction Surveys. These surveys aim to gain a better understanding of the needs and requirements of Galileo and EGNOS end users and to ensure that these needs are taken into consideration in future evolutions of the programmes. To take part in the Galileo survey, click here; and here for the EGNOS survey.

The users presented and shared the latest trends and applications. Their presentations are now available here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Users are at the centre of Galileo and EGNOS service provision.

GSA Executive Director receives Karel Kramar distinction

10.1.2020 9:46  
The Karel Kramar honour is awarded for service in the restoration of democracy, human rights and liberties in the Czech Republic
Published: 
10 January 2020

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) Executive Director has been awarded the Karel Kramar Medal by the Czech Prime Minister. The honour is awarded as a token of gratitude for demonstrable service in the Czech Republic.

The honour was awarded to the GSA Executive Director, Carlo des Dorides in a ceremony held at on January 8 at the Office of the Government of the Czech Republic. In a tweet following the award ceremony, the Czech Prime Minister said: “I awarded the Karel Kramar honour to the GSA Director Mr Carlo des Dorides, who was responsible for moving the Galileo navigation system to Prague in 2012.”

“Space systems have huge potential and the GSA headquarters in the Czech Republic offers many opportunities for our entrepreneurs,” the Prime Minister Andrej Babis said.

Great honour

Accepting the award, des Dorides thanked the Prime Minister for the great honour bestowed on him and outlined the history of the GSA in the Czech Capital. “When the GSA came to Prague on September 2012 it was a small agency with many plans and hopes and Galileo was a system on paper only,” he said.

 

 

Read this: A message from Carlo des Dorides, GSA Executive Director

“We can now safely say that a lot has changed in these 7 years. The GSA has grown to more than 5 times its original size and is now sitting at the table with the main space agencies in Europe; 26 satellites have been launched and Galileo is operational with more than 1 billion users world-wide,” des Dorides said.

Space renaissance

In his speech, the GSA Executive Director also looked to the future and the evolution of the GSA into the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA). “The Czech Republic is now positioning itself, more and more, at the centre of  a ‘space renaissance’ with high potential ahead,” he said.

And this: From GSA to EUSPA: space transforming business and the economy

“My best wish is that EUSPA will be for the Czech Republic not only a nice jewel but will really become the engine of a new course for the Czech entrepreneurial sector, which uses space as a driver for innovation,” he said, adding: “When I look at the number of new companies belonging to the space ecosystem that are looking at establishing here in the Czech Republic, I think you have already started to move in this direction.”

The Karel Kramar Honour was crafted to mark the 90th anniversary of the establishment of the first Czechoslovak government and was named after the first Czechoslovak Prime Minister, Karel Kramar.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The Karel Kramar honour is awarded for service in the restoration of democracy, human rights and liberties in the Czech Republic

GSA Executive Director receives Karel Kramar distinction

10.1.2020 9:46  
The Karel Kramar honour is awarded for service in the restoration of democracy, human rights and liberties in the Czech Republic
Published: 
10 January 2020

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) Executive Director has been awarded the Karel Kramar Medal by the Czech Prime Minister. The honour is awarded as a token of gratitude for demonstrable service in the Czech Republic.

The honour was awarded to the GSA Executive Director, Carlo des Dorides in a ceremony held at on January 8 at the Office of the Government of the Czech Republic. In a tweet following the award ceremony, the Czech Prime Minister said: “I awarded the Karel Kramar honour to the GSA Director Mr Carlo des Dorides, who was responsible for moving the Galileo navigation system to Prague in 2012.”

“Space systems have huge potential and the GSA headquarters in the Czech Republic offers many opportunities for our entrepreneurs,” the Prime Minister Andrej Babis said.

Great honour

Accepting the award, des Dorides thanked the Prime Minister for the great honour bestowed on him and outlined the history of the GSA in the Czech Capital. “When the GSA came to Prague on September 2012 it was a small agency with many plans and hopes and Galileo was a system on paper only,” he said.

 

 

Read this: A message from Carlo des Dorides, GSA Executive Director

“We can now safely say that a lot has changed in these 7 years. The GSA has grown to more than 5 times its original size and is now sitting at the table with the main space agencies in Europe; 26 satellites have been launched and Galileo is operational with more than 1 billion users world-wide,” des Dorides said.

Space renaissance

In his speech, the GSA Executive Director also looked to the future and the evolution of the GSA into the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA). “The Czech Republic is now positioning itself, more and more, at the centre of  a ‘space renaissance’ with high potential ahead,” he said.

And this: From GSA to EUSPA: space transforming business and the economy

“My best wish is that EUSPA will be for the Czech Republic not only a nice jewel but will really become the engine of a new course for the Czech entrepreneurial sector, which uses space as a driver for innovation,” he said, adding: “When I look at the number of new companies belonging to the space ecosystem that are looking at establishing here in the Czech Republic, I think you have already started to move in this direction.”

The Karel Kramar Honour was crafted to mark the 90th anniversary of the establishment of the first Czechoslovak government and was named after the first Czechoslovak Prime Minister, Karel Kramar.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The Karel Kramar honour is awarded for service in the restoration of democracy, human rights and liberties in the Czech Republic

GSA Executive Director receives Karel Kramar distinction

10.1.2020 9:46  
The Karel Kramar honour is awarded for service in the restoration of democracy, human rights and liberties in the Czech Republic
Published: 
10 January 2020

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) Executive Director has been awarded the Karel Kramar Medal by the Czech Prime Minister. The honour is awarded as a token of gratitude for demonstrable service in the Czech Republic.

The honour was awarded to the GSA Executive Director, Carlo des Dorides in a ceremony held at on January 8 at the Office of the Government of the Czech Republic. In a tweet following the award ceremony, the Czech Prime Minister said: “I awarded the Karel Kramar honour to the GSA Director Mr Carlo des Dorides, who was responsible for moving the Galileo navigation system to Prague in 2012.”

“Space systems have huge potential and the GSA headquarters in the Czech Republic offers many opportunities for our entrepreneurs,” the Prime Minister Andrej Babis said.

Great honour

Accepting the award, des Dorides thanked the Prime Minister for the great honour bestowed on him and outlined the history of the GSA in the Czech Capital. “When the GSA came to Prague on September 2012 it was a small agency with many plans and hopes and Galileo was a system on paper only,” he said.

 

 

Read this: A message from Carlo des Dorides, GSA Executive Director

“We can now safely say that a lot has changed in these 7 years. The GSA has grown to more than 5 times its original size and is now sitting at the table with the main space agencies in Europe; 26 satellites have been launched and Galileo is operational with more than 1 billion users world-wide,” des Dorides said.

Space renaissance

In his speech, the GSA Executive Director also looked to the future and the evolution of the GSA into the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA). “The Czech Republic is now positioning itself, more and more, at the centre of  a ‘space renaissance’ with high potential ahead,” he said.

And this: From GSA to EUSPA: space transforming business and the economy

“My best wish is that EUSPA will be for the Czech Republic not only a nice jewel but will really become the engine of a new course for the Czech entrepreneurial sector, which uses space as a driver for innovation,” he said, adding: “When I look at the number of new companies belonging to the space ecosystem that are looking at establishing here in the Czech Republic, I think you have already started to move in this direction.”

The Karel Kramar Honour was crafted to mark the 90th anniversary of the establishment of the first Czechoslovak government and was named after the first Czechoslovak Prime Minister, Karel Kramar.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The Karel Kramar honour is awarded for service in the restoration of democracy, human rights and liberties in the Czech Republic

EU Space Week 2019: Investors meet innovation

8.1.2020 13:25  
Space Week brought space innovators together with investors and potential partners.
Published: 
08 January 2020

A major theme running through EU Space Week 2019 in Helsinki was the wealth of innovative space-based applications, products and services being created in Europe. The ‘New Space’ sector is full of bright ideas and creative people, but turning a brilliant concept into a profitable enterprise is not easy. Fortunately, Space Week provided a wide range of opportunities for space innovators to develop ideas, meet investors and network with partners. One session allowed entrepreneurs to pitch their ideas to business angels, venture capitalists and other sources of public and private investment.

Over the two days prior to the main Space Week events, the Finnish Transport and Communication Agency Traficom had invited teams of developers to an Innovation Challenge to develop innovative applications using the enhanced performance of Galileo in three areas: high accuracy (supported by the GSA), signal interference, and robotics.

Space Week itself also included sessions on the EGNSS Accelerator initiative that provides multiple benefits to Galileo Masters winners and finalists, such as coaching services and business incubation opportunities, and, of course, the glittering 2019 Galileo Masters Award Ceremony too.

Read this: Put your project in the spotlight at MWC Barcelona

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) organised a specific ‘Investors meet the Innovators’ event on the morning of 3 December with three panel discussions that covered an introduction to the most promising application areas from the investors’ point of view, the most common mistakes of start-ups and SMEs when applying for private funding, and advice on how to grow, minimise risks, and achieve self-sustainability once initial finance or funding has been obtained. 

Following these panel debates innovators had the opportunity to meet the investors on a one-to-one basis in a ‘speed dating’ session that extended through into a wider SME showcase Fair in the afternoon. Here SMEs and entrepreneurs had the possibility to talk to investors who provided them with investment readiness and pitch training.

Pitch perfect

The highlight of the day was the dynamic, early evening pitching session, where 13 space-based companies were given just four minutes to sell their ideas and aspirations to a broader audience of potential investors, press, corporates, public sector officials and fellow startups. Their presentations were followed by testing questions from the audience. 

The pitching entrepreneurs illustrated the wide range and ambitions of the growing space-based business sector.

EUSW PITCHERS
1/Collective crunch is a Finnish-German company with a leading position in applying artificial intelligence (AI) to forestry asset planning with their Linda Forest application.
2/ CX-GEODRONE from the Spanish universities of Vigo and Oviedo have developed a drone carrying a synthetic aperture radar package for underground and over ground applications. The development has high market potential and a university spin-out company is planned in 2020.  
3/ Deep Planet uses satellites and machine learning to understand risk and discover intelligence usually invisible to the human eye. Their presentation focused on an application to optimise irrigation in vineyards and boost yield. The app is currently being tested in Australia.
4/ Greensense is an Austrian enterprise developing smart solutions for smarter farms; described as ‘Agriculture 4.0’. Their intuitive app helps space data seamlessly integrate into the normal farm workflow including the use of augmented reality tools.
5/ Hurricane UNwinder is building an intensity forecast service for hurricanes, typhoons and tropical cyclones. The long-term goal is to find weather modification opportunities for reducing storm intensity. As well as software the team is developing a customised ‘sonde’ that can be dropped into the eye of a storm to collect data.
6/ Qascom is a thought leader on satellite navigation and space cybersecurity, a market growth area, to provide robust PNT information. The company is already one of the leaders in the use of authentication signals that will be introduced to Galileo services during 2020.
7/ Topview Sal EASY PV uses drones to improve maintenance of photoelectric (PV) plants by detecting faulty panels in situ. This solution, which uses an auto detect algorithm to identify broken panels, is much cheaper than manual inspection procedures.
8/ uMaze was the winner of the Accuracy Matters theme of the Innovation Challenge in Helsinki with their virtual maze builder and navigator app. Mazes have fascinated humanity for millennia and this Galileo-powered app brings the maze craze up to date!
9/ UNISPHERE core business is the use of high-level platforms, or pseudo-satellites, to build up the ecosystem for unmanned aviation and enable it to become a commodity for society.
10/ Xylene is working to boost trust in timber by allowing clients to take full control of their supply chain from forest to finished product using geolocation and blockchain technologies.
11/ Aurora is a small Finnish company developing novel propulsion technologies for manoeuvring small satellites. This is a rapidly growing market and the company is currently moving from hand production to mass production. Future products include an E-sail module for possible interplanetary missions.
12/ Deep Blue Globe is a group of ex-ESA engineers who are creating exciting space data products including the POSEIDON project which combines weather and ocean data in a navigation algorithm to optimise maritime routes and save on energy costs, reduce emissions and increase safety.

13/ The final presentation was on Feverr – the dating app with a twist. The app aims to enable singles to spend more time meeting potential partners rather than staring at their phone screen. The app also has a focus on personal safety.

Hopefully all these entrepreneurs will have met their ideal investor at Space Week 2019 whether they are starting up, scaling up or looking to go global!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Space Week brought space innovators together with investors and potential partners.

EU Space Week 2019: Investors meet innovation

8.1.2020 13:25  
Space Week brought space innovators together with investors and potential partners.
Published: 
08 January 2020

A major theme running through EU Space Week 2019 in Helsinki was the wealth of innovative space-based applications, products and services being created in Europe. The ‘New Space’ sector is full of bright ideas and creative people, but turning a brilliant concept into a profitable enterprise is not easy. Fortunately, Space Week provided a wide range of opportunities for space innovators to develop ideas, meet investors and network with partners. One session allowed entrepreneurs to pitch their ideas to business angels, venture capitalists and other sources of public and private investment.

Over the two days prior to the main Space Week events, the Finnish Transport and Communication Agency Traficom had invited teams of developers to an Innovation Challenge to develop innovative applications using the enhanced performance of Galileo in three areas: high accuracy (supported by the GSA), signal interference, and robotics.

Space Week itself also included sessions on the EGNSS Accelerator initiative that provides multiple benefits to Galileo Masters winners and finalists, such as coaching services and business incubation opportunities, and, of course, the glittering 2019 Galileo Masters Award Ceremony too.

Read this: Put your project in the spotlight at MWC Barcelona

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) organised a specific ‘Investors meet the Innovators’ event on the morning of 3 December with three panel discussions that covered an introduction to the most promising application areas from the investors’ point of view, the most common mistakes of start-ups and SMEs when applying for private funding, and advice on how to grow, minimise risks, and achieve self-sustainability once initial finance or funding has been obtained. 

Following these panel debates innovators had the opportunity to meet the investors on a one-to-one basis in a ‘speed dating’ session that extended through into a wider SME showcase Fair in the afternoon. Here SMEs and entrepreneurs had the possibility to talk to investors who provided them with investment readiness and pitch training.

Pitch perfect

The highlight of the day was the dynamic, early evening pitching session, where 13 space-based companies were given just four minutes to sell their ideas and aspirations to a broader audience of potential investors, press, corporates, public sector officials and fellow startups. Their presentations were followed by testing questions from the audience. 

The pitching entrepreneurs illustrated the wide range and ambitions of the growing space-based business sector.

EUSW PITCHERS
1/Collective crunch is a Finnish-German company with a leading position in applying artificial intelligence (AI) to forestry asset planning with their Linda Forest application.
2/ CX-GEODRONE from the Spanish universities of Vigo and Oviedo have developed a drone carrying a synthetic aperture radar package for underground and over ground applications. The development has high market potential and a university spin-out company is planned in 2020.  
3/ Deep Planet uses satellites and machine learning to understand risk and discover intelligence usually invisible to the human eye. Their presentation focused on an application to optimise irrigation in vineyards and boost yield. The app is currently being tested in Australia.
4/ Greensense is an Austrian enterprise developing smart solutions for smarter farms; described as ‘Agriculture 4.0’. Their intuitive app helps space data seamlessly integrate into the normal farm workflow including the use of augmented reality tools.
5/ Hurricane UNwinder is building an intensity forecast service for hurricanes, typhoons and tropical cyclones. The long-term goal is to find weather modification opportunities for reducing storm intensity. As well as software the team is developing a customised ‘sonde’ that can be dropped into the eye of a storm to collect data.
6/ Qascom is a thought leader on satellite navigation and space cybersecurity, a market growth area, to provide robust PNT information. The company is already one of the leaders in the use of authentication signals that will be introduced to Galileo services during 2020.
7/ Topview Sal EASY PV uses drones to improve maintenance of photoelectric (PV) plants by detecting faulty panels in situ. This solution, which uses an auto detect algorithm to identify broken panels, is much cheaper than manual inspection procedures.
8/ uMaze was the winner of the Accuracy Matters theme of the Innovation Challenge in Helsinki with their virtual maze builder and navigator app. Mazes have fascinated humanity for millennia and this Galileo-powered app brings the maze craze up to date!
9/ UNISPHERE core business is the use of high-level platforms, or pseudo-satellites, to build up the ecosystem for unmanned aviation and enable it to become a commodity for society.
10/ Xylene is working to boost trust in timber by allowing clients to take full control of their supply chain from forest to finished product using geolocation and blockchain technologies.
11/ Aurora is a small Finnish company developing novel propulsion technologies for manoeuvring small satellites. This is a rapidly growing market and the company is currently moving from hand production to mass production. Future products include an E-sail module for possible interplanetary missions.
12/ Deep Blue Globe is a group of ex-ESA engineers who are creating exciting space data products including the POSEIDON project which combines weather and ocean data in a navigation algorithm to optimise maritime routes and save on energy costs, reduce emissions and increase safety.

13/ The final presentation was on Feverr – the dating app with a twist. The app aims to enable singles to spend more time meeting potential partners rather than staring at their phone screen. The app also has a focus on personal safety.

Hopefully all these entrepreneurs will have met their ideal investor at Space Week 2019 whether they are starting up, scaling up or looking to go global!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Space Week brought space innovators together with investors and potential partners.

ITT: EGNSS-based rail safety service analysis

6.1.2020 11:23  
What integrity concept for the rail sector based on EGNSS would enable rationalising the current rail signalling infrastructure?
Published: 
06 January 2020

The European Commission’s Directorate-General for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs (DG GROW) has issued an Invitation To Tender (ITT) for a planned call for a new service contract to assess the feasibility of an EGNSS-based safety service for the rail sector beyond 2022 which would enable the rationalisation of rail signalling infrastructure.

The main tasks of the study are the identification of user and service requirements, the development of an appropriate integrity concept and the definition of the service provision scheme. As part of the user level integrity concept, the contractor shall develop an algorithm to cope with the local environment of the rail sector.

When defining the service, the contractor shall produce the service concept and consolidate it through iteration with a Working Group of experts. The analysis will enable the EC to determine whether a European rail safety service based on EGNOS and Galileo needs to be created specifically to enable the rationalisation of the current rail signalling infrastructure. 

More information about the Invitation to Tender (ITT) can be found here.

European GNSS in ERTMS

Rail signalling systems are used to safely control railway traffic in order to prevent train collisions. There are currently more than 20 rail signalling systems in Europe, since each country has developed its own railway infrastructure, equipment and operational rules. This has led to increased costs and technical and operational complexity of the train sets. This is why the European rail industry, supported by the EU Institutions, is working on the European Rail Traffic Management System (ERTMS), with an aim to implement a common signalling system for Europe.

Read this: GNSS and the future of rail.

The European Commission (EC) is currently specifying the long-term evolution of the EGNSS programme, including new services for Galileo and EGNOS. The use of an EGNSS receiver in combination with other sensors could provide an accurate and reliable position which would translate into the overall improvement of the rail system. 

Galileo is Europe’s Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) providing a highly accurate, guaranteed global positioning service under civilian control. Galileo has been operational since the Initial Service declaration at the end of 2016. Full Operational Capability is expected to be reached in 2020.

EGNOS is the European SBAS and augments GPS L1 C/A civilian signal by providing corrections and integrity information for positioning and navigation applications over Europe. EGNOS Version 3, set to enter into service in the near future, will augment both GPS and Galileo constellations in the L1 and L5 bands and will extend the service area to the entire landmasses of EU Member States.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

What integrity concept for the rail sector based on EGNSS would enable rationalising the current rail signalling infrastructure?

ITT: EGNSS-based rail safety service analysis

6.1.2020 11:23  
What integrity concept for the rail sector based on EGNSS would enable rationalising the current rail signalling infrastructure?
Published: 
06 January 2020

The European Commission’s Directorate-General for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs (DG GROW) has issued an Invitation to Tender (ITT) for a planned call for a new service contract to assess the feasibility of an EGNSS-based safety service for the rail sector beyond 2022 which would enable the rationalisation of rail signalling infrastructure.

The main tasks of the study are the identification of user and service requirements, the development of an appropriate integrity concept and the definition of the service provision scheme. As part of the user level integrity concept, the contractor shall develop an algorithm to cope with the local environment of the rail sector.

When defining the service, the contractor shall produce the service concept and consolidate it through iteration with a Working Group of experts. The analysis will enable the EC to determine whether a European rail safety service based on EGNOS and Galileo needs to be created specifically to enable the rationalisation of the current rail signalling infrastructure. 

More information about the Invitation to Tender (ITT) can be found here.

European GNSS in ERTMS

Rail signalling systems are used to safely control railway traffic in order to prevent train collisions. There are currently more than 20 rail signalling systems in Europe, since each country has developed its own railway infrastructure, equipment and operational rules. This has led to increased costs and technical and operational complexity of the train sets. This is why the European rail industry, supported by the EU Institutions, is working on the European Rail Traffic Management System (ERTMS), with an aim to implement a common signalling system for Europe.

Read this: GNSS and the future of rail.

The European Commission (EC) is currently specifying the long-term evolution of the EGNSS programme, including new services for Galileo and EGNOS. The use of an EGNSS receiver in combination with other sensors could provide an accurate and reliable position which would translate into the overall improvement of the rail system. 

Galileo is Europe’s Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) providing a highly accurate, guaranteed global positioning service under civilian control. Galileo has been operational since the Initial Service declaration at the end of 2016. Full Operational Capability is expected to be reached in 2020.

EGNOS is the European SBAS and augments GPS L1 C/A civilian signal by providing corrections and integrity information for positioning and navigation applications over Europe. EGNOS Version 3, set to enter into service in the near future, will augment both GPS and Galileo constellations in the L1 and L5 bands and will extend the service area to the entire landmasses of EU Member States.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

What integrity concept for the rail sector based on EGNSS would enable rationalising the current rail signalling infrastructure?

ITT: EGNSS-based rail safety service analysis

6.1.2020 11:23  
What integrity concept for the rail sector based on EGNSS would enable rationalising the current rail signalling infrastructure?
Published: 
06 January 2020

The European Commission’s Directorate-General for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs (DG GROW) has issued an Invitation to Tender (ITT) for a planned call for a new service contract to assess the feasibility of an EGNSS-based safety service for the rail sector beyond 2022 which would enable the rationalisation of rail signalling infrastructure.

The main tasks of the study are the identification of user and service requirements, the development of an appropriate integrity concept and the definition of the service provision scheme. As part of the user level integrity concept, the contractor shall develop an algorithm to cope with the local environment of the rail sector.

When defining the service, the contractor shall produce the service concept and consolidate it through iteration with a Working Group of experts. The analysis will enable the EC to determine whether a European rail safety service based on EGNOS and Galileo needs to be created specifically to enable the rationalisation of the current rail signalling infrastructure. 

More information about the Invitation to Tender (ITT) can be found here.

European GNSS in ERTMS

Rail signalling systems are used to safely control railway traffic in order to prevent train collisions. There are currently more than 20 rail signalling systems in Europe, since each country has developed its own railway infrastructure, equipment and operational rules. This has led to increased costs and technical and operational complexity of the train sets. This is why the European rail industry, supported by the EU Institutions, is working on the European Rail Traffic Management System (ERTMS), with an aim to implement a common signalling system for Europe.

Read this: GNSS and the future of rail.

The European Commission (EC) is currently specifying the long-term evolution of the EGNSS programme, including new services for Galileo and EGNOS. The use of an EGNSS receiver in combination with other sensors could provide an accurate and reliable position which would translate into the overall improvement of the rail system. 

Galileo is Europe’s Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) providing a highly accurate, guaranteed global positioning service under civilian control. Galileo has been operational since the Initial Service declaration at the end of 2016. Full Operational Capability is expected to be reached in 2020.

EGNOS is the European SBAS and augments GPS L1 C/A civilian signal by providing corrections and integrity information for positioning and navigation applications over Europe. EGNOS Version 3, set to enter into service in the near future, will augment both GPS and Galileo constellations in the L1 and L5 bands and will extend the service area to the entire landmasses of EU Member States.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

What integrity concept for the rail sector based on EGNSS would enable rationalising the current rail signalling infrastructure?

A message from Carlo des Dorides, GSA Executive Director

20.12.2019 10:17  
Carlo des Dorides, GSA Executive Director
Published: 
20 December 2019

This has been a year of tremendous growth for the GSA, Galileo, EGNOS and the European Space Programme as a whole. We hit the ground running in 2019, buoyed by a wave of optimism following the successful European Space Week, held in in Marseille last December. 

At the end of 2018 we launched the Accuracy Matters campaign to raise awareness among end users and the public about the benefits of Galileo. This campaign continued to run throughout 2019 and has been very effective in raising the public profile of the European space programme in general and of Galileo in particular.

Throughout the year, we stayed true to our mission of putting users at the centre of Galileo service provision and work continued at full speed to prepare for the launch of Full Operational Capability next year. In February, we commissioned a batch of four Galileo satellites, bringing the number of launched satellites to 26. February also saw the launch of the world’s first Galileo-enabled personal location beacon (PLB), with the Return Link Service endorsed by COSPAS-SARSAT towards the end of the year, further consolidating Galileo’s contribution to global search and rescue. 

In aviation, the European space programme continued to make a significant contribution to increased safety and efficiency, and the GSA signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the deployment manager for the Single European Sky ATM Research (SESAR) on future cooperation to modernise EU air traffic management by leveraging Galileo and EGNOS. 

EGNOS is continuing its evolution towards EGNOS V3, which will augment both GPS and Galileo in the L1 and L5 bands, supported by payload launched this year. Furthermore, following the successful testing of EGNOS corrections in the maritime domain at the end of last year, EGNOS has also been performing well for the maritime community.

There were major developments for the space sector in Europe in April, when the European Parliament endorsed a provisional agreement on the EU Space Programme for 2021-2027. This new EUR 16-billion programme will help maintain and further enhance the EU's leadership in space. The new programme also has major implications for the GSA, which will grow into the European Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) with an expanded mandate to manage the market uptake and communications of the Copernicus Earth observation programme, helping ensure that synergies between Galileo and Copernicus can be exploited to the benefit of European society and business. The Space Programme also introduces the new security-related space initiatives Space and Situational Awareness (SSA) and Governmental Satellite Communication (GOVSATCOM), which will put Europe in a better position to react to ongoing changes in the international space sector.

The skies were not entirely cloud-free this year, however. In July a technical incident related to the Galileo ground infrastructure resulted in a temporary interruption of the Galileo initial navigation and timing services. Following the incident, we worked closely with all our partners to remedy the situation as quickly as possible and an Independent Inquiry Board was set up by the European Commission to identify the root causes of the incident. While this incident was a setback, valuable lessons were learned ahead of reaching Full Operational Capability and I believe that the GSA and the Galileo programme will be stronger as a result.

September was an exciting month. Galileo reached a major milestone, when the estimated number of Galileo-enabled smartphones in use reached 1 billion. At the same time, the GSA celebrated its 15th anniversary, as part of which we signed a cooperation agreement with the European Investment Bank to support investment in the European space-based service economy. This agreement will help ensure that the European space programme is leveraged to the fullest extent to allow Europeans reap the greatest possible benefits in terms of economic growth and job creation.

In October we launched the 6th issue of our GNSS Market Report. Providing comprehensive information on the dynamic global GNSS market along with in-depth analysis of the latest global trends and developments, this report was eagerly awaited by all market stakeholders and was downloaded over 1,000 times in the first 24 hours. The 1-billion smartphones milestone reached in the previous month, and the market uptake figures in the Market Report, particularly in new markets such as drones and New Space, are extremely encouraging and indicate a growing EU share of the market for downstream applications.

The year drew to a close with three successful demos stemming from GSA research and development projects (Horizon 2020 and Fundamental Elements), again clearly showing the tangible benefits and innovation delivered when EU funding, industry and SMEs come together. In the first of these the GSA and its partners successfully performed end-to-end tests on remote beacon activation using the Galileo Return Link Service (RLS), helping to validate the operational concept for a potential new use of Galileo to support fast response in distress situations. Then we had a live demo of the first autonomous vehicle powered by Galileo, during which an electric car was autonomously driven on a track and public roads, in a world first for Galileo. The PRoPART Galileo-based positioning solution for automated trucks and advanced driver assistance systems was also successfully tested at the end of the month.

These are exciting times for the space industry, 2020 will mark a turning point for Europe’s space programmes and for the GSA, with the Galileo programme getting closer to Full Operational Capability and the GSA to take up its expanded responsibilities within the European Agency for the Space Programme. In the 15 years since it was created, the GSA has put together a uniquely talented and interdisciplinary team with a diverse range of skills and expertise. As a result, the GSA has a stronger basis than ever and is ready to tackle the challenges ahead and turn Europe’s investment in space into opportunities for growth.

EUSPA will usher in a new era for the EU space programme. With its expanded mandate, our team will work to maintain our excellent performance in operations management, service delivery and security. We will also open up new markets and applications, create new funding opportunities and reach out to new stakeholders and user communities. Consolidation of the EU space programmes within one agency will make it possible to explore new horizons and create even stronger links between our satellites in space and the needs of users on the ground.

Our core aim will always be to strengthen the European space programme, while at the same time building an Agency that is future-proof, ready to learn and grow and quickly respond to change, because it is only in this way that we can consolidate the EU’s position as a global space power. 

As the year draws to a close, I would like to express my sincere gratitude to all the GSA staff for their hard work and commitment throughout the year, and to the European GNSS user community for their continued trust and support. It is thanks to this support that European GNSS continues to flourish.

Best wishes for 2020 to all of you!

 

 


Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Carlo des Dorides, GSA Executive Director

Instrument flying supported by EGNOS for General Aviation

20.12.2019 9:49  
The materials identify blocking points to a wider uptake of EGNOS-based procedures in general aviation
Published: 
20 December 2019

Even though the General Aviation (GA) community undertakes millions of flights on aircraft equipped with GNSS-receivers, it is not taking full advantage of the technology. It is a priority of the European GNSS Agency (GSA) to support GA by facilitating instrument procedures with EGNOS. As a first step the GSA has identified enablers and blocking points along with aviation stakeholders and the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA).

There are currently 660 EGNOS procedures in Europe, most of which are at instrument runways. However, EGNOS can also support general and business aviation on non-instrument runways. The GSA has issued safety promotion material on GNSS-based Instrument Flight Procedures implementation for General Aviation, Uncontrolled Aerodromes and Non-Instrument Runways in an effort to address this and encourage a wider use of EGNOS in general aviation.

The materials draw together the current regulatory analysis supporting EGNOS operations, along with enablers and best practices to support implementation, open issues and, last but not least, use case examples to encourage national authorities to authorise these types of operations in their countries. This includes examples showcasing how these can be implemented at locations where there are currently visual flight rules only.

Read this: EGNSS enabling change in General Aviation

High engagement

This document is aligned with the EASA Roadmap for General Aviation, which identifies simpler, more proportional rules and operations that are cost efficient, flexible and based on existing best practices. It aims to provide a view on the current implementation enablers in different EU countries and highlights the results of EASA RMTs (Rule Making Tasks) which can be relevant for the implementation of IFR for General Aviation.

“The General Aviation community undertakes millions of flights with aircraft equipped with GNSS-receivers without using the full capabilities of this new technology. By developing IFR procedures for situations where the ground infrastructure may not be present at the aerodrome it would enable GA pilots to plan A-to-B flights with more confidence of being able to complete them safely in changing weather conditions, which would have a positive impact on safety. EASA is extremely grateful to EGA for this collaborative effort,” said Dominique Roland, Head of General Aviation & Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems at EASA.

The document will be of interest to General Aviation community, aerodromes, and air traffic control staff and national authorities alike. Publication of this document aims to start a discussion within the General aviation community, trigger future pilot cases and obtain feedback to identify the tools that should be developed to support the implementation of the IFR procedures for general aviation. 

“Engagement from the aviation community has been high - we received more than 320 comments from over 25 contributors, including civil aviation authorities, air navigation service providers and others during preparation of the document. The GSA would like to thank all the contributors and supporters of this initiative, as this support was fundamental to the development of the document,” said GSA head of Market Development department Fiammetta Diani. “Special thanks go to EASA, ESSP, PPL IR, AOPA, EBAA, Austro Control, DFS, IDRF, FOCA Swiss, the Swedish Transport Agency, Europe Air Sports and the European Regional Aerodromes Community,” she said.

Just the beginning

The document will be published as a Safety Promotion material under EASA’s Together4Safety Safety Promotion initiative. This initiative is a key enabler towards reaching the ultimate objectives of the EU Aviation Safety Management Strategy and contributes to the continuous improvement of aviation safety in Europe and worldwide, together with regulations and oversight.

And this: Austro Control and EGNOS – a story of success

Publication of the materials is just the beginning. The GSA is launching a network of pilot cases in 2020 to collect lessons learned and best practices to promote and support future implementation. It is also proof that GNSS/SBAS is ready to support many different types of operations, extending beyond the traditional scope or initial objectives that the technology was designed for. If you would like to be among first to implement LPV at a non-instrument runway, you are more than welcome!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The materials identify blocking points to a wider uptake of EGNOS-based procedures in general aviation

Galileo and EGNOS: supporting effective disaster management

19.12.2019 15:03  
Synergies between satellite observation, navigation and communications support the most effective disaster management response
Published: 
19 December 2019

When an emergency or a disaster hits a city or region, the priorities are to care for the wounded, restore infrastructure, provide logistics and basic services, and then to restore livelihoods and reconstruct communities. European GNSS – Galileo and EGNOS – supports applications and the delivery of critical services during the four key phases of the disaster management life cycle: preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation.

When it comes to effectively preparing for and managing the consequences of a disaster, it is important to have access to precise and up-to-date information. GNSS-based applications make a significant contribution during the preparation and mitigation phases of disaster management, supporting GNSS monitoring and early warning systems for disasters such as landslide or tsunami. 

For the future, an EGNSS-based Emergency Warning Service is being considered as an additional service to support disaster management. The widespread use of Galileo receivers embedded in mobile phones means that the system can provide truly global early warnings and direct the civilian population in the event of an emergency. 

Response and recovery

During the response and recovery phases of disaster management, rescue teams need guidance to use the routes that are still available to reach the affected areas. This requires detailed mapping and high accuracy navigation and positioning capabilities. High accuracy is especially needed under difficult circumstances that reduce visibility, such as fires, smoke or fog. 

Watch this: EGNOS for Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS)

Here the upcoming Galileo High Accuracy Service (HAS) will make a difference, providing the accuracy needed to navigate drones and to enhance the navigation capability of search and rescue teams, while the Authenticated Open Service (OS-NMA) will provide additional robustness to the Galileo signals, foiling any attempt to disrupt rescue operations. EGNOS enabled PinS also increase access to helipads in poor visibility for Helicopter Emergency and Medical Services (HEMS).

Drones for disaster response

Responding to the need for an effective system for people location that can be used by disaster relief services in difficult terrain, the MOBNET project is designing a system to locate isolated victims in the event of natural or man-made disasters. The system also can help first responder services to find lost people in the mountains. 

Read this: Integrating GNSS in UAVs for faster SAR

The MOBNET solution takes advantage of the ubiquity of mobile phones and the cost and performance gains of using drones in search and rescue operations, while leveraging the high-quality timing synchronisation capabilities provided by Galileo. Taking advantage of these three features, MOBNET uses digital cellular technologies to detect the presence of people, by locating their mobiles, and help rescuers in their search.

Synergies in space

Earth observation such as Copernicus is invaluable to detect fires or to map the extent of a disaster. Depending on the type of emergency, timely meteorological data from satellites and ground monitoring stations are also very useful in coping with the response.

EGNSS works along with Copernicus remote sensing and Earth observation to provide a comprehensive space-based approach to disaster management. Copernicus applications include short and long-term flood forecasting and a fire risk index, early warning alerts, insurance and rapid mapping of disaster areas during an emergency. 

Communications links are also vital to coordinate and direct the rescue teams at a time when transportation infrastructure, including roads and bridges, may be severely damaged or impassable. Satellite communication allows the transfer of data when the usual communication infrastructures are disabled by the disaster event. Working in synergy, Copernicus, EGNSS and satellite communications provide the spatial awareness, connectivity and highly accurate positioning and navigation needed for an effective response.

More success stories 

The GEO-VISION project (GNSS-driven EO and Verifiable Image and Sensor Integration for mission-critical Operational Networks) has developed the RAIDO and AGILE solutions to increase the situational awareness of emergency services and allow first responders to check the integrity of the GNSS signals they receive, increasing the efficiency of the emergency response and helping to save more lives. 

Likewise, the AIOSAT (Autonomous Indoor & Outdoor Safety Tracking System) project is developing a portable system that can be carried by first responders operating in a disaster zone. This system continuously transmits the position of the responders to a Mobile Coordination Centre, allowing them to effectively manage the situation and prevent rescue workers from taking risky actions.

In this way, the application counteracts some of the issues that arise with GNSS use in an emergency situation, such as a fire for example, where GNSS availability, reliability, and accuracy can be affected by the thick smoke, dense forests, rough terrain or the fact that responders are inside buildings.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Synergies between satellite observation, navigation and communications support the most effective disaster management response

EGNSS and agriculture – a win-win relationship

19.12.2019 11:32  
GNSS supports precision agriculture and a more efficient implementation of the CAP
Published: 
19 December 2019

GNSS is a key enabler of precision agriculture, allowing farmers to drive their tractors along parallel lines, avoid overlaps and gaps in field cultivation, and reduce their fatigue thanks to satellite-enabled autopilot. GNSS also helps to reduce agriculture’s ecological footprint – a win-win situation for society as a whole. Thanks to Galileo´s dual frequency and authentication capability, it can also help farmers and authorities in the frame of the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP).  

Speaking at the EGNSS4CAP Workshop, a part of the 25th JRC MARS Conference in Prague on 29 November, European GNSS Agency Executive Director Carlo des Dorides said that for 10 years already EGNOS had been providing farmers with an affordable precision agriculture entry solution, delivering metre-level accuracy over Europe free of charge.

He noted that equipment manufacturers had been quick to realize the benefits of EGNOS, and that over 90% of new tractors in Europe are currently equipped with EGNOS receivers. “Galileo also offers several services that the agriculture community can benefit from – the Open Service is already improving positioning and navigation, especially thanks to dual frequency. It will be complemented by the High Accuracy Service that will provide around 20-cm accuracy free of charge and the Authentication Service that will reduce risks associated with spoofing,” des Dorides said.

Space synergies

On its own, GNSS provides considerable benefits to farmers, but it is when it works in synergy with the EU Earth observation programme Copernicus that the EU space programmes really deliver. “EGNSS and Copernicus are two pillars that play a crucial role in achieving sustainable agriculture,” des Dorides said. “In particular, the satellite programmes play a crucial role in the Common Agricultural Policy, delivering significant added-value for farmers, the institutions involved and society at large,” he said.

Read this: EU Space Week 2019: Sustainability and Space

One application that exploits synergies between EGNSS and Earth observation is EGNSS4CAP. This is an Android smartphone app that enables EU farmers to digitalise procedures related to their reporting requirements under the current and post-2020 CAP. The application will enable farmers to provide geo-tagged photos to support and complement a Copernicus-based monitoring approach to CAP. It uses the Galileo differentiators, Open Service Authentication and dual frequency, and can help authorities and farmers to reduce bureaucratic burden and duplications, as well as improve performance and reliability.

Implementing CAP

“GNSS and Copernicus are the core components in the digital farming ecosystem (Agriculture 4.0) and the main contributors to the modernised CAP,” Fiammetta Diani, the GSA’s Head of Market Development said at the conference.

For example, satellite-based monitoring procedures can reduce the need for On-The-Spot Checks (OTSC) for area-based CAP payments (EU subsidies related to the area and type of crop). The Galileo-based geo-tagged photo application provides the location and timing of the photo, leveraging Galileo’s dual-frequency and authentication features to provide higher accuracy and authentication for reporting to the paying agencies. The application is freely and openly available for any institution or company that would like to integrate it in their own solutions.   

In this way, EGNSS is helping to support efficient operations in one of the key areas of the EU economy. The CAP impacts almost 10 million people working in agriculture and has a proposed budget of EUR 365 billion for 2021-2027, accounting for about one-third of the total EU budget.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

GNSS supports precision agriculture and a more efficient implementation of the CAP

Drones take flight – on the wings of GNSS

19.12.2019 10:02  
Galileo is already present in more than 30% of the receivers used for drone applications
Published: 
19 December 2019

The drone market is booming and is set to outstrip any other GNSS user base in aviation and open up new business opportunities for application developers, according to a White Paper on European Global Navigation Satellite Systems (EGNSS) for drones operations, produced by the European GNSS Agency (GSA).

In light of the upswing on the drone market, European drone service revenues are expected to nearly double from EUR 32 million in 2018 to approximately EUR 60 million by 2020 and are eventually forecast to reach EUR 150 million by 2023. 

GNSS is not an option for drones anymore, but a necessary asset. GNSS is essential for the safe and reliable navigation of drones, and GNSS receivers are implemented on almost all new commercial drones as standard. With increasing demand for beyond visual line of sight (BVLOS) operations GNSS, possibly with various augmentations, is the most obvious choice of technology for navigation, although it is not the only one. 

EGNSS for added accuracy

Given the additional accuracy that Galileo offers, it is no surprise that Galileo is already present in more than 30% of the receivers used for drone applications, and many of them also implement EGNOS corrections to increase accuracy. The GSA White paper provides an overview of the added value of EGNOS and Galileo for current and emerging operations, as well as for future U-Space services. 

Read this: Targeting the development of a drone-borne Galileo receiver

The paper provides a market perspective of GNSS for drones, together with a summary of applications powered by EGNSS and the results of testing campaigns that show the benefits of EGNSS vs GPS in different operational contexts. With Galileo satellites in addition to GPS, drones can use signals from more satellites for position determination which improves their accuracy and also increases the availability of received signals. This is particularly important in urban canyons. 

Galileo also offers distinct and unique features that benefit drone operations. For example, Galileo’s authentication will provide additional trust in the position, which is more robust against intentional or unintentional interferences. EGNOS corrections also provide improved robustness over Europe and higher safety of navigation as well as improved accuracy, which is especially relevant in the vertical axis for drones operations. 

Seeking your input

The paper targets drone manufacturers and operators, but also entrepreneurs planning to offer new services with unmanned platforms. The document can serve as a basis to choose navigation solutions based on EGNOS/Galileo that will increase the robustness of their operations thanks to increased navigation performance. 

And this: Performance Cockpit takes overall prize at Galileo Masters 2019

The document is intended to be a living document and we welcome contributions from operators and users who would like to share their experience of using EGNOS and Galileo. Likewise, if you have additional needs that you would like to be met by future evolutions of the EGNSS services, then we would love to hear from you.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Galileo is already present in more than 30% of the receivers used for drone applications

Drones take flight – on the wings of GNSS

19.12.2019 10:02  
Galileo is already present in more than 30% of the receivers models used for drone applications
Published: 
19 December 2019

The drone market is booming and is set to outstrip any other GNSS user base in aviation and open up new business opportunities for application developers, according to a White Paper on European Global Navigation Satellite Systems (EGNSS) for drones operations, produced by the European GNSS Agency (GSA).

In light of the upswing on the drone market, European drone service revenues are expected to nearly double from EUR 32 million in 2018 to approximately EUR 60 million by 2020 and are eventually forecast to reach EUR 150 million by 2023. 

GNSS is not an option for drones anymore, but a necessary asset. GNSS is essential for the safe and reliable navigation of drones, and GNSS receivers are implemented on almost all new commercial drones as standard. With increasing demand for beyond visual line of sight (BVLOS) operations GNSS, possibly with various augmentations, is the most obvious choice of technology for navigation, although it is not the only one. 

EGNSS for added accuracy

Given the additional accuracy that Galileo offers, it is no surprise that Galileo is already present in more than 30% of the receivers used for drone applications, and many of them also implement EGNOS corrections to increase accuracy. The GSA White paper provides an overview of the added value of EGNOS and Galileo for current and emerging operations, as well as for future U-Space services. 

Read this: Targeting the development of a drone-borne Galileo receiver

The paper provides a market perspective of GNSS for drones, together with a summary of applications powered by EGNSS and the results of testing campaigns that show the benefits of EGNSS vs GPS in different operational contexts. With Galileo satellites in addition to GPS, drones can use signals from more satellites for position determination which improves their accuracy and also increases the availability of received signals. This is particularly important in urban canyons. 

Galileo also offers distinct and unique features that benefit drone operations. For example, Galileo’s authentication will provide additional trust in the position, which is more robust against intentional or unintentional interferences. EGNOS corrections also provide improved robustness over Europe and higher safety of navigation as well as improved accuracy, which is especially relevant in the vertical axis for drones operations. 

Seeking your input

The paper targets drone manufacturers and operators, but also entrepreneurs planning to offer new services with unmanned platforms. The document can serve as a basis to choose navigation solutions based on EGNOS/Galileo that will increase the robustness of their operations thanks to increased navigation performance. 

And this: Performance Cockpit takes overall prize at Galileo Masters 2019

The document is intended to be a living document and we welcome contributions from operators and users who would like to share their experience of using EGNOS and Galileo. Likewise, if you have additional needs that you would like to be met by future evolutions of the EGNSS services, then we would love to hear from you.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Galileo is already present in more than 30% of the receivers models used for drone applications

White Paper on EGNSS for drones now available

19.12.2019 10:02  
Galileo is already present in more than 30% of the receivers models used for drone applications
Published: 
19 December 2019

The drone market is booming and is set to outstrip any other GNSS user base in aviation and open up new business opportunities for application developers, according to a White Paper on European Global Navigation Satellite Systems (EGNSS) for drones operations, produced by the European GNSS Agency (GSA).

In light of the upswing on the drone market, European drone service revenues are expected to nearly double from EUR 32 million in 2018 to approximately EUR 60 million by 2020 and are eventually forecast to reach EUR 150 million by 2023. 

GNSS is not an option for drones anymore, but a necessary asset. GNSS is essential for the safe and reliable navigation of drones, and GNSS receivers are implemented on almost all new commercial drones as standard. With increasing demand for beyond visual line of sight (BVLOS) operations GNSS, possibly with various augmentations, is the most obvious choice of technology for navigation, although it is not the only one. 

EGNSS for added accuracy

Given the additional accuracy that Galileo offers, it is no surprise that Galileo is already present in more than 30% of the receivers used for drone applications, and many of them also implement EGNOS corrections to increase accuracy. The GSA White paper provides an overview of the added value of EGNOS and Galileo for current and emerging operations, as well as for future U-Space services. 

Read this: Targeting the development of a drone-borne Galileo receiver

The paper provides a market perspective of GNSS for drones, together with a summary of applications powered by EGNSS and the results of testing campaigns that show the benefits of EGNSS vs GPS in different operational contexts. With Galileo satellites in addition to GPS, drones can use signals from more satellites for position determination which improves their accuracy and also increases the availability of received signals. This is particularly important in urban canyons. 

Galileo also offers distinct and unique features that benefit drone operations. For example, Galileo’s authentication will provide additional trust in the position, which is more robust against intentional or unintentional interferences. EGNOS corrections also provide improved robustness over Europe and higher safety of navigation as well as improved accuracy, which is especially relevant in the vertical axis for drones operations. 

Seeking your input

The paper targets drone manufacturers and operators, but also entrepreneurs planning to offer new services with unmanned platforms. The document can serve as a basis to choose navigation solutions based on EGNOS/Galileo that will increase the robustness of their operations thanks to increased navigation performance. 

And this: Performance Cockpit takes overall prize at Galileo Masters 2019

The document is intended to be a living document and we welcome contributions from operators and users who would like to share their experience of using EGNOS and Galileo. Likewise, if you have additional needs that you would like to be met by future evolutions of the EGNSS services, then we would love to hear from you.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Galileo is already present in more than 30% of the receivers models used for drone applications

Instrument flying supported by EGNOS for General Aviation

18.12.2019 12:49  
The materials identify blocking points to a wider uptake of EGNOS-based procedures in general aviation
Published: 
20 December 2019

Even though the General Aviation (GA) community undertakes millions of flights on aircraft equipped with GNSS-receivers, it is not taking full advantage of the technology. It is a priority of the European GNSS Agency (GSA) to support GA by facilitating instrument procedures with EGNOS. As a first step the GSA has identified enablers and blocking points along with aviation stakeholders and the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA).

There are currently 660 EGNOS procedures in Europe, most of which are at instrument runways. However, EGNOS can also support general and business aviation on non-instrument runways. The GSA has issued safety promotion material on GNSS-based Instrument Flight Procedures implementation for General Aviation, Uncontrolled Aerodromes and Non-Instrument Runways in an effort to address this and encourage a wider use of EGNOS in general aviation.

The materials draw together the current regulatory analysis supporting EGNOS operations, along with enablers and best practices to support implementation, open issues and, last but not least, use case examples to encourage national authorities to authorise these types of operations in their countries. This includes examples showcasing how these can be implemented at locations where there are currently visual flight rules only.

Read this: EGNSS enabling change in General Aviation

High engagement

This document is aligned with the EASA Roadmap for General Aviation, which identifies simpler, more proportional rules and operations that are cost efficient, flexible and based on existing best practices. It aims to provide a view on the current implementation enablers in different EU countries and highlights the results of EASA RMTs (Rule Making Tasks) which can be relevant for the implementation of IFR for General Aviation.

“The General Aviation community undertakes millions of flights with aircraft equipped with GNSS-receivers without using the full capabilities of this new technology. By developing IFR procedures for situations where the ground infrastructure may not be present at the aerodrome it would enable GA pilots to plan A-to-B flights with more confidence of being able to complete them safely in changing weather conditions, which would have a positive impact on safety. EASA is extremely grateful to EGA for this collaborative effort,” said Dominique Roland, Head of General Aviation & Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems at EASA.

The document will be of interest to General Aviation community, aerodromes, and air traffic control staff and national authorities alike. Publication of this document aims to start a discussion within the General aviation community, trigger future pilot cases and obtain feedback to identify the tools that should be developed to support the implementation of the IFR procedures for general aviation. 

“Engagement from the aviation community has been high - we received more than 320 comments from over 25 contributors, including civil aviation authorities, air navigation service providers and others during preparation of the document. The GSA would like to thank all the contributors and supporters of this initiative, as this support was fundamental to the development of the document,” said GSA head of Market Development department Fiammetta Diani. “Special thanks go to EASA, ESSP, PPL IR, AOPA, EBAA, Austro Control, DFS, IDRF, FOCA Swiss, the Swedish Transport Agency, Europe Air Sports and the European Regional Aerodromes Community,” she said.

Just the beginning

The document will be published as a Safety Promotion material under EASA’s Together4Safety Safety Promotion initiative. This initiative is a key enabler towards reaching the ultimate objectives of the EU Aviation Safety Management Strategy and contributes to the continuous improvement of aviation safety in Europe and worldwide, together with regulations and oversight.

And this: Austro Control and EGNOS – a story of success

Publication of the materials is just the beginning. The GSA is launching a network of pilot cases in 2020 to collect lessons learned and best practices to promote and support future implementation. It is also proof that GNSS/SBAS is ready to support many different types of operations, extending beyond the traditional scope or initial objectives that the technology was designed for. If you would like to be among first to implement LPV at a non-instrument runway, you are more than welcome!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The materials identify blocking points to a wider uptake of EGNOS-based procedures in general aviation

Last calls for Horizon 2020, first views for Horizon Europe

18.12.2019 11:40  
Funding downstream R&I is an important part of the GSA’s strategy to foster EGNSS uptake and boost EU competitiveness
Published: 
18 December 2019

The second day of the EU Space Week event in Helsinki opened with an overview of the final tranche of project calls under the Horizon 2020 space programme. The final Horizon 2020 EGNSS (Galileo and EGNOS) calls are now open, with a closing date of 5 March 2020. The session covered research and innovation topics across Copernicus, EGNOS and Galileo programmes and also took a look to the future with Horizon Europe.

The context of the calls, in terms of EGNSS market uptake, was described by Reinhard Blasi from the GSA. “European investments in EGNSS are already making profits, with some EUR 2.8 billion of benefits computed for 2018 alone,” he stated. Currently EGNSS market revenues represent 25% of global sales, with a target of 30% to be achieved by 2025.

Funding downstream research and innovation is an important component of the GSA’s integrated strategy to foster the adoption of EGNSS technologies and boost EU competitiveness.

The H2020-SPACE-EGNSS-2020 call is open until 5 March, has an overall indicative budget of EUR 21 million and covers four topics: EGNSS apps for green, smart transport, EGNSS for mass market digitisation, EGNSS apps for resilience and environmental protection, and EGNSS applications for public authority procurement of research. The last topic is the first attempt to use the Pre-Commercial Procurement (PCP) instrument under Horizon 2020 in the EGNSS domain.

Fundamental work

The GSA’s Fundamental Elements programme has also issued project calls with more to come. The published calls include development of an enhanced GNSS User terminal, emerging EGNSS receiver technologies, development of advanced interference systems, and the development of a drone-borne double frequency receiver. Three more calls to be published in December will cover receivers for rail applications, high precision in the mass market, and a shipborne double frequency, multi-constellation receiver.

Read this: GSA funding: Filling the gaps and emerging technologies

“There is still much to do in 2020 and beyond,” said Blasi. “The GSA has three main objectives: to complete the uptake of EGNSS in more long-term regulated markets, position Galileo as the leader with its differentiating characteristics including authentication and high accuracy, and continue to support the downstream industry.”

Eric Guyader from the European Commission outlined upcoming calls administered through the Commission’s EGNSS Mission and Services (MAS) actions. Two calls are to be published soon on R&D for EGNOS services for payment or liability critical applications in the road sector and EGNSS rail safety services.

And this: Targeting the development of a drone-borne Galileo receiver

In addition, up to eight calls may be published in 2020 under the European Space Agency administered Horizon 2020 Satellite Navigation programme (HSNAV) with some EUR 2 million earmarked for projects relating to EGNSS evolution projects.

STRIKE success

An EGNSS research success story was provided by Zahidul Bhuiyan of the Finnish National Land Survey who described the Strike-3 project funded under Horizon 2020 looking at standardisation of GNSS Interference Threat Monitoring and Receiver Testing. The project had set up an international network to monitor GNSS interference. “GNSS needs protection,” said Bhuiyan. “STRIKE-3 aimed to improve our understanding of the threat scene facing stakeholders in implementing GNSS safety and security.”

The project found that out of over half a million monitored interference events, both unintentional and malicious, only 5% had an impact on the receiver, with the vast majority not actually denying the use of GNSS. The project reinforced the recognition that improved interference detection and mitigation can help the robustness of PNT services, in particular for critical infrastructure, and its receiver testing standard document provides a good initial test standard to ensure that reports from different systems are compatible.

Horizon Europe

Although the budget for the next Framework R&D programme for 2021-2027, Horizon Europe, is still subject to negotiation Mats Ljungqvist of DG GROW gave an overview of the current state of play. The current budget for the EU Space Programme in Horizon Europe is EUR 16 billion with some EUR 9.7 billion allocated to EGNSS topics.

An orientation document on the first strategic plan and work programme for Horizon Europe published at the end of October contains two sections on space research and innovation: 4.8 ‘A globally competitive space sector reinforcing EU sovereignty’ and 4.11 ‘New services from Space for the EU society and economy’.

Within the three pillars of Horizon Europe, Pillar 2 on Global Challenges and Industrial Competitiveness is allocated around half the total budget and includes a cluster (Digital, Industry & Space) that directly addresses space topics. “Pillar 3 on Open Innovation will also be of interest to the space sector,” said Ljungqvist. “An Enhanced European Innovation Council will provide accelerator and pathfinder grants to help bring bright ideas to market.”

Higher innovation funding should also be made available via an enhanced InvestEU programme where a European Union guarantee of some EUR 40 billion is looking to mobilise up to EUR 700 billion of private investment for growth and scale-up.

Together with a new Commission Directorate-General for Defence and Space, starting work at the beginning of 2020, there is a clear focus for space-related strategy and activities in Europe that reflect the growing importance of the space sector.

The GSA and the Commission have also been consulting with GNSS user communities to take their input into consideration when defining EGNSS downstream funding priorities in the new financial perspective. A recent report from the GSA summarises the results of these consultations and outlines future R&I priorities.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Funding downstream R&I is an important part of the GSA’s strategy to foster EGNSS uptake and boost EU competitiveness

MyGalileoApp shines spotlight on opportunities for start-ups

18.12.2019 11:04  
Start-ups learned about the opportunities available to them at a dedicated MyGalileoApp panel discussion
Published: 
18 December 2019

Concrete funding opportunities that are available to space tech start-ups were in focus at the MyGalileoApp competition, held at the European GNSS Agency’s (GSA) headquarters in Prague on 7 November. At an investors panel discussion held as part of the event, start-ups heard about some of the concrete funding opportunities that are available to them.

Kicking-off the panel discussion, Marta Krywanis-Brzostowska, Head of Downstream R&D in the GSA Market Development Department, noted that the Agency currently has a portfolio of over 60 projects worth a total of over EUR 120 million. She said that, through Horizon 2020, the GSA is supporting the development of applications, while the Fundamental Elements mechanism targets the development of hardware, such as chipsets and receivers.

Noting that funding is also made available through aviation grants and smaller initiatives like MyGalileoApp and other prizes such as the Galileo Masters and Farming by Satellite, Krywanis-Brzostowska said that start-ups stand to receive more dedicated support in the future.

Dedicated start-up programme

“We are aware that there is a need to support start-ups, this is why in the new financial framework after 2020 we are planning, along with the European Commission, to define a dedicated programme that will support start-ups,” she said.

Read this: EU space infrastructure guarantees leadership in security and defence

Thierry Chapuis, space applications expert at CNES (Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales) in France spoke about some of the support available through his organisation, in particular the Connect by CNES initiative, which was set up to help private and public actors to develop their applications. CNES is also participating in and funding the ESA Business Incubation Centres at the French national level. CNES is also working at the aviation level and organising hackathons such as Act in Space, the next edition of which will be in April 2020, he said.

Like Krywanis-Brzostowska, Chapuis also noted that start-ups stood to benefit from some dedicated support. “The French government has decided to develop start-ups and a big budget of EUR 400 million has been approved. CNES is responsible for selecting start-ups related to space activities within this programme,” he said.

Advancing to the next stage

João Duarte, responsible for early stage venture capital at Lighthouse Ventures, a EUR 23-million fund based in Prague, said that his company supports early stage start-ups with between 50,000 to 700,000 euros per start-up, with EUR 300,000 being the most typical amount. “We also have an acceleration programme where we invest EUR 20,000 for a couple of months to help a start-up go from the idea stage to having a business plan and some early customers. If they successfully complete the acceleration, then they will be eligible for larger investment to take them to the next stage,” he said.

And this: GSA, EIB sign agreement on investment in space

Representing UP21, an incubator and seed fund based in Prague, Anna Efros informed the participants that, so far her company had carried out 16 investments in two strategies: incubation with up to EUR 30,000 for 3-6 months, and larger investments of up to EUR 500,000 euros. “We are currently setting up a venture capital fund called START21 which will hopefully amount to EUR 25 million, and also we are co-organiser of the Start-up World Cup and Summit, which will be held in April 2020,” she said.

Money to disperse

Unlike other similar agencies, the Italian Space Agency doesn’t have its own research labs. However, Anilkumar Dave, Head of Innovation and Transfer of Technologies at the Agency, said that it has a lot of government money to disburse. “We will launch the first venture capital fund on space in Italy at the end of this year, where we are the cornerstone investor - but we will not invest in early-stage and seed, but rather in SMEs,” he said. 

Marketa Filipenska, International Funding Specialist at the South Moravian Innovation Centre (JIC) noted that her centre had recently opened a European Space Agency BIC where it is helping people with ideas related to space upstream and downstream. “We are providing them with EUR 50,000 and business mentoring, in addition to connecting them to big players in the sector,” she said.

Wrapping up the discussion, Fiammetta Diani, Head of Market Development at the GSA, spoke about a Memorandum of Understanding that the GSA signed with the European Investment Bank (EIB) in September this year, dealing with cooperation on supporting investment in the European space-based service economy. “The MoU aims to give space start-ups a greater portfolio of opportunities and tools to help them to grow,” she said.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Start-ups learned about the opportunities available to them at a dedicated MyGalileoApp panel discussion

MyGalileoApp – an ecosystem of innovation

17.12.2019 12:04  
MyGalileoApp competitors learned some of the key elements needed for a successful app
Published: 
17 December 2019

The MyGalileoApp competition has contributed to the creation of an ecosystem that helps start-ups and other innovators to build innovative applications and grow while enabling both private and public investors to find and invest in projects of interest to them. At the MyGalileoApp finals, which took place at the European GNSS Agency’s (GSA) Prague headquarters at the start of November, start-ups heard about some of the key elements that they will need to succeed in a highly-competitive marketplace.

Galileo has been available to users around the globe since the launch of initial services back in December 2016 and the challenge generally, and for the MyGalileoApp competition specifically, is to make use of the Galileo services to develop systems and applications and to drive innovation based on the technology that Galileo makes available. The competition took nine months in total, during which the competitors progressed from the idea stage to creating a working app with 100% functionality.

Engines of innovation

Francesco Perticarari from Silicon Roundabout, who was a mentor at this year’s competition, noted that the approach of the GSA has been to leverage start-ups as engines of innovation. “The GSA did not just set up a competition to award money to successful developers, it set out to create an ecosystem of tech innovators, from start-ups to mentors and investors and the GSA itself, which also provides support,” he said, adding that the power of the MyGalileoApp competition is the ecosystem it creates that enables start-ups to deliver. 

 “Whether or not you win a prize today, this is not the end of the story. The connections you have made with mentors, investors and other start-ups are what you should really treasure,” he told the finalists in this year’s competition. 

Watch this: Meet Argeo: #MyGalileoApp Competition Winner

Another mentor, Piotr Bucki from Bucki PRO, outlined some of the forces that can drive a start-up forward, including social demographics in the form of a trend that an app can follow. It is also possible to ride a regulatory wave. “If rules from the European Commission or some other authority call for improvements in a service, then companies have no choice but to up their game, he said.

Growth mind-set

“In addition to timing, financing, strategy and riding the aforementioned waves, one more thing that makes start-ups successful is having a growth mind-set. A growth mind-set is the opposite of a fixed mind-set, in which intelligence is static, while in a growth mind-set intelligence and skills can be developed and iterated,” Bucki said.

Maaike Dokter from Xablu noted that location services can improve our quality of life, and that this was true for all of the sectors addressed by the MyGalileoApp finalists’ apps. As a designer with a focus on healthcare, she outlined how location-based services can improve things in this industry by optimising processes and reducing admin, allowing providers to focus on healthcare provision and reducing the amount of time a person has to spend in hospital. 

“By increasing outdoor and indoor accuracy, we can take advantage of these opportunities. The MyGalileoApp competitors are finding solutions in which Galileo plays an important role, turning ideas into reality,” she said. 

Ensuring sustainability

At a panel discussion held later in the day, start-ups heard from investors about the key qualities that would ensure their sustainability. Marketa Filipenska, International Funding Specialist at the South Moravian Innovation Centre (JIC) said that, in addition to mentoring, complementary services are also important, closely linked to the ecosystem in the region. 

Read this: EGNOS service for payment and liability-critical road applications

 “We connect venture capital funds, business angels, universities, local stakeholders and corporates - all of these meet with our start-ups and clients to identify opportunities on the market. Investor matching is important, not only to make the business sustainable, but to scale up the company,” she said.

Marta Krywanis-Brzostowska, Head of Downstream R&D in the GSA Market Development Department, noted that when reviewing projects for funding, one thing at the forefront of the GSA’s mind is that it does not want another prototype to put on the shelf. 

“We always highlight that it is important to have a link between the proposed solution and needs on the market. Knowledge of the market is critical, so we ask applicants to include a business plan along with their proposals,” she said, adding that an important tool in understanding the market is the GSA’s GNSS Market Report

“To be sustainable, you have to follow trends, be creative, understand the technology, be enthusiastic about what you are doing and be open to any support,” she said.

Thanks to MyGalileoApp, the GSA has built a network where business partners, public players and investors can connect with start-ups and young innovators, thereby contributing to the development of innovative applications leveraging the advantages of Galileo.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

MyGalileoApp competitors learned some of the key elements needed for a successful app

Galileo Masters 2019: Something special in the Air in Helsinki?

17.12.2019 11:11  
Participants at this year’s Galileo Masters in Helsinki.
Published: 
17 December 2019

Once again, the Galileo Masters – and its sister award programme the Copernicus Masters – was the glittering highlight of EU Space Week 2019 that took place in Helsinki on 3 to 5 December. In its 15th year the Galileo Masters continues to attract the attention of some of the brightest and best minds. Topics submitted to the competition this year ranged through digitisation, big data, the sharing economy and artificial intelligence (AI), amongst others, but all with a common theme: the use of European Global Navigation Satellite Systems (EGNSS) Galileo and/or EGNOS to benefit society.

The 2019 Galileo Masters attracted some 203 participants reaching entrepreneurs from over 41 countries in Europe and around the world. Since its inception in 2004 the competition has seen a cumulative participation by just under 12,000 individuals submitting 4,587 individual business cases.

In addition to the overall Galileo Masters winner and regional awards, a range of special prizes are also given, including ‘Idea of the Year’ and ‘Start-up of the Year’ and a new prize for 2019 responding to an emerging trend: The Galileo-Copernicus Synergy Challenge.

Special prizes

The Gala event took place at the Helsinki Congress Paasitorni centre in central Helsinki on the evening of 4 December. In all, some 31 awards were handed out on the night under the Galileo Masters categories. Master of ceremonies, Bavarian broadcaster and celebrity Claus Kruesken, described the Masters awards ceremony as the “festive highlight of EU Space Week.” 

Read this: Performance Cockpit takes overall prize at Galileo Masters 2019

This year’s new prize, the GSA Galileo-Copernicus Synergy Challenge was presented by GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. Commenting on the event, he highlighted the links that the competition inspired between the GSA and the space applications community by “providing the GSA with a first-hand experience of emerging needs and solutions.” The first ever winner of the synergy prize was the Xylene concept from Giuseppe Benenati and his team. Read more here.

Other Galileo special prizes this year included the DLR Artificial Intelligence Navigation Challenge awarded to Pieter Bastiaan Ober of INTEGRICOM for a proposal to analyse the Galileo Signal in Space using AI. The BMVI PRS Applications Challenge was presented to Brandon Bradford of tissEU for his Odin’s Eye idea – a Galileo-enabled PRS tactical drone – that was also the winner of the Bavaria regional Challenge prize. 

The University Challenge was announced by Paul Bhatia from the University of Nottingham with the winner, Freewheel – a platform that allows people with reduced mobility to increase their accessibility and inclusion – awarded to Lotfi Massarweh, Deimos Engenharia and their Elecnor team. 

The SAWCER concept won the GNSS Living Lab Prize with an idea inspired by a move to a new city, Barcelona, for winner Adrienne Fanning. Her app makes local shops as easy to search as online stores by creating and sharing crowdsourced, geo-localised catalogues.

The internet of Things (IoT) is building to be one of Galileo’s largest markets for applications and the Galileo 5G IoT Challenge award was presented to another idea to help inclusivity by making outdoor sports more accessible to blind or partially sighted people: the WAIBRO belt developed by Katrina Sedlackova and her team at WAIBRO sports.

New ideas and accelerators

Fiammetta Diani, Head of Market Development at the GSA presented the Idea of the Year and Start-up of the Year prizes; both of which target entrepreneurship. Idea of the Year went to the CX-GEODRONE project and a joint team from the Universities of Vigo and Oviedo, who also won the Galicia regional prize, for a radar-based drone payload that promised the inspection of underground utilities infrastructure without the need to dig up the road.

And this: uMaze takes Accuracy Matters prize in Galileo Innovation Challenge

The Start-up of the Year is awarded to a project that is already being implemented in a start-up that is not older than three years and this year was awarded to PODIS - Post Distress Signal. The winning team led by Andreas Alamanos also won the Greek regional prize for this IoT solution-as-a-service concept for automatic crash notification system.

The prestigious EGNSS Accelerator Winners were announced by Pierre Delsaux, Deputy Director-General for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs at the European Commission. Three winners were announced for the valuable incubation prize. First up was MEDeus, aka the drone doctors, represented by Hammad Jeilani and his UK regional winning team that is looking to improve the efficiency of delivering healthcare supplies using drones. 

Another double winner was second: Dronetag also won the Czech regional prize for Lukaz Brchl. The Dronetag concept will provide real-time identification for UAVs by leveraging Galileo and IoT technologies.

The third Incubation winner was in fact a triple success for the German Tocsen GmbH team. Tocsen won the Baden-Wurttemberg regional prize, took this Incubation Accelerator win and was on stage again as the single winner of the EGNSS crowdfunding campaign accelerator! Tocsen is a smart crash detection and automatic emergency call system designed to be incorporated in cyclists’ crash helmets.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Participants at this year’s Galileo Masters in Helsinki.

Galileo Masters 2019: Something special in the Air in Helsinki?

17.12.2019 11:11  
Participants at this year’s Galileo Masters in Helsinki.
Published: 
17 December 2019

Once again, the Galileo Masters – and its sister award programme the Copernicus Masters – was the glittering highlight of EU Space Week 2019 that took place in Helsinki on 3 to 5 December. In its 15th year the Galileo Masters continues to attract the attention of some of the brightest and best minds. Topics submitted to the competition this year ranged through digitisation, big data, the sharing economy and artificial intelligence (AI), amongst others, but all with a common theme: the use of European Global Navigation Satellite Systems (EGNSS) Galileo and/or EGNOS to benefit society.

The 2019 Galileo Masters attracted some 203 participants reaching entrepreneurs from over 41 countries in Europe and around the world. Since its inception in 2004 the competition has seen a cumulative participation by just under 12,000 individuals submitting 4,587 individual business cases.

In addition to the overall Galileo Masters winner and regional awards, a range of special prizes are also given, including ‘Idea of the Year’ and ‘Start-up of the Year’ and a new prize for 2019 responding to an emerging trend: The Galileo-Copernicus Synergy Challenge.

Special prizes

The Gala event took place at the Helsinki Congress Paasitorni centre in central Helsinki on the evening of 4 December. In all, some 31 awards were handed out on the night under the Galileo Masters categories. Master of ceremonies, Bavarian broadcaster and celebrity Claus Kruesken, described the Masters awards ceremony as the “festive highlight of EU Space Week.” 

Read this: Performance Cockpit takes overall prize at Galileo Masters 2019

This year’s new prize, the GSA Galileo-Copernicus Synergy Challenge was presented by GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. Commenting on the event, he highlighted the links that the competition inspired between the GSA and the space applications community by “providing the GSA with a first-hand experience of emerging needs and solutions.” The first ever winner of the synergy prize was the Xylene concept from Giuseppe Benenati and his team. Read more here.

Other Galileo special prizes this year included the DLR Artificial Intelligence Navigation Challenge awarded to Pieter Bastiaan Ober of INTEGRICOM for a proposal to analyse the Galileo Signal in Space using AI. The BMVI PRS Applications Challenge was presented to Brandon Bradford of tissEU for his Odin’s Eye idea – a Galileo-enabled PRS tactical drone – that was also the winner of the Bavaria regional Challenge prize. 

The University Challenge was announced by Paul Bhatia from the University of Nottingham with the winner, Freewheel – a platform that allows people with reduced mobility to increase their accessibility and inclusion – awarded to Lotfi Massarweh, Deimos Engenharia and their Elecnor team. 

The SAWCER concept won the GNSS Living Lab Prize with an idea inspired by a move to a new city, Barcelona, for winner Adrienne Fanning. Her app makes local shops as easy to search as online stores by creating and sharing crowdsourced, geo-localised catalogues.

The internet of Things (IoT) is building to be one of Galileo’s largest markets for applications and the Galileo 5G IoT Challenge award was presented to another idea to help inclusivity by making outdoor sports more accessible to blind or partially sighted people: the WAIBRO belt developed by Katrina Sedlackova and her team at WAIBRO sports.

New ideas and accelerators

Fiammetta Diani, Deputy Head of Market Development at the GSA presented the Idea of the Year and Start-up of the Year prizes; both of which target entrepreneurship. Idea of the Year went to the CX-GEODRONE project and a joint team from the Universities of Vigo and Oviedo, who also won the Galicia regional prize, for a radar-based drone payload that promised the inspection of underground utilities infrastructure without the need to dig up the road.

And this: uMaze takes Accuracy Matters prize in Galileo Innovation Challenge

The Start-up of the Year is awarded to a project that is already being implemented in a start-up that is not older than three years and this year was awarded to PODIS - Post Distress Signal. The winning team led by Andreas Alamanos also won the Greek regional prize for this IoT solution-as-a-service concept for automatic crash notification system.

The prestigious EGNSS Accelerator Winners were announced by Pierre Delsaux, Deputy Director-General for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs at the European Commission. Three winners were announced for the valuable incubation prize. First up was MEDeus, aka the drone doctors, represented by Hammad Jeilani and his UK regional winning team that is looking to improve the efficiency of delivering healthcare supplies using drones. 

Another double winner was second: Dronetag also won the Czech regional prize for Lukaz Brchl. The Dronetag concept will provide real-time identification for UAVs by leveraging Galileo and IoT technologies.

The third Incubation winner was in fact a triple success for the German Tocsen GmbH team. Tocsen won the Baden-Wurttemberg regional prize, took this Incubation Accelerator win and was on stage again as the single winner of the EGNSS crowdfunding campaign accelerator! Tocsen is a smart crash detection and automatic emergency call system designed to be incorporated in cyclists’ crash helmets.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Participants at this year’s Galileo Masters in Helsinki.

GIANO – robust GNSS for critical infrastructure

13.12.2019 15:47  
The GIANO receiver will be more robust against jamming and spoofing
Published: 
16 December 2019

Thales Alenia Space has been awarded a grant under the European GNSS Agency’s (GSA) Fundamental Elements funding mechanism for the development of the GIANO (Galileo-based TIming Receiver for CriticAl INfrastructure Robustness) receiver, which aims to make critical infrastructure more robust against interference, jamming and spoofing.

In an increasingly complex GNSS environment in which there is both unintentional and deliberate disruption of satellite signals, the GSA is funding the development of a timing receiver for professional applications to address the needs of the critical infrastructure user community, mainly energy generation and distribution, telecommunications and financial operators. 

Improved resilience

The GIANO receiver will leverage Galileo and EGNOS-driven innovation to improve the resilience of the receiver against interference, jamming and spoofing and increase the accuracy and reliability of the time transfer service. The timing platform prototype to be developed and validated will integrate all the latest innovative technologies, including professional products from Thales Alenia Space, paving the way for future Galileo-based timing receivers that offer improved resilience and accuracy at a reasonable cost.

Read this: GSA funding opportunity: Enhanced GNSS Receiver/User Terminal

“Critical infrastructure operators use GNSS for timing and synchronisation and are an important target segment for GSA Market Development because Galileo can make a difference. By funding the development of the GIANO receiver, the GSA aims to provide technological solutions to this community for robust and reliable timing,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani.

Towards this goal, outreach activities have been conducted among potential final users in the main commercial target groups to collect and analyse their needs. Then, following the definition and consolidation of stakeholders’ needs and the platform specifications, the project conducted a Preliminary Design Review at the end of November 2019.  

Europe-wide cooperation

The two-year project, funded under a GSA grant related to the Development of a Galileo-based timing receiver for critical infrastructures (GSA/GRANT/05/2017), will be coordinated by Thales Alenia Space in Italy, in collaboration with four European partners: Business Integration Partners S.p.A (BIP, Italy), PIKTime Systems (Poland), Space Research Centre of the Polish Academy of Science (SRC PAS, Poland) and DEIMOS (Portugal).

And this: Orolia selected for Galileo resilient time receiver initiative

The project will also benefit from the support of the European Commission’s in-house science service - the Joint Research Centre (JRC) and the Italian National Metrology Institute (INRIM), which will make available its test facilities for verification activities on the developed equipment.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).
The GIANO receiver will be more robust against jamming and spoofing

GIANO – robust GNSS for critical infrastructure

13.12.2019 15:47  
The GIANO receiver will make critical infrastructure such as energy networks more robust against jamming and spoofing. ©Unsplash
Published: 
16 December 2019

Thales Alenia Space has been awarded a grant under the European GNSS Agency’s (GSA) Fundamental Elements funding mechanism for the development of the GIANO (Galileo-based TIming Receiver for CriticAl INfrastructure Robustness) receiver, which aims to make critical infrastructure more robust against interference, jamming and spoofing.

In an increasingly complex GNSS environment in which there is both unintentional and deliberate disruption of satellite signals, the GSA is funding the development of a timing receiver for professional applications to address the needs of the critical infrastructure user community, mainly energy generation and distribution, telecommunications and financial operators. 

Improved resilience

The GIANO receiver will leverage Galileo and EGNOS-driven innovation to improve the resilience of the receiver against interference, jamming and spoofing and increase the accuracy and reliability of the time transfer service. The timing platform prototype to be developed and validated will integrate all the latest innovative technologies, including professional products from Thales Alenia Space, paving the way for future Galileo-based timing receivers that offer improved resilience and accuracy at a reasonable cost.

Read this: GSA funding opportunity: Enhanced GNSS Receiver/User Terminal

“Critical infrastructure operators use GNSS for timing and synchronisation and are an important target segment for GSA Market Development because Galileo can make a difference. By funding the development of the GIANO receiver, the GSA aims to provide technological solutions to this community for robust and reliable timing,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani.

Towards this goal, outreach activities have been conducted among potential final users in the main commercial target groups to collect and analyse their needs. Then, following the definition and consolidation of stakeholders’ needs and the platform specifications, the project conducted a Preliminary Design Review at the end of November 2019.  

Europe-wide cooperation

The two-year project, funded under a GSA grant related to the Development of a Galileo-based timing receiver for critical infrastructures (GSA/GRANT/05/2017), will be coordinated by Thales Alenia Space in Italy, in collaboration with four European partners: Business Integration Partners S.p.A (BIP, Italy), PIKTime Systems (Poland), Space Research Centre of the Polish Academy of Science (SRC PAS, Poland) and DEIMOS (Portugal).

And this: Orolia selected for Galileo resilient time receiver initiative

The project will also benefit from the support of the European Commission’s in-house science service - the Joint Research Centre (JRC) and the Italian National Metrology Institute (INRIM), which will make available its test facilities for verification activities on the developed equipment.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).
The GIANO receiver will make critical infrastructure such as energy networks more robust against jamming and spoofing. ©Unsplash

The true impact of space is felt downstream

13.12.2019 15:12  
Space is driving innovation and supporting service delivery across the global economy
Published: 
16 December 2019

The upstream space market, with its rocket launches and high-tech satellite payloads, may seem at a first glance to be the most exciting segment of the space industry. But when it comes to innovation, job and revenue creation and the provision of services that change people’s lives for the better, the downstream market is where the action is. This was the key message delivered by European GNSS Agency (GSA) Executive Director Carlo des Dorides at the New Space Economy forum in Rome on December 12.

We are living in the Golden Age of GNSS. Space-based technology is driving innovation and supporting service delivery in almost all sectors of the global economy – from agriculture and transport to healthcare and telecoms. Satellites and the location-based services that they enable are transforming the way that we live and work. 

Downstream driving the space economy

Delivering a keynote address on GNSS markets, applications and data at the NSE forum, the GSA Executive Director noted that downstream users are directly benefitting from Galileo. “Over 50,000 jobs are supported annually in the downstream GNSS industry,” des Dorides said, adding that European companies account for 27% of the global GNSS market and that this share is set to grow.

“GNSS downstream is driving the space economy. Global revenue generated by the GNSS downstream market is forecast to reach EUR 150 billion in 2019 and increase to EUR 325 billion in 2029,” des Dorides said, citing the latest edition of the GSA GNSS Market Report. “Over 50% of this GNSS revenue comes from added-value services,” he said.

Read this: Europe’s economy is increasingly dependent on space

With the evolution of the GSA into the European Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) it will be possible to fully exploit synergies between the EU space programmes to deliver applications and services in a wide range of sectors, from security and emergency response, to urban planning, agriculture and energy and critical infrastructure, des Dorides said.

“With its expanded mandate, the GSA will continue to support entrepreneurship and stimulate the EU downstream market to deliver applications with tangible social benefits, such as improved environmental performance, better transport efficiency and more effective emergency response,” he said.

Driving innovation in transport

One sector in particular in which new possibilities are opening up is road transport, which is a huge GNSS market segment. The road segment is forecast to dominate all other market segments and account for 93.3% of cumulative revenue in 2019-2029. In her keynote at the NSE forum, the GSA’s Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani spoke about GNSS and the road sector and, in particular, the state of play in autonomous vehicles.

Noting that almost 97% of new vehicles are equipped with GNSS-enabled in-vehicle systems, which provide PNT for a wide range of in-vehicle applications, Diani said that these systems are currently able to support navigation, remote diagnostics and assisted driving. “In the future, IVS will support even more complex applications, including automated driving,” she said.

And this: First Galileo-enabled autonomous vehicle successfully demonstrated

In terms of the state of play with autonomous driving, the GSA’s Head of Market Development said that preparations are currently underway for Level 4. At this level, a highly automated vehicle performs all driving tasks and monitors the environment under limited conditions, but the driver may still be required to intervene. Level 4 is the penultimate stage before full automation at Level 5.

Diani also noted the recent live demonstration of a Galileo-enabled autonomous vehicle. As part of this demonstration, a Renault ZOE electric car fitted with an innovative positioning engine developed by the ESCAPE project was autonomously driven on tracks at the University of Technology and on public roads in Compiègne, France. The EGE leverages Galileo signals and services to provide a core positioning component in autonomous vehicles.

"This successful test of the ESCAPE positioning engine based on Galileo, at automation Level 4, means that we are getting closer to provide the high accurate and reliable absolute positioning that will be needed for full automation,” she said.

More generally, Galileo will support new road safety functions that will become mandatory from 2022, including accident data recording, intelligent speed assistance, lane keeping assistance and vulnerable road user detection. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Space is driving innovation and supporting service delivery across the global economy

EU Space Week 2019: Sustainability and Space

13.12.2019 12:13  
Space can contribute to a more sustainable future for Europe
Published: 
13 December 2019

Helsinki was the cool venue for European Space Week 2019. From 3 to 5 December Europe’s leading space event brought together business leaders, policymakers, international experts and the space application user community to gain first-hand insights into the EU’s Space Programmes Copernicus, EGNOS and Galileo. They discussed how space solutions can contribute to a more sustainable future for Europe and the world. 

This year’s European Space Week focused on four central themes: how space solutions can help to strengthen the EU’s position as a global leader in climate action; the new space economy for sustainable growth; how to save space for future generations; and space solutions for a sustainable Arctic environment.

Opening the EU Space Week plenary under the banner ‘Sustainable Space, Sustainable Europe, Sustainable Future’ former Finnish President Tarja Halonen highlighted how “Space applications observe own blue planet, enable us to find our way, communicate and connect, more sustainably.”

Christophe Grudler, MEP stated: "Major investments by the EU have enabled progress that no Member State could have achieved on its own.” He highlighted the need to defend and grow the space allocation in the forthcoming European Union budget negotiations. “An ambitious budget will be the only way to ensure Europe's global leadership and strategic autonomy," he concluded.

Pierre Delsaux from the European Commission agreed saying: “We must continue to invest in space.” 

Space for climate action

The new European Commission will have a clear focus on climate action, but how can space solutions help? Pierre Delsaux highlighted a future Copernicus mission to monitor CO2 emissions, while GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides outlined the contributions of Galileo and EGNOS to improve resource and energy efficiency and sustainable agriculture through more accurate positioning by enabling the maxim: “Doing more with less.”

“At GSA’s core is the development of products and services,” he continued. “We are funding concrete projects delivering solutions to specific questions and organising events such as hackathons to inspire young developers. The limit to projects is human creativity.”

Sustainable space ecosystem

A new economic ecosystem has been created in Europe as more talent and investment see the space sector as a cool place to do business. Pekka Laurila of Iceye, a small satellite company in Finland building a new digital infrastructure to enable real time knowledge of where everything is at all times, acknowledged that their success has been enabled by others. “We are the product of an ecosystem; we are standing on the shoulders of giants including institutions funded by public money plus a high-quality education system,” Laurila said. 

Investor Uli Fricke, founder of Triangles, agreed that there was a viable and thriving commercial space market in Europe and “The funding ecosystem from start-up to IPO is the bottleneck for many companies.” The key factor for any young space business was to have a clear business model and value proposition. “Often you need to take the space angle out of the question, when talking to investors,” she added.

Pascal Claudel, Chief Operating Officer at the GSA highlighted the agency’s role in delivering services 24/7 to users and in fostering users across all market sectors. “We can support SMEs in this ecosystem across the whole EU,” he said. “And there is no need to have space experience to work in the space market nowadays.” But there was a need to work together and involve all EU Member States and public and private investors to grow and sustain the market.

Saving Space

Space – especially low Earth orbit – is becoming a congested space noted keynote speaker Professor Minna Palmroth of the University of Helsinki. And more satellites are being launched with a mega trend towards very large fleets of small commercial satellites. Space debris is becoming a priority issue and she also highlighted the lack of knowledge of space weather in the near-Earth environment. “We still do not fully understand the environment that we launch into,” she commented.

But how to clear the debris? Newer satellites will have limited lifetimes and include de-orbiting technology, while older satellites might require third party action. Could there be a market established for deorbiting space debris and is international legislation a way forward or is standardisation the right route? “The sustainable future in space requires every one of us to work together on this topic,” she concluded.

Sustainable Arctic

The final Space Week plenary examined how EU space solutions can protect the arctic environment and support sustainable growth as the climate changes. Jouni Pulliainen, Director of Space & EO, at the Finnish Meteorological Institute saw three main issues where space can help: gaps in monitoring the climatic changes that are happening, improved communications and more accurate navigation information. Session moderator Professor Heidi Kuusniemi of Vaasa University reinforced the growing importance of robust and reliable navigation services in the Arctic.

Improved synergies between space services could help boost their use in the Arctic said Dan Chirondojan, Director at the Commission’s Joint Research Centre that has conducted a study on space solutions and the region. Improved satellite navigation and communication would be needed to enable future remote control and autonomous vessels in the arctic said Karno Kenovuo, Co-founder and CEO of Awake.AI so evolution of EGNSS services in the region was important. Wider coverage of the Galileo Search and Rescue (SAR) service would be very useful due to its enhanced performance.

Mauro Facchini of the European Commission agreed and indicated that the EGNOS Safety of Life service was currently supported to 72 degrees North but may be extended to 75 degrees North soon and could be deployed over the entire arctic by 2030.

Concluding the plenary sessions Finnish Undersecretary of State at the Ministry of Economic Affairs, Katri Kulmuni thanked all participants in EU Space Week 2019 and stated that: “Space activities must be pursued in a sustainable and responsible manner,” but that the week’s debates had shown that “Space is truly a channel for sustainable growth.”

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Space can contribute to a more sustainable future for Europe

Targeting the development of a drone-borne Galileo receiver

12.12.2019 13:45  
This FE call is targeting the development of a Galileo receiver for the rapidly developing drone market.
Published: 
13 December 2019

A Call for Proposals recently opened under the European GNSS Agency’s (GSA) Fundamental Elements funding mechanism is targeting the development of a drone-borne double-frequency Galileo receiver that leverages the differentiators of European GNSS (EGNOS and Galileo).

Drones bring innovation and new applications and business models to European citizens, becoming the 3rd GNSS market segment for device shipments according to the last GSA market report. The sector is booming and growth in drone use is set to outstrip any other user base in aviation. Drones generally integrate GNSS solutions in an effort to navigate efficiently and safely. EGNSS added value

European GNSS, EGNOS and Galileo, provides significant added value to drone navigation, positioning and related applications, and the use of their differentiators will be instrumental in opening up new business opportunities.

Read this: Shaping the future of EGNSS research and innovation

Within this context, this Call for Proposals is targeting the development of a drone-borne low-cost double-frequency Galileo multi-constellation receiver, integrated with INS (inertial navigation system) and other sensors. The technology should be at a sufficient level of maturity (technology readiness level 7).

   

Fundamental Elements call: At a Glance 

  • Title: Development of a drone-borne double frequency Galileo receiver     
  • Budget: €1,500,000
  • Indicative number of projects: up to 2 projects
  • Deadline for applications: 2 March 2020  

 

 

Robust solution

The call aims at delivery of a robust navigation solution, including integrity requirements for operations, that leverages Galileo differentiators such as OS Authentication and High Accuracy. The solution should be validated in a representative environment for the target operations. This includes conducting flight tests and analysing the performances obtained from a Galileo-only constellation and comparing these with those coming from multi-constellation mode.

For more information on this call, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

This FE call is targeting the development of a Galileo receiver for the rapidly developing drone market.

Targeting the development of a drone-borne Galileo receiver

12.12.2019 13:45  
This FE call is targeting the development of a Galileo receiver for the rapidly developing drone market.
Published: 
13 December 2019

A Call for Proposals recently opened under the European GNSS Agency’s (GSA) Fundamental Elements funding mechanism is targeting the development of a drone-borne double-frequency Galileo receiver that leverages the differentiators of European GNSS (EGNOS and Galileo).

Drones bring innovation and new applications and business models to European citizens, becoming the 3rd GNSS market segment for device shipments according to the last GSA market report. The sector is booming and growth in drone use is set to outstrip any other user base in aviation. Drones generally integrate GNSS solutions in an effort to navigate efficiently and safely. EGNSS added value

European GNSS, EGNOS and Galileo, provides significant added value to drone navigation, positioning and related applications, and the use of their differentiators will be instrumental in opening up new business opportunities.

Read this: Shaping the future of EGNSS research and innovation

Within this context, this Call for Proposals is targeting the development of a drone-borne low-cost double-frequency Galileo multi-constellation receiver, integrated with INS (inertial navigation system) and other sensors. The technology should be at a sufficient level of maturity (technology readiness level 7).

 

Fundamental Elements call: At a Glance 

  • Title: Development of a drone-borne double frequency Galileo receiver     
  • Budget: €1,500,000
  • Indicative number of projects: up to 2 projects
  • Deadline for applications: 2 March 2020  

 

 

Robust solution

The call aims at delivery of a robust navigation solution, including integrity requirements for operations, that leverages Galileo differentiators such as OS Authentication and High Accuracy. The solution should be validated in a representative environment for the target operations. This includes conducting flight tests and analysing the performances obtained from a Galileo-only constellation and comparing these with those coming from multi-constellation mode.

For more information on this call, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

This FE call is targeting the development of a Galileo receiver for the rapidly developing drone market.

You asked; we listened: new SAR/Galileo Service status information available

12.12.2019 11:29  
The new SAR information page will provide useful resources to the SAR community.
Published: 
12 December 2019

To support Search and Rescue services and provide general awareness on the related infrastructure, the GNSS Service Centre is publishing relevant SAR/Galileo information, such as the status of the Galileo satellites SAR payload, SAR reference beacons on ground and the availability of the SAR data server.

Search and Rescue (SAR) operations involve locating and helping people in distress. Launched as part of the Galileo Initial Services, Galileo is the first GNSS constellation to offer global SAR capability and is fully integrated in the COSPAS-SARSAT system, enabling quick detection of people in distress and subsequent rescue. Galileo not only provides a precise location for emitting beacons, but also a return channel which will inform users that help is on its way.

Aiming at a continuous upgrade of service provision from the GNSS Service Centre (GSC), new information has been published about the deployed SAR infrastructure, including the status of the service and the availability of the data provided by the GSC. This information is provided to professionals, academia and enthusiasts as a new effort on the part of the GSA to show transparency and a commitment to the Galileo community.

What SAR/Galileo information is available?

The following data is now provided on the GSC website:

SAR/Galileo satellites information: a table with information about operating mode and current status of the forward- and return-link transponders per each Galileo satellite. 

SAR payload characteristics: technical specifications of the SAR repeater instrument.

SAR/Galileo reference beacons and their availability: these stations are geographically distributed across the service area and are used for continuous monitoring of the SAR/Galileo Service.  

SAR/Galileo server status: the SAR/Galileo Server is a complementary Galileo infrastructure operated by the GSC that provides support to the SAR/Galileo Service and worldwide SAR community by providing information on the availability of Galileo constellation orbital products in a precise and timely manner. The SAR/Galileo server can be accessed worldwide through a secure FTP connection. This section informs the users about the working status of this infrastructure.

All this information is accessible through a new menu section called SAR Information under the “System & Service Status” heading. This section complements the general description of the SAR Service and the related market.

The SAR information will be updated whenever a new Galileo satellite is launched or whenever there is a maintenance event affecting the SAR/Galileo service. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The new SAR information page will provide useful resources to the SAR community.

You asked; we listened: new SAR/Galileo Service status information available

12.12.2019 11:29  
The new SAR information page will provide useful resources to the SAR community.
Published: 
12 December 2019

To support Search and Rescue services and provide general awareness on the related infrastructure, the GNSS Service Centre is publishing relevant SAR/Galileo information, such as the status of the Galileo satellites SAR payload, SAR reference beacons on the ground and the availability of the SAR data server.

Search and Rescue (SAR) operations involve locating and helping people in distress. Launched as part of the Galileo Initial Services, Galileo is the first GNSS constellation to offer global SAR capability and is fully integrated in the COSPAS-SARSAT system, enabling quick detection of people in distress and subsequent rescue. Galileo not only provides a precise location for emitting beacons, but also a return channel which will inform users that help is on its way.

Aiming at a continuous upgrade of service provision from the GNSS Service Centre (GSC), new information has been published about the deployed SAR infrastructure, including the status of the service and the availability of the data provided by the GSC. This information is provided to professionals, academia and enthusiasts as a new effort on the part of the GSA to show transparency and a commitment to the Galileo community.

What SAR/Galileo information is available?

The following data is now provided on the GSC website:

SAR/Galileo satellites information: a table with information about operating mode and current status of the forward- and return-link transponders per each Galileo satellite. 

SAR payload characteristics: technical specifications of the SAR repeater instrument.

SAR/Galileo reference beacons and their availability: these stations are geographically distributed across the service area and are used for continuous monitoring of the SAR/Galileo Service.  

SAR/Galileo server status: the SAR/Galileo Server is a complementary Galileo infrastructure operated by the GSC that provides support to the SAR/Galileo Service and worldwide SAR community by providing information on the availability of Galileo constellation orbital products in a precise and timely manner. The SAR/Galileo server can be accessed worldwide through a secure FTP connection. This section informs the users about the working status of this infrastructure.

All this information is accessible through a new menu section called SAR Information under the “System & Service Status” heading. This section complements the general description of the SAR Service and the related market.

The SAR information will be updated whenever a new Galileo satellite is launched or whenever there is a maintenance event affecting the SAR/Galileo service. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The new SAR information page will provide useful resources to the SAR community.

GSA funding: Filling the gaps and emerging technologies

12.12.2019 10:58  
Find out how to write a successful proposal at our webinar on 17 December!
Published: 
12 December 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) has opened a call for proposals within its Fundamental Elements funding mechanism, targeting the development of close-to-market GNSS receivers and associated technologies (‘filling the gaps technologies’) not developed by other FE projects; and/or cutting-edge GNSS receiver technologies (‘emerging technologies’) that are at the forefront of current R&D and may or may not have immediate adoption in market-ready products. The deadline for submissions is 8 January 2020.

The Call for Proposals targets the development, integration, testing and demonstration of hardware components and/or software/firmware algorithms that leverage Galileo differentiators and fill technology gaps for GNSS devices, receivers and/or antennas.

The proposals should be innovative and compliant with specific market constraints, ready to be integrated into a close-to-market device and meet the application requirements. The technology readiness level should be at least 7, which means that a system prototype should be demonstrated in an operational environment.

Looking to the future

Applicants may also be interested in submitting a proposal in the second stream in the call, which targets the development, integration, testing and demonstration of hardware components and/or software based on disruptive, future-looking technologies for GNSS devices, receivers and/or antennas. As with the ‘filling the gaps’ solutions, this technology should also leverage Galileo differentiators. 

Read this: Shaping the future of EGNSS research and innovation

Proposals in this section should focus on R&D excellence going beyond the current state-of-the-art and current market needs. However, the technology does not necessarily have to be focused on a specific application or segment. The technology readiness level should be at least 4, meaning that the technology should have been validated in a lab.

Informative webinar

The GSA is organising a webinar on 17 December 2019 at 10:00, on the Fundamental Elements Call “Filling the gaps and emerging E-GNSS receiver technologies”. This will be an opportunity for interested stakeholders and applicants to learn how to prepare a successful proposal. To register to the webinar, click here.

 

Fundamental Elements call: At a Glance

  • Market segment: Transversal
  • Deadline for submission of proposals: 8 January 2020
  • Expected signature of contract: June to July 2020
  • Maximum budget allocated: EUR 5,000,000
  • Maximum number of projects: 6
  • EU financing amount of each of the two projects: up to EUR 1,000,000 (70% co-funding)
  • Webinar date: 17 December 2019 10:00

 


Things to keep in mind

The Fundamental Elements programme already covers a wide range of markets and key applications, so the developed technology should complement rather than overlap any of past, ongoing or planned projects funded by the GSA. The outcome of the grant should develop GNSS-relevant technologies in line with current market trends and needs in the short term (2020-2025). 

Analysis in the GNSS Market Report and User Technology Report shows that new requirements from existing and emerging applications will increase the demand for innovative PNT technologies. The technology developed in the call should be integrated and demonstrated in a GNSS device fitting one or more applications within the GNSS market.

For more details, please see the call documentation package.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Find out how to write a successful proposal at our webinar on 17 December!

GSA funding: Filling the gaps and emerging technologies

12.12.2019 10:58  
Find out how to write a successful proposal at our webinar on 17 December!
Published: 
12 December 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) has opened a call for proposals within its Fundamental Elements funding mechanism, targeting the development of close-to-market GNSS receivers and associated technologies (‘filling the gaps technologies’) not developed by other FE projects; and/or cutting-edge GNSS receiver technologies (‘emerging technologies’) that are at the forefront of current R&D and may or may not have immediate adoption in market-ready products. The deadline for submissions is 8 January 2020.

The Call for Proposals targets the development, integration, testing and demonstration of hardware components and/or software/firmware algorithms that leverage Galileo differentiators and fill technology gaps for GNSS devices, receivers and/or antennas.

The proposals should be innovative and compliant with specific market constraints, ready to be integrated into a close-to-market device and meet the application requirements. The technology readiness level should be at least 7, which means that a system prototype should be demonstrated in an operational environment.

Looking to the future

Applicants may also be interested in submitting a proposal in the second stream in the call, which targets the development, integration, testing and demonstration of hardware components and/or software based on disruptive, future-looking technologies for GNSS devices, receivers and/or antennas. As with the ‘filling the gaps’ solutions, this technology should also leverage Galileo differentiators. 

Read this: Shaping the future of EGNSS research and innovation

Proposals in this section should focus on R&D excellence going beyond the current state-of-the-art and current market needs. However, the technology does not necessarily have to be focused on a specific application or segment. The technology readiness level should be at least 4, meaning that the technology should have been validated in a lab.

Informative webinar

The GSA is organising a webinar on 17 December 2019 at 10:00, on the Fundamental Elements Call “Filling the gaps and emerging E-GNSS receiver technologies”. This will be an opportunity for interested stakeholders and applicants to learn how to prepare a successful proposal. To register to the webinar, click here.

 

 

Fundamental Elements call: At a Glance

  • Market segment: Transversal
  • Deadline for submission of proposals: 8 January 2020
  • Expected signature of contract: June to July 2020
  • Maximum budget allocated: EUR 5,000,000
  • Maximum number of projects: 6
  • EU financing amount of each of the two projects: up to EUR 1,000,000 (70% co-funding)        
  • Webinar date: 17 December 2019 10:00

 

 


Things to keep in mind

The Fundamental Elements programme already covers a wide range of markets and key applications, so the developed technology should complement rather than overlap any of past, ongoing or planned projects funded by the GSA. The outcome of the grant should develop GNSS-relevant technologies in line with current market trends and needs in the short term (2020-2025). 

Analysis in the GNSS Market Report and User Technology Report shows that new requirements from existing and emerging applications will increase the demand for innovative PNT technologies. The technology developed in the call should be integrated and demonstrated in a GNSS device fitting one or more applications within the GNSS market.

For more details, please see the call documentation package.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Find out how to write a successful proposal at our webinar on 17 December!

GSA funding: Filling the gaps and emerging technologies

12.12.2019 10:58  
Find out how to write a successful proposal at our webinar on 17 December!
Published: 
12 December 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) has opened a call for proposals within its Fundamental Elements funding mechanism, targeting the development of close-to-market GNSS receivers and associated technologies (‘filling the gaps technologies’) not developed by other FE projects; and/or cutting-edge GNSS receiver technologies (‘emerging technologies’) that are at the forefront of current R&D and may or may not have immediate adoption in market-ready products. The deadline for submissions is 8 January 2020.

The Call for Proposals targets the development, integration, testing and demonstration of hardware components and/or software/firmware algorithms that leverage Galileo differentiators and fill technology gaps for GNSS devices, receivers and/or antennas.

The proposals should be innovative and compliant with specific market constraints, ready to be integrated into a close-to-market device and meet the application requirements. The technology readiness level should be at least 7, which means that a system prototype should be demonstrated in an operational environment.

Looking to the future

Applicants may also be interested in submitting a proposal in the second stream in the call, which targets the development, integration, testing and demonstration of hardware components and/or software based on disruptive, future-looking technologies for GNSS devices, receivers and/or antennas. As with the ‘filling the gaps’ solutions, this technology should also leverage Galileo differentiators. 

Read this: Shaping the future of EGNSS research and innovation

Proposals in this section should focus on R&D excellence going beyond the current state-of-the-art and current market needs. However, the technology does not necessarily have to be focused on a specific application or segment. The technology readiness level should be at least 4, meaning that the technology should have been validated in a lab.

Informative webinar

The GSA is organising a webinar on 17 December 2019 at 10:00, on the Fundamental Elements Call “Filling the gaps and emerging E-GNSS receiver technologies”. This will be an opportunity for interested stakeholders and applicants to learn how to prepare a successful proposal. To register to the webinar, click here.

 

 

Fundamental Elements call: At a Glance

  • Market segment: Transversal
  • Deadline for submission of proposals: 8 January 2020
  • Expected signature of contract: June to July 2020
  • Maximum budget allocated: EUR 5,000,000
  • Maximum number of projects: 6
  • EU financing amount of each of the two projects: up to EUR 1,000,000 (70% co-funding)        
  • Webinar date: 17 December 2019 10:00 CET

 

 


Things to keep in mind

The Fundamental Elements programme already covers a wide range of markets and key applications, so the developed technology should complement rather than overlap any of past, ongoing or planned projects funded by the GSA. The outcome of the grant should develop GNSS-relevant technologies in line with current market trends and needs in the short term (2020-2025). 

Analysis in the GNSS Market Report and User Technology Report shows that new requirements from existing and emerging applications will increase the demand for innovative PNT technologies. The technology developed in the call should be integrated and demonstrated in a GNSS device fitting one or more applications within the GNSS market.

For more details, please see the call documentation package.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Find out how to write a successful proposal at our webinar on 17 December!

GSA funding: Filling the gaps and emerging technologies

12.12.2019 10:58  
Find out how to write a successful proposal at our webinar on 17 December!
Published: 
12 December 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) has opened a call for proposals within its Fundamental Elements funding mechanism, targeting the development of close-to-market GNSS receivers and associated technologies (‘filling the gaps technologies’) not developed by other FE projects; and/or cutting-edge GNSS receiver technologies (‘emerging technologies’) that are at the forefront of current R&D and may or may not have immediate adoption in market-ready products. The deadline for submissions is 8 January 2020.

The Call for Proposals targets the development, integration, testing and demonstration of hardware components and/or software/firmware algorithms that leverage Galileo differentiators and fill technology gaps for GNSS devices, receivers and/or antennas.

The proposals should be innovative and compliant with specific market constraints, ready to be integrated into a close-to-market device and meet the application requirements. The technology readiness level should be at least 7, which means that a system prototype should be demonstrated in an operational environment.

Looking to the future

Applicants may also be interested in submitting a proposal in the second stream in the call, which targets the development, integration, testing and demonstration of hardware components and/or software based on disruptive, future-looking technologies for GNSS devices, receivers and/or antennas. As with the ‘filling the gaps’ solutions, this technology should also leverage Galileo differentiators. 

Read this: Shaping the future of EGNSS research and innovation

Proposals in this section should focus on R&D excellence going beyond the current state-of-the-art and current market needs. However, the technology does not necessarily have to be focused on a specific application or segment. The technology readiness level should be at least 4, meaning that the technology should have been validated in a lab.

Informative webinar

The GSA is organising a webinar on 17 December 2019 at 10:00, on the Fundamental Elements Call “Filling the gaps and emerging E-GNSS receiver technologies”. This will be an opportunity for interested stakeholders and applicants to learn how to prepare a successful proposal. To register to the webinar, click here.

 

 

Fundamental Elements call: At a Glance

  • Market segment: Transversal
  • Deadline for submission of proposals: 8 January 2020
  • Expected signature of contract: June to July 2020
  • Maximum budget allocated: EUR 5,000,000
  • Maximum number of projects: 6
  • EU financing amount of each of the two projects: up to EUR 1,000,000 (70% co-funding)        
  • Webinar date: 17 December 2019 10:00 CET

 

 


Things to keep in mind

The Fundamental Elements programme already covers a wide range of markets and key applications, so the developed technology should complement rather than overlap any of past, ongoing or planned projects funded by the GSA. The outcome of the grant should develop GNSS-relevant technologies in line with current market trends and needs in the short term (2020-2025). 

Analysis in the GNSS Market Report and User Technology Report shows that new requirements from existing and emerging applications will increase the demand for innovative PNT technologies. The technology developed in the call should be integrated and demonstrated in a GNSS device fitting one or more applications within the GNSS market.

For more details, please see the call documentation package.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Find out how to write a successful proposal at our webinar on 17 December!

GSA funding: Filling the gaps and emerging technologies

12.12.2019 10:58  
Find out how to write a successful proposal at our webinar on 17 December!
Published: 
12 December 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) has opened a call for proposals within its Fundamental Elements funding mechanism, targeting the development of close-to-market GNSS receivers and associated technologies (‘filling the gaps technologies’) not developed by other FE projects; and/or cutting-edge GNSS receiver technologies (‘emerging technologies’) that are at the forefront of current R&D and may or may not have immediate adoption in market-ready products. The deadline for submissions is 8 January 2020.

The Call for Proposals targets the development, integration, testing and demonstration of hardware components and/or software/firmware algorithms that leverage Galileo differentiators and fill technology gaps for GNSS devices, receivers and/or antennas.

The proposals should be innovative and compliant with specific market constraints, ready to be integrated into a close-to-market device and meet the application requirements. The technology readiness level should be at least 7, which means that a system prototype should be demonstrated in an operational environment.

Looking to the future

Applicants may also be interested in submitting a proposal in the second stream in the call, which targets the development, integration, testing and demonstration of hardware components and/or software based on disruptive, future-looking technologies for GNSS devices, receivers and/or antennas. As with the ‘filling the gaps’ solutions, this technology should also leverage Galileo differentiators. 

Read this: Shaping the future of EGNSS research and innovation

Proposals in this section should focus on R&D excellence going beyond the current state-of-the-art and current market needs. However, the technology does not necessarily have to be focused on a specific application or segment. The technology readiness level should be at least 4, meaning that the technology should have been validated in a lab.

Informative webinar

The GSA is organising a webinar on 17 December 2019 at 10:00 CET, on the Fundamental Elements Call “Filling the gaps and emerging E-GNSS receiver technologies”. This will be an opportunity for interested stakeholders and applicants to learn how to prepare a successful proposal. To register to the webinar, click here.

 

 

Fundamental Elements call: At a Glance

  • Market segment: Transversal
  • Deadline for submission of proposals: 8 January 2020
  • Expected signature of contract: June to July 2020
  • Maximum budget allocated: EUR 5,000,000
  • Maximum number of projects: 6
  • EU financing amount of each of the two projects: up to EUR 1,000,000 (70% co-funding)        
  • Webinar date: 17 December 2019 10:00 CET

 

 


Things to keep in mind

The Fundamental Elements programme already covers a wide range of markets and key applications, so the developed technology should complement rather than overlap any of past, ongoing or planned projects funded by the GSA. The outcome of the grant should develop GNSS-relevant technologies in line with current market trends and needs in the short term (2020-2025). 

Analysis in the GNSS Market Report and User Technology Report shows that new requirements from existing and emerging applications will increase the demand for innovative PNT technologies. The technology developed in the call should be integrated and demonstrated in a GNSS device fitting one or more applications within the GNSS market.

For more details, please see the call documentation package.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Find out how to write a successful proposal at our webinar on 17 December!

Put your project in the spotlight at MWC Barcelona

11.12.2019 12:49  
MWC Barcelona is an ideal forum to showcase your projects to a wide audience of your peers.
Published: 
11 December 2019

Interested in presenting your solution at the world’s largest mobile event? Then read on! The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is looking for innovative solutions to showcase at the Galileo stand at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona on 24-27 February 2020. Every year MWC brings together leading mobile technology developers, manufacturers, service providers and app developers from across the globe. With over 107,000 visitors expected in 2020, next year’s event will be a perfect opportunity to showcase the latest EGNSS-based innovations.

MWC Barcelona will host the latest cutting-edge technologies from more than 2,400 of the world’s leading mobile technology companies. With a programme featuring leading visionaries and investors, the Congress is a not-to-be-missed opportunity to present and promote innovative new ideas, technologies and applications and bring them to the attention of key decision-makers.

With the goal of exploring the hottest trends influencing the mobile industry, MWC Barcelona is an ideal platform to showcase and promote innovative EGNSS-based solutions and applications, such as those being developed within Horizon 2020. The congress also shows how European space research is enhancing EU industrial competitiveness and playing a pivotal role in tackling the various societal challenges facing Europe. 

Read this: The GSA and Galileo at MWC Barcelona

“MWC is an ideal chance to present your EGNSS-based solutions and bring your applications to the attention of a large audience of your peers, investors and the public at large. If you have an EGNSS-based solution with the potential to improve the lives of European citizens, then we would like to hear from you,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani.

Expression of Interest

With this in mind, ahead of next year’s MWC the GSA is launching a call for expressions of interest among its Horizon 2020 and Fundamental Elements partners and other EU companies. The idea is to provide a space at the GSA stand to showcase our partners’ Galileo-enabled mobile solutions. For this edition of the congress, the theme of the GSA stand will be: “Leisure, fitness and sports applications” so priority will be given to solutions that address these markets. If you have an EGNSS-based solution or product that you would like to demonstrate at MWC Barcelona, please submit your application to market@gsa.europa.eu by 3 January 2020. Put “Interested in showcasing our project at MWC 2020” in the subject line of your email. For more information on how to apply read the Rules and Conditions.

This will be an unmissable opportunity to present your solutions to a potential investors and beneficiaries. Join us in Barcelona in February 2020 at MWC, where innovation is celebrated, connections are made, insights are gained, products are launched and business gets done!

EGNSS-based innovation

By matching ideas with opportunities and talent with available resources, MWC Barcelona helps support the GSA in its mission of linking space to user needs. In fact, from dual frequency chipsets to new smartphones, EGNSS was behind many of the technology announcements made during the Mobile World Congress 2019. 

And this: Ubiscale: low-power GNSS processing for tracking devices

What’s more, at the MWC 2019, the GSA stand featured displays and presentations on a number of EU projects, including the GSA-managed Horizon 2020 and Fundamental Elements projects Flamingo and ESCAPE, along with solutions from Lycie, Ubiscale, GEO++, Navisoc and Galileo for Mobility. Among the showcased products there was a new solution developed by Ubiscale enabling low-power GNSS sensing and position determination for IoT and a high-accuracy positioning application developed by GEO++, leveraging RTK technology in the backend to apply generated GNSS corrections to smartphone measurements.

Places at the Galileo stand will be limited, so get in touch with us as soon as possible to take advantage of this exciting opportunity!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

MWC Barcelona is an ideal forum to showcase your projects to a wide audience of your peers.

Put your project in the spotlight at MWC Barcelona

11.12.2019 12:49  
MWC Barcelona is an ideal forum to showcase your projects to a wide audience of your peers.
Published: 
11 December 2019

Interested in presenting your solution at the world’s largest mobile event? Then read on! The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is looking for innovative solutions to showcase at the Galileo stand at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona on 24-27 February 2020. Every year MWC brings together leading mobile technology developers, manufacturers, service providers and app developers from across the globe. With over 107,000 visitors expected in 2020, next year’s event will be a perfect opportunity to showcase the latest EGNSS-based innovations.

MWC Barcelona will host the latest cutting-edge technologies from more than 2,400 of the world’s leading mobile technology companies. With a programme featuring leading visionaries and investors, the Congress is a not-to-be-missed opportunity to present and promote innovative new ideas, technologies and applications and bring them to the attention of key decision-makers.

With the goal of exploring the hottest trends influencing the mobile industry, MWC Barcelona is an ideal platform to showcase and promote innovative EGNSS-based solutions and applications, such as those being developed within Horizon 2020. The congress also shows how European space research is enhancing EU industrial competitiveness and playing a pivotal role in tackling the various societal challenges facing Europe. 

Read this: The GSA and Galileo at MWC Barcelona

“MWC is an ideal chance to present your EGNSS-based solutions and bring your applications to the attention of a large audience of your peers, investors and the public at large. If you have an EGNSS-based solution with the potential to improve the lives of European citizens, then we would like to hear from you,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani.

Expression of Interest

With this in mind, ahead of next year’s MWC the GSA is launching a call for expressions of interest among its Horizon 2020 and Fundamental Elements partners and other EU companies. The idea is to provide a space at the GSA stand to showcase our partners’ Galileo-enabled mobile solutions. For this edition of the congress, the theme of the GSA stand will be: “Leisure, fitness and sports applications” so priority will be given to solutions that address these markets. If you have an EGNSS-based solution or product that you would like to demonstrate at MWC Barcelona, please submit your application to market@gsa.europa.eu by 3 January 2020. Put “Interested in showcasing our project at MWC 2020” in the subject line of your email. For more information on how to apply read the Rules and Conditions.

This will be an unmissable opportunity to present your solutions to a potential investors and beneficiaries. Join us in Barcelona in February 2020 at MWC, where innovation is celebrated, connections are made, insights are gained, products are launched and business gets done!

EGNSS-based innovation

By matching ideas with opportunities and talent with available resources, MWC Barcelona helps support the GSA in its mission of linking space to user needs. In fact, from dual frequency chipsets to new smartphones, EGNSS was behind many of the technology announcements made during the Mobile World Congress 2019. 

And this: Ubiscale: low-power GNSS processing for tracking devices

What’s more, at the MWC 2019, the GSA stand featured displays and presentations on a number of EU projects, including the GSA-managed Horizon 2020 and Fundamental Elements projects Flamingo and ESCAPE, along with solutions from Lycie, Ubiscale, GEO++, Navisoc and Galileo for Mobility. Among the showcased products there was a new solution developed by Ubiscale enabling low-power GNSS sensing and position determination for IoT and a high-accuracy positioning application developed by GEO++, leveraging RTK technology in the backend to apply generated GNSS corrections to smartphone measurements.

Places at the Galileo stand will be limited, so get in touch with us as soon as possible to take advantage of this exciting opportunity!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

MWC Barcelona is an ideal forum to showcase your projects to a wide audience of your peers.

NeQuick G code available for download!

11.12.2019 9:56  
Global ionospheric map calculated with NeQuick G for the 18 09 2019 at 07 UT (DOY 261, 2019).
Published: 
11 December 2019

A version of the NeQuick G algorithm using a new coding approach is now available for download on the GSC website. This version is the result of intensive recoding by engineers at the EU’s Joint Research Centre.

GNSS signals travelling through the ionosphere can be significantly delayed by the electrical charges in this atmospheric layer before reaching the users’ terminal. To compensate for this delay in the signal, Galileo receivers integrate a dynamic model of the ionosphere composition known as the NeQuick G model. Receiver manufacturers will now be able to benefit from a version of the NeQuick G correction algorithm that implements a new coding approach. 

Rigorous testing

The JRC concluded its work recently after successful rigorous testing in the framework of the gLAB tool (GNSS software suite from the Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya). This version of the code has been designed to be highly modular, rendering it more legible for a potential programmer with no specific knowledge about signal propagation in the ionosphere. A library has been also developed to enable its quick integration into existing applications.

Read this: Have your say on the future of Galileo and EGNOS

This software will be released as free and open source software under the terms of the European Union Public Licence (EUPL), version 1.2. The open-source code is now ready to be implemented on single-frequency platforms and can be used on a global scale without limitation under the EUPL. This freedom should contribute to a wider adoption of the NeQuick G model at user level.

This version of the NeQuick G code is available for download on the GSC website. You can register on the site here, and then download the software here

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Global ionospheric map calculated with NeQuick G for the 18 09 2019 at 07 UT (DOY 261, 2019).

NeQuick G code available for download!

11.12.2019 9:56  
Published: 
11 December 2019

A version of the NeQuick G algorithm using a new coding approach is now available for download on the GSC website. This version is the result of intensive recoding by engineers at the EU’s Joint Research Centre.

GNSS signals travelling through the ionosphere can be significantly delayed by the electrical charges in this atmospheric layer before reaching the users’ terminal. To compensate for this delay in the signal, Galileo receivers integrate a dynamic model of the ionosphere composition known as the NeQuick G model. Receiver manufacturers will now be able to benefit from a version of the NeQuick G correction algorithm that implements a new coding approach. 

Rigorous testing

The JRC concluded its work recently after successful rigorous testing in the framework of the gLAB tool (GNSS software suite from the Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya). This version of the code has been designed to be highly modular, rendering it more legible for a potential programmer with no specific knowledge about signal propagation in the ionosphere. A library has been also developed to enable its quick integration into existing applications.

Read this: Have your say on the future of Galileo and EGNOS

This software will be released as free and open source software under the terms of the European Union Public Licence (EUPL), version 1.2. The open-source code is now ready to be implemented on single-frequency platforms and can be used on a global scale without limitation under the EUPL. This freedom should contribute to a wider adoption of the NeQuick G model at user level.

This version of the NeQuick G code is available for download on the GSC website. You can register on the site here, and then download the software here

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Global ionospheric map calculated with NeQuick G for the 18 09 2019 at 07 UT (DOY 261, 2019).

PRoPART demonstrates highly accurate automotive positioning solution

10.12.2019 14:15  
The ProPART solution may be a game changer for future autonomous transport.
Published: 
10 December 2019

The Horizon 2020-funded PRoPART project successfully tested a Galileo-based positioning solution enhanced with Real Time Kinematic (RTK) technique for automated trucks and advanced driver assistance systems at the AstaZero Proving Ground in Sandhult, near Borås, Sweden, at the end of November. Combining Galileo’s differentiators with other positioning and sensor technologies, the solution offers reliable cm-level accuracy using correction data from reference stations.

Autonomous vehicles/trucks and advanced driver assistance systems need robust and precise positioning to enhance safety and efficiency and enable reliable operations. This is especially important in the early transition phase when not all vehicles will be automated. 

PRoPART has achieved this goal by exploiting the distinguishing features of Galileo in combination with other positioning sensors and technologies, which it shares using V2X technology. The innovative solution developed during the project has the potential to be a game changer for autonomous transport in the future.

A game changer

The solution was demonstrated in a recreated highway situation, with a connected autonomous truck and two unconnected manned cars. As part of the test, a Scania self-driving truck executed a safe and efficient lane change managed by the PRoPART system, relying on centimetre-level positioning combined with collaborative perception sensor data.

Watch this:PRoPART Project - Precise and Robust Positioning for Automated Road Transports

“Galileo is a key component of the PRoPART platform, and contributes to maintaining the integrity of the information which is essential,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani.

PRoPART is an important project, in the sense that it delivers robust positioning and timing for future autonomous road transport that fulfils the various needs of vehicle OEMs. It uses object detection sensors as well as PVT information from the GNSS engine along with similar information from road side detection units. This allows it to remotely sense non-connected vehicles, offering a reliable solution for the transition period when both automated and non-automated vehicles will be using the roads.

A truly European venture

The project combines RTK positioning software from Waysure (Sweden) with satellite measurements, in particular advanced and wide band Galileo signals for improved accuracy and enabled with authentication, as developed by Fraunhofer IIS (Germany). The satellite positioning is augmented with an Ultra-Wideband (UWB) ranging solution from Spanish research institution Ceit-IK4. 

And thisFirst Galileo-enabled autonomous vehicle successfully demonstrated

The self-driving truck was supplied by Scania, with Hungary-based V2X company Commsignia providing the C-ITS technology. Baselabs from Germany provided fusion of sensor data from on-board and road-side sensors and developed a situational assessment for the automated lane change manoeuvre. The project was coordinated by the Research Institute of Sweden (RISE) and received funding from the GSA under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 innovation programme (grant agreement No 776307).

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The ProPART solution may be a game changer for future autonomous transport.

PRoPART demonstrates highly accurate automotive positioning solution

10.12.2019 14:15  
The ProPART solution may be a game changer for future autonomous transport.
Published: 
10 December 2019

The Horizon 2020-funded PRoPART project successfully tested a Galileo-based positioning solution enhanced with Real Time Kinematic (RTK) technique for automated trucks and advanced driver assistance systems at the AstaZero Proving Ground in Sandhult, near Borås, Sweden, at the end of November. Combining Galileo’s differentiators with other positioning and sensor technologies, the solution offers reliable cm-level accuracy using correction data from reference stations.

Autonomous vehicles/trucks and advanced driver assistance systems need robust and precise positioning to enhance safety and efficiency and enable reliable operations. This is especially important in the early transition phase when not all vehicles will be automated. 

PRoPART has achieved this goal by exploiting the distinguishing features of Galileo in combination with other positioning sensors and technologies, which it shares using V2X technology. The innovative solution developed during the project has the potential to be a game changer for autonomous transport in the future.

A game changer

The solution was demonstrated in a recreated highway situation, with a connected autonomous truck and two unconnected manned cars. As part of the test, a Scania self-driving truck executed a safe and efficient lane change managed by the PRoPART system, relying on centimetre-level positioning combined with collaborative perception sensor data.

Watch thisPRoPART - Precise and Robust Positioning for Automated Road Transport

“Galileo is a key component of the PRoPART platform, and contributes to maintaining the integrity of the information which is essential,” said GSA Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani.

PRoPART is an important project, in the sense that it delivers robust positioning and timing for future autonomous road transport that fulfils the various needs of vehicle OEMs. It uses object detection sensors as well as PVT information from the GNSS engine along with similar information from road side detection units. This allows it to remotely sense non-connected vehicles, offering a reliable solution for the transition period when both automated and non-automated vehicles will be using the roads.

A truly European venture

The project combines RTK positioning software from Waysure (Sweden) with satellite measurements, in particular advanced and wide band Galileo signals for improved accuracy and enabled with authentication, as developed by Fraunhofer IIS (Germany). The satellite positioning is augmented with an Ultra-Wideband (UWB) ranging solution from Spanish research institution Ceit-IK4. 

Read thisFirst Galileo-enabled autonomous vehicle successfully demonstrated

The self-driving truck was supplied by Scania, with Hungary-based V2X company Commsignia providing the C-ITS technology. Baselabs from Germany provided fusion of sensor data from on-board and road-side sensors and developed a situational assessment for the automated lane change manoeuvre. The project was coordinated by the Research Institute of Sweden (RISE) and received funding from the GSA under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 innovation programme (grant agreement No 776307).

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The ProPART solution may be a game changer for future autonomous transport.

Shaping the future of EGNSS research and innovation

9.12.2019 13:13  
Horizon Europe should establish EGNSS leadership in markets that best exploit its differentiators.
Published: 
09 December 2019

Together with the European Commission, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) has been consulting with GNSS user communities to take their input into consideration when defining EGNSS downstream funding priorities in the new financial perspective. A recent report from the GSA summarises the results of these consultations and outlines future R&I priorities.

EGNSS downstream R&I should build on the positive momentum achieved in Horizon 2020, Fundamental Elements and earlier framework programmes by leveraging space data to build applications, receivers that integrate the various EU space programme services and stimulate entrepreneurship and job creation in Europe. 

The GSA’s consultation with the GNSS user community during its User Consultation Platforms in 2017 and 2018 revealed that, to make the space sector competitive, R&I investment should be focused on the downstream domain, increasing the use of space signals and data, and leveraging the differentiators of the EU space programmes to improve the worldwide market share of EU industry and SMEs.

Read this: Horizon 2020 key to international cooperation for Galileo & EGNOS

After 2020, when the Galileo system is fully operational and the new version of EGNOS will start to be deployed, the primary goal will be to establish European GNSS as the leader in those markets and sectors that best exploit the unique differentiators of the systems. Steps should also be taken to complete market uptake in longer-term regulated market segments (e.g. rail, aviation and maritime). Also new funding tools should be introduced in order to cope with the new needs.

Key recommendations

The report makes a number of key recommendations, including on the need to secure the budget and scope related to EGNSS downstream in the Space Regulation and Horizon Europe. What’s more, to achieve the goals outlined above, the report recommends that the Horizon Europe budget be significantly increased compared to Horizon 2020. This increase will also allow for larger pilot projects and operational implementations of Galileo differentiators.

It is also recommended that the Fundamental Elements funding mechanism should fill the gaps in the development of EGNSS-enabled receivers and antennas and target the emerging Galileo differentiators as they become operational, so as to facilitate market readiness. 

Finally, the report recommends the introduction of new funding tools to cope with new needs that cannot be covered by the Horizon 2020 and Fundamental Elements tools as used until now: 

  • Innovation Procurement for the public sector as a customer of Galileo;
  • Centres of Excellence to leverage regional and national competences as examples and supporters for others;
  • Space-based entrepreneurship to provide a dedicated funding tool for start-ups and SMEs (e.g. in the area of mass market);
  • Venture Capital to scale-up our start-ups.

Next steps 

In April 2019 the European Parliament and the Council reached a political agreement on key elements of the Horizon Europe proposal. According to this agreement, Horizon Europe will be structured in three Pillars: 1. Excellent Science; 2. Global Challenges and European Industrial Competitiveness; and 3. Innovative Europe.

And this: Latest updates to Reports on User Needs and Requirements released

Early involvement and exchanges with Member States and consultation with stakeholders and the public at large took place during the summer of 2019, to stimulate a co-design process towards the first Strategic Plan for the framework programme. This included a workshop held at GSA headquarters in Prague.

This Strategic Planning process will prepare the Strategic Plan for Horizon Europe for 2021-2024. The plan will facilitate the implementation of Horizon Europe, focusing on Pillar II, by setting out key strategic orientations for support to research and innovation. Drafting of the first Horizon Europe Work Programme on the basis of the Strategic Plan will take place during 2020, after which Horizon Europe will come into effect in 2021.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Horizon Europe should establish EGNSS leadership in markets that best exploit its differentiators.

Shaping the future of EGNSS research and innovation

9.12.2019 13:13  
Horizon Europe should establish EGNSS leadership in markets that best exploit its differentiators.
Published: 
09 December 2019

Together with the European Commission, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) has been consulting with GNSS user communities to take their input into consideration when defining EGNSS downstream funding priorities in the new financial perspective. A recent report from the GSA summarises the results of these consultations and outlines future R&I priorities.

EGNSS downstream R&I should build on the positive momentum achieved in Horizon 2020, Fundamental Elements and earlier framework programmes by leveraging space data to build applications, receivers that integrate the various EU space programme services and stimulate entrepreneurship and job creation in Europe. 

The GSA’s consultation with the GNSS user community during its User Consultation Platforms in 2017 and 2018 revealed that, to make the space sector competitive, R&I investment should be focused on the downstream domain, increasing the use of space signals and data, and leveraging the differentiators of the EU space programmes to improve the worldwide market share of EU industry and SMEs.

Read this: Horizon 2020 key to international cooperation for Galileo & EGNOS

After 2020, when the Galileo system is fully operational and the new version of EGNOS will start to be deployed, the primary goal will be to establish European GNSS as the leader in those markets and sectors that best exploit the unique differentiators of the systems. Steps should also be taken to complete market uptake in longer-term regulated market segments (e.g. rail, aviation and maritime). Also new funding tools should be introduced in order to cope with the new needs.

Key recommendations

The report makes a number of key recommendations, including on the need to secure the budget and scope related to EGNSS downstream in the Space Regulation and Horizon Europe. What’s more, to achieve the goals outlined above, the report recommends that the Horizon Europe budget be significantly increased compared to Horizon 2020. This increase will also allow for larger pilot projects and operational implementations of Galileo differentiators.

It is also recommended that the Fundamental Elements funding mechanism should fill the gaps in the development of EGNSS-enabled receivers and antennas and target the emerging Galileo differentiators as they become operational, so as to facilitate market readiness. 

Finally, the report recommends the introduction of new funding tools to cope with new needs that cannot be covered by the Horizon 2020 and Fundamental Elements tools as used until now: 

  • Innovation Procurement for the public sector as a customer of Galileo;
  • Centres of Excellence to leverage regional and national competences as examples and supporters for others;
  • Space-based entrepreneurship to provide a dedicated funding tool for start-ups and SMEs (e.g. in the area of mass market);
  • Venture Capital to scale-up our start-ups.

Next steps 

In April 2019 the European Parliament and the Council reached a political agreement on key elements of the Horizon Europe proposal. According to this agreement, Horizon Europe will be structured in three Pillars: 1. Excellent Science; 2. Global Challenges and European Industrial Competitiveness; and 3. Innovative Europe.

And this: Latest updates to Reports on User Needs and Requirements released

Early involvement and exchanges with Member States and consultation with stakeholders and the public at large took place during the summer of 2019, to stimulate a co-design process towards the first Strategic Plan for the framework programme. This included a workshop held at GSA headquarters in Prague.

This Strategic Planning process will prepare the Strategic Plan for Horizon Europe for 2021-2024. The plan will facilitate the implementation of Horizon Europe, focusing on Pillar II, by setting out key strategic orientations for support to research and innovation. Drafting of the first Horizon Europe Work Programme on the basis of the Strategic Plan will take place during 2020, after which Horizon Europe will come into effect in 2021.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Horizon Europe should establish EGNSS leadership in markets that best exploit its differentiators.

Performance Cockpit takes overall prize at Galileo Masters 2019

6.12.2019 12:23  
Participants at this year’s Galileo Masters in Helsinki
Published: 
06 December 2019

Performance Cockpit, a business intelligence system from the start-up Aeroficial Intelligence, was named the 2019 Overall Winner of the Galileo Masters international innovation competition during its awards ceremony, held as part of European Space Week on 4 December in Helsinki, Finland. 

The Aeroficial Intelligence system leverages Galileo positioning and EGNOS augmentation in data-driven solutions that increase operational efficiency and considerably reduce fuel consumption in the aviation industry. In this way, it addresses a pressing challenge in an industry that is set to see the world’s aircraft fleet more than double in the next 20 years.

Galileo-Copernicus Synergy Challenge

In addition to the overall prize, 26 more prizes were awarded at this year’s Galileo Masters, including the Galileo-Copernicus Synergy Challenge. This award went to Xylene, an app that revolutionises the way timber is supplied to the market. The concept behind the Xylene app is to document every step of the timber supply chain, from the forest to the final product. This unique Source-2-Store process not only enables supply chain tracking, but also validates the origin of the wood as certified or not. 

Read this: uMaze takes Accuracy Matters prize in Galileo Innovation Challenge

By automatically registering GNSS position and consignment volume data, matching this with the individual process steps and generating real-time reports in the event of violations, the app prevents illegal wood from entering the supply chain and reduces fraud. The end customer, in addition to each partner along the supply chain, can visualise the entire supply chain using QR codes. Leveraging Galileo positioning and Copernicus imagery, the app offers the best combination of reliability, feasibility and cost.

Promoting innovation

“Promoting innovation has always been a key goal for the GSA. During our 11 years of partnership with the Galileo Masters, the competition has been an important generator of new market-driven applications and services based on Galileo’s differentiators, and this year has been no different,” said GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. “I would like to congratulate all of the participants in this year’s competition and particularly the winners for their innovative use of Galileo,” he said.

Idea of the year

In the ‘Idea of the Year’ category, the winner was CX-GEODRON – a radar-based drone payload for underground detection. The CX-Geodron project is developing a drone payload based on radar equipment and post-processing techniques for geo-referenced data to complement, and sometimes replace, LiDAR laser technologies and take the next step in underground detection applications.

And this: First Galileo-enabled autonomous vehicle successfully demonstrated

The use of drones in non-destructive inspection applications has proven feasible and effective, making this a field with very important growth potential. The accuracy, stability, and flight time of drone platforms have significantly improved and the feasibility of using Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems in different applications related to terrestrial observation has been demonstrated. What’s more, the detection of buried objects is also continuing to improve with regard to resolution and depth. 

Start-up of the Year

The winner in the ‘Start-up of the Year’ category - PODIS (POst DIstress Signal) - is a client-server IoT solution-as-a-service for automatic crash notification (ACN). The solution’s unique selling point is its patented underlying methodology for filtering out false alarms. Other ACN systems try to filter out false alarms on the client side, which is difficult due to varying vehicle behaviour, while PODIS does this on the server side. 

In this way, PODIS maximises the use of the “golden hour”. This is a trauma term that refers to the first hour from the moment a car accident occurs. The goal of trauma professionals is to get injured people to a hospital within one hour to increase their chances of survival.

The Galileo Masters annually awards the best services, products, and business ideas using satellite navigation in everyday life, fostering the development of market-driven applications and identifying the most outstanding business cases related to GNSS, in line with the EU Space Strategy.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Participants at this year’s Galileo Masters in Helsinki

Performance Cockpit takes overall prize at Galileo Masters 2019

6.12.2019 12:23  
Participants at this year’s Galileo Masters in Helsinki
Published: 
06 December 2019

The Aeroficial Intelligence system leverages Galileo positioning and EGNOS augmentation in data-driven solutions that increase operational efficiency and considerably reduce fuel consumption in the aviation industry. In this way, it addresses a pressing challenge in an industry that is set to see the world’s aircraft fleet more than double in the next 20 years.

Galileo-Copernicus Synergy Challenge

In addition to the overall prize, 26 more prizes were awarded at this year’s Galileo Masters, including the Galileo-Copernicus Synergy Challenge. This award went to Xylene, an app that revolutionises the way timber is supplied to the market. The concept behind the Xylene app is to document every step of the timber supply chain, from the forest to the final product. This unique Source-2-Store process not only enables supply chain tracking, but also validates the origin of the wood as certified or not. 

Read this: uMaze takes Accuracy Matters prize in Galileo Innovation Challenge

By automatically registering GNSS position and consignment volume data, matching this with the individual process steps and generating real-time reports in the event of violations, the app prevents illegal wood from entering the supply chain and reduces fraud. The end customer, in addition to each partner along the supply chain, can visualise the entire supply chain using QR codes. Leveraging Galileo positioning and Copernicus imagery, the app offers the best combination of reliability, feasibility and cost.

Promoting innovation

“Promoting innovation has always been a key goal for the GSA. During our 11 years of partnership with the Galileo Masters, the competition has been an important generator of new market-driven applications and services based on Galileo’s differentiators, and this year has been no different,” said GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. “I would like to congratulate all of the participants in this year’s competition and particularly the winners for their innovative use of Galileo,” he said.

Idea of the year

In the ‘Idea of the Year’ category, the winner was CX-GEODRON – a radar-based drone payload for underground detection. The CX-Geodron project is developing a drone payload based on radar equipment and post-processing techniques for geo-referenced data to complement, and sometimes replace, LiDAR laser technologies and take the next step in underground detection applications.

And this: First Galileo-enabled autonomous vehicle successfully demonstrated

The use of drones in non-destructive inspection applications has proven feasible and effective, making this a field with very important growth potential. The accuracy, stability, and flight time of drone platforms have significantly improved and the feasibility of using Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems in different applications related to terrestrial observation has been demonstrated. What’s more, the detection of buried objects is also continuing to improve with regard to resolution and depth. 

Start-up of the Year

The winner in the ‘Start-up of the Year’ category - PODIS (POst DIstress Signal) - is a client-server IoT solution-as-a-service for automatic crash notification (ACN). The solution’s unique selling point is its patented underlying methodology for filtering out false alarms. Other ACN systems try to filter out false alarms on the client side, which is difficult due to varying vehicle behaviour, while PODIS does this on the server side. 

In this way, PODIS maximises the use of the “golden hour”. This is a trauma term that refers to the first hour from the moment a car accident occurs. The goal of trauma professionals is to get injured people to a hospital within one hour to increase their chances of survival.

The Galileo Masters annually awards the best services, products, and business ideas using satellite navigation in everyday life, fostering the development of market-driven applications and identifying the most outstanding business cases related to GNSS, in line with the EU Space Strategy.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Participants at this year’s Galileo Masters in Helsinki

Performance Cockpit takes overall prize at Galileo Masters 2019

6.12.2019 12:23  
Participants at this year’s Galileo Masters in Helsinki
Published: 
06 December 2019

The Aeroficial Intelligence system leverages Galileo positioning and EGNOS augmentation in data-driven solutions that increase operational efficiency and considerably reduce fuel consumption in the aviation industry. In this way, it addresses a pressing challenge in an industry that is set to see the world’s aircraft fleet more than double in the next 20 years.

Galileo-Copernicus Synergy Challenge

In addition to the overall prize, 26 more prizes were awarded at this year’s Galileo Masters, including the Galileo-Copernicus Synergy Challenge. This award went to Xylene, an app that revolutionises the way timber is supplied to the market. The concept behind the Xylene app is to document every step of the timber supply chain, from the forest to the final product. This unique Source-2-Store process not only enables supply chain tracking, but also validates the origin of the wood as certified or not. 

Read this: uMaze takes Accuracy Matters prize in Galileo Innovation Challenge

By automatically registering GNSS position and consignment volume data, matching this with the individual process steps and generating real-time reports in the event of violations, the app prevents illegal wood from entering the supply chain and reduces fraud. The end customer, in addition to each partner along the supply chain, can visualise the entire supply chain using QR codes. Leveraging Galileo positioning and Copernicus imagery, the app offers the best combination of reliability, feasibility and cost.

Promoting innovation

“Promoting innovation has always been a key goal for the GSA. During our 11 years of partnership with the Galileo Masters, the competition has been an important generator of new market-driven applications and services based on Galileo’s differentiators, and this year has been no different,” said GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. “I would like to congratulate all of the participants in this year’s competition and particularly the winners for their innovative use of Galileo,” he said.

Idea of the year

In the ‘Idea of the Year’ category, the winner was CX-GEODRON – a radar-based drone payload for underground detection. The CX-Geodron project is developing a drone payload based on radar equipment and post-processing techniques for geo-referenced data to complement, and sometimes replace, LiDAR laser technologies and take the next step in underground detection applications.

And this: First Galileo-enabled autonomous vehicle successfully demonstrated

The use of drones in non-destructive inspection applications has proven feasible and effective, making this a field with very important growth potential. The accuracy, stability, and flight time of drone platforms have significantly improved and the feasibility of using Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems in different applications related to terrestrial observation has been demonstrated. What’s more, the detection of buried objects is also continuing to improve with regard to resolution and depth. 

Start-up of the Year

The winner in the ‘Start-up of the Year’ category - PODIS (POst DIstress Signal) - is a client-server IoT solution-as-a-service for automatic crash notification (ACN). The solution’s unique selling point is its patented underlying methodology for filtering out false alarms. Other ACN systems try to filter out false alarms on the client side, which is difficult due to varying vehicle behaviour, while PODIS does this on the server side. 

In this way, PODIS maximises the use of the “golden hour”. This is a trauma term that refers to the first hour from the moment a car accident occurs. The goal of trauma professionals is to get injured people to a hospital within one hour to increase their chances of survival.

The Galileo Masters annually awards the best services, products, and business ideas using satellite navigation in everyday life, fostering the development of market-driven applications and identifying the most outstanding business cases related to GNSS, in line with the EU Space Strategy.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Participants at this year’s Galileo Masters in Helsinki

EU space ambition in focus in Prague

4.12.2019 11:51  
Jean-Yves Le Gall, Madame de Montchalin and Carlo des Dorides at GSA headquarters
Published: 
04 December 2019

The European Union’s ambitions in space were in focus during a recent visit to the European GNSS Agency’s (GSA) Prague headquarters by French State Secretary for European Affairs Amélie de Montchalin, who visited the Agency on Friday 29 November.

Madame de de Montchalin was in Prague to visit the GSA and, during her visit, she noted that: “European ambition in space is considerable, as we saw on 28 November in Seville, and the GSA is transforming this ambition into concrete projects that are improving the life of European citizens.”

The EU is a global leader in space and the space sector in Europe employs over 231,000 professionals, with an estimated value of €53-62 billion to the European economy in 2017. What’s more, Europe manufactures one third of all the world's satellites and, according to Eurospace, the space manufacturing industry posted sales worth €8.5 billion in 2018.

Read this: Horizon 2020 key to international cooperation for Galileo & EGNOS

French Space Agency (CNES) President and GSA Administrative Board Chair Jean-Yves Le Gall following his attendance at the European Space Agency ministerial meeting in Seville, Spain on November 27-28 welcomed Madame de Montchalin to the GSA headquarters. “We are very pleased to welcome Madame de Montchalin to the GSA, her visit bears testimony to the importance that France places on ensuring that space serves all Europeans,” he said.

Key contribution

At the meeting, GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides highlighted the central role of Europe’s GNSS programmes in the overall contribution of space to the European economy. “According to the latest edition of our GNSS Market Report, European companies account for an estimated 27% of the global GNSS downstream market, which is forecast to increase to EUR 325 billion in 2029,” he said.

“France has been a valued partner for the Galileo programme since the launch of the first operational satellite from the Guiana Space Centre at Kourou in French Guiana in 2011, and the critical Launch and Early Orbit Phase (LEOP) for our Galileo launches is controlled from the CNES Space Centre in Toulouse,” des Dorides said.

‘When the GSA is to taking on new its responsibilities in becoming EUSPA at the beginning of 2021 and with Galileo reaching full capability, this is important that all the Member States continue to support our activities and so we are pleased to take the opportunity of the visit of Mrs Montchalin to explain the evolution of the Galileo services,” he said.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Jean-Yves Le Gall, Madame de Montchalin and Carlo des Dorides at GSA headquarters

EU space ambition in focus in Prague

4.12.2019 11:51  
Jean-Yves Le Gall, Madame de Montchalin and Carlo des Dorides at GSA headquarters
Published: 
04 December 2019

The European Union’s ambitions in space were in focus during a recent visit to the European GNSS Agency’s (GSA) Prague headquarters by French State Secretary for European Affairs Amélie de Montchalin, who visited the Agency on Friday 29 November.

Madame de de Montchalin was in Prague to visit the GSA and, during her visit, she noted that: “European ambition in space is considerable, as we saw on 28 November in Seville, and the GSA is transforming this ambition into concrete projects that are improving the life of European citizens.”

The EU is a global leader in space and the space sector in Europe employs over 231,000 professionals, with an estimated value of €53-62 billion to the European economy in 2017. What’s more, Europe manufactures one third of all the world's satellites and, according to Eurospace, the space manufacturing industry posted sales worth €8.5 billion in 2018.

Read this: Horizon 2020 key to international cooperation for Galileo & EGNOS

French Space Agency (CNES) President and GSA Administrative Board Chair Jean-Yves Le Gall following his attendance at the European Space Agency ministerial meeting in Seville, Spain on November 27-28 welcomed Madame de Montchalin to the GSA headquarters. “We are very pleased to welcome Madame de Montchalin to the GSA, her visit bears testimony to the importance that France places on ensuring that space serves all Europeans,” he said.

Key contribution

At the meeting, GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides highlighted the central role of Europe’s GNSS programmes in the overall contribution of space to the European economy. “According to the latest edition of our GNSS Market Report, European companies account for an estimated 27% of the global GNSS downstream market, which is forecast to increase to EUR 325 billion in 2029,” he said.

“France has been a valued partner for the Galileo programme since the launch of the first operational satellite from the Guiana Space Centre at Kourou in French Guiana in 2011, and the critical Launch and Early Orbit Phase (LEOP) for our Galileo launches is controlled from the CNES Space Centre in Toulouse,” des Dorides said.

‘When the GSA is taking on new its responsibilities in becoming EUSPA at the beginning of 2021 and with Galileo reaching full capability, it is important that all the Member States continue to support our activities, and so we are pleased to take the opportunity of the visit of Mrs Montchalin to explain the evolution of the Galileo services,” he said.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Jean-Yves Le Gall, Madame de Montchalin and Carlo des Dorides at GSA headquarters

EU space ambition in focus in Prague

4.12.2019 11:51  
Jean-Yves Le Gall, Madame de Montchalin and Carlo des Dorides at GSA headquarters
Published: 
04 December 2019

The European Union’s ambitions in space were in focus during a recent visit to the European GNSS Agency’s (GSA) Prague headquarters by French State Secretary for European Affairs Amélie de Montchalin, who visited the Agency on Friday 29 November.

Madame de de Montchalin was in Prague to visit the GSA and, during her visit, she noted that: “European ambition in space is considerable, as we saw on 28 November in Seville, and the GSA is transforming this ambition into concrete projects that are improving the life of European citizens.”

The EU is a global leader in space and the space sector in Europe employs over 231,000 professionals, with an estimated value of €53-62 billion to the European economy in 2017. What’s more, Europe manufactures one third of all the world's satellites and, according to Eurospace, the space manufacturing industry posted sales worth €8.5 billion in 2018.

Read this: Horizon 2020 key to international cooperation for Galileo & EGNOS

French Space Agency (CNES) President and GSA Administrative Board Chair Jean-Yves Le Gall following his attendance at the European Space Agency ministerial meeting in Seville, Spain on November 27-28 welcomed Madame de Montchalin to the GSA headquarters. “We are very pleased to welcome Madame de Montchalin to the GSA, her visit bears testimony to the importance that France places on ensuring that space serves all Europeans,” he said.

Key contribution

At the meeting, GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides highlighted the central role of Europe’s GNSS programmes in the overall contribution of space to the European economy. “According to the latest edition of our GNSS Market Report, European companies account for an estimated 27% of the global GNSS downstream market, which is forecast to increase to EUR 325 billion in 2029,” he said.

“France has been a valued partner for the Galileo programme since the launch of the first operational satellite from the Guiana Space Centre at Kourou in French Guiana in 2011, and the critical Launch and Early Orbit Phase (LEOP) for our Galileo launches is controlled from the CNES Space Centre in Toulouse,” des Dorides said.

‘With the GSA taking on new its responsibilities in becoming EUSPA at the beginning of 2021 and with Galileo reaching full capability, it is important that all the Member States continue to support our activities, and so we are pleased to take the opportunity of the visit of Mrs Montchalin to explain the evolution of the Galileo services,” he said.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Jean-Yves Le Gall, Madame de Montchalin and Carlo des Dorides at GSA headquarters

EU space ambition in focus in Prague

4.12.2019 11:51  
Jean-Yves Le Gall, Madame de Montchalin and Carlo des Dorides at GSA headquarters
Published: 
04 December 2019

The European Union’s ambitions in space were in focus during a recent visit to the European GNSS Agency’s (GSA) Prague headquarters by French State Secretary for European Affairs Amélie de Montchalin, who visited the Agency on Friday 29 November.

Madame de de Montchalin was in Prague to visit the GSA and, during her visit, she noted that: “European ambition in space is considerable, as we saw on 28 November in Seville, and the GSA is transforming this ambition into concrete projects that are improving the life of European citizens.”

The EU is a global leader in space and the space sector in Europe employs over 231,000 professionals, with an estimated value of €53-62 billion to the European economy in 2017. What’s more, Europe manufactures one third of all the world's satellites and, according to Eurospace, the space manufacturing industry posted sales worth €8.5 billion in 2018.

Read this: Horizon 2020 key to international cooperation for Galileo & EGNOS

French Space Agency (CNES) President and GSA Administrative Board Chair Jean-Yves Le Gall following his attendance at the European Space Agency ministerial meeting in Seville, Spain on November 27-28 welcomed Madame de Montchalin to the GSA headquarters. “We are very pleased to welcome Madame de Montchalin to the GSA, her visit bears testimony to the importance that France places on ensuring that space serves all Europeans,” he said.

Key contribution

At the meeting, GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides highlighted the central role of Europe’s GNSS programmes in the overall contribution of space to the European economy. “According to the latest edition of our GNSS Market Report, European companies account for an estimated 27% of the global GNSS downstream market, which is forecast to increase to EUR 325 billion in 2029,” he said.

“France has been a valued partner for the Galileo programme since the launch of the first operational satellite from the Guiana Space Centre at Kourou in French Guiana in 2011, and the critical Launch and Early Orbit Phase (LEOP) for our Galileo launches is controlled from the CNES Space Centre in Toulouse,” des Dorides said.

‘With the GSA taking on new its responsibilities in becoming EUSPA at the beginning of 2021 and with Galileo reaching full capability, it is important that all the Member States continue to support our activities, and so we are pleased to take the opportunity of the visit of Mrs Montchalin to explain the evolution of the Galileo services,” he said.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Jean-Yves Le Gall, Madame de Montchalin and Carlo des Dorides at GSA headquarters

Have your say on the future of Galileo and EGNOS

3.12.2019 12:41  
Help shape future evolutions of Galileo and EGNOS
Published: 
03 December 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is launching the 2019 edition of its Galileo User Satisfaction Survey and its EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey. These surveys aim to gain a better understanding of the needs and requirements of Galileo and EGNOS end users and to ensure that these needs are taken into consideration in future evolutions of the programmes.

Users have always been at the heart of European GNSS (Galileo and EGNOS) service provision, and feedback from users on their experience of Galileo and EGNOS is invaluable in shaping these services, helping ensure that they continuously improve and better serve the user community.

Tailored by segment

The Galileo User Satisfaction Survey is tailored to fit different categories of users and market segments. Likewise, this year’s EGNOS survey is broken down per EGNOS market segment (Aviation, Maritime, Rail, Road, Agriculture, Surveying and Mapping and LBS). When responding to the survey, select the market segment in which you operate; the market segment that corresponds to your main area of activity; or the market segment that is the most important for your company or organisation, if you are active in multiple market segments.  

Read this: Latest updates to Reports on User Needs and Requirements released

The EGNOS survey covers all market segments and services, including the Open Service, the Safety of Life Service and the EGNOS Data Access Service (EDAS). It also assesses the EGNOS service provider’s management of EGNOS User Support Services.

If you are a Galileo or EGNOS user, we strongly encourage you to participate and let your voice be heard. The more users that respond, the better the GSA and the Galileo and EGNOS systems will be able to continue to meet your requirements. The surveys will only take about five minutes to complete, and your feedback will make a real difference to future EGNSS service provision.

Survey results

Based on the 2018 Galileo User Satisfaction Results, we can see that user satisfaction was up compared with the previous year, with 90% of users satisfied with Galileo. In total, 98% of users would recommend Galileo to others. Based on feedback from the community, a number of actions were identified for implementation to strengthen Galileo’s market position. 

These include spreading the message that Galileo is already available and performing well; putting additional communications and training efforts in place in the LBS community; and collecting all user related information on EGNSS in a single website, in order to provide users with an integrated interface to support them with application development.

The 2018 EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey also showed a positive trend, with a global user satisfaction score of 8.3 out of 10, up from 8.1 in 2017. User satisfaction was highest in the road segment, which scored 9.4 points. User satisfaction with the accuracy, availability, continuity and coverage of the EGNOS Safety of Life (SoL) and Open Service were all up compared to the previous year. 

The main outcomes and conclusions from the 2018 EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey are available, and can be downloaded here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Help shape future evolutions of Galileo and EGNOS

Have your say on the future of Galileo and EGNOS

3.12.2019 12:41  
Help shape future evolutions of Galileo and EGNOS
Published: 
03 December 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is launching the 2019 edition of its Galileo User Satisfaction Survey and its EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey. These surveys aim to gain a better understanding of the needs and requirements of Galileo and EGNOS end users and to ensure that these needs are taken into consideration in future evolutions of the programmes.

Users have always been at the heart of European GNSS (Galileo and EGNOS) service provision, and feedback from users on their experience of Galileo and EGNOS is invaluable in shaping these services, helping ensure that they continuously improve and better serve the user community.

Tailored by segment

The Galileo User Satisfaction Survey is tailored to fit different categories of users and market segments. Likewise, this year’s EGNOS survey is broken down per EGNOS market segment (Aviation, Maritime, Rail, Road, Agriculture, Surveying and Mapping and LBS). When responding to the survey, select the market segment in which you operate; the market segment that corresponds to your main area of activity; or the market segment that is the most important for your company or organisation, if you are active in multiple market segments.  

Read this: Latest updates to Reports on User Needs and Requirements released

The EGNOS survey covers all market segments and services, including the Open Service, the Safety of Life Service and the EGNOS Data Access Service (EDAS). It also assesses the EGNOS service provider’s management of EGNOS User Support Services.

If you are a Galileo or EGNOS user, we strongly encourage you to participate and let your voice be heard. The more users that respond, the better the GSA and the Galileo and EGNOS systems will be able to continue to meet your requirements. The surveys will only take about five minutes to complete, and your feedback will make a real difference to future EGNSS service provision.

Survey results

Based on the 2018 Galileo User Satisfaction Results, we can see that user satisfaction was up compared with the previous year, with 90% of users satisfied with Galileo. In total, 98% of users would recommend Galileo to others. Based on feedback from the community, a number of actions were identified for implementation to strengthen Galileo’s market position. 

These include spreading the message that Galileo is already available and performing well; putting additional communications and training efforts in place in the LBS community; and collecting all user related information on EGNSS in a single website, in order to provide users with an integrated interface to support them with application development.

The 2018 EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey also showed a positive trend, with a global user satisfaction score of 8.3 out of 10, up from 8.1 in 2017. User satisfaction was highest in the road segment, which scored 9.4 points. User satisfaction with the accuracy, availability, continuity and coverage of the EGNOS Safety of Life (SoL) and Open Service were all up compared to the previous year. 

The main outcomes and conclusions from the 2018 EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey are available, and can be downloaded here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Help shape future evolutions of Galileo and EGNOS

Have your say on the future of Galileo and EGNOS

3.12.2019 12:41  
Published: 
03 December 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is launching the 2019 edition of its Galileo User Satisfaction Survey and its EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey. These surveys aim to gain a better understanding of the needs and requirements of Galileo and EGNOS end users and to ensure that these needs are taken into consideration in future evolutions of the programmes.

Users have always been at the heart of European GNSS (Galileo and EGNOS) service provision, and feedback from users on their experience of Galileo and EGNOS is invaluable in shaping these services, helping ensure that they continuously improve and better serve the user community.

Tailored by segment

The Galileo User Satisfaction Survey is tailored to fit different categories of users and market segments. Likewise, this year’s EGNOS survey is broken down per EGNOS market segment (Aviation, Maritime, Rail, Road, Agriculture, Surveying and Mapping and LBS). When responding to the survey, select the market segment in which you operate; the market segment that corresponds to your main area of activity; or the market segment that is the most important for your company or organisation, if you are active in multiple market segments.  

Read this: Latest updates to Reports on User Needs and Requirements released

The EGNOS survey covers all market segments and services, including the Open Service, the Safety of Life Service and the EGNOS Data Access Service (EDAS). It also assesses the EGNOS service provider’s management of EGNOS User Support Services.

If you are a Galileo or EGNOS user, we strongly encourage you to participate and let your voice be heard. The more users that respond, the better the GSA and the Galileo and EGNOS systems will be able to continue to meet your requirements. The surveys will only take about five minutes to complete, and your feedback will make a real difference to future EGNSS service provision.

Survey results

Based on the 2018 Galileo User Satisfaction Results, we can see that user satisfaction was up compared with the previous year, with 90% of users satisfied with Galileo. In total, 98% of users would recommend Galileo to others. Based on feedback from the community, a number of actions were identified for implementation to strengthen Galileo’s market position. 

These include spreading the message that Galileo is already available and performing well; putting additional communications and training efforts in place in the LBS community; and collecting all user related information on EGNSS in a single website, in order to provide users with an integrated interface to support them with application development.

The 2018 EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey also showed a positive trend, with a global user satisfaction score of 8.3 out of 10, up from 8.1 in 2017. User satisfaction was highest in the road segment, which scored 9.4 points. User satisfaction with the accuracy, availability, continuity and coverage of the EGNOS Safety of Life (SoL) and Open Service were all up compared to the previous year. 

The main outcomes and conclusions from the 2018 EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey are available, and can be downloaded here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Help shape future evolutions of Galileo and EGNOS

uMaze takes Accuracy Matters prize in Galileo Innovation Challenge

2.12.2019 14:11  
The winning team receiving their prize.
Published: 
02 December 2019

The Finnish team uMaze was declared the winner of the GSA’s Accuracy Matters challenge in the Galileo Innovation Challenge, which took place at Traficom Headquarters - Dynamicum, in Helsinki on 29 November – 1 December. The hackathon was organised by Ultrahack, with support from the Finnish Transport and Communications Agency (Traficom) and European Space Week. The European GNSS Agency (GSA) acted as a partner, providing mentors and judges and sponsoring a challenge.

The contenders for the challenge were tasked with designing, developing and demonstrating a beta version of an innovative application that benefits from Galileo’s enhanced accuracy. In total, seven teams of innovators and developers from around the world took up the challenge, and worked over the three days to either create a new app or enhance an existing one to demonstrate how accurate positioning adds value in a variety of use cases.

The top four

uMaze took the EUR 3000 first prize for their app, which creates mazes in specific outdoor areas in which users can play. The uMaze team also reached the finals of the MyGalileoApp competition. Since then, they have taken their app to the next level, increasing accuracy and including a function that informs users when the phone’s Galileo positioning is working. Given the level of precision required by the mazes, the user experience really depends on whether the phone has Galileo, so it scored highly on the hackathon’s ‘Galileo relevance’ criterion.

Read this: First Galileo-enabled autonomous vehicle successfully demonstrated

“For its part, Traficom wants to help Finnish industry and application developers to be at the forefront in introducing new services based on the Galileo system. The objective of the Galileo Innovation Challenge is to raise public awareness about European satellite navigation and support application developers in creating more solutions based on Galileo,” says Senior Specialist Tero Vihavainen from Traficom.

There was a tie for second prize of EUR 2000 between the Heim.tech and Kill it before it Kills You teams. The Heim.tech app monitors and manages wild fires using a drone equipped with a very sensitive thermal sensor to detect even small fires; a mobile app for people on the ground, and a user interface for controlling operations.

At the hackathon they focused only on the mobile app interface for managing assets and resources on the ground, mapping distances to the fire, calculating the human and material resources needed to reach the fire, providing an overview of where the fire is growing, and optimising the speed and efficiency of the response.

The Kill it before it Kills You app, which monitors the spread of contagious diseases, consists of two parts: one for the disease control centre and one for the infected patient. The app creates heat maps for contagious diseases and also tracks infected people, monitoring where the disease might spread.

The idea is that when infected people go to hospital and are diagnosed, they are given free drugs in exchange for using the app to track where they go. The business case is that prevention is cheaper than cure, and that only by having a clear overview of where a disease is spreading will it be possible to put crisis centres in place and organise a targeted response.

And this: MyGalileoApp: the results are in!

Finally, third prize worth EUR 1000, went to the Approach team, for their crowdsourced app for climbers. The app is able to pinpoint arrival and destination marks for a climb and, based on user input, calculate the optimal path for reaching a climbing destination. The app uses the enhanced positioning of Galileo, pinpointing every step of the climb and mapping the continuous decision-making process of climbers as they navigate the most secure paths.

“All of the apps presented at the Galileo Innovation Challenge rely on the positioning provided by GNSS and Galileo, the apps that we supported and evaluated as part of the ‘Accuracy Matters’ stream really took advantage of Galileo and dual frequency, to the point that accuracy really determined the outcome and quality of the user experience,” said Justyna Redelkiewicz Musial, in charge of LBS and IoT market development at the GSA.

“App developers are a great community to work with because they completely understand the ‘user-centric’ ethos which is also at the heart of our work at the GSA,” she said.

Quantum leap progress

All the winning apps made quantum leap progress during the 48 hours of the hackathon and made the most of the support provided by the GSA in terms of strategic guidance, technical mentoring and business development.

Along with the cash prizes the top three teams will be able to take advantage of some one-to-one coaching on preparing an application to the Finnish ESA Business Incubation Centre, where the value of the potential incubation amounts to EUR 75 000 EUR. The winning teams will also get the opportunity to network with a wide selection of potential investors at European Space Week, which is taking place immediately after the Galileo Innovation Challenge, at Helsinki Congress Paasitorni on 3-5 December.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The winning team receiving their prize.

Horizon 2020 key to international cooperation for Galileo & EGNOS

29.11.2019 10:54  
Horizon 2020 is a key driver of international cooperation in the area of EGNSS
Published: 
29 November 2019

Use of European GNSS (Galileo and EGNOS, EGNSS) is not restricted to Europe’s borders, and the compatibility of space systems means that users and businesses around the globe are able to benefit from greater coverage, higher accuracy and more confidence in their position fixes thanks to EGNSS. International users are therefore interested in exploring opportunities for greater cooperation with the European space programmes. Horizon 2020 is a key entry point for this.

Horizon 2020 and its successor framework programme Horizon Europe offer excellent opportunities for organisations around the world to team up with entities in the European Union to conduct research and development in a wide range of areas. European GNSS (EGNSS) is one such area and the EGNSS downstream market, in particular, is an ideal forum for international cooperation, with advantages for both sides in terms of new markets and business opportunities.

In this context, participation in Horizon 2020 Calls is an effective driver of international cooperation that strengthens existing and creates new links with non-EU countries. Any H2020 project can include international partners and international participation in these projects brings multiple benefits, including access to knowledge, markets, talent and investment, better research and exploitation and a higher global profile for the projects. Through previous R&I initiatives GSA has established cooperation with a wide network of international EGNSS players and the objective is to strengthen the existing and upcoming link with more countries.

Applicants from non-EU countries are eligible to take part in Horizon 2020 programmes – even if the calls for proposals or topic texts do not explicitly state this. However, they are not always automatically entitled to funding. For a list of countries eligible for Horizon 2020 funding, click here.

Creating international partnerships

EGNSS-related projects funded under Horizon 2020 have already yielded significant successes. One such project is BELS and its successor BELS+. The BELS+ consortium brings together partners from Europe and Southeast Asia with the aim of developing GNSS markets for EU companies in Southeast Asia and helping EGNSS applications gain a foothold in this rapidly growing market. Towards this goal, the project conducts a range of coordinated activities to raise awareness and build capacities for the exploitation of EGNSS technologies in the region.

Watch thisGalileo Hackathon Bangalore

Likewise, the European GNSS Agency (GSA)-funded GNSS.asia H2020 project aims to stimulate the creation of partnerships between GNSS industries in Europe and Asia, while supporting institutional cooperation and encouraging Galileo adoption. The project is dedicated to GNSS industrial cooperation between Europe and the Asia-Pacific region, with a focus on the downstream market. The project offers various services, including industry matchmaking and international cooperation events, and has permanent teams in Europe, India, China, Taiwan, South Korea and Japan.

Another example of successful international EGNSS cooperation is the MAGNIFIC project. The core aim of MAGNIFIC (Multiplying in Africa European Global Navigation Initiatives Fostering Interlaced Cooperation), which was funded in the Horizon 2020 1st Galileo call, was to demonstrate the benefits of EGNSS to African stakeholders. The project focused in particular on six priority markets: road, aviation, maritime, precision, agriculture/environment protection, civil protection and surveillance, and LBS.

Read this: Bavaria rings to the sound of BELS+

Last chance before Horizon Europe

Horizon 2020 will draw to a close in 2020, but there is still time to take advantage of the opportunities for international cooperation in the final EGNSS market uptake 2019-2020 Call. This Call, with a total budget of EUR 21 million, opened on 5 November.

Dealing with the development of new innovative applications fostering digitisation, smart mobility, societal resilience and environmental protection and with a brand new topic tailored to public authorities, this is the last Horizon 2020 Call before the launch of its successor framework programme – Horizon Europe.

For more information on the final EGNSS market uptake call, click here. The deadline for submissions is 5 March 2020.

Do you need support in getting in touch with non-EU partners? We can help, as we have particularly active links with:

  • UAE, Oman, Saudi Arabia
  • Northern African countries: Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, Egypt
  • South Africa
  • ASECNA countries
  • Israel, Lebanon, Jordan
  • Ukraine, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Moldavia
  • South America: Brazil, Chile, Argentina, Uruguay
  • Central America: Mexico, Costar Rica, Panama
  • Vietnam, Malaysia, South Korea, Japan.
  • Australia, New Zealand.

We would be happy to discuss with you, contact us at RESEARCH@gsa.europa.eu!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Horizon 2020 is a key driver of international cooperation in the area of EGNSS

First Galileo-enabled autonomous vehicle successfully demonstrated

28.11.2019 12:06  
The test saw a Renault ZOE electric car autonomously driven on tracks and on public roads.
Published: 
28 November 2019

The University of Technology of Compiègne, France, has hosted a live demonstration of the first autonomous vehicle powered by Galileo. As part of this demonstration, a Renault ZOE electric car has been autonomously driven on tracks and on public roads in a world first for the Galileo programme.

Participants in the event had a unique opportunity to ride in an autonomous vehicle fitted with an innovative positioning engine developed by the ESCAPE project - the ESCAPE GNSS engine (EGE). The EGE leverages Galileo signals and services to provide a core positioning component in autonomous vehicles. It was designed and prototyped by the ESCAPE project, funded under the European GNSS Agency’s (GSA) Fundamental Elements programme.

GSA and European Commission representatives, the French and Spanish national authorities and the automobile industry took part in the demonstration of the Galileo-enabled autonomous vehicle.

“The Declaration of Amsterdam already states that the Galileo and EGNOS differentiators -authentication, high accuracy and integrity - are sine qua non conditions for the uptake of autonomous vehicles. Nevertheless, this technological development should aim to be fair, inclusive and green,” said Alvaro Herrero from the Spanish Ministry of Ministry of Public Works and Transport.

Watch this: Driving with Galileo

“GNSS is a key enabling technology towards fully Connected and Automated Driving. What we are witnessing today with the demonstration of the ESCAPE GNSS engine, which leverages Galileo’s multi-frequency and multi-constellation capability, is actually a glimpse of what ‘driving’ will look like in the near future, and is a key milestone bringing us ever closer to full automation,” GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides said.

Live demonstrations

Cars equipped with the EGE were showcased in two demonstrations at the event. During the first demo on a Renault ZOE electric car, participants and journalists had a unique opportunity to get on board the vehicle and take a driverless ride on the University of Technology of Compiègne (UTC) track.

“The information available from the Galileo GNSS constellation should contribute to the deployment of vehicles with autonomous driving capabilities and to enhance our location-dependent driving Assistance Systems (ADAS),” said Patrick Bastard, Research Director at Renault Group. “The results from the ESCAPE project on the integrity associated with the estimated vehicle location are very important; they are an enabler for the deployment of any safety critical vehicle application. It tells us about the ‘quality’ of the estimates, thus its usability.”

In the second demo, a second vehicle was driven on a public road in Compiègne to demonstrate the potential of the system in a peri-urban environment. There were no passengers in this car, but the participants were able to watch a live video of the test broadcast via 4G with the estimated position obtained using the EGE along with RTK.

“Galileo will dramatically improve precision and allows us to deploy these vehicles quicker,” said Rémi Bastien, VP automotive prospective at Renault Group.

Localisation workshop

Information sessions on the ESCAPE project, including use cases for autonomous driving, high accuracy and integrity, localisation standards, and HD maps for localisation followed the demos.

A presentation of the TESEO APP receiver from STMicroelectronics, which combines multiple-frequency and multi-constellation tracking and enables autonomous-driving systems to combine precise positioning with sensor data for enhanced performance, safety and reliability was also delivered.

Read this: GNSS and mobility: innovation in motion at ITS Singapore

Following the presentations, a workshop was held on localisation integrity for autonomous driving, with discussions on relative and absolute localisation and integrity estimation for land-based applications.

The ESCAPE prototype

The EGE prototype design includes several major components, including a novel multi-frequency, multi-constellation automotive-grade GNSS receiver. The main distinguishing feature of the ESCAPE receiver is its ability to precisely and simultaneously process signals from two different GNSS bands and from different satellite constellations. Although this capability is common in high-end professional receivers, it is cutting-edge in the automotive Tier-2 panorama.

The receiver is also a first-of-a-kind device in its segment to support the new Navigation Message Authentication (NMA) service of Galileo - the open E1 signal. Finally, the new GNSS receiver comes with several core signal-processing enhancements: better receiver sensitivity and tracking capability, multipath mitigation, more intermediate frequency (IF) channels and flexibility in routing IF samples, jamming detection and mitigation, and optimisation of the GNSS data flow.

The result is an ESCAPE GNSS sensor that combines a high-end GNSS technology traditionally reserved for professional applications, innovative dual-band Galileo processing, as well as all the hardware and software safety aspects that are needed to certify the component for the automotive market.

“When we fund projects in automation we always involve users, in this case the car maker. By funding ESCAPE, currently at level 4 of high automation, we are following our strategy to develop autonomous driving technology one level after the other to reach full automation with the next Horizon 2020 project which will begin in January 2020,” said GSA Market Development Officer Flavio Sbardellati.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The test saw a Renault ZOE electric car autonomously driven on tracks and on public roads.

First Galileo-enabled autonomous vehicle successfully demonstrated

28.11.2019 12:06  
The test saw a Renault ZOE electric car autonomously driven on tracks and on public roads.
Published: 
28 November 2019

The University of Technology of Compiègne, France, has hosted a live demonstration of the first autonomous vehicle powered by Galileo. As part of this demonstration, a Renault ZOE electric car has been autonomously driven on tracks and on public roads in a world first for the Galileo programme.

Participants in the event had a unique opportunity to ride in an autonomous vehicle fitted with an innovative positioning engine developed by the ESCAPE project - the ESCAPE GNSS engine (EGE). The EGE leverages Galileo signals and services to provide a core positioning component in autonomous vehicles. It was designed and prototyped by the ESCAPE project, funded under the European GNSS Agency’s (GSA) Fundamental Elements programme.

GSA and European Commission representatives, the French and Spanish national authorities and the automobile industry took part in the demonstration of the Galileo-enabled autonomous vehicle.

“The EU, Member states, industry, and other stakeholders have already recognized, in the Declaration of Amsterdam, that the Galileo and Egnos differentiators (authentication, high accuracy and integrity) are sine qua non conditions for the uptake of the automated driving technology. This technology will allow us to make automated vehicles safer, and will bring us closer to our objectives of achieving an inclusive, accessible, affordable and sustainable mobility to all,” said Alvaro Herrero from the Spanish Ministry of Ministry of Public Works and Transport.

Watch this: Driving with Galileo

“GNSS is a key enabling technology towards fully Connected and Automated Driving. What we are witnessing today with the demonstration of the ESCAPE GNSS engine, which leverages Galileo’s multi-frequency and multi-constellation capability, is actually a glimpse of what ‘driving’ will look like in the near future, and is a key milestone bringing us ever closer to full automation,” GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides said.

Live demonstrations

Cars equipped with the EGE were showcased in two demonstrations at the event. During the first demo on a Renault ZOE electric car, participants and journalists had a unique opportunity to get on board the vehicle and take a driverless ride on the University of Technology of Compiègne (UTC) track.

“The information available from the Galileo GNSS constellation should contribute to the deployment of vehicles with autonomous driving capabilities and to enhance our location-dependent driving Assistance Systems (ADAS),” said Patrick Bastard, Research Director at Renault Group. “The results from the ESCAPE project on the integrity associated with the estimated vehicle location are very important; they are an enabler for the deployment of any safety critical vehicle application. It tells us about the ‘quality’ of the estimates, thus its usability.”

In the second demo, a second vehicle was driven on a public road in Compiègne to demonstrate the potential of the system in a peri-urban environment. There were no passengers in this car, but the participants were able to watch a live video of the test broadcast via 4G with the estimated position obtained using the EGE along with RTK.

“Galileo will dramatically improve precision and allows us to deploy these vehicles quicker,” said Rémi Bastien, VP automotive prospective at Renault Group.

Localisation workshop

Information sessions on the ESCAPE project, including use cases for autonomous driving, high accuracy and integrity, localisation standards, and HD maps for localisation followed the demos.

A presentation of the TESEO APP receiver from STMicroelectronics, which combines multiple-frequency and multi-constellation tracking and enables autonomous-driving systems to combine precise positioning with sensor data for enhanced performance, safety and reliability was also delivered.

Read this: GNSS and mobility: innovation in motion at ITS Singapore

Following the presentations, a workshop was held on localisation integrity for autonomous driving, with discussions on relative and absolute localisation and integrity estimation for land-based applications.

The ESCAPE prototype

The EGE prototype design includes several major components, including a novel multi-frequency, multi-constellation automotive-grade GNSS receiver. The main distinguishing feature of the ESCAPE receiver is its ability to precisely and simultaneously process signals from two different GNSS bands and from different satellite constellations. Although this capability is common in high-end professional receivers, it is cutting-edge in the automotive Tier-2 panorama.

The receiver is also a first-of-a-kind device in its segment to support the new Navigation Message Authentication (NMA) service of Galileo - the open E1 signal. Finally, the new GNSS receiver comes with several core signal-processing enhancements: better receiver sensitivity and tracking capability, multipath mitigation, more intermediate frequency (IF) channels and flexibility in routing IF samples, jamming detection and mitigation, and optimisation of the GNSS data flow.

The result is an ESCAPE GNSS sensor that combines a high-end GNSS technology traditionally reserved for professional applications, innovative dual-band Galileo processing, as well as all the hardware and software safety aspects that are needed to certify the component for the automotive market.

“When we fund projects in automation we always involve users, in this case the car maker. By funding ESCAPE, currently at level 4 of high automation, we are following our strategy to develop autonomous driving technology one level after the other to reach full automation with the next Horizon 2020 project which will begin in January 2020,” said GSA Market Development Officer Flavio Sbardellati.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The test saw a Renault ZOE electric car autonomously driven on tracks and on public roads.

From GSA to EUSPA: space transforming business and the economy

27.11.2019 15:07  
GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides speaking at the Prague House debate.
Published: 
27 November 2019

On Tuesday 19 November 2019, a debate entitled ‘Prague’s Guide to the Galaxy: From GSA to EU Agency for the Space Programme’ was held on the premises of Prague House in Brussels. Organised  by the Permanent Representation of the Czech Republic to the EU, the debate looked at how space data can transform our economy and businesses.

The panel debate featured GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides, MEP and member of the EP Committee on Industry, Research and Energy Martina Dlabajová, Director for EU Satellite Navigation Programmes at the European Commission Matthias Petschke, Director of the Intelligent Transport Systems, Space Activities, R&D and Innovation Department at the Czech Ministry of Transport Václav Kobera, and Director of the Prague Project Management Department Jan Dobrovský. 
The debate was moderated by Ambassador Jaroslav Zajicek, Permanent Representative of the Czech Republic to COREPER I (Committee of the Permanent Representatives of the Governments of the Member States to the European Union) and, following a welcoming address by Head of the Prague Delegation to the EU Lucie Čadilová, GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides spoke about space’s contribution to the European economy.

Enormous potential

“According to our recent GNSS Market Report, the global downstream market revenue from both GNSS devices and services will grow from EUR 150 billion in 2019 to EUR 325 billion in 2029. These figures show us that space already plays a major role in the EU economy, creating opportunities for business and jobs for European citizens,” des Dorides said, adding that this role would only increase in the future, especially with the new responsibilities of the Agency, which is to  become the EU Space Programme Agency (EUSPA) by January 2021, taking over responsibilities for Copernicus markets uptake also. 
MEP Dlabajová noted that it had been seven years since the administrative centre of the Galileo Navigation System was relocated from Brussels to Prague – a city with a long tradition of space research and industry. She said that this had been a good decision, while also stressing the need to secure adequate funding for the programme. 
“It offers many opportunities including for small and medium-sized enterprises which are core to the European economy. If the EU wants a space strategy with a real impact on our citizens and businesses and to achieve all the commitments and even further goals, we must secure sufficient funding,” she said. 

Bringing space to Earth

At the event, Ambassador Zajicek also highlighted the importance of funding, and expressed the hope that the event would help spread the word about the benefits that EU space activities bring to our everyday lives. “It is crucial that the GSA, and later the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), is well funded so it can continue its tremendous work in bringing space to Earth," he said. 
Representing the business sector on the panel, Luboš Kučera, Managing Director at GISAT, a Czech company providing geo-information services based on Earth Observation technology, spoke about the synergies to be found between Earth observation and GNSS positioning and presented several applications based on these synergies.
The event was very well attended, with several MEPs present, including MEP Christophe Grudler from the Committee on Employment and Social Affairs, along with financial attachés from nearly all the EU Member States.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides speaking at the Prague House debate.

From GSA to EUSPA: space transforming business and the economy

27.11.2019 15:07  
GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides speaking at the Prague House debate.
Published: 
27 November 2019

On Tuesday 19 November 2019, a debate entitled ‘Prague’s Guide to the Galaxy: From GSA to EU Agency for the Space Programme’ was held on the premises of Prague House in Brussels. Organised  by the Permanent Representation of the Czech Republic to the EU, the debate looked at how space data can transform our economy and businesses.

The panel debate featured GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides, MEP and member of the EP Committee on Industry, Research and Energy Martina Dlabajová, Director for EU Satellite Navigation Programmes at the European Commission Matthias Petschke, Director of the Intelligent Transport Systems, Space Activities, R&D and Innovation Department at the Czech Ministry of Transport Václav Kobera, and Director of the Prague Project Management Department Jan Dobrovský. 
The debate was moderated by Ambassador Jaroslav Zajicek, Permanent Representative of the Czech Republic to COREPER I (Committee of the Permanent Representatives of the Governments of the Member States to the European Union) and, following a welcoming address by Head of the Prague Delegation to the EU Lucie Čadilová, GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides spoke about space’s contribution to the European economy.

Enormous potential

“According to our recent GNSS Market Report, the global downstream market revenue from both GNSS devices and services will grow from EUR 150 billion in 2019 to EUR 325 billion in 2029. These figures show us that space already plays a major role in the EU economy, creating opportunities for business and jobs for European citizens,” des Dorides said, adding that this role is at the centre of the new responsibilities of the Agency, which is to  become the EU Space Programme Agency (EUSPA) by January 2021, taking over responsibilities for Copernicus markets uptake also. 
MEP Dlabajová noted that it had been seven years since the administrative centre of the Galileo Navigation System was relocated from Brussels to Prague – a city with a long tradition of space research and industry. She said that this had been a good decision, while also stressing the need to secure adequate funding for the programme. 
“It offers many opportunities including for small and medium-sized enterprises which are core to the European economy. If the EU wants a space strategy with a real impact on our citizens and businesses and to achieve all the commitments and even further goals, we must secure sufficient funding,” she said. 

Bringing space to Earth

At the event, Ambassador Zajicek also highlighted the importance of funding, and expressed the hope that the event would help spread the word about the benefits that EU space activities bring to our everyday lives. “It is crucial that the GSA, and later the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), is well funded so it can continue its tremendous work in bringing space to Earth," he said. 
Representing the business sector on the panel, Luboš Kučera, Managing Director at GISAT, a Czech company providing geo-information services based on Earth Observation technology, spoke about the synergies to be found between Earth observation and GNSS positioning and presented several applications based on these synergies.
The event was very well attended, with several MEPs present, including MEP Christophe Grudler from the Committee on Employment and Social Affairs, along with financial attachés from nearly all the EU Member States.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides speaking at the Prague House debate.

From GSA to EUSPA: space transforming business and the economy

27.11.2019 15:07  
GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides speaking at the Prague House debate.
Published: 
27 November 2019

On Tuesday 19 November 2019, a debate entitled ‘Prague’s Guide to the Galaxy: From GSA to EU Agency for the Space Programme’ was held on the premises of Prague House in Brussels. Organised by the Permanent Representation of the Czech Republic to the EU, the debate looked at how space data can transform our economy and businesses.

The panel debate featured GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides, MEP and member of the EP Committee on Industry, Research and Energy Martina Dlabajová, Director for EU Satellite Navigation Programmes at the European Commission Matthias Petschke, Director of the Intelligent Transport Systems, Space Activities, R&D and Innovation Department at the Czech Ministry of Transport Václav Kobera, and Director of the Prague Project Management Department Jan Dobrovský.

The debate was moderated by Ambassador Jaroslav Zajicek, Permanent Representative of the Czech Republic to COREPER I (Committee of the Permanent Representatives of the Governments of the Member States to the European Union) and, following a welcoming address by Head of the Prague Delegation to the EU Lucie Čadilová, GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides spoke about space’s contribution to the European economy.

Enormous potential

“According to our recent GNSS Market Report, the global downstream market revenue from both GNSS devices and services will grow from EUR 150 billion in 2019 to EUR 325 billion in 2029. These figures show us that space already plays a major role in the EU economy, creating opportunities for business and jobs for European citizens,” des Dorides said, adding that this role is at the centre of the new responsibilities of the Agency, which is to  become the EU Space Programme Agency (EUSPA) by January 2021, taking over responsibilities for Copernicus markets uptake also.

Read this: Europe’s economy is increasingly dependent on space

MEP Dlabajová noted that it had been seven years since the administrative centre of the Galileo Navigation System was relocated from Brussels to Prague – a city with a long tradition of space research and industry. She said that this had been a good decision, while also stressing the need to secure adequate funding for the programme. 

“It offers many opportunities including for small and medium-sized enterprises which are core to the European economy. If the EU wants a space strategy with a real impact on our citizens and businesses and to achieve all the commitments and even further goals, we must secure sufficient funding,” she said. 

Bringing space to Earth

At the event, Ambassador Zajicek also highlighted the importance of funding, and expressed the hope that the event would help spread the word about the benefits that EU space activities bring to our everyday lives. “It is crucial that the GSA, and later the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), is well funded so it can continue its tremendous work in bringing space to Earth," he said.

And this: Space programme in focus at Brussels meetings

Representing the business sector on the panel, Luboš Kučera, Managing Director at GISAT, a Czech company providing geo-information services based on Earth Observation technology, spoke about the synergies to be found between Earth observation and GNSS positioning and presented several applications based on these synergies.

The event was very well attended, with several MEPs present, including MEP Christophe Grudler from the Committee on Employment and Social Affairs, along with financial attachés from nearly all the EU Member States.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides speaking at the Prague House debate.

EU space infrastructure guarantees leadership in security and defence

21.11.2019 14:24  
Space policy is an essential dimension of the European Union’s strategic autonomy
Published: 
21 November 2019

The European Union’s space infrastructure and know-how provide the assets needed to guarantee leadership in the area of security and defence policy. At a meeting of the European Parliament's Subcommittee on Security and Defence (SEDE) on 12 November European GNSS Agency (GSA) Chief Operating Officer Pascal Claudel spoke about how the European Union's space programmes contribute to its strategic autonomy in the area of security and defence.

Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus offer the European Union and its Member States the fundamental tools needed for independence in decision-making through the navigation, localisation, Earth observation, communication and surveillance services that they provide.

SEDE Committee Chair Nathalie Loiseau opened the meeting with a comment on the security and defence dimension of space, noting that Europe’s economies, societies, infrastructures and public services policies are becoming more and more dependent on space. “Space has become a critical strategic element for developed societies. This makes us vulnerable, so we need to be aware of this in our security and defence policy,” she said. 

In his speech at the meeting, Claudel noted that the new Regulation on the space programme passed in April further strengthens the link between space, defence and security by creating synergies between the fields of navigation, Earth observation and communication. “These synergies will lead to improved applications for the detection and fight against global natural disasters,” he said.

Essential culture of security

Claudel also noted that the development of space surveillance, the Space Situational Awareness (SSA) programme, is essential for ensuring the protection of the EU's space capabilities. The SSA programme is designed to support Europe's independent access and utilisation of space by providing timely and accurate information on the space environment, and particularly hazards to in-orbit and ground infrastructure.

Read this: Europe’s economy is increasingly dependent on space - ITRE committee hears

“Security is one of the 3 major missions entrusted to the GSA, including the Security Accreditation Board (SAB). Although an independent entity, the SAB is supported by the GSA in its mission, which is to ensure compliance between European GNSS standards and the safety regulations of the European Union,” Claudel said. 

He said that, in order to strengthen the EU's Security and Defence Policy, a security culture at the service of the EU's space programmes is essential. “The experience gained by the GSA through the operations of Galileo in terms of security (including cybersecurity) is fundamental to reinforce synergies and the sharing of space resources in the service of our security and security policy,” he said.

Cornerstone of government space use

Along with security, the GSA COO also touched on the other 2 key areas in which the GSA has acquired solid experience that can be put to the service of all the EU’s space programmes when the Agency’s remit is broadened under the aegis of the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA). These are the PRS and Critical Infrastructure.

The Galileo Public Regulated Service (PRS) is an encrypted navigation service for governmental authorised users and sensitive applications that require high continuity. “The PRS service is the cornerstone for governmental use of the European space programmes. It is delivered through  a security chain adapted to the needs of the EU Member States and of the European Union.” Claudel said.

And this: PRS – the future is bright!

He said that this requires continuity of services, efficient operational procedures and a high level of security to protect the entire infrastructure and its communications to end users. “The experience gained from the PRS will be crucial for the handling of Galileo navigation, GovSatCom telecommunication and SSA space surveillance information,” he said.

Essential for strategic autonomy

Regarding the protection of critical infrastructures and their synchronisation with satellite navigation systems, he noted that this synchronisation is currently mainly provided by GPS. “It is therefore important that legislation establishes Galileo ahead of time as the main provider of services, in order to ensure autonomy,” he said, adding that this is particularly important in the context of internal security, transport, energy and telecommunications.

As space policy is an essential dimension of our strategic autonomy, it is essential to preserve the EU’s sensitive technological and industrial capabilities, which means that it is necessary to be very present on the civilian market because of the difference in terms of budget spending by our competitors, he said.

“This is also why a key goal of the GSA is to promote and stimulate the use of European GNSS in all sectors of the market, thus guaranteeing a work plan for our industry and SMEs, job creation and growth at European level,” he said.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Space policy is an essential dimension of the European Union’s strategic autonomy

EU space infrastructure guarantees leadership in security and defence

21.11.2019 14:24  
Space policy is an essential dimension of the European Union’s strategic autonomy
Published: 
21 November 2019

The European Union’s space infrastructure and know-how provide the assets needed to guarantee leadership in the area of security and defence policy. At a meeting of the European Parliament's Subcommittee on Security and Defence (SEDE) on 12 November European GNSS Agency (GSA) Chief Operating Officer Pascal Claudel spoke about how the European Union's space programmes contribute to its strategic autonomy in the area of security and defence.

Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus offer the European Union and its Member States the fundamental tools needed for independence in decision-making through the navigation, localisation, Earth observation, communication and surveillance services that they provide.

SEDE Committee Chair Nathalie Loiseau opened the meeting with a comment on the security and defence dimension of space, noting that Europe’s economies, societies, infrastructures and public services policies are becoming more and more dependent on space. “Space has become a critical strategic element for developed societies. This makes us vulnerable, so we need to be aware of this in our security and defence policy,” she said. 

In his speech at the meeting, Claudel noted that the new Regulation on the space programme passed in April further strengthens the link between space, defence and security by creating synergies between the fields of navigation, Earth observation and communication. “These synergies will lead to improved applications for the detection and fight against global natural disasters,” he said.

Essential culture of security

Claudel also noted that the development of space surveillance, the Space Situational Awareness (SSA) programme, is essential for ensuring the protection of the EU's space capabilities. The SSA programme is designed to support Europe's independent access and utilisation of space by providing timely and accurate information on the space environment, and particularly hazards to in-orbit and ground infrastructure.

Read this: Europe’s economy is increasingly dependent on space - ITRE committee hears

“Security is one of the 3 major missions entrusted to the GSA, including the Security Accreditation Board (SAB). Although an independent entity, the SAB is supported by the GSA in its mission, which is to ensure compliance between European GNSS standards and the safety regulations of the European Union,” Claudel said. 

He said that, in order to strengthen the EU's Security and Defence Policy, a security culture at the service of the EU's space programmes is essential. “The experience gained by the GSA through the operations of Galileo in terms of security (including cybersecurity) is fundamental to reinforce synergies and the sharing of space resources in the service of our security and security policy,” he said.

Cornerstone of government space use

Along with security, the GSA COO also touched on the other 2 key areas in which the GSA has acquired solid experience that can be put to the service of all the EU’s space programmes when the Agency’s remit is broadened under the aegis of the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA). These are the PRS and Critical Infrastructure.

The Galileo Public Regulated Service (PRS) is an encrypted navigation service for governmental authorised users and sensitive applications that require high continuity. “The PRS service is the cornerstone for governmental use of the European space programmes. It is delivered through  a security chain adapted to the needs of the EU Member States and of the European Union.” Claudel said.

And this: PRS – the future is bright!

He said that this requires continuity of services, efficient operational procedures and a high level of security to protect the entire infrastructure and its communications to end users. “The experience gained from the PRS will be crucial for the handling of Galileo navigation, GovSatCom telecommunication and SSA space surveillance information,” he said.

Essential for strategic autonomy

Regarding the protection of critical infrastructures and their synchronisation with satellite navigation systems, he noted that this synchronisation is currently mainly provided by GPS. “It is therefore important that legislation establishes Galileo ahead of time as the main provider of services, in order to ensure autonomy,” he said, adding that this is particularly important in the context of internal security, transport, energy and telecommunications.

As space policy is an essential dimension of our strategic autonomy, it is essential to preserve the EU’s sensitive technological and industrial capabilities, which means that it is necessary to be very present on the civilian market because of the difference in terms of budget spending by our competitors, he said.

“This is also why a key goal of the GSA is to promote and stimulate the use of European GNSS in all sectors of the market, thus guaranteeing a work plan for our industry and SMEs, job creation and growth at European level,” he said.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Space policy is an essential dimension of the European Union’s strategic autonomy

Invitation to tender: EGNOS service for payment and liability-critical road applications

20.11.2019 10:35  
Under what conditions would it be beneficial to implement an EGNOS service for payment and liability critical applications in the road sector in the 2025-2035 timeframe?
Published: 
20 November 2019

The European Commission’s Directorate-General for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs (DG GROW) has issued an Invitation To Tender (ITT) for a service contract on using satellite-based augmentation systems (SBAS) for applications such as road tolling or pay-as-you-drive insurance with the aim of developing an appropriate integrity concept for payment/liability critical applications focused on the road sector.

The main tasks of the study are the identification of user and service requirements, the development of an appropriate integrity concept and the definition of the service provision scheme. As part of the user level integrity concept the contractor shall develop an algorithm to cope with the local environment of the road sector.

When defining the service, the contractor shall consider to which extent evolutions of the EGNOS services, user equipment or of the service provision scheme are needed to provide the required integrity assurance. Integrity in this context refers to the level of confidence that can be put in the navigation solution. The On-Board Unit (OBU) will have to allow all the features necessary to trust the position in situations where enforcement, payments and related claims are involved. Since the E-GNSS sensor may just be one component among other sensors, the project shall address what other technologies or components may be needed on top of the current GNSS signals, and what would be the contribution of each element to the overall integrity assurance.

The study will be fully financed by the European Commission under the H2020 framework programme for research and innovation, within the budget allocated to the evolution of EGNOS mission. The European GNSS Agency (GSA) will be in charge of the technical supervision of the project on behalf of the European Commission.

More information about the Invitation to tender can be found here.

Tailored premiums

Pay-as-you-drive (PAYD) and pay-how-you-drive (PHYD) insurance are emerging applications in the road sector that rely on how much, where, when and how the road user drives. These applications make it possible to tailor the premiums paid by the policyholder.

Read this: European GNSS supports smarter mobility

In the future, other road applications such as reconstruction of accidents, mobility as a service, traffic infraction monitoring and fine management, traffic congestion monitoring, automatic charging in car parks, etc. may also rely on the vehicle’s position and navigation data.

Liability and payment-critical applications are highly sensitive to undetected large navigation errors since significant legal or economic consequences for the service or application provider may occur. In fact, a mismatch of the vehicle’s current speed together with erroneous position data may impact the user charging associated with the driving paths, skills and habits of the road user. Afterwards, it becomes very difficult for end users to claim that they are being overcharged or for service providers to avoid undercharging their customers.

Webinar

On 27 November 2019 at 16:00 CET, a webinar on this invitation to tender will be held to provide applicants with information. To register to the webinar click here.

EGNOS is the European SBAS and augments the GPS L1 C/A civilian signal by providing corrections and integrity information for positioning and navigation applications over Europe. EGNOS Version 3, set to enter in service in the near future, will augment both GPS and Galileo constellations in the L1 and L5 bands and will extend the service area to the entire landmasses of EU Member States.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Under what conditions would it be beneficial to implement an EGNOS service for payment and liability critical applications in the road sector in the 2025-2035 timeframe?

Latest updates to Reports on User Needs and Requirements released

19.11.2019 14:08  
The GNSS User Needs and Requirements series is based on a systematic consultation with users of position, navigation, and time services and technologies.
Published: 
19 November 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) has released updates to its Reports on User Needs and Requirements. This series of reports is compiled following a systematic process of consultation with the community of users of position, navigation, and time services and technologies. Thanks to these consultations it is possible to take users’ needs and requirements into account in the short and long-term evolution of European GNSS.

The current round of updates to the reports was compiled based on feedback received from the user community at the latest European GNSS User Consultation Platform, held during EU Space Week in Marseille in December 2018. You can find the updated reports here.*

To make it easier for readers to see what has changed, all the updated information in the reports has been highlighted. What’s more, a detailed change log has been included as an annex to each of the reports and is available for download. The new reports have been designated Version 2.0.

  

A taste of what’s new

Agriculture: the policy and regulatory framework has been updated to reflect the new CAP update which opens novel opportunities for EGNSS solutions. What’s more, a specific mention has been made regarding repeatability and integrity in connection with the applications that these mainly apply to and there has been a clarification around the quoted values of accuracy. To read the updated report in full, click here.

Location-based Services: accuracy and coverage parameters have been refined and the corresponding users’ requirements quantification has been updated. The Augmented Reality category has also been refined and new applications have been added (Augmented Reality for leisure, Augmented Reality for professional applications, Robotics), along with their user requirements. To read the updated report in full, click here.

Rail: Definition of GNSS use in rail safety relevant applications is still ongoing, so the user requirements for rail have to be considered as a work in progress. That said, several recommendations were made by the Rail panel during UCP 2018 for consideration in the future versions of the report. In particular: some applications were removed for redundancy reasons (such as train warning or ATP) and some applications have been modified from safety-relevant to non-safety. To read the updated report in full, click here.

Road: previously unreferenced requirements have been validated and other requirements have been revised. Furthermore, the regulatory context has been updated to take into account the latest EU Regulation. To read the updated report in full, click here.

Surveying: sections of the text were optimised and updated to reflect additions and clarifications on topics along with technology developments (open and proprietary formats for PPP, RTK and PPP-RTK; Open Sky vs. harsh environment; requirements table; Galileo HAS for surveying; raw measurements on Android; and software-based GNSS and Positioning-as-a-Service techniques). A further analysis on specific requirements for the integration of GNSS with LiDAR, RPAS, AR and other emerging technologies has also been included. To read the updated report in full, click here.

Time & Synchronisation: the increasing demand for calibration of hardware equipment delays for both scientific and industrial applications has been included as a new driver. Moreover, there is a more precise characterisation of robustness against spoofing, along with an introduction of the potential T&S needs for 5G networks and an updated regulatory context. To read the updated report in full, click here.

  

The User Consultation Platform

The User Consultation Platform (UCP) is a biennial forum, organised by the European Commission and the GSA, involving end users, user associations and representatives of the value chain, such as receiver and chipset manufacturers, application developers and the organisations and institutions dealing, directly and indirectly, with Galileo and EGNOS. The event is a part of the process developed at the GSA to collect user needs and requirements and take them as inputs for the provision of user-driven Galileo and EGNOS services.

The next UCP will take place in 2020. In the meantime, on 3-5 December 2019, European Space Week will take place in Helsinki. This event will include an “E-GNSS User Assembly” where the latest trends in services and technologies will be discussed.

Join us in the ongoing discussion and ensure that future European space programme evolutions meet your needs and requirements by registering to attend European Space Week here.

*Updates to the Aviation and Maritime reports are still pending at this point.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GNSS User Needs and Requirements series is based on a systematic consultation with users of position, navigation, and time services and technologies.

Space programme in focus at Brussels meetings

18.11.2019 14:38  
Europe’s strong and innovative space industry supports economic growth, benefitting European citizens.
Published: 
18 November 2019

The European Space Programme was very much in focus at two meetings in Brussels at the start of November. The first, on 5 November, was a meeting of the European Council’s Space Working Party, dealing with space solutions for a sustainable Arctic, while the second, on 6 November, dealt with European space policy – perspectives for business. At both meetings, the invaluable contribution of EGNSS (Galileo and EGNOS) was underscored.

At the 5 November meeting, the discussion held under the Finnish Presidency of the EU highlighted how EGNSS can support its priorities, such as strengthening the EU’s position as a  global leader in climate action, and making the EU more competitive and socially inclusive.

Speaking at the meeting, European GNSS Agency (GSA) Chief Operating Officer Pascal Claudel highlighted achievements on the GNSS market and how EGNSS can contribute to the goals set by the Finnish Presidency by supporting the transition to a low-carbon and circular economy and underpinning the development of smart mobility and smart cities solutions. “Developing the user market and meeting the needs of all market segments through innovative solutions, applications and receivers is a major mission of the GSA,” he said.

Another priority for the Finnish Presidency is to comprehensively protect the security of European citizens. Here too, EGNSS is making a critical contribution, providing high-precision robust timing and synchronization solutions for critical infrastructure, such as energy and telecoms networks and the banking and finance sector. Galileo and EGNOS also support key services in the area of public safety, such as the E112 and eCall emergency response services.

Read this: Space – underpinning the blue economy

The GSA COO stressed that the Agency is ready to provide skills and know-how for the development of innovative solutions, adding that other stakeholders can also contribute to the development of space-driven solutions. “The downstream sector does not require highly specific knowledge of space technology, so SMEs and the industries of EU Member States without a space heritage can participate,” he said.

Perspectives for business

The second event – a seminar on European Space Policy - perspectives for business, was held in the Permanent Representation of Poland to the EU. This event provided an opportunity to debate European space policy and the benefits of developing the space industry, including supporting European competitiveness.

Participants in the seminar discussed Europe’s strong and innovative space industry, citing examples from successful Polish companies, and heard about possibilities emerging from the new EU Space Programme and from synergies in space topics in the research, investment and defence domains (H2020, Horizon Europe, InvestEU, Defence Fund).

Fostering innovative solutions

At the seminar, Claudel highlighted the economic significance of EGNSS. “About 10% of European GDP relies on satellite navigation services and Europe will receive EUR 60 billion in revenue by 2027 thanks to Galileo and EGNOS,” Claudel said. He said that the GSA was fostering innovative solutions and supporting the competitiveness of European companies through Horizon 2020 and the Fundamental Elements financing mechanism.

And this: Final EGNSS calls open under Horizon 2020

Claudel noted that the economic benefits of space would be magnified even further by the opening up of new markets for non-space SMEs, adding that for European citizens to reap the greatest benefit from EU investment in space, there would need to be strong political leadership and a long-term vision for the EU space programme. He said that this would come with the setting up of the new EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA).

“With the new regulation, it will be possible to exploit the strong synergies that exist between Galileo, Copernicus and Govsatcom, in addition to three-dimensional ‘navigation-imagery-telecom’ synergies, allowing you to know where you are, what is around you and how to connect with everyone,” he said.

He also noted the need to involve all actors at EU level in the creation of market opportunities and to promote the use of Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus data and services. Citing the eCall emergency response system as a precedent, he said that it is necessary to foster the use of EU space data as the reference in Europe.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Europe’s strong and innovative space industry supports economic growth, benefitting European citizens.

PIN: EGNSS-based rail safety service analysis

15.11.2019 10:28  
What integrity concept to develop for the rail sector using EGNOS and Galileo?
Published: 
15 November 2019

The European Commission’s Directorate-General for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs (DG GROW) has issued a Prior Information Notice (PIN) for a planned call for a new service contract to assess the feasibility of an EGNSS-based safety service for the rail sector beyond 2022 which would make it possible to rationalise rail signalling infrastructure.

When defining the service, the contractor shall produce the service concept and consolidate it through iteration with a Working Group of experts. The analysis will enable the EC to determine whether an EGNOS service needs to be created specifically for rail safety.

The contract notice will be published in the near future. More information can be found in the Prior Information Notice (PIN).

Tailored premiums

Rail signalling systems are used to safely control railway traffic in order to prevent train collisions. There are currently more than 20 rail signalling systems in Europe since each country has developed its own railway infrastructure, equipment and operational rules. This has led to increased costs and technical and operational complexity. Therefore, the European Rail Industry, supported by the EU Institutions, is working on the European Rail Traffic Management System (ERTMS), with an aim to implement a common signalling system for Europe.

Read this: Space4Rail: From innovation to implementation.

The European Commission (EC) is currently specifying the long-term evolution of the EGNSS programme, including new services for Galileo and EGNOS. The use of an EGNSS receiver in combination with other sensors could result in the provision of an accurate and reliable position which would translate into an overall improvement in the rail system.

Galileo is Europe’s Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), providing a highly accurate, guaranteed global positioning service under civilian control. Galileo is operational since the Initial Service declaration at the end of 2016. Full Operational Capability is expected to be reached in 2020.

EGNOS is the European SBAS and augments GPS L1 C/A civilian signal by providing corrections and integrity information for positioning and navigation applications over Europe. EGNOS Version 3, set to enter in service in the near future, will augment both GPS and Galileo constellations in the L1 and L5 bands and will extend the service area to the entire landmasse of EU Member States.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

What integrity concept to develop for the rail sector using EGNOS and Galileo?

Excited and interested visitors @ GSA Open Days 2019

15.11.2019 10:23  
The GSA Open Days give the public the opportunity to see for themselves the benefits of EU investment in space
Published: 
15 November 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) threw open its doors for the 5th year in a row on 8-9 November to welcome visitors to the GSA Open Days 2019. With a wide range of activities targeted at general public, this year’s event received nearly 2000 visitors from the Czech Republic and across Europe, including families with kids, young adults interested in science and technology, space enthusiasts and young professionals interested in technology and EU affairs.

The GSA Open Days give the public an opportunity to learn about and experience applications based on the EU space programmes Galileo and EGNOS. The theme of this year’s event was Accuracy Matters and the importance of accuracy for a wide range of applications was underlined in a series of seminars, quizzes and workshops in Czech and English held at various times throughout both days.

Landing a plane with EGNOS

Over 350 students from Czech schools and universities registered to attend the event, and this number was augmented by visitors from neighbouring schools who dropped by in the afternoon to take part in the many exciting activities on offer. These included the chance to be a pilot and land an airbus A350 using EGNOS. EGNOS is mainly used in aviation and offers tangible benefits to operators using European skies. By minimising the frequency of aborted landings EGNOS helps in reducing CO2 emissions, delays and noise pollution.

Read this: European Space Week: A taste of what to expect

“End users are at the centre of the European space programme, which was developed with the core aim of benefitting the lives of Europeans. Throwing open the doors of our Prague home to the public gives us at the GSA the opportunity to meet with the beneficiaries of Galileo and EGNOS while giving end users the chance to learn more about the GSA and the benefits of Europe’s investment in space,” GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides said.

Galileo to the rescue!

Visitors also had for the first time the opportunity to become initiated in cryptography and decrypt messages, and learn more about Galileo security.It raised a huge interest amongst visitors.

"Search and rescue" feature of Galileo was also in focus, with visitors able to experience a live rescue in the snow-capped Alps with the help of Galileo and be rescued at sea, thanks to Galileo’s added accuracy.

A new addition to this year’s programme focused on the importance of EGNOS in precision agriculture, which is developing at an unprecedented pace with more than 85% of EU farmers now using EGNOS. A farming game gave visitors the chance to test for themselves how EGNOS is optimising tractor use on farms.

And this: MyGalileoApp: the results are in!

With Galileo expected to reach Full Operational Capability in less than 18 months the GSA is growing and, to help meet this demand the GSA’s HR department featured its very own stand at the Open Days to inform visitors about the Agency’s recruitment processes and future openings.

See you next year

In total, GSA staff delivered more than 15 workshops over the 2 days and answered thousands of questions from visitors. Visitors also met with this year’s special guest - Martin Rota, a Czech YouTuber passionate about science and space.

If you were lucky enough to attend this year’s Open Days, then we hope you had an enjoyable visit. If not – then we hope to see you next year, when we will present more success stories from Galileo and EGNOS. In the meantime remember - when close isn’t good enough…#Use Galileo!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GSA Open Days give the public the opportunity to see for themselves the benefits of EU investment in space

Excited and interested visitors @ GSA Open Days 2019

15.11.2019 10:23  
The GSA Open Days give the public the opportunity to see for themselves the benefits of EU investment in space
Published: 
15 November 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) threw open its doors for the 5th year in a row on 8-9 November to welcome visitors to the GSA Open Days 2019. With a wide range of activities targeted at the general public, this year’s event received nearly 2000 visitors from the Czech Republic and across Europe, including families with kids, young adults interested in science and technology, space enthusiasts and young professionals interested in technology and EU affairs.

The GSA Open Days give the public an opportunity to learn about and experience applications based on the EU space programmes Galileo and EGNOS. The theme of this year’s event was Accuracy Matters and the importance of accuracy for a wide range of applications was underlined in a series of seminars, quizzes and workshops in Czech and English held at various times throughout both days.

Landing a plane with EGNOS

Over 350 students from Czech schools and universities registered to attend the event, and this number was augmented by visitors from neighbouring schools who dropped by in the afternoon to take part in the many exciting activities on offer. These included the chance to be a pilot and land an airbus A350 using EGNOS. EGNOS is mainly used in aviation and offers tangible benefits to operators using European skies. By minimising the frequency of aborted landings EGNOS helps in reducing CO2 emissions, delays and noise pollution.

Read this: European Space Week: A taste of what to expect

“End users are at the centre of the European space programme, which was developed with the core aim of benefitting the lives of Europeans. Throwing open the doors of our Prague home to the public gives us at the GSA the opportunity to meet with the beneficiaries of Galileo and EGNOS while giving end users the chance to learn more about the GSA and the benefits of Europe’s investment in space,” GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides said.

Galileo to the rescue!

Visitors also had for the first time the opportunity to become initiated in cryptography, decrypt messages, and learn more about Galileo security. This section raised a lot of interest amongst visitors.

Galileo's Search and Rescue feature was also in focus, with visitors able to experience a live rescue in the snow-capped Alps with the help of Galileo and be rescued at sea, thanks to Galileo’s added accuracy.

A new addition to this year’s programme focused on the importance of EGNOS in precision agriculture, which is developing at an unprecedented pace with more than 85% of EU farmers now using EGNOS. A farming game gave visitors the chance to test for themselves how EGNOS is optimising tractor use on farms.

And this: MyGalileoApp: the results are in!

With Galileo expected to reach Full Operational Capability in less than 18 months the GSA is growing and, to help meet this demand the GSA’s HR department featured its very own stand at the Open Days to inform visitors about the Agency’s recruitment processes and future openings.

See you next year

In total, GSA staff delivered more than 15 workshops over the 2 days and answered thousands of questions from visitors. Visitors also met with this year’s special guest - Martin Rota, a Czech YouTuber passionate about science and space.

If you were lucky enough to attend this year’s Open Days, then we hope you had an enjoyable visit. If not – then we hope to see you next year, when we will present more success stories from Galileo and EGNOS. In the meantime remember - when close isn’t good enough…#Use Galileo!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GSA Open Days give the public the opportunity to see for themselves the benefits of EU investment in space

GSA Open Days 2019 gets over 2000 visitors

15.11.2019 10:23  
Published: 
15 November 2019

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) threw open its doors for the 5th year in a row on 8-9 November to welcome visitors to the GSA Open Days 2019. With a wide range of activities targeted at young people and adults, this year’s event received over 2000 visitors from the Czech Republic and across Europe, including families with kids, young adults interested in science and technology, space enthusiasts and young professionals interested in technology and EU affairs.

The GSA Open Days give the public an opportunity to learn about and experience applications based on the EU space programmes Galileo and EGNOS. The theme of this year’s event was Accuracy Matters and the importance of Galileo’s additional accuracy for a wide range of applications was underlined in a series of seminars, quizzes and workshops in Czech and English held at various times throughout both days.

Landing a plane with EGNOS

Over 350 students from Czech schools and universities registered to attend the event, and this number was augmented by visitors from neighbouring schools who dropped by in the afternoon to take part in the many exciting activities on offer. These included the chance to be a pilot and land an airbus A350 using EGNOS. EGNOS is mainly used in aviation and offers tangible benefits to operators using European skies. By minimising the frequency of aborted landings EGNOS helps in reducing CO2 emissions, delays and noise pollution.

Read this: European Space Week: A taste of what to expect

“End users are at the centre of the European space programme, which was developed with the core aim of benefitting the lives of Europeans. Throwing open the doors of our Prague home to the public gives us at the GSA the opportunity to meet with the beneficiaries of Galileo and EGNOS while giving end users the chance to learn more about the GSA and the benefits of Europe’s investment in space,” GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides said.

Galileo to the rescue!

Visitors also had the opportunity to build their own satellites, become initiated in cryptography and decrypt messages, and learn more about Galileo security. Search and rescue was also in focus, with visitors able to experience a live rescue in the snow-capped Alps with the help of Galileo and be rescued at sea, thanks to Galileo’s added accuracy.

A new addition to this year’s programme focused on the importance of EGNOS in precision agriculture, which is developing at an unprecedented pace with more than 85% of EU farmers now using EGNOS. A farming game gave visitors the chance to test for themselves how EGNOS is optimising tractor use on farms.

And this: MyGalileoApp: the results are in!

With Galileo expected to reach Full Operational Capability in less than 18 months the GSA is growing and, to help meet this demand the GSA’s HR department featured its very own stand at the Open Days to inform visitors about the Agency’s recruitment processes and future openings.

See you next year

In total, GSA staff delivered more than 15 workshops over the 2 days and answered thousands of questions from visitors. Visitors also met with this year’s special guest - Martin Rota, a Czech YouTuber passionate about science and space.

If you were lucky enough to attend this year’s Open Days, then we hope you had an enjoyable visit. If not – then we hope to see you next year, when we will present more success stories from Galileo and EGNOS. In the meantime remember - when close isn’t good enough…#Use Galileo!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

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