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zdroje zpráv:

Copernicus Demonstrators

21.4.2024 15:36   Copernicus Demonstrators Anonymous (not verified)
Ref. no.
EUSPA/OP/03/22
Type of available opportunity
Status of the opportunity

Copernicus Demonstrators

21.4.2024 15:36   Copernicus Demonstrators Anonymous (not verified)
Ref. no.
EUSPA/OP/03/22
Type of available opportunity
Status of the opportunity

Prior Information Notice - European GNSS Service Demonstrator (ESD)

20.4.2024 10:19   Prior Information Notice - European GNSS Service Demonstrator (ESD) Gaspard.FONTAINE
Status of the opportunity

Prior Information Notice - European GNSS Service Demonstrator (ESD)

20.4.2024 10:19   Prior Information Notice - European GNSS Service Demonstrator (ESD) Gaspard.FONTAINE
Status of the opportunity

Provision of Mobile Telephony Services to EUSPA

19.4.2024 10:16   Provision of Mobile Telephony Services to EUSPA Michela.MILANESE
Ref. no.
EUSPA/OP/24/23
Status of the opportunity

Provision of Mobile Telephony Services to EUSPA

19.4.2024 10:16   Provision of Mobile Telephony Services to EUSPA Michela.MILANESE
Ref. no.
EUSPA/OP/24/23
Status of the opportunity

Where are they now?

18.4.2024 16:09   Where are they now?

Leveraging the support they received via the CASSINI initiative, companies of all shapes and sizes have gone on to develop some very cool space-based solutions.

riesgju
Date
Image
light blue banner with European Union flag and text "CASSINI #EUSpace"
Through its hackathons, matchmaking, challenges and business accelerator, CASSINI has invested a significant amount of money into a lot of EU Space-based companies.

Leveraging the support they received via the CASSINI initiative, companies of all shapes and sizes have gone on to develop some very cool space-based solutions.

If you are a frequent flyer here at euspa.eu, you’ve probably read about CASSINI, the European Commission’s initiative geared to supporting entrepreneurs, start-ups and SMEs developing innovative applications and services that leverage the EU Space Programme.

Through its hackathons, matchmaking, challenges and business accelerator, CASSINI has provided financial support to almost 600 companies from all European Union countries.

But CASSINI’s impact doesn’t stop with the cash. 

Leveraging the support they received via the CASSINI initiative, these companies have gone on to develop some very cool space-based solutions.

Take for example Arkadia Space, a Spanish orbital propulsion company. Since its involvement in the 2022 and 2023 editions of the Cassini Matchmaking, the company has designed, developed and brought to market a cost-effective propulsion system based on green propellants. Most recently, Arkadia Space closed on a EUR 2.8 million seed round of funding – an investment it plans to put towards boosting its R&D efforts and conducting an in-orbit demonstration of its technology. 

Two other Matchmaking alumni, Orbital Matter and Dreamwaves, have also seen significant growth since their involvement with CASSINI. The former is developing an in-orbit 3D printing solution that will make manufacturing space infrastructure components faster and cheaper. The Polish start-up, which bills itself as a space-based construction company, finalised EUR 1 million in financing to demonstrate their solution in a microgravity environment and to invest in novel use cases for their technology.

Dreamwaves introduces cutting-edge technology for intuitive navigation using spatial audio. The approach enhances scalability and ease of deployment with a novel localization method. Leveraging spatial audio, the technology provides dynamic three-dimensional sound placement around the user, creating an immersive experience that adjusts to movements. The localization technique uses deep learning to correlate smartphone images with map data, improving AR experiences without extensive 3D mapping reliance. 

"We are immensely proud that our project has been honoured with the Seal of Excellence of the European Innovation Council recognising the high quality of our innovative idea but also validates the diligent research we have conducted and our ambitious vision for the future. The ongoing support from the EUSPA, ever since our first challenge back in 2020, has been crucial in achieving this success, demonstrating the pivotal role that these collaborations have played in our journey," declared Hugo Furtado, Dreamwaves CEO.

From challenges to hackathons 

On the CASSINI Challenges side of the equation there’s Artificial Brain, whose idea to optimise EO satellite scheduling using quantum computing took home the top prize in 2022 (when the contest was called the ‘myEUspace competition’). Last year the company, which now has offices in Europe, the US and India, earned a mention in the prestigious Nature India journal for its involvement with the precise placement of wind turbines. 

Another winner, QuSide, was awarded for their idea on combining quantum machine learning with Galileo and Copernicus data as a means of optimising connectivity and computing. The Barcelona-based company’s flagship Quantum Random Number Generation (QRNG) product is already making waves in the market, with the innovative cloud service having launched on Amazon Web Services.

And let’s not forget our latest CASSINI Hackathon winners, which includes Hiris Guider. The Cyprus-based startup developed a platform service for evaluating emergency evacuation plans and scenarios using Copernicus data on land cover, vegetation, moisture and forests, along with data about population density.

After winning the top prize in 2023, the company received six months of business mentorship, including from EUSPA’s team of market experts. Most recently Hiris Guider successfully tested its algorithms on a case study involving wildfires in Rhodes.

You can’t win if you don’t play

This is but a small sampling of a long list of companies that have benefited from the CASSINI initiative – a list that continues to expand. 

“Winning the CASSINI Challenges was transformative for our company, allowing us to refine our technology, expand our market reach, and open doors to new applications,” says Morten Fjord Pedersen, co-founder and CEO of ClearSky Vision, a start-up using deep learning algorithms to deliver cloud-free Sentinel-2 images. “10 out of 10, we would do it again.”

And so should you! 

But, as they say, you can’t win if you don’t play. So don’t delay, go here to learn about the latest opportunities being offered by the CASSINI initiative. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Where are they now?

18.4.2024 16:09   Where are they now?
Leveraging the support they received via the CASSINI initiative, companies of all shapes and sizes have gone on to develop some very cool space-based solutions.
riesgju
Date
Image
light blue banner with European Union flag and text
Through its hackathons, matchmaking, challenges and business accelerator, CASSINI has invested a significant amount of money into a lot of EU Space-based companies.

Leveraging the support they received via the CASSINI initiative, companies of all shapes and sizes have gone on to develop some very cool space-based solutions.

If you are a frequent flyer here at euspa.eu, you’ve probably read about CASSINI, the European Commission’s initiative geared to supporting entrepreneurs, start-ups and SMEs developing innovative applications and services that leverage the EU Space Programme.

Through its hackathons, matchmaking, challenges and business accelerator, CASSINI has provided financial support to almost 600 companies from all European Union countries.

But CASSINI’s impact doesn’t stop with the cash. 

Leveraging the support they received via the CASSINI initiative, these companies have gone on to develop some very cool space-based solutions.

Take for example Arkadia Space, a Spanish orbital propulsion company. Since its involvement in the 2022 and 2023 editions of the Cassini Matchmaking, the company has designed, developed and brought to market a cost-effective propulsion system based on green propellants. Most recently, Arkadia Space closed on a EUR 2.8 million seed round of funding – an investment it plans to put towards boosting its R&D efforts and conducting an in-orbit demonstration of its technology. 

Two other Matchmaking alumni, Orbital Matter and Dreamwaves, have also seen significant growth since their involvement with CASSINI. The former is developing an in-orbit 3D printing solution that will make manufacturing space infrastructure components faster and cheaper. The Polish start-up, which bills itself as a space-based construction company, finalised EUR 1 million in financing to demonstrate their solution in a microgravity environment and to invest in novel use cases for their technology.

Dreamwaves introduces cutting-edge technology for intuitive navigation using spatial audio. The approach enhances scalability and ease of deployment with a novel localization method. Leveraging spatial audio, the technology provides dynamic three-dimensional sound placement around the user, creating an immersive experience that adjusts to movements. The localization technique uses deep learning to correlate smartphone images with map data, improving AR experiences without extensive 3D mapping reliance. 

"We are immensely proud that our project has been honoured with the Seal of Excellence of the European Innovation Council recognising the high quality of our innovative idea but also validates the diligent research we have conducted and our ambitious vision for the future. The ongoing support from the EUSPA, ever since our first challenge back in 2020, has been crucial in achieving this success, demonstrating the pivotal role that these collaborations have played in our journey," declared Hugo Furtado, Dreamwaves CEO.

From challenges to hackathons 

On the CASSINI Challenges side of the equation there’s Artificial Brain, whose idea to optimise EO satellite scheduling using quantum computing took home the top prize in 2022 (when the contest was called the ‘myEUspace competition’). Last year the company, which now has offices in Europe, the US and India, earned a mention in the prestigious Nature India journal for its involvement with the precise placement of wind turbines. 

Another winner, QuSide, was awarded for their idea on combining quantum machine learning with Galileo and Copernicus data as a means of optimising connectivity and computing. The Barcelona-based company’s flagship Quantum Random Number Generation (QRNG) product is already making waves in the market, with the innovative cloud service having launched on Amazon Web Services.

And let’s not forget our latest CASSINI Hackathon winners, which includes Hiris Guider. The Cyprus-based startup developed a platform service for evaluating emergency evacuation plans and scenarios using Copernicus data on land cover, vegetation, moisture and forests, along with data about population density.

After winning the top prize in 2023, the company received six months of business mentorship, including from EUSPA’s team of market experts. Most recently Hiris Guider successfully tested its algorithms on a case study involving wildfires in Rhodes.

You can’t win if you don’t play

This is but a small sampling of a long list of companies that have benefited from the CASSINI initiative – a list that continues to expand. 

“Winning the CASSINI Challenges was transformative for our company, allowing us to refine our technology, expand our market reach, and open doors to new applications,” says Morten Fjord Pedersen, co-founder and CEO of ClearSky Vision, a start-up using deep learning algorithms to deliver cloud-free Sentinel-2 images. “10 out of 10, we would do it again.”

And so should you! 

But, as they say, you can’t win if you don’t play. So don’t delay, go here to learn about the latest opportunities being offered by the CASSINI initiative. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

 

Where are they now?

18.4.2024 16:09  
light blue banner with European Union flag and text "CASSINI #EUSpace"
Published: 
18 April 2024

If you are a frequent flyer here at euspa.eu, you’ve probably read about CASSINI, the European Commission’s initiative geared to supporting entrepreneurs, start-ups and SMEs developing innovative applications and services that leverage the EU Space Programme.

Through its hackathons, matchmaking, challenges and business accelerator, CASSINI has provided financial support to almost 600 companies from all European Union countries.

But CASSINI’s impact doesn’t stop with the cash. 

Leveraging the support they received via the CASSINI initiative, these companies have gone on to develop some very cool space-based solutions.

Take for example Arkadia Space, a Spanish orbital propulsion company. Since its involvement in the 2022 and 2023 editions of the Cassini Matchmaking, the company has designed, developed and brought to market a cost-effective propulsion system based on green propellants. Most recently, Arkadia Space closed on a EUR 2.8 million seed round of funding – an investment it plans to put towards boosting its R&D efforts and conducting an in-orbit demonstration of its technology. 

Two other Matchmaking alumni, Orbital Matter and Dreamwaves, have also seen significant growth since their involvement with CASSINI. The former is developing an in-orbit 3D printing solution that will make manufacturing space infrastructure components faster and cheaper. The Polish start-up, which bills itself as a space-based construction company, finalised EUR 1 million in financing to demonstrate their solution in a microgravity environment and to invest in novel use cases for their technology.

Dreamwaves introduces cutting-edge technology for intuitive navigation using spatial audio. The approach enhances scalability and ease of deployment with a novel localization method. Leveraging spatial audio, the technology provides dynamic three-dimensional sound placement around the user, creating an immersive experience that adjusts to movements. The localization technique uses deep learning to correlate smartphone images with map data, improving AR experiences without extensive 3D mapping reliance. 

"We are immensely proud that our project has been honoured with the Seal of Excellence of the European Innovation Council recognising the high quality of our innovative idea but also validates the diligent research we have conducted and our ambitious vision for the future. The ongoing support from the EUSPA, ever since our first challenge back in 2020, has been crucial in achieving this success, demonstrating the pivotal role that these collaborations have played in our journey," declared Hugo Furtado, Dreamwaves CEO.

From challenges to hackathons 

On the CASSINI Challenges side of the equation there’s Artificial Brain, whose idea to optimise EO satellite scheduling using quantum computing took home the top prize in 2022 (when the contest was called the ‘myEUspace competition’). Last year the company, which now has offices in Europe, the US and India, earned a mention in the prestigious Nature India journal for its involvement with the precise placement of wind turbines. 

Another winner, QuSide, was awarded for their idea on combining quantum machine learning with Galileo and Copernicus data as a means of optimising connectivity and computing. The Barcelona-based company’s flagship Quantum Random Number Generation (QRNG) product is already making waves in the market, with the innovative cloud service having launched on Amazon Web Services.

And let’s not forget our latest CASSINI Hackathon winners, which includes Hiris Guider. The Cyprus-based startup developed a platform service for evaluating emergency evacuation plans and scenarios using Copernicus data on land cover, vegetation, moisture and forests, along with data about population density.

After winning the top prize in 2023, the company received six months of business mentorship, including from EUSPA’s team of market experts. Most recently Hiris Guider successfully tested its algorithms on a case study involving wildfires in Rhodes.

You can’t win if you don’t play

This is but a small sampling of a long list of companies that have benefited from the CASSINI initiative – a list that continues to expand. 

“Winning the CASSINI Challenges was transformative for our company, allowing us to refine our technology, expand our market reach, and open doors to new applications,” says Morten Fjord Pedersen, co-founder and CEO of ClearSky Vision, a start-up using deep learning algorithms to deliver cloud-free Sentinel-2 images. “10 out of 10, we would do it again.”

And so should you! 

But, as they say, you can’t win if you don’t play. So don’t delay, go here to learn about the latest opportunities being offered by the CASSINI initiative. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Through its hackathons, matchmaking, challenges and business accelerator, CASSINI has invested a significant amount of money into a lot of space-based companies.

Where are they now?

18.4.2024 16:09  
light blue banner with European Union flag and text "CASSINI #EUSpace"
Published: 
18 April 2024

If you are a frequent flyer here at euspa.eu, you’ve probably read about CASSINI, the European Commission’s initiative geared to supporting entrepreneurs, start-ups and SMEs developing innovative applications and services that leverage the EU Space Programme.

Through its hackathons, matchmaking, challenges and business accelerator, CASSINI has provided financial support to almost 600 companies from all European Union countries.

But CASSINI’s impact doesn’t stop with the cash. 

Leveraging the support they received via the CASSINI initiative, these companies have gone on to develop some very cool space-based solutions.

Take for example Arkadia Space, a Spanish orbital propulsion company. Since its involvement in the 2022 and 2023 editions of the Cassini Matchmaking, the company has designed, developed and brought to market a cost-effective propulsion system based on green propellants. Most recently, Arkadia Space closed on a EUR 2.8 million seed round of funding – an investment it plans to put towards boosting its R&D efforts and conducting an in-orbit demonstration of its technology. 

Two other Matchmaking alumni, Orbital Matter and Dreamwaves, have also seen significant growth since their involvement with CASSINI. The former is developing an in-orbit 3D printing solution that will make manufacturing space infrastructure components faster and cheaper. The Polish start-up, which bills itself as a space-based construction company, finalised EUR 1 million in financing to demonstrate their solution in a microgravity environment and to invest in novel use cases for their technology.

Dreamwaves introduces cutting-edge technology for intuitive navigation using spatial audio. The approach enhances scalability and ease of deployment with a novel localization method. Leveraging spatial audio, the technology provides dynamic three-dimensional sound placement around the user, creating an immersive experience that adjusts to movements. The localization technique uses deep learning to correlate smartphone images with map data, improving AR experiences without extensive 3D mapping reliance. 

"We are immensely proud that our project has been honoured with the Seal of Excellence of the European Innovation Council recognising the high quality of our innovative idea but also validates the diligent research we have conducted and our ambitious vision for the future. The ongoing support from the EUSPA, ever since our first challenge back in 2020, has been crucial in achieving this success, demonstrating the pivotal role that these collaborations have played in our journey," declared Hugo Furtado, Dreamwaves CEO.

From challenges to hackathons 

On the CASSINI Challenges side of the equation there’s Artificial Brain, whose idea to optimise EO satellite scheduling using quantum computing took home the top prize in 2022 (when the contest was called the ‘myEUspace competition’). Last year the company, which now has offices in Europe, the US and India, earned a mention in the prestigious Nature India journal for its involvement with the precise placement of wind turbines. 

Another winner, QuSide, was awarded for their idea on combining quantum machine learning with Galileo and Copernicus data as a means of optimising connectivity and computing. The Barcelona-based company’s flagship Quantum Random Number Generation (QRNG) product is already making waves in the market, with the innovative cloud service having launched on Amazon Web Services.

And let’s not forget our latest CASSINI Hackathon winners, which includes Hiris Guider. The Cyprus-based startup developed a platform service for evaluating emergency evacuation plans and scenarios using Copernicus data on land cover, vegetation, moisture and forests, along with data about population density.

After winning the top prize in 2023, the company received six months of business mentorship, including from EUSPA’s team of market experts. Most recently Hiris Guider successfully tested its algorithms on a case study involving wildfires in Rhodes.

You can’t win if you don’t play

This is but a small sampling of a long list of companies that have benefited from the CASSINI initiative – a list that continues to expand. 

“Winning the CASSINI Challenges was transformative for our company, allowing us to refine our technology, expand our market reach, and open doors to new applications,” says Morten Fjord Pedersen, co-founder and CEO of ClearSky Vision, a start-up using deep learning algorithms to deliver cloud-free Sentinel-2 images. “10 out of 10, we would do it again.”

And so should you! 

But, as they say, you can’t win if you don’t play. So don’t delay, go here to learn about the latest opportunities being offered by the CASSINI initiative. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Through its hackathons, matchmaking, challenges and business accelerator, CASSINI has invested a significant amount of money into a lot of EU Space-based companies.

Where are they now?

18.4.2024 16:09  
light blue banner with European Union flag and text "CASSINI #EUSpace"
Published: 
17 April 2024

If you are a frequent flyer here at euspa.eu, you’ve probably read about CASSINI, the European Commission’s initiative geared to supporting entrepreneurs, start-ups and SMEs developing innovative applications and services that leverage the EU Space Programme.

Through its hackathons, matchmaking, challenges and business accelerator, CASSINI has provided financial support to almost 600 companies from all European Union countries.

But CASSINI’s impact doesn’t stop with the cash. 

Leveraging the support they received via the CASSINI initiative, these companies have gone on to develop some very cool space-based solutions.

Take for example Arkadia Space, a Spanish orbital propulsion company. Since its involvement in the 2022 and 2023 editions of the Cassini Matchmaking, the company has designed, developed and brought to market a cost-effective propulsion system based on green propellants. Most recently, Arkadia Space closed on a EUR 2.8 million seed round of funding – an investment it plans to put towards boosting its R&D efforts and conducting an in-orbit demonstration of its technology. 

Two other Matchmaking alumni, Orbital Matter and Dreamwaves, have also seen significant growth since their involvement with CASSINI. The former is developing an in-orbit 3D printing solution that will make manufacturing space infrastructure components faster and cheaper. The Polish start-up, which bills itself as a space-based construction company, finalised EUR 1 million in financing to demonstrate their solution in a microgravity environment and to invest in novel use cases for their technology.

Dreamwaves introduces cutting-edge technology for intuitive navigation using spatial audio. The approach enhances scalability and ease of deployment with a novel localization method. Leveraging spatial audio, the technology provides dynamic three-dimensional sound placement around the user, creating an immersive experience that adjusts to movements. The localization technique uses deep learning to correlate smartphone images with map data, improving AR experiences without extensive 3D mapping reliance. 

"We are immensely proud that our project has been honoured with the Seal of Excellence of the European Innovation Council recognising the high quality of our innovative idea but also validates the diligent research we have conducted and our ambitious vision for the future. The ongoing support from the EUSPA, ever since our first challenge back in 2020, has been crucial in achieving this success, demonstrating the pivotal role that these collaborations have played in our journey," declared Hugo Furtado, Dreamwaves CEO.

From challenges to hackathons 

On the CASSINI Challenges side of the equation there’s Artificial Brain, whose idea to optimise EO satellite scheduling using quantum computing took home the top prize in 2022 (when the contest was called the ‘myEUspace competition’). Last year the company, which now has offices in Europe, the US and India, earned a mention in the prestigious Nature India journal for its involvement with the precise placement of wind turbines. 

Another winner, QuSide, was awarded for their idea on combining quantum machine learning with Galileo and Copernicus data as a means of optimising connectivity and computing. The Barcelona-based company’s flagship Quantum Random Number Generation (QRNG) product is already making waves in the market, with the innovative cloud service having launched on Amazon Web Services.

And let’s not forget our latest CASSINI Hackathon winners, which includes Hiris Guider. The Cyprus-based startup developed a platform service for evaluating emergency evacuation plans and scenarios using Copernicus data on land cover, vegetation, moisture and forests, along with data about population density.

After winning the top prize in 2023, the company received six months of business mentorship, including from EUSPA’s team of market experts. Most recently Hiris Guider successfully tested its algorithms on a case study involving wildfires in Rhodes.

You can’t win if you don’t play

This is but a small sampling of a long list of companies that have benefited from the CASSINI initiative – a list that continues to expand. 

“Winning the CASSINI Challenges was transformative for our company, allowing us to refine our technology, expand our market reach, and open doors to new applications,” says Morten Fjord Pedersen, co-founder and CEO of ClearSky Vision, a start-up using deep learning algorithms to deliver cloud-free Sentinel-2 images. “10 out of 10, we would do it again.”

And so should you! 

But, as they say, you can’t win if you don’t play. So don’t delay, go here to learn about the latest opportunities being offered by the CASSINI initiative. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Through its hackathons, matchmaking, challenges and business accelerator, CASSINI has invested a significant amount of money into a lot of EU Space-based companies.

Where are they now?

18.4.2024 16:09   Where are they now?

Leveraging the support they received via the CASSINI initiative, companies of all shapes and sizes have gone on to develop some very cool space-based solutions.

riesgju
Date
Image
light blue banner with European Union flag and text
Through its hackathons, matchmaking, challenges and business accelerator, CASSINI has invested a significant amount of money into a lot of EU Space-based companies.

Leveraging the support they received via the CASSINI initiative, companies of all shapes and sizes have gone on to develop some very cool space-based solutions.

If you are a frequent flyer here at euspa.eu, you’ve probably read about CASSINI, the European Commission’s initiative geared to supporting entrepreneurs, start-ups and SMEs developing innovative applications and services that leverage the EU Space Programme.

Through its hackathons, matchmaking, challenges and business accelerator, CASSINI has provided financial support to almost 600 companies from all European Union countries.

But CASSINI’s impact doesn’t stop with the cash. 

Leveraging the support they received via the CASSINI initiative, these companies have gone on to develop some very cool space-based solutions.

Take for example Arkadia Space, a Spanish orbital propulsion company. Since its involvement in the 2022 and 2023 editions of the Cassini Matchmaking, the company has designed, developed and brought to market a cost-effective propulsion system based on green propellants. Most recently, Arkadia Space closed on a EUR 2.8 million seed round of funding – an investment it plans to put towards boosting its R&D efforts and conducting an in-orbit demonstration of its technology. 

Two other Matchmaking alumni, Orbital Matter and Dreamwaves, have also seen significant growth since their involvement with CASSINI. The former is developing an in-orbit 3D printing solution that will make manufacturing space infrastructure components faster and cheaper. The Polish start-up, which bills itself as a space-based construction company, finalised EUR 1 million in financing to demonstrate their solution in a microgravity environment and to invest in novel use cases for their technology.

Dreamwaves introduces cutting-edge technology for intuitive navigation using spatial audio. The approach enhances scalability and ease of deployment with a novel localization method. Leveraging spatial audio, the technology provides dynamic three-dimensional sound placement around the user, creating an immersive experience that adjusts to movements. The localization technique uses deep learning to correlate smartphone images with map data, improving AR experiences without extensive 3D mapping reliance. 

"We are immensely proud that our project has been honoured with the Seal of Excellence of the European Innovation Council recognising the high quality of our innovative idea but also validates the diligent research we have conducted and our ambitious vision for the future. The ongoing support from the EUSPA, ever since our first challenge back in 2020, has been crucial in achieving this success, demonstrating the pivotal role that these collaborations have played in our journey," declared Hugo Furtado, Dreamwaves CEO.

From challenges to hackathons 

On the CASSINI Challenges side of the equation there’s Artificial Brain, whose idea to optimise EO satellite scheduling using quantum computing took home the top prize in 2022 (when the contest was called the ‘myEUspace competition’). Last year the company, which now has offices in Europe, the US and India, earned a mention in the prestigious Nature India journal for its involvement with the precise placement of wind turbines. 

Another winner, QuSide, was awarded for their idea on combining quantum machine learning with Galileo and Copernicus data as a means of optimising connectivity and computing. The Barcelona-based company’s flagship Quantum Random Number Generation (QRNG) product is already making waves in the market, with the innovative cloud service having launched on Amazon Web Services.

And let’s not forget our latest CASSINI Hackathon winners, which includes Hiris Guider. The Cyprus-based startup developed a platform service for evaluating emergency evacuation plans and scenarios using Copernicus data on land cover, vegetation, moisture and forests, along with data about population density.

After winning the top prize in 2023, the company received six months of business mentorship, including from EUSPA’s team of market experts. Most recently Hiris Guider successfully tested its algorithms on a case study involving wildfires in Rhodes.

You can’t win if you don’t play

This is but a small sampling of a long list of companies that have benefited from the CASSINI initiative – a list that continues to expand. 

“Winning the CASSINI Challenges was transformative for our company, allowing us to refine our technology, expand our market reach, and open doors to new applications,” says Morten Fjord Pedersen, co-founder and CEO of ClearSky Vision, a start-up using deep learning algorithms to deliver cloud-free Sentinel-2 images. “10 out of 10, we would do it again.”

And so should you! 

But, as they say, you can’t win if you don’t play. So don’t delay, go here to learn about the latest opportunities being offered by the CASSINI initiative. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Provision of support services to the European Union Agency for the Space Programme and the European Commission

18.4.2024 10:22   Provision of support services to the European Union Agency for the Space Programme and the European Commission ilaria

Link to the procurement documents included in the Contract Notice.

An informative webinar took place on 15 March at 09:30 CET

Updated Deadline for submission of offers: 16.05.2024. 

Submission deadline
Ref. no.
EUSPA/OP/37/23 (EUSPA/PRG/2024/OP/0001)
Status of the opportunity

Provision of support services to the European Union Agency for the Space Programme and the European Commission

18.4.2024 10:22   Provision of support services to the European Union Agency for the Space Programme and the European Commission ilaria

Link to the procurement documents included in the Contract Notice.

An informative webinar took place on 15 March at 09:30 CET

Updated Deadline for submission of offers: 16.05.2024. 

Submission deadline
Ref. no.
EUSPA/OP/37/23 (EUSPA/PRG/2024/OP/0001)
Status of the opportunity

World Beacon Day – Galileo continues to help save lives

8.4.2024 12:24  
Radio beacon shown in a search and rescue operation
Published: 
08 April 2024

World Beacon Day or #406 day is a day to honour the search and rescue teams that are helping save thousands of lives every year. 406 Day marks the 6 April as a reference to the 406 MHz frequency of the beacons used by the SAR teams in their missions. These beacons are integrated into the COSPAS-SARSAT system and are helping to save 2,000 lives per year. 

What is COSPAS-SARSAT?

Galileo SAR system is integrated into the COSPAS-SARSAT programme - a satellite-based SAR distress alert detection and information distribution system. The system finds distress signals from radio beacons that comply with COSPAS-SARSAT specifications and standards and provides the information to search and rescue teams.

How does Galileo play a role?

Galileo has proven a valuable resource when it comes to these rescue missions. 

Thanks to the SAR transponder which seamlessly integrates into the satellite constellation, Galileo has revolutionised the detection and location process of distress beacons, significantly reducing response times and enhancing survival probabilities. 

By locating the 406 MHz signals transmitted from the beacons, the System pinpoints the distress position and timely expedites the location data to relevant authorities significantly augmenting the likelihood of survival for those in perilous situations.

Central to Galileo’s innovation is the Return Link Service (RLS), a ground-breaking feature that provides 406 users with a vital confirmation and reassurance that its distress transmission has been received within a remarkable 10-to-20-minute timeframe.

Galileo’s SAR technology has not only revolutionized SAR operations but has also become a beacon of hope for individuals facing emergencies in remote or hazardous environments. With each successful mission, Galileo reaffirms its status as an indispensable asset, transcending boundaries and saving lives with unparalleled efficiency. 

Galileo SAR Fully Operational Capability (FOC)

Galileo's Search and Rescue Service is set for a remarkable leap forward with the imminent declaration of its Full Operational Capability (FOC). This milestone promises to elevate safety and support in SAR operations, reaffirming Galileo's dedication to worldwide SAR endeavours. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Launched on December 2016, Galileo SAR service contributes live-saving efforts by swiftly relaying radio beacon distress signals to the relevant SAR crews.

EGNOS Safety-of-Life service offers increased resiliency against peak solar flares

5.4.2024 12:56  
black and white image of the sun producing solar flares
Published: 
04 April 2024

Have trouble telling your north from your south? You’re not alone. It turns out, the sun seems to get things mixed up too. 

That’s because every 11 or so years, the sun’s magnetic field flips, causing its north and south poles to switch places. This process is called the solar cycle, and we’re currently in the early stages of Solar Cycle 25.

Solar cycles are marked by a significant increase of activity on the sun’s surface. Sometimes this activity can result in solar flares, which are large eruptions that blast energy and material into space. 

When a flare reaches Earth, it can impact everything from radio communications to electricity grids. It can even cause issues with satellite signals, including the GNSS signals we use for location, positioning and timing services.

The good news is that there are services that can detect incoming solar flares. For example, on 23 March, the Space Weather Prediction Center, part of the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), issued a severe geomagnetic storm alert about the detection of a strong solar flare. 

When that solar flare hit on 24 March, it caused satellite anomalies and periods of GPS degradation. 

However, thanks to EGNOS, most of us probably didn’t even notice. 

EGNOS, Europe's regional satellite-based augmentation system (SBAS), helps improve the performance of GNSS systems like GPS and soon Galileo. It does this by using GNSS measurements taken by accurately located reference stations deployed across Europe. All measured GNSS errors are transferred to a central computing centre where differential corrections and integrity messages are calculated. These calculations are then broadcast over the covered area using geostationary satellites that serve as an augmentation, or overlay, to the original GNSS message.

As a result, EGNOS improves the accuracy and reliability of GNSS positioning information – even during such anomalies as a solar flare. In fact, during the 24 March solar flare event, EGNOS recorded good performance. EGNOS Safety-of-life Service performance dropped slightly in the far north of Finland and Norway, down to 98%. Users in the area were more likely to notice the aurora borealis lighting up the sky than any issue with their positioning information. 

Just as Solar Cycle 25 continues to ramp up, so too does EGNOS. The latest system upgrade offers increased resilience against peak solar activity, amongst other advanced functionalities.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

On 24 March a solar flare caused satellite anomalies and periods of GPS degradation. But, thanks to EGNOS, you probably didn’t even notice.

EGNOS offers increased resiliency against peak solar flares

5.4.2024 12:56  
black and white image of the sun producing solar flares
Published: 
05 April 2024

Have trouble telling your north from your south? You’re not alone. It turns out, the sun seems to get things mixed up too. 

That’s because every 11 or so years, the sun’s magnetic field flips, causing its north and south poles to switch places. This process is called the solar cycle, and we’re currently in the early stages of Solar Cycle 25.

Solar cycles are marked by a significant increase of activity on the sun’s surface. Sometimes this activity can result in solar flares, which are large eruptions that blast energy and material into space. 

When a flare reaches Earth, it can impact everything from radio communications to electricity grids. It can even cause issues with satellite signals, including the GNSS signals we use for location, positioning and timing services.

The good news is that there are services that can detect incoming solar flares. For example, on 23 March, the Space Weather Prediction Center, part of the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), issued a severe geomagnetic storm alert about the detection of a strong solar flare. 

When that solar flare hit on 24 March, it caused satellite anomalies and periods of GPS degradation. 

However, thanks to EGNOS, most of us probably didn’t even notice. 

EGNOS, Europe's regional satellite-based augmentation system (SBAS), helps improve the performance of GNSS systems like GPS and Galileo. It does this by using GNSS measurements taken by accurately located reference stations deployed across Europe. All measured GNSS errors are transferred to a central computing centre where differential corrections and integrity messages are calculated. These calculations are then broadcast over the covered area using geostationary satellites that serve as an augmentation, or overlay, to the original GNSS message.

As a result, EGNOS improves the accuracy and reliability of GNSS positioning information – even during such anomalies as a solar flare. In fact, during the 24 March solar flare event, EGNOS recorded good performance. EGNOS Safety-of-life Service performance dropped slightly in the far north of Finland and Norway, down to 98%. Users in the area were more likely to notice the aurora borealis lighting up the sky than any issue with their positioning information. 

Just as Solar Cycle 25 continues to ramp up, so too does EGNOS. The latest system upgrade offers increased resilience against peak solar activity, amongst other advanced functionalities.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

On 24 March a solar flare caused satellite anomalies and periods of GPS degradation. But, thanks to EGNOS, you probably didn’t even notice.

EUSPA funded research projects take flight

4.4.2024 14:14  
light blue/purple background with two round images showing a drone each
Published: 
04 April 2024

Innovative Air Mobility (IAM) is an air-based transport system that integrates new aircraft designs and technologies, including drones, Urban Air Mobility (UAM) concepts and eVTOLs, into today’s airspace operations. In doing so, it will revolutionise how we move people and goods while also making transport more efficient and effective. According to EASA, IAM is defined as “the safe, secure and sustainable air mobility of passengers and cargo enabled by new-generation technologies integrated into a multimodal transportation system”.

Through such funding initiatives as Horizon Europe and Fundamental Elements, EUSPA is supporting numerous research and development projects working within the IAM sector as well as aerial operations (e.g. surveillance, inspections, mapping, telecommunications networking, etc.). 

One of those initiatives is the DEGREE project. Funded under the Fundamental Elements mechanism, the project is developing a cutting-edge Galileo dual-frequency GNSS receiver. By leveraging the unique features of Galileo, the receiver will help Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) safely integrate into non-segregated airspace and into U-space, the EU’s UAS Traffic Management (UTM) system. 

The DEGREE receiver is unique in that it leverages the Galileo Open Service Navigation Message Authentication (OSNMA) service to detect certain types of spoofing attacks. 

“OSNMA stands as a formidable defence against the tampering and spoofing of navigation data, which is essential to the safe integration of UAS into the airspace,” explains DEGREE project manager Sergi Dueñas Pedrosa. 

While the OSNMA provides defence against some spoofing attacks, the project’s use of the Galileo High Accuracy Service (HAS) enhances the receiver’s ability to operate in situations where high positioning accuracy is required. 

According to Dueñas Pedrosa, the integration of Galileo’s OSNMA and HAS services into the GNSS receivers takes the operational capabilities of a UAS platform to a whole new level both within Europe and beyond. “These services not only provide navigation-level authentication and better accuracy, they also provide confidence and assurance that the navigation system integrated into a customer’s platform can handle the stringent requirements for such critical operations as emergency management or the transport of medical goods,” he says. 

Earlier this year, the project successfully conducted flight tests to validate the performance of its GNSS receiver.

Helping drones safely navigate low altitude airspace

Also working on the GNSS receiver front is the GEODESY project. The Fundamental Elements supported project has developed a multi-constellation, multi-frequency Galileo GNSS receiver that will help drones safely navigate the low altitude airspace that defines most urban areas. 

The receiver, which uses both the Galileo OSNMA and HAS, is designed to achieve robust navigation performance, as well as critical technical and operational requirements. 

The project also added integrity features into the navigation system. 

That system was recently tested on two drones, one fixed-wing and one rotary-wing, at the ATLAS experimental flight centre, during which the GNSS receiver was able to achieve such key operations as automatic take-offs and landings.     

Addressing IAM’s safety and security issues

Addressing the safety and security of IAM applications that rely on Position Navigation and Time (PNT) technologies powered by EGNSS is GAUSSIAN. The Horizon Europe funded project aims to demonstrate how combining the authenticated Galileo signals with integrated GNSS/INS platforms will result in greater robustness against spoofing attempts and the better continuity and availability of PNT data in constrained environments. 

“GAUSSIAN wants to mitigate some of the security risks and concerns that originate from the real needs of flight operators, and we want to do so by leveraging advances in existing PNT technologies,” explains GAUSSIAN project coordinator Daniele Stopponi.

The project also intends to use the Precise Point Positioning (PPP)-RTK corrections provided by the Galileo HAS to help improve PNT data accuracy. 

“Starting with existing concepts, prototypes and components developed by different companies, we are focused on creating new integrated and certified products for the rapidly evolving advanced air mobility market,” adds Stopponi.

Thanks to the work being done by GAUSSIAN, along with that of the DEGREE and GEODESY projects, IAM and aerial operations are on track to not only take off, but to do so in a way that will make air transport safer, quieter and more sustainable.  

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Three EUSPA supported projects help advance Innovative Air Mobility with Galileo services

EUSPA funded research projects take flight

4.4.2024 14:14  
light blue/purple background with two round images showing a drone each
Published: 
04 April 2024

Innovative Air Mobility (IAM) is an air-based transport system that integrates new aircraft designs and technologies, including drones, Urban Air Mobility (UAM) concepts and eVTOLs, into today’s airspace operations. In doing so, it will revolutionise how we move people and goods while also making transport more efficient and effective. According to EASA, IAM is defined as “the safe, secure and sustainable air mobility of passengers and cargo enabled by new-generation technologies integrated into a multimodal transportation system”.

Through such funding initiatives as Horizon Europe and Fundamental Elements, EUSPA is supporting numerous research and development projects working within the IAM sector as well as aerial operations (e.g. surveillance, inspections, mapping, telecommunications networking, etc.). 

One of those initiatives is the DEGREE project. Funded under the Fundamental Elements mechanism, the project is developing a cutting-edge Galileo dual-frequency GNSS receiver. By leveraging the unique features of Galileo, the receiver will help Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) safely integrate into non-segregated airspace and into U-space, the EU’s UAS Traffic Management (UTM) system. 

The DEGREE receiver is unique in that it leverages the Galileo Open Service Navigation Message Authentication (OSNMA) service to detect certain types of spoofing attacks. 

“OSNMA stands as a formidable defence against the tampering and spoofing of navigation data, which is essential to the safe integration of UAS into the airspace,” explains DEGREE project manager Sergi Dueñas Pedrosa. 

While the OSNMA provides defence against some spoofing attacks, the project’s use of the Galileo High Accuracy Service (HAS) enhances the receiver’s ability to operate in situations where high positioning accuracy is required. 

According to Dueñas Pedrosa, the integration of Galileo’s OSNMA and HAS services into the GNSS receivers takes the operational capabilities of a UAS platform to a whole new level both within Europe and beyond. “These services not only provide navigation-level authentication and better accuracy, they also provide confidence and assurance that the navigation system integrated into a customer’s platform can handle the stringent requirements for such critical operations as emergency management or the transport of medical goods,” he says. 

Earlier this year, the project successfully conducted flight tests to validate the performance of its GNSS receiver.

Helping drones safely navigate low altitude airspace

Also working on the GNSS receiver front is the GEODESY project. The Fundamental Elements supported project has developed a multi-constellation, multi-frequency Galileo GNSS receiver that will help drones safely navigate the low altitude airspace that defines most urban areas.

Learn how GEODESY supports drones achieving robuts navigation performances.

The receiver, which uses both the Galileo OSNMA and HAS, is designed to achieve robust navigation performance, as well as critical technical and operational requirements. 

The project also added integrity features into the navigation system. 

That system was recently tested on two drones, one fixed-wing and one rotary-wing, at the ATLAS experimental flight centre, during which the GNSS receiver was able to achieve such key operations as automatic take-offs and landings.     

Addressing IAM’s safety and security issues

Addressing the safety and security of IAM applications that rely on Position Navigation and Time (PNT) technologies powered by EGNSS is GAUSSIAN. The Horizon Europe funded project aims to demonstrate how combining the authenticated Galileo signals with integrated GNSS/INS platforms will result in greater robustness against spoofing attempts and the better continuity and availability of PNT data in constrained environments. 

“GAUSSIAN wants to mitigate some of the security risks and concerns that originate from the real needs of flight operators, and we want to do so by leveraging advances in existing PNT technologies,” explains GAUSSIAN project coordinator Daniele Stopponi.

The project also intends to use the Precise Point Positioning (PPP)-RTK corrections provided by the Galileo HAS to help improve PNT data accuracy. 

“Starting with existing concepts, prototypes and components developed by different companies, we are focused on creating new integrated and certified products for the rapidly evolving advanced air mobility market,” adds Stopponi.

Thanks to the work being done by GAUSSIAN, along with that of the DEGREE and GEODESY projects, IAM and aerial operations are on track to not only take off, but to do so in a way that will make air transport safer, quieter and more sustainable.  

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Three EUSPA supported projects help advance Innovative Air Mobility with Galileo services

Philippe Bertrand re-elected as Chair of the Security Accreditation Board of the EU Space Programme

26.3.2024 13:46  
Philippe Bertrand re-elected as Chair of the Security Accreditation Board of the EU Space Programme.
Published: 
25 March 2024

Representatives from EU Member States, representing 92% of the European population, re-elected Philippe Bertrand as the Chair of the Security Accreditation Board. Bertrand, who brings a wealth of experience in security and space, expressed his gratitude for the opportunity to continue serving in this crucial role. 

"I am deeply honoured to have been re-elected Chair of the EU Space Programme Security Accreditation Board and would like to thank all the EU Member States representatives for their trust," stated Bertrand.

The Security Accreditation Board (SAB), where C. Schanet remains SAB deputy Chair, plays a pivotal role as the security accreditation authority for the entire EU Space Programme and all its components: Copernicus, EGNOS, Galileo, GOVSATCOM, IRIS2, and SSA. In this capacity, it ensures that the security risks are known and that security measures are defined to reduce such risks to an acceptable level, given the security needs of the Union and its Member States. Within the SAB, Member States make accreditation decisions independently from the European Commission, EUSPA and ESA to approve satellite launches, the operations of systems and the services.

"At the SAB, the Member States rigorously assess independently the reality of security measures in place in particular with cyber audits and cyber penetration tests. In times of increased cyber security threats, the SAB helps the Programme in identifying when additional security measures are needed to develop user trust in the EU Space programme services." confirmed P. Bertrand.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Philippe Bertrand re-elected as Chair of the Security Accreditation Board of the EU Space Programme.

Philippe Bertrand re-elected as Chair of Security Accreditation Board of the EU Space Programme

26.3.2024 13:46  
Philippe Bertrand re-elected as Chair of Security Accreditation Board of the EU Space Programme.
Published: 
26 March 2024

Representatives from EU Member States, representing 92% of the European population, re-elected Philippe Bertrand as the Chair of the Security Accreditation Board. Bertrand, who brings a wealth of experience in security and space, expressed his gratitude for the opportunity to continue serving in this crucial role. 

"I am deeply honoured to have been re-elected Chair of the EU Space Programme Security Accreditation Board and would like to thank all the EU Member States representatives for their trust," stated Bertrand.

The Security Accreditation Board (SAB), where C. Schanet remains SAB deputy Chair, plays a pivotal role as the security accreditation authority for the entire EU Space Programme and all its components: Copernicus, EGNOS, Galileo, GOVSATCOM, IRIS2, and SSA. In this capacity, it ensures that the security risks are known and that security measures are defined to reduce such risks to an acceptable level, given the security needs of the Union and its Member States. Within the SAB, Member States make accreditation decisions independently from the European Commission, EUSPA and ESA to approve satellite launches, the operations of systems and the services.

"At the SAB, the Member States rigorously assess independently the reality of security measures in place in particular with cyber audits and cyber penetration tests. In times of increased cyber security threats, the SAB helps the Programme in identifying when additional security measures are needed to develop user trust in the EU Space programme services." confirmed P. Bertrand.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Philippe Bertrand re-elected as Chair of Security Accreditation Board of the EU Space Programme.

Evidence-based urban planning starts with EO

22.3.2024 17:00  
By leveraging the power of Earth Observation, the EUSPA-supported UDENE project is working to make cities safe, resilient and sustainable.
Published: 
25 March 2024

The world is becoming increasingly urban. Driven by climate change, inequalities and conflict, urbanisation is a phenomenon seen around the globe. However, it is particularly prominent in Europe and North Africa, where 70% and 78% of the respective populations live in cities.

The problem is that the bulk of this urban development, especially in emerging countries, happens without any real planning. As a result, liveability in cities tends to trend downwards. 

But Earth Observation (EO) data could offer a solution. 

According to the EUSPA-supported and Horizon Europe funded UDENE project, the EO data coming from Copernicus satellites and local sources has the potential to enable evidence-based decision making for urban development.   

To support the UN Sustainable Development Goal 11 of making cities safe, resilient and sustainable, the UDENE project is developing a platform that will provide scenario-based projections using Copernicus data complemented by remote sensing and local in-situ data. 

“The wealth of EO data in fast and accessible data cube format provides a great search space for exploring natural experiments and exploiting the value-add of causal analysis,” says Ali Türker, Digital Transformation Leader at WEglobal and UDENE project coordinator.

An EO-based approach to urban development 

The UDENE project brings together partners from France, Italy, Serbia, Slovenia, Tunisia and Turkey. Together, this international team will conduct such activities as data acquisition and partnership building – all of which will be facilitated by open Financial Support for Third Parties calls. 

All the project’s outcomes will be integrated into a virtual laboratory platform, which will match users to existing EO products, processes and services. “We want to provide a place where urban visionaries, planners and developers from our partner countries can use Copernicus derived data to test the specific impact of their ideas via natural experiments that occurred in another place and/or at another time,” explains Türker. 

The virtual lab will be validated via three use cases. In Istanbul, Turkey, a use case will focus on the impact high-rise building districts have on earthquake preparedness and/or damage and loss assessment. In Tunis, Tunisia, the project looks to classify local climate zones and involve citizens in the data collection process as part of a use case evaluating how green spaces can help reduce urban heat islands.  

Read more: Using Copernicus data to climate-proof cities

The third use case, set to take place in Novi Sad, Serbia, will leverage local traffic metrics to analyse the effects the construction of a ring road would have on congestion and air quality. 

“We are confident that our evidence-based approach to urban development – an approach that is powered by a vast amount of EO data – will complement existing Earth Observation products and services,” concludes Türker. “In doing so, UDENE will also expand European excellence in the use of EO technology for urban development applications that have both a high economic and societal impact.” 

Earth Observation: A powerful tool for effective urban planning 

Earth Observation is a particularly powerful tool for urban planning. According to the latest edition of EUSPA’s EO and GNSS Market Report, EO provides valuable information for monitoring informal dwellings and informing the progress and state of urban greening. 

Moreover, EO-based services provide essential information on air quality in urban environments, measuring particles that might affect the heath of citizens and monitoring greenhouse gas emissions. EO data also facilitates the assessment of an urban area’s vulnerability to a range of natural hazards and aids in the creation of resilient urban spaces that can withstand, or even minimise, the impact of natural disasters.

EO data further serves as a valuable source for detecting signs of urban decline, mapping the extent of destruction, and providing essential geospatial information for effective urban planning and development. When combined with GNSS data, it offers a comprehensive understanding of the urban landscape, empowering urban planners and stakeholders to make informed decisions and drive sustainable recovery and development.

  

The UDENE Mission

Objective 1: Structure local in-situ data on urban environments as data cubes and link them to existing Copernicus data cube federations to enable the fast exploration of impact evidence about potential urban development ideas across time and locations in EO data.

Objective 2: Jointly develop new and advanced sensitivity analysis algorithms to verify and operationalise multivariate causal effect models of the impact that an urban development option may have on economic outcomes that are relevant for cities (e.g., efficient water use, air pollution, heat load, energy consumption, earthquakes, mobility measures).

Objective 3: Build partnerships between the European space industry, SMEs, universities, research institutes, and GEO initiatives and non-EU (public/private) entities, with the shared goal of valorising existing EO-related technologies and promoting further investments. Leverage the urban development decision support system for this purpose.

  

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

By leveraging the power of Earth Observation, the EUSPA-supported UDENE project is working to make cities safe, resilient and sustainable.

Evidence-based urban planning starts with EO

22.3.2024 17:00  
By leveraging the power of Earth Observation, the EUSPA-supported UDENE project is working to make cities safe, resilient and sustainable.
Published: 
26 March 2024

The world is becoming increasingly urban. Driven by climate change, inequalities and conflict, urbanisation is a phenomenon seen around the globe. However, it is particularly prominent in Europe and North Africa, where 70% and 78% of the respective populations live in cities.

The problem is that the bulk of this urban development, especially in emerging countries, happens without any real planning. As a result, liveability in cities tends to trend downwards. 

But Earth Observation (EO) data could offer a solution. 

According to the EUSPA-supported and Horizon Europe funded UDENE project, the EO data coming from Copernicus satellites and local sources has the potential to enable evidence-based decision making for urban development.   

With the aim of supporting the UN Sustainable Development Goal 11 of making cities safe, resilient and sustainable, the UDENE project is developing a platform that will provide scenario-based projections using Copernicus data complemented by remote sensing and local in-situ data. 

“The wealth of EO data in fast and accessible data cube format provides a great search space for exploring natural experiments and exploiting the value-add of causal analysis,” says Ali Türker, Digital Transformation Leader at WEglobal and UDENE project coordinator.

An EO-based approach to urban development 

The UDENE project brings together partners from France, Italy, Serbia, Slovenia, Tunisia and Turkey. Together, this international team will conduct such activities as data acquisition and partnership building – all of which will be facilitated by open Financial Support for Third Parties calls. 

All the project’s outcomes will be integrated into a virtual laboratory platform, which will match users to existing EO products, processes and services. “We want to provide a place where urban visionaries, planners and developers from our partner countries can use Copernicus derived data to test the specific impact of their ideas via natural experiments that occurred in another place and/or at another time,” explains Türker. 

The virtual lab will be validated via three use cases. In Istanbul, Turkey, a use case will focus on the impact high-rise building districts have on earthquake preparedness and/or damage and loss assessment. In Tunis, Tunisia, the project looks to classify local climate zones and involve citizens in the data collection process as part of a use case evaluating how green spaces can help reduce urban heat islands.  

Read more: Using Copernicus data to climate-proof cities

The third use case, set to take place in Novi Sad, Serbia, will leverage local traffic metrics to analyse the effects the construction of a ring road would have on congestion and air quality. 

“We are confident that our evidence-based approach to urban development – an approach that is powered by a vast amount of EO data – will complement existing Earth Observation products and services,” concludes Türker. “In doing so, UDENE will also expand European excellence in the use of EO technology for urban development applications that have both a high economic and societal impact.” 

Earth Observation: A powerful tool for effective urban planning 

Earth Observation is a particularly powerful tool for urban planning. According to the latest edition of EUSPA’s EO and GNSS Market Report, EO provides valuable information for monitoring informal dwellings and informing the progress and state of urban greening. 

Moreover, EO-based services provide essential information on air quality in urban environments, measuring particles that might affect the heath of citizens and monitoring greenhouse gas emissions. EO data also facilitates the assessment of an urban area’s vulnerability to a range of natural hazards and aids in the creation of resilient urban spaces that can withstand, or even minimise, the impact of natural disasters.

EO data further serves as a valuable source for detecting signs of urban decline, mapping the extent of destruction, and providing essential geospatial information for effective urban planning and development. When combined with GNSS data, it offers a comprehensive understanding of the urban landscape, empowering urban planners and stakeholders to make informed decisions and drive sustainable recovery and development.

  

The UDENE Mission

Objective 1: Structure local in-situ data on urban environments as data cubes and link them to existing Copernicus data cube federations to enable the fast exploration of impact evidence about potential urban development ideas across time and locations in EO data.

Objective 2: Jointly develop new and advanced sensitivity analysis algorithms to verify and operationalise multivariate causal effect models of the impact that an urban development option may have on economic outcomes that are relevant for cities (e.g., efficient water use, air pollution, heat load, energy consumption, earthquakes, mobility measures).

Objective 3: Build partnerships between the European space industry, SMEs, universities, research institutes, and GEO initiatives and non-EU (public/private) entities, with the shared goal of valorising existing EO-related technologies and promoting further investments. Leverage the urban development decision support system for this purpose.

  

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

By leveraging the power of Earth Observation, the EUSPA-supported UDENE project is working to make cities safe, resilient and sustainable.

Copernicus takes centre stage in the EU’s fight against deforestation

21.3.2024 13:01  
Ardennes Forest, Belgium. Credit: European Union, Copernicus Sentinel-2 imagery
Published: 
21 March 2024

Forests are a resource that keep on giving. Not only do they provide shade on a hot sunny day, forests are also home to a wide range of flora and fauna. Furthermore, trees are a crucial raw material for a range of everyday products, including the packages made by the pulp and paper industry. And who of us hasn’t enjoyed a walk in the woods?

But today trees play another important role: that of climate ally. 

Capable of absorbing and storing vast amounts of CO2, forests are our secret weapon in the fight against climate change. According to some estimates, trees can remove up to 328 million tonnes of CO2 from atmosphere per year. This CO2 is then stored, with the Forest Information System for Europe calculating that, as of 2020, forests hold a total carbon stock of 92.1 gigatonnes.

Unfortunately, tree cover loss continues to accelerate – by as much as 4.7 million hectares a year! This is the result of human activity, climate change, forest fires, extreme weather events and disease. 

But all is not lost. By leveraging Earth Observation (EO) data, including that coming from the Copernicus programme, we have a real shot at protecting and even restoring our critical forests.

EO helps EU Forest Strategy ‘grow the sink’

The recent Copernicus for Forestry workshop co-organised by EUSPA and the European Commission put the spotlight how Earth Observation and Copernicus, benefits the forestry sector. “Earth Observation allows for the remote monitoring and health assessment of forest inventories, as well as the detection of such issues as deforestation,” said Fiammetta Diani, Head of the Market Development and Innovation department.

The event, which welcomed over 400 online attendees and featured 70 experts from both the public and private sectors, preceded the International Day of Forests, celebrated annually on 21 March. The workshop was also aligned with developments in such forestry-related regulations as the EU Forest Strategy for 2030, the EU Deforestation-Free Products Regulation and the proposed Forest Monitoring Law.

“With the goal of ‘growing the sink’, the EU Forest Strategy aims to improve the quantity and quality of Europe’s forests while also strengthening their protection, restoration and resilience – all of which will require information and data coming from Earth Observation,” explained Chiara Solimini, EUSPA. 

According to the latest edition of EUSPA’s EO and GNSS Market Report, the integration of EO data, coupled with Artificial Intelligence and advanced big data analytics and leveraging the capabilities of cloud computing, introduces objectivity and transparency to the evaluation of the strategy's effectiveness.

Earth Observation at the heart of the Deforestation-Free Products Regulation

The Deforestation-Free Products Regulation (EUDR) is a ground-breaking law aimed at combatting global deforestation. This regulation, which passed in 2023, establishes mandatory due diligence requirements for all operators and traders involved in the import, distribution or export of various commodities within the EU market, including soy, beef, palm oil, cocoa, coffee, rubber and timber, along with derived products such as furniture and printed paper. It requires anyone who place commodities on the EU market, or export from it, to demonstrate that the plot where the commodity was produced does not contribute to deforestation. 

One of the best ways of doing this is with Earth Observation. 

The Copernicus Land Monitoring Service (CLMS) and the new EU Observatory on deforestation and forest degradation are already developing EO-based tools for forest monitoring. Using Copernicus and the optical and radar instruments onboard Sentinel satellites, these tools can provide forestry stakeholders global data with a high acquisition frequency – all free of charge.

Private companies also play a critical role in monitoring deforestation and supporting operators and traders impacted by EUDR. During the workshop, companies such as Airbus, Satelligence, LiveEO and innovative start-ups including Orbify, Beetle for Tech and KERMAP, showcased their cutting-edge, end-to-end space-based solutions for detecting, mapping and monitoring deforestation. 

To enforce the EUDR, EU authorities will use company-provided information such as GNSS-enabled coordinates of land plots where commodities are produced, EO-based deforestation analysis or complementary data (e.g., geotagged photographs). They will also conduct thorough inspections utilising satellite monitoring tools and in-situ analysis, ensuring that the commodities in question do not originate from deforested areas.

“While the regulation does not specifically require the use of Copernicus, there is a huge potential for Member States to leverage Copernicus data and services to support activities related to the required checks on imported and exported commodities,” noted Solimini.

Proposed Forest Monitoring Law to mandate use of space data

Another topic of discussion was the proposed Forest Monitoring Law, which aims to plug existing gaps in the information on European forests. To do this, the proposal looks to create a comprehensive forest knowledge base that Member States, forest owners and forest managers can all use to improve their response to the growing pressures on forests and strengthen forest resilience.

But what makes the proposal really unique is that it is the first draft EU legislation that specifically mandates the use of space data for environmental monitoring. 

“This is yet another example of how EU Space is becoming a key enabling tool for forestry managers to efficiently execute forestry operations and for governmental bodies to monitor the environmental impact of forestry activities,” concluded Diani.

To learn more about how EU Space benefits the forestry sector, download your free copy of the new GNSS and EO Market Report

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Ardennes Forest, Belgium. Credit: European Union, Copernicus Sentinel-2 imagery

You have a space-based product. We have EUR 100 000

20.3.2024 14:40  
blue background banner with text: CASSINI Challenges Info Webinar 26 March 16:00 CET
Published: 
20 March 2024

The next deadline for the Cassini Challenges is less than a month away! So, if you have a space-based product that is either ready for commercialisation or already on the market, don’t delay – with a cash prize of EUR 100 000 on the table, it’s time to apply today.

The Cassini Challenges aim to support the development of innovative commercial solutions – such as mobile apps or hardware-based solutions – that leverage the data and services of the EU Space Programme.

To ensure your company has all the information it needs to make the ‘Submission of a Product’ track’s 19 April Deadline, EUSPA is organising an informational webinar. Scheduled for 26 March at 16:00 CET, the webinar will cover everything from how to apply to the way submissions will be evaluated. There will also be ample time for questions and answers.

More than just covering the details, the webinar will highlight the many ways you stand to benefit from the competition. That’s because the top five applicants not only receive EUR 100 000 each, you’ll also get the support of EUSPA’s team of Market Development experts and have access to our treasure trove of tools, market intelligence and publications

As if that alone wasn’t enough to send you searching for the ‘apply now’ button, then consider this: you’ll have direct access to a range of EU Space Programme services, including those provided by the EGNOS, Galileo, and Copernicus programmes. 

But don’t take our word for it. Here’s what a past winner has to say about how they benefited from the competition: 

“Winning the CASSINI Challenges product track has been transformative for us, significantly evolving our cloudless service and business model into a scalable subscription service. This accolade not only refined our technology but also expanded our market reach, opening doors to new applications. The competition offered us exposure, matchmaking opportunities, and funding, a powerful mix that's propelling our growth forward. 10/10, would do it again,” says Morten Fjord Pedersen, Co-founder & CEO of ClearSky Vision, who won the Product Track during the 2023 edition of the competition. The start-up uses deep learning algorithms to deliver cloud-free Sentinel-2 images, ensuring accurate and timely information for various applications.

Although the webinar is free, registration is required.

Time for the fine print

The Cassini Challenges is open to anyone from the EU27 plus Switzerland, Norway and Iceland. All submitted products must target one of the following innovation areas:

  • Next Generation Challenge: applicants are asked to leverage Galileo and Copernicus data to craft value adding solutions to improve the well-being, safety, security and connectivity of EU citizens.
  • Sustainable Future Challenge: participants are tasked with developing innovative solutions for the conservation of ecosystems, sustainable agriculture and management of energy and resources.
  • Emerging Technologies Challenge: innovators must develop disruptive solutions combining EU Space data with deep technologies such as Artificial Intelligence (AI), quantum technologies, blockchain, Extended Reality or the Metaverse.

All products and applications should have a TRL level of 8 or 9 and submissions must include a description of the typical use case of the product, the customer needs it addresses and the value proposition. 

The five winners will be announced during an awards ceremony in Prague, part of EUSPA’s annual Entrepreneurship Day.

More information on the CASSINI Challenges can be found here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

5 best ranked applicants will receive a prize of €100.000 each. The application shall present a product using EU Space data or signals, that is ready for commercialization or already in the market.

EUSPA launches new EGNOS Safety of Life Assisted Service for Maritime Users

8.3.2024 11:25  
banner with ESMAS documents showing a ship on the cover
Published: 
13 March 2024

EGNOS, Europe's regional satellite-based augmentation system (SBAS), is adding a new service to its repertoire: The EGNOS Safety of Life Assisted Service for Maritime Users (ESMAS). 

“Although GNSS is the primary means of obtaining positioning, navigation and timing information while at sea, these signals must be augmented using ground-based signals like DGNSS,” explains EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. “Designed to complement ground-based augmented signals, ESMAS adds another layer of protection against errors while also increasing the accuracy and ensuring the integrity of the GNSS signal.” 

DGNSS, short for Differential Global Navigation Satellite System, is an enhancement to GNSS that was developed to correct errors and inaccuracies in the GNSS system and thus allow for more accurate positioning information. 

“ESMAS takes this one step further, providing an augmentation solution even in areas where DGNSS services are unavailable, not deployed or are out of the maritime user’s range,” adds da Costa.

Because it does not require any additional infrastructure, ESMAS is well-positioned to support navigation in ocean and coastal waters, including harbour approaches and entrances. All that is needed to utilise the service is an SBAS-enabled GNSS receiver developed according to the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standards.  With such a receiver onboard, a vessel can navigate with increased accuracy and can receive alerts signalling errors on  GNSS with the objective to avoid unsafe situation. Furthermore, EGNOS interfaces NAVAREA coordinators, to timely provide Maritime Safety Information (MSI) - the navigational warnings and other urgent safety related messages - that could be broadcast to the ships using conventional channels.

Although the service targets merchant vessels, the ESMAS signal is available free of charge to all SOLAS-conforming vessels from EU Member States, Iceland, Norway and Switzerland. 

The ESMAS offers a service tailored to maritime users to enable marine navigation in harbour entrances, harbour approaches and coastal waters of the European Union Member States and EGNOS contributing countries (Iceland, Norway and Switzerland) in line with the IMO Resolution A.1046.

Expanding the EGNOS service portfolio

Used to improve the performance of global navigation satellite systems like Galileo and GPS, EGNOS provides several navigation services to the aviation, maritime, rail, surveying and agriculture sectors, along with a range of land-based users. 

The new ESMAS is in addition to the already available EGNOS Open Service, which is used by mass-market receivers and common user applications; the EGNOS Data Access Service (EDAS), which offers ground-based access to EGNOS data through the internet; and the Safety of Life Service (SoL), which is used for safety-critical aviation applications that require enhanced, guaranteed performance and an integrity warning system.   

Unlike these other EGNOS services, which are delivered by ESSP under a contract with EUSPA, ESMAS will be delivered directly by EUSPA.

An ESMAS webpage, contains real-time service performance, and information about the service’s historical performance, along with all relevant documentation (e.g., SDD, Service Notices, etc.). Users can also pose questions related to the service via the site’s helpdesk. For urgent issues, a 24/7 hotline is available.  

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

ESMAS is provided openly and is freely accessible without any direct charge.

Empower your EU Space journey with the enhanced EU Space Academy Learning Platform

5.3.2024 17:36  
Blue banner with a rocket cartoon and pink dialog box reading: Elevate your ideas!
Published: 
07 March 2024

Following successful sessions gathering over 600 registered users, the EU Space Academy Learning Platform is back – and it’s better than ever.

The free online training programme will continue to provide entrepreneurs, start-ups and SMEs with the tools and skills they need to build ground-breaking new apps and disruptive business solutions using the power of the EU Space Programme

But now this training comes with even more EU Space!

The revamped EU Space Academy Learning Platform covers the entire EU Space Programme, including EGNOS, Galileo, Copernicus, GOVSATCOM and Space Situational Awareness (SSA). We’ve also refreshed all our course materials and even added an entirely new course on EU Space for Security. 

Participants can now choose from 12 learning modules and 44 lessons. They are designed to serve as building blocks for turning your innovative idea into a successful space business. These not only cover such hot topics as enabling technologies, New Space and cybersecurity, they also cover the technical components of the EU Space Programme and such ‘nuts and bolts’ business skills as:

  • Customer support and sales
  • Building a successful team
  • Resource allocation
  • Business plans and models
  • Access to finance and funding
  • Investment readiness
  • Intellectual Property, copyrights and data policy

You can pick and choose which modules to follow and tailor your training to your own unique learning needs. All modules can be accessed online by using your own device – meaning you can complete them when and where you want. An online mobile app is currently being developed and should be available soon. The modules are taught by top academics, industry leaders and EUSPA experts, all of whom bring real-world experience to your learning journey. 

In addition to the training modules, the EU Space Academy Learning Platform also comes with ample opportunities for Q&A, one-on-one sessions, additional workshops, networking and matchmaking, personalised follow-ups and mentoring. Once you finish the training, you’ll receive an official certificate of completion from EUSPA.  

Ready to get started? Then head over here to enrol in the all-new EU Space Academy Learning Platform! 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The enhanced EU Space Academy Learning Platform provides the business and technical skills you need to build ground-breaking new apps and disruptive business solutions.

Empower your EU Space journey with the enhanced EU Space Academy Learning Platform

5.3.2024 17:36  
Blue banner with a rocket cartoon and pink dialog box reading: Elevate your ideas!
Published: 
07 March 2024

Following successful sessions gathering over 1100 registered users, the EU Space Academy Learning Platform is back – and it’s better than ever.

The free online training programme will continue to provide entrepreneurs, start-ups and SMEs with the tools and skills they need to build ground-breaking new apps and disruptive business solutions using the power of the EU Space Programme

But now this training comes with even more EU Space!

The revamped EU Space Academy Learning Platform covers the entire EU Space Programme, including EGNOS, Galileo, Copernicus, GOVSATCOM and Space Situational Awareness (SSA). We’ve also refreshed all our course materials and even added an entirely new course on EU Space for Security. 

Participants can now choose from 12 learning modules and 44 lessons. They are designed to serve as building blocks for turning your innovative idea into a successful space business. These not only cover such hot topics as enabling technologies, New Space and cybersecurity, they also cover the technical components of the EU Space Programme and such ‘nuts and bolts’ business skills as:

  • Customer support and sales
  • Building a successful team
  • Resource allocation
  • Business plans and models
  • Access to finance and funding
  • Investment readiness
  • Intellectual Property, copyrights and data policy

You can pick and choose which modules to follow and tailor your training to your own unique learning needs. All modules can be accessed online by using your own device – meaning you can complete them when and where you want. An online mobile app is currently being developed and should be available soon. The modules are taught by top academics, industry leaders and EUSPA experts, all of whom bring real-world experience to your learning journey. 

In addition to the training modules, the EU Space Academy Learning Platform also comes with ample opportunities for Q&A, one-on-one sessions, additional workshops, networking and matchmaking, personalised follow-ups and mentoring. Once you finish the training, you’ll receive an official certificate of completion from EUSPA.  

Ready to get started? Then head over here to enrol in the all-new EU Space Academy Learning Platform! 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The enhanced EU Space Academy Learning Platform provides the business and technical skills you need to build ground-breaking new apps and disruptive business solutions.

EUSPA Industry Day: Provision of support services to EUSPA and the European Commission

5.3.2024 9:27  
dark blue banner with white text announcing EUSPA Industry Day:  Provision of support services to EUSPA and the European Commission webinar
Published: 
05 March 2024

The European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) plays a pivotal role in implementing the EU Space Programme. EUSPA requires therefore robust support services to effectively execute its responsibilities and mission. 

Furthermore, as co-contracting authorities, EUSPA and the European Commission are jointly committed to leveraging these support services to drive innovation, enhance security, and promote the sustainable development of space-related initiatives within the European Union.

The total estimated value of the procedure, excluding VAT, is 297,418,000.00 EUR.

The time limit for receipt of tenders has been set out for Thursday, 25 April 2024 at 23:59 (Prague time)

The tender documents are available here

Precisely, the procedure is split into five distinctive lots, as follows, covering EUSPA’s and EC’s needs transversally, as well as covering all sites, EU space components and corporate activities: 

Lot 1 – Mission, Services Engineering and Uptake Support;

Lot 2 – Ground and Space Segments Engineering Support;

Lot 3 – Security- Cyber and Risk Analysis Support;

Lot 4 – Project Management & Quality Support;

Lot 5 – Operations and Service Provision and Management Support. 

The objective is to conclude two Multiple Framework Contracts per each lot in cascade. All lots are envisaged as interinstitutional contracts whereby EUSPA and EC will be co-contracting authorities. 

The tasks are meant to support contracting authorities in fulfilling their respective roles in the implementation of the EU Space Programme Components and for the execution of future tasks that may be entrusted in relation to other EU Space Programmes, such as the IRIS2.

To ensure broad participation in the call, a dedicated webinar on the call will be held on Friday, 15 March 2024 from 09:30 to 12:00 (Prague local time). This informative webinar aims to provide clarity, address questions, and encourage engagement from all interested parties. The participation is encouraged to ensure a transparent and inclusive process.

You can participate by following this link.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The dedicated webinar will address the relevant information about the open procedure to provide support services to EUSPA and the EC.

GOVSATCOM, the EU secure satcom service hub

27.2.2024 9:12  
Satellite antennas superposed by worldwide map interconnected
Published: 
27 February 2024

When disaster strikes, having ready access to communications services is critical to emergency response and mitigation efforts. But what happens when a disaster, such as an earthquake, causes terrestrial networks to collapse, effectively shutting down communications within the disaster area? Or when the crisis area is located in the sea and there are limited or non-existent terrestrial communications networks?

For this, there’s GOVSATCOM.

The European Union Governmental Satellite Communications (GOVSATCOM) programme, launched by the European Commission, aims to provide secure and cost-efficient communications capabilities to security and safety for critical missions and operations managed by the EU and its Member States, including national security actors and EU Agencies and institutions.

“GOVSATCOM is the EU’s tool for providing robust, secure and highly available satellite communications to governmental users,” says EUSPA GOVSATCOM programme manager Dr Georgios Synnefakis, who was a recent guest on Spacewatch Europe’s Space Café podcast.  

By pooling the services, capacities and resources of government and commercial satellite communications (SATCOM) providers, GOVSATCOM will serve as a one stop secure SatCom shop for authorised governmental users. “In this sense, the programme gives users access to the best-of-the-best of European satellite communication services,” explains Synnefakis.   

GOVSATCOM will also provide access to the EU’s IRIS2 programme. The new constellation is set to provide secure governmental communication services to the EU and its Member States, as well as broadband connectivity for European citizens and private companies.    

For fire brigades, police, military, coast guard and other authorised users, this pooling of services means they won’t need to find and book secure SatCom services directly from the service providers – a cumbersome and time-consuming process that can significantly delay emergency response efforts. Furthermore, by always having some SatCom services reserved for EU Member States, GOVSATCOM eliminates the risk of commercial services being unavailable. 

Read more: Unlocking the future with secure SatCom

“The programme is designed to make it easy – and fast – for users to review, select and use the services they need when and where they need them,” adds Synnefakis.  

Another key advantage, especially for those users unfamiliar with secure satellite communications, is that GOVSATCOM can help them select the right services for a specific need.

Linking secure SatCom suppliers to authorised government user needs

In line with its mission of linking space to user needs, EUSPA has played an instrumental role in surveying governmental users, understanding their secure SatCom needs, and defining a GOVSATCOM service provision scheme that meets those needs. 

With the programme now in the implementation phase, EUSPA is responsible for procuring the GOVSATCOM Hub, the programme’s secure operational ground segment. It is also responsible for the Hub’s operations and the coordination of the user-related aspects of the programme, all in close collaboration with the European Commission, the Member States and other involved entities. 

“The Hub is the heart of the GOVSATCOM ecosystem, linking the programme’s pool of SatCom services with authorised government users,” remarks Synnefakis. 

While GOVSATCOM’s users may be governments, its beneficiary is Europe. For instance, in addition to its use during natural disasters, natural and man made crisis, the service will play an important role in securing critical infrastructure like dams and air traffic control. It can also be used to support such governmental operations as border monitoring, especially in remote areas that lack terrestrial connectivity. 

“By helping governments mitigate – even prevent – disasters and other emergencies, GOVSATCOM ensures the safety, security and wellbeing of all EU citizens,” concludes Synnefakis. 

GOVSATCOM initial services are expected to be launched in 2024, with full operational capability to follow by 2027.   

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Pooling the services, capacities and resources of government and commercial providers, GOVSATCOM will serve as a one stop secure SatCom shop for authorised governmental users.

Everything begins with an idea

19.2.2024 9:55  
blue banner with the text: winners of the idea track
Published: 
19 February 2024

Nomadic herders, border control agents, urban planners and autonomous vehicles all leveraging the power of EU Space. This isn’t the plot for a science fiction thriller. These are some of the winning ideas from the CASSINI Challenges initiative.  

With a total prize purse of EUR 1 million, the Cassini Challenges aim to support the development of innovative commercial solutions – such as mobile apps or hardware-based solutions – that leverage EU Space data from EGNOS, Galileo and/or Copernicus

“Space data is at the heart of the technological revolution currently sweeping Europe,” says EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. “Entrepreneurs are particularly enthusiastic about embracing the potential offered by the EU Space Programme and translating it into the innovative solutions that will help answer some of society’s most pressing challenges.”

Open to anyone from the EU27 plus Switzerland, Norway and Iceland, applicants can participate with either an idea, a prototype or a product, depending on the maturity of a solution. Regardless of which track one participates in, all proposed solutions must target one of the following innovation areas:

  1. Next Generation Challenge: applicants are asked to leverage Galileo and Copernicus data to craft value adding solutions to improve the well-being, safety, security and connectivity of EU citizens.
  2. Sustainable Future Challenge: participants are tasked with developing innovative solutions for the conservation of ecosystems, sustainable agriculture and management of energy and resources.
  3. Emerging Technologies Challenge: innovators must develop disruptive solutions combining EU Space data with deep technologies such as Artificial Intelligence (AI), quantum technologies, blockchain, Extended Reality or the Metaverse.

And the winning ideas are…

The first track, which closed on 4 December, saw the submission of more than 100 innovative ideas from 21 countries. 

After careful consideration, the 15 winners of the Submission of an Idea Track are:

Next Generation

  • Circe-AIS (ES): a lightweight receiver for small recreational boats that uses security features from the Galileo OS-NMA to resist radio frequency interference.
  • Sterna (HR): using Copernicus, Galileo and EGNOS data to help border control agencies prevent illegal crossings.
  • AdaGeo (FR): a unique environmental monitoring and detection platform powered by the synergistic use of Galileo and Copernicus.
  • Monitoring and forecasting urbanisation (DE): harnessing space data to help policymakers better manage rapid urbanisation in low and middle-income countries.

Sustainable Future

  • Planetary Platform (DE): using EU Space data for nature-related risk assessments.
  • Caius Paskou (EL): enabling sustainable livestock grazing with Galileo and Copernicus.
  • Trrimber (DK): a space-enabled tool for sustainable forest management. 
  • Thermopolis (AT): supporting the EU’s Energy Performance of Buildings Directive with space- and ground-based imagery.
  • GAROTES (ES): combining Earth Observation imagery with GNSS positioning to improve coastline resilience models. 

Emerging Technologies 

  • Manteo (EL): a chat-based Earth Observation platform that democratizes planetary awareness.
  • Salutes Space (DE): an intelligent computer system for autonomous aerospace operations in-space and on-earth.
  • Bridging Space and Maritime (DE): leveraging AI, Machine Learning, and real-time data sources from Galileo and Copernicus to forecasts ship arrival times with exceptional precision.
  • QOOL (ES): taking advantage of Galileo and Copernicus data to deliver autonomous vehicle applications like collision avoidance. 
  • AID (SE): uses Copernicus data and services to give decision makers a visual web platform for detecting and predicting hazards in real-time.
  • GBAT (PL): a ground-based augmentation transceiver to improve positioning availability in areas with poor satellite visibility.

“Every era-defining technology starts as an idea and I am impressed by the innovativeness, the use of EU Space data and services, and the enormous potential exhibited by all our winning ideas,” adds da Costa. “I would like to personally congratulate the winners, along with everyone who submitted an idea during this track of the CASSINI Challenges.” 

Each winning idea, which you can read more about here, receives a cash prize of EUR 10 000. The cash could be used to further develop the idea into a prototype or product, which can then be submitted for consideration in another CASSINI Challenges track.

The deadline for the ‘Submission of a Product’ Track is 19 April. The five winners, each of whom will receive a cash prize of EUR 100 000, will be announced during an awards ceremony in Prague, part of EUSPA’s annual Entrepreneurship Day.

More information on the CASSINI Challenges can be found here.      

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The CASSINI Challenges first track – for Ideas – received 100 submissions from 21 countries.

Everything begins with an idea

19.2.2024 9:55  
blue banner with the text: winners of the idea track
Published: 
19 February 2024

Nomadic herders, border control agents, urban planners and autonomous vehicles all leveraging the power of EU Space. This isn’t the plot for a science fiction thriller. These are some of the winning ideas from the CASSINI Challenges initiative.  

With a total prize purse of EUR 1 million, the Cassini Challenges aim to support the development of innovative commercial solutions – such as mobile apps or hardware-based solutions – that leverage EU Space data from EGNOS, Galileo and/or Copernicus

“Space data is at the heart of the technological revolution currently sweeping Europe,” says EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. “Entrepreneurs are particularly enthusiastic about embracing the potential offered by the EU Space Programme and translating it into the innovative solutions that will help answer some of society’s most pressing challenges.”

Open to anyone from the EU27 plus Switzerland, Norway and Iceland, applicants can participate with either an idea, a prototype or a product, depending on the maturity of a solution. Regardless of which track one participates in, all proposed solutions must target one of the following innovation areas:

  1. Next Generation Challenge: applicants are asked to leverage Galileo and Copernicus data to craft value adding solutions to improve the well-being, safety, security and connectivity of EU citizens.
  2. Sustainable Future Challenge: participants are tasked with developing innovative solutions for the conservation of ecosystems, sustainable agriculture and management of energy and resources.
  3. Emerging Technologies Challenge: innovators must develop disruptive solutions combining EU Space data with deep technologies such as Artificial Intelligence (AI), quantum technologies, blockchain, Extended Reality or the Metaverse.

And the winning ideas are…

The first track, which closed on 4 December, saw the submission of more than 100 innovative ideas from 21 countries. 

After careful consideration, the 15 winners of the Submission of an Idea Track are:

Next Generation

  • Circe-AIS (ES): a lightweight receiver for small recreational boats that uses security features from the Galileo OS-NMA to resist radio frequency interference.
  • Sterna (HR): using Copernicus, Galileo and EGNOS data to help border control agencies prevent illegal crossings.
  • AdaGeo (FR): a unique environmental monitoring and detection platform powered by the synergistic use of Galileo and Copernicus.
  • Monitoring and forecasting urbanisation (DE): harnessing space data to help policymakers better manage rapid urbanisation in low and middle-income countries.

Sustainable Future

  • Planetary Platform (DE): using EU Space data for nature-related risk assessments.
  • Caius Paskou (EL): enabling sustainable livestock grazing with Galileo and Copernicus.
  • Trrimber (DK): a space-enabled tool for sustainable forest management. 
  • Thermopolis (AT): supporting the EU’s Energy Performance of Buildings Directive with space- and ground-based imagery.
  • GAROTES (ES): combining Earth Observation imagery with GNSS positioning to improve coastline resilience models. 

Emerging Technologies 

  • Manteo (EL): a chat-based Earth Observation platform that democratizes planetary awareness.
  • Salutes Space (DE): an intelligent computer system for autonomous aerospace operations in-space and on-earth.
  • Bridging Space and Maritime (DE): leveraging AI, Machine Learning, and real-time data sources from Galileo and Copernicus to forecasts ship arrival times with exceptional precision.
  • qool (DK): taking advantage of Galileo and Copernicus data to deliver autonomous vehicle applications like collision avoidance. 
  • AID (SE): uses Copernicus data and services to give decision makers a visual web platform for detecting and predicting hazards in real-time.
  • GBAT (PL): a ground-based augmentation transceiver to improve positioning availability in areas with poor satellite visibility.

“Every era-defining technology starts as an idea and I am impressed by the innovativeness, the use of EU Space data and services, and the enormous potential exhibited by all our winning ideas,” adds da Costa. “I would like to personally congratulate the winners, along with everyone who submitted an idea during this track of the CASSINI Challenges.” 

Each winning idea, which you can read more about here, receives a cash prize of EUR 10 000. The cash could be used to further develop the idea into a prototype or product, which can then be submitted for consideration in another CASSINI Challenges track.

The deadline for the ‘Submission of a Product’ Track is 19 April. The five winners, each of whom will receive a cash prize of EUR 100 000, will be announced during an awards ceremony in Prague, part of EUSPA’s annual Entrepreneurship Day.

More information on the CASSINI Challenges can be found here.      

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The CASSINI Challenges first track – for Ideas – received 100 submissions from 21 countries.

Strengthening EU Resilience: The Horizon Europe GEXTRECS project and secure SATCOM

14.2.2024 17:13  
GEXTRECS team at EUSPA headquarters in Prague
Published: 
15 February 2024

Protecting citizens and freedoms stands as a cornerstone of the European Union's strategic agenda for 2019-2024, with a priority to increase the EU's resilience against both natural and man-made disasters. At the heart of this effort lies the need for secure satellite communications (SATCOM), essential for implementing a common security policy and safeguarding EU autonomy and independence.

Secure SATCOM serves as a vital communication tool for covering large geographical areas and operating in remote or isolated sites. It also functions as an instrumental backup communication means when terrestrial networks face compromise or unreliability. Recognizing this, the European Union Governmental Satellite Communications (EU GOVSATCOM) Programme aims to furnish secure, guaranteed and cost-effective SATCOM services to eligible EU governmental users.

In this context, the Horizon Europe project GEXTRECS emerges aimed at defining and demonstrating an End-to-End GOVSATCOM Service supporting Extreme Events Crisis Management. GEXTRECS Kick Off Meeting took place at EUSPA Headquarters on February 8, 2024, with attendance of representatives of all project partners.

Over the course of 24 months, GEXTRECS endeavours to develop a solution that meets user needs and requirements for secure SATCOM, while also exploring synergies with other EU Space Programme components, notably Galileo and Copernicus, in emergency management. Two demonstrations are planned: one addressing a cross-border emergency scenario and another focused on maritime emergencies.

The project leverages the expertise of skilled user professionals in both land and maritime scenarios, engaging worldwide stakeholders from private and governmental entities involved in massive emergencies to prepare the solution for operational use. Among others, the consortium aims to create training materials and solicit end-user feedback through dedicated Key Performance Indicators assessed during the demonstrations.

Demonstrations will be coordinated from the On-Site Operations Coordination Centre hosted by the Training Base Weeze (TBW) located in Germany. From there, demonstrations of land and maritime use cases will be managed, coordinating with technical teams deployed onboard a vessel in Spain and on land near TBW.

The innovative GEXTRECS solution integrates several key components: 

  • A smart and continuous Dynamic Planner, which will enable dynamic SATCOM resources allocation in the most optimal manner, making use of advance heuristics;
  • A Network Balancer, which will enable the required interoperability ensuring that secure communications are preserved when using different communications networks; 
  • Copernicus based products and services (e.g. Emergency Management Service (CEMS),..)
  • Galileo services and differentiators, tailored to the selected use cases

The GEXTRECS consortium brings together expertise from four EU countries: Germany, Italy, Poland, and Spain. Partners possess extensive experience in addressing emergencies stemming from natural hazards such as fires, floods, and earthquakes, as well as challenges related to geographical situations.

Through collaborative efforts like GEXTRECS, the EU aims to enhance its resilience and responsiveness to crises, ensuring the safety and security of its citizens while reinforcing its position as a leader in satellite communication technology and emergency management.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

GEXTRECS will define and demonstrate an End-to-End GOVSATCOM Service supporting Crisis Management.

Enhancing critical infrastructure resilience: Galileo Timing Receivers standardization

13.2.2024 16:44  
black and blue banner with white text: workshop on standardisation of timing receivers
Published: 
14 February 2024

Accurate and secure timing information is essential for critical infrastructure in strategic networks such as the energy distribution grids, the telecom, or financial ones. These sectors, and all timing users, will benefit from the Galileo Timing Service and from the implementation of Standards in timing receivers.

On February 2nd, the Workshop on standardisation of Galileo Timing Receivers, jointly organized by EUSPA and the European Commission, with the support of the Joint Research Centre (JRC), convened a large number of stakeholders from various sectors crucial to critical infrastructure, including receiver manufacturers, telecom operators, timing laboratories, research institutions and BIPM. At the centre of this workshop was the presentation of the 1st Galileo Timing Receiver Standard, developed within CEN/CENELEC under the initiative of the European Commission. The Standard will play a pivotal role towards ensuring higher levels of timing accuracy and reliability to end users.

Key outcomes included reaffirming the necessity of timing receiver standards, previously identified by projects developed under Horizon 2020 and Fundamental Elements programmes. The Workshop was also the occasion to review the comprehensive set of requirements and needs for timing and synchronization, overseen by EUSPA as part of the User Consultation Platform process – and published through the Report on Time & Synchronisation User Needs and Requirements. Notably none of the existing requirements were challenged and they remained as per the current version. 

The active participation during the Q&A session, allowing attendees to delve deeper into the standard, particularly beneficial for those unfamiliar with the CEN/CENELEC process, demonstrated the strong interest in the workshop.

In summary, the workshop provided the opportunity to present and discuss the Standard for Galileo Timing Receivers, confirms its relevance for the community and validates the existing set of timing and synchronisation user needs and requirements.

For additional insights, you can find the presentations delivered here.

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The 1st Galileo Timing Receiver Standard was presented during a workshop co-organised by EUSPA and the European Commission.

112 and Galileo: Answering the call and saving lives

9.2.2024 14:55  
mobile phone showing 112 emergency number
Published: 
09 February 2024

With the European 112-emergency number, help is never more than a phone call away. The service, which is available free of charge from fixed and mobile phones everywhere in the EU, connects a caller to a Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP). A PSAP is a call centre where calls for first responders, including police, ambulance and fire brigade, are received and handled.  

While 112 has been answering the call – and saving lives – for over 30 years, thanks in part to EU Space, it’s also continually evolving to offer even better services. 

The EU Space Programme was conceived to benefit and protect EU citizens, and Galileo’s successful integration into the 112-emergency number does exactly that. 

As Europe celebrates 112 Day, let’s look at how the EU Space Programme is helping to enhance these lifesaving digits. 

Galileo signals for more accurate positioning 

Before we started to use GNSS for locating callers making an emergency call from their smartphones, when an emergency call was placed via a mobile phone, the caller’s location was established based on the coverage area of a cellular network tower. Unfortunately, the accuracy of that location information could vary anywhere from two to 10 kilometres. That’s a pretty big gap in which an emergency responder would need to find you! 

But today, GNSS, including Galileo, which helps fill this accuracy gap.  

In fact, the EU now requires that all smartphones placed in the European single market be compatible and interoperable with at least Galileo. The result is E112, a location-enhanced version of the 112-emergency service.

When a mobile phone is GNSS-enabled, including Galileo one, it can provide location information with an accuracy of down to just a few metres. This level of accuracy can have a major impact in terms of response times – and in emergency situations, every second counts.

Advanced Mobile Location (AML) uses GNSS information from the caller’s smartphone to accurately locate them. When a caller dials 112 from their smartphone, AML uses the phone’s integrated functionalities, deriving data from Galileo (and Wi-Fi) to accurately pinpoint the caller’s location. This information is then transmitted to a dedicated endpoint, usually a PSAP, which makes the caller’s location available to emergency responders, ensuring that help gets to where it needs to be even faster.  

Putting the power of Galileo into smartphones and emergency control rooms across Europe translates into even more lives being saved. 

Currently, more than 3 billion Galileo-enabled smartphones are in use worldwide. You can see if yours is one of them by visiting www.useGalileo.eu.    

eCall to the rescue 

While 112 has proven to be a lifesaving service, it only works if you call it. However, in a motor vehicle accident, a victim might not be able to reach their mobile phone or be physically capable of calling 112. 

In situations like these, there’s eCall.

The eCall service is automatically activated as soon as in-vehicle sensors detect a serious crash. Once activated, the system dials the 112-emergency number and establishes a telephone link to the appropriate emergency call centre.

Leveraging EGNSS (Galileo and EGNOS), the system sends the accurate position of the crashed vehicle and the direction of travel to the emergency services, enabling responders to get to the accident site faster. 

An eCall can also be triggered manually by pushing a button in the car, for example by a witness to a serious accident.

According to the European Commission, in some cases eCall can cut emergency response times in half, reducing the number of fatalities by 4% and the number of severe injuries by 6 – 10%. More so, thanks to improved accident management, it has the potential to help reduce congestion costs caused by traffic accidents.

All new car models sold in the EU are required to come with the Galileo-enabled 112-based eCall system already installed. 

“eCall is a true success story for Europe, one that leverages EU Space and specifically Galileo’s precise positioning to save lives – which is certainly something worth celebrating,” concludes da Costa.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Europe’s 112-emergency number has been answering the call – and saving lives – for over 30 years, as well as evolving to offer even better services.

Security Accreditation Board and EASA establish strategic collaboration to elevate oversight of EGNOS system and operations

1.2.2024 15:50  
Philippe Bertrand, EUSP SAB, and Luc Tytgat, EASA, signed a MoC that will reinforce EGNOS System and Operations
Published: 
01 February 2024

The EU Space Programme Security Accreditation Board (SAB) plays a critical role in ensuring the security of the components of the EU Space Programme, both in space and on the ground. As the responsibilities of the SAB expand with the increasing components of the EU Space Programme, it remains dedicated to independently assessing the security of the program, instilling confidence in users to utilize EU Space services.

The EU Space Programme Security Accreditation Board (SAB) and EASA (European Union Aviation Safety Agency) have entered into a non-binding Memorandum of Cooperation (MoC) effective as of January 23, 2024, aimed at fortifying collaborative efforts in ensuring effective oversight of the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service (EGNOS) System and Operations.

"The MoC formalizes our commitment to enhancing the security and safety of air navigation services within the European Union. By establishing a cooperation between the SAB accreditation authorities and the EASA certification authorities, we aim to strengthen the oversight of the EGNOS system, contributing to its seamless operation and ensuring its compliance with the security standards," says Philippe Bertrand, Chair of the EU Space Programme Security Accreditation Board.

A key cooperation for proactively addressing the security accreditation

The MoC outlines the creation of a coordination Board, comprising representatives from both EASA and the SAB. This Board aims to facilitate coordination on various aspects, including accreditation and certification decisions and regulatory frameworks.

Dedicated coordination meetings are also set at various EGNOS stages of the accreditation and certification process, to facilitate the exchange of planned activities and assessment of outcomes from accreditation and certification oversight efforts.

"The collaboration between EASA and EUSP SAB signifies a milestone in ensuring the safety and reliability of the EGNOS System. By establishing dedicated coordination mechanisms, we seek to optimize our efforts in overseeing the system's operations and promptly addressing any emerging challenges," comments Luc Tytgat, Acting Executive Director of EASA.

"This collaboration exemplifies the synergies possible and how proactive our Security Accreditation Board is. By establishing clear modalities of collaboration, we are better positioned to address the evolving security needs of air navigation services and enhance the overall reliability of the EGNOS system, " adds Bertrand.

This Memorandum of Cooperation stands as a testament to the commitment of EUSP SAB and EASA towards fostering collaborative endeavours for the benefit of air navigation services in the European Union. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Philippe Bertrand, EUSP SAB, and Luc Tytgat, EASA, signed a MoC that will reinforce EGNOS System and Operations

Space Surveillance and Tracking: a global challenge

31.1.2024 14:31  
EU SST is the European operational capability that safeguards the space assets of the EU, especially the satellites involved in the EU Space Programme, its Member States and other space operators.
Published: 
31 January 2024

Space is becoming increasingly congested. More than one million space debris objects larger than 1 cm are travelling uncontrolled in Earth’s orbit, putting at risk our space infrastructure and space-based applications critical for our daily lives, such as navigation, communication and Earth observation. It is likely that this risk will increase, as 20,000 new satellites are expected to be launched in the next ten years. To address this challenge, the European Union established in 2014 the EU Space Surveillance and Tracking capability: EU SST.

What is EU SST?

EU SST is part of the EU Space Programme’s Space Situational Awareness (SSA) component. It is the EU’s operational capability that safeguards space-based infrastructure, facilities and services, including spacecraft involved in Galileo, EGNOS, Copernicus and GOVSATCOM, as well as satellites from Member States and other space operators. The EU SST Partnership, composed of 15 EU Member States, has networked its assets to provide, in cooperation with EUSPA as the EU SST Front Desk, three SST services: Collision Avoidance, Re-entry Analysis and Fragmentation Analysis.

Protecting space assets from Europe and beyond

In 2023, EU SST opened its Collision Avoidance service worldwide to all spacecraft operators, as foreseen in the EU Space Regulation. Today, more than 400 satellites are protected by EU SST from the risk of collision with space debris or other spacecraft, and approximately 100 of them are from non-EU operators – such as from the United States, Norway and Switzerland - numbers which are expected to continue growing. The expansion of the EU SST user community significantly contributes to the long-term sustainability of outer space activities: the more space assets are protected, the better our space environment is safeguarded.

The importance of EU SST has proven to be crucial to ensure the safety and sustainability of space activities. In 2023, EU SST detected 15,639 close approaches between space objects, of which 1000 were considered of high risk - requiring in some cases collision avoidance manoeuvres performed by the satellite operators -, and monitored 127 re-entries of space objects into Earth’s atmosphere and 6 in-orbit fragmentations. 

The EU SST Front Desk delivered alerts, based on the information generated by national Operations Centres, to the registered users of the SST services.

The network of sensors from the Member States of EU SST, located across the globe, gathered last year more than 444,000 measurements of space objects per day, thus playing an essential role in the provision of services. These data are shared through a database, and analysed and processed by the Operations Centres to generate the EU SST services.

EUSPA, the EU SST Front Desk

EUSPA is responsible for the EU SST Front Desk operations since 1 July 2023. The Front Desk is the interface for the provision of the EU SST services to currently more than 190 organisations. It operates and maintains the SST Portal, manages service requests, provides support to users, and is responsible for user uptake, performance monitoring and communication activities. 

Looking ahead

In 2024, as the backbone of the EU’s approach to Space Traffic Management (STM), EU SST will work to improve the performance of its current services and develop new ones, enhance its core capabilities and develop new technologies, relying as much as possible on the European SSA commercial ecosystem. EUSPA, in its role as the EU SST Front Desk, will continue supporting a growing community of SST users, enhancing the SST Portal with new features, such as visualisation, coordination and communication tools, and contributing to the security monitoring of the EU SST system.

You can learn more about EU SST here or by reading its leaflet and factsheet.

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EU SST is the European operational capability that safeguards the space assets of the EU, especially the satellites involved in the EU Space Programme, its Member States and other space operators.

Galileo Emergency Warning Satellite Service is underway

24.1.2024 10:22  
With end-users always at the centre of its action, the EU Space Programme continues to evolve, offering services that contribute to the safety and well-being of European citizens.
Published: 
24 January 2024

Whether caused by nature or human activity, the on-going disasters in our continent highlight the necessity for innovative tools and solutions for resilient risk management and response. The objective is to safeguard lives and protect properties.

With end-users always at the centre of its action, the EU Space Programme continues to evolve, offering services that contribute to the safety and well-being of European citizens. One such service is the upcoming Galileo Emergency Warning Satellite Service (EWSS), currently under development and testing by the Directorate General for Defence Industry and Space, together with the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA).

So, what exactly is the Galileo Emergency Warning Satellite Service?

EWSS is an upcoming service of the Galileo constellation, which will be disseminating alert messages directly to the population of areas threatened by a looming natural or manmade disaster. More specifically, the Galileo satellites will be transmitting to smartphones, or to any other navigation devices able to receive Galileo signals (through a chipset), information related to the hazard (such as type of hazard, its severity, time of onset and expected duration, the targeted area) and instructions to follow depending on the area the user is located at. The alert content will be generated by national authorities and transmitted to Galileo for broadcast.

The real added value of EWSS

This service comes on top of existing alert systems but, as EWSS Manager at the European Commission, Eric Guyader explains, “for reaching the highest number of people in case of danger, the more alert systems the better. And this new service offers an important advantage: it remains available also when other alert systems like mobile networks are congested, disrupted or even destroyed”. 

EUSPA Galileo exploitation programme Manager, Guerric Pont confirms, “we continue to broaden the link between users and space, where EWSS will ensure the distribution of alert messages and guidance to safeguard populations, on top of best-of-class navigation data.”

This is particularly useful for people who live in remote and rural regions of Europe with poor or no mobile signal at all. It can also be proved lifesaving when traditional terrestrial alert systems are unavailable due to high traffic, or damage as is regularly the case with earthquakes, floods or fires for example.  

Preparing for the service declaration in 2025

While the service is expected to become operational in 2025, it has already been successfully tested in different sites across the Union. According to the latest tests carried out with several national civil protection agencies, the alert message can be transmitted and received by every user located in the danger area, in less than 60 seconds.

Once operational, it will be offered free of charge to national civil protection authorities across the EU27. It will be up to the EU Member States to decide whether they activate it to disseminate their alerts via the Galileo satellites in space. 

Together with the Copernicus Emergency Management Service, EWSS will become a strategic asset to support the policies of the European Union and its Member States in the field of disaster management.

Ahead of the declaration in 2025, the European Commission together with the EU Agency for the Space Programme published today the Common Alert Message Format Specifications document.

The technical document contains important information regarding the format of the alert message, to be used for encoding (resp. decoding) the alert information into (resp. from) the Galileo signals. The document is useful for EU MS to start implementing EWSS in their national alert systems, for receiver manufacturers to introduce the necessary functionalities in navigation devices, and for any satellite navigation systems willing to broadcast alert messages encapsulated in their satellite navigation signals.

For more information and technical details, click here.

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With end-users always at the centre of its action, the EU Space Programme continues to evolve, offering services that contribute to the safety and well-being of European citizens.

The new EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report is out, time to know more!

23.1.2024 10:04  
EUSPA releases the second edition of the "EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report," delving into practical applications and benefits of downstream space technology and revealing the growth trajectory for EO and GNSS technologies.
Published: 
23 January 2024

The report analyses evolving GNSS and EO markets, detailing how global trends and drivers shape the adoption of space-enabled applications. Utilizing the latest data and advanced forecasting models, the report estimates market evolution, including revenues for EO and GNSS, shipments, and the GNSS installed base, up to 2033.

In an era where innovative solutions are essential to progress, Earth Observation (EO) and Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) technologies emerge as linchpins for addressing societal challenges and boosting business processes. As of 2023, global revenues from GNSS and EO stood at approximately €260 billion and €3.4 billion, respectively. Projections for 2033 signal significant growth, with GNSS expected to reach €580 billion and EO nearly €6 billion.

To provide insight and guidance into these burgeoning markets, the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) proudly presents the second edition of the "EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report." This comprehensive study not only unravels the practical applications and benefits of downstream space technology but also offers analytical insights into the dynamic GNSS and EO markets.

The report categorizes applications into 15 market segments, addressing diverse stakeholders ranging from citizens and businesses to governments, industries, international organizations, NGOs, and researchers. These applications span key sectors such as Agriculture, Aviation and Drones, Climate, Environment, and Biodiversity, Consumer Solutions, Tourism and Health, Emergency Management and Humanitarian Aid, Energy and Raw Materials, Fisheries and Aquaculture, Forestry, Infrastructure, Insurance and Finance, Maritime and Inland Waterways, Rail, Road and Automotive, Space, Urban Development and Cultural Heritage.

Market Highlights and Trends, let’s summarise

Driving forces: The adoption of EO and GNSS technologies is bolstered by overarching market drivers, including the digital transition, climate change, population growth, energy demands, supply chain challenges, and the ascent of New Space entrepreneurship.

GNSS growth trajectory: GNSS market revenues, covering device and service sales, are poised to more than double from approximately €260 billion in 2023 to nearly €580 billion in 2033. Mass-market segments like Consumer Solutions, Tourism and Health, and Road and Automotive are set to dominate, catering to the vast majority of device shipments and installed base.

EO expansion: The EO market is projected to expand from €3.4 billion in 2023 to almost €6 billion by 2033. This growth is propelled by the imperative to enhance sustainability, improved services, and increased awareness of EO's potential applications. Segments like Insurance and Finance will notably contribute, alongside established domains like Climate, Environment, and Biodiversity, Agriculture, and Urban Development with Cultural Heritage.

“Considering today’s global context of rapid technological advancement, climate-related changes and ongoing geopolitical tensions […], this report underscores a pivotal insight. Amidst these challenges, Europe has the opportunity to harness the capabilities of EO and GNSS, fostering innovative solutions that positively impact society and play a role in shaping our collective future” concludes EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. 

The EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report serves as a beacon for those seeking to understand, integrate, and leverage Satellite Navigation and Earth Observation technologies, fostering a future where space solutions drive positive change.

You can download it here

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EUSPA releases the second edition of the "EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report," delving into practical applications and benefits of downstream space technology and revealing the growth trajectory for EO and GNSS technologies.

Have you met HAS?

22.1.2024 14:23  
Learn what sets the Galileo High Accuracy Service (HAS) apart from other GNSS augmentation services.
Published: 
22 January 2024

The Galileo High Accuracy Service (HAS) completes its first year in operations after its Initial Service Declaration in January 2023, providing good and stable performances since then. 

But what is the HAS?

Essentially, the Galileo HAS brings precise point positioning (PPP) options to capable receivers. More specifically, the service provides PPP corrections through the Galileo signal (E6-B) and by terrestrial means (internet) enabling decimetre level accurate user positioning. 

Galileo is the first GNSS constellation capable of providing a high accuracy service globally, 24/7 operated with committed performance and for free ” explains EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. “This is unique in that, typically, high accuracy services are either regional, provided for a fee or without a performance commitment.

In doing so, the HAS offers real-time improved user positioning performance down to a decimetre level (in normal conditions, when processed by user PPP algorithm). 

Galileo HAS offers several key differentiators

While other commercially available augmentation services also provide PPP corrections, the Galileo HAS comes with several key differentiators. First and foremost, the service is free of charge, with the signal being freely available over the internet via the Galileo (E6-B) signal. 

This means that if one or more Galileo satellites are in view and the user has a suitable receiver, the signals can be obtained without requiring a further license or a special signal receive.  

Therefore, the corrections are transmitted from the Galileo satellite and not a geostationary communication satellite, it is much easier to receive the corrections in areas like urban canyons. 

It should also be noted that, in addition to Galileo corrections, the Galileo HAS transmits GPS related corrections.

Convergence time and accuracy 

The Galileo HAS Full Service will provide two service levels:

  • Service Level 1 (SL1):  With global coverage availability, SL1 provides high accuracy corrections (orbits, clocks) and biases (code, phase) for Galileo E1/E5b/E5a/E6 and E5AltBOC and GPS L1/L5/L2C signals. This SL1 is already enabled by the HAS Initial service (with slightly reduced scope) 
  • Service Level 2 (SL2): with regional coverage availability over the European Coverage Area (ECA), SL2 will provide SL1 corrections plus atmospheric (at least ionospheric) corrections and potential additional biases as part of the HAS Full service

While SL1 will have a typical convergence time of less than 300 seconds, SL2’s convergence time will be lower than 100 seconds. 

The user positioning accuracy for both service levels, once the full service is operational, is stated as less than 20cm horizontally and less than 40cm vertically (95% confidence level), whereas the current HAS Initial Service Performance, already close to these targets, is described in detail in the corresponding Service Definition Document.  

Targeted markets include autonomous driving

This convergence time and accuracy level will make the Galileo HAS particularly useful for autonomous driving applications, providing a much more accurate position and – even more importantly – more stable correction signal. 

Other target markets for the Galileo HAS include geomatics, agriculture, aviation, road, consumer solutions, rail, maritime, inland waterways and space applications.

 “High accuracy is primarily used in professional applications such as surveying, precision agriculture and civil engineering, amongst others,” concludes da Costa. “However, new and emerging applications, including autonomous driving, unmanned vehicles, robotics and a range of location-based services will all demand high accuracy – and the Galileo HAS is set to deliver.”

In conclusion, in its first year, the Galileo High Accuracy Service (HAS) has revolutionized global positioning, offering decimeter-level accuracy for free. Evolving towards faster convergence times and supporting applications ranging from autonomous driving to precision agriculture, the Galileo HAS is set to redefine high-precision GNSS services on a global scale.

You can learn more about the Galileo HAS here

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Learn what sets the Galileo High Accuracy Service (HAS) apart from other GNSS augmentation services.

Unlocking the future with secure SATCOM

18.1.2024 9:47  
On the heels of its new Secure SATCOM Market and User Technology Report, EUSPA recently held a webinar covering everything from market opportunities to the latest technological trends.
Published: 
18 January 2024

The EU needs autonomous, secure, resilient and high-speed, space-based connectivity to satisfy the requirements of its institutions, bodies, agencies and Member States. 

Answering that need is secure SATCOM.

That was one of the key takeaways from a recent EUSPA webinar on secure SATCOM in the Union. Entitled ‘Secure SATCOM in the EU – A Comprehensive Overview’ and with a focus on market opportunities and technological trends, the 12 December webinar was geared towards those small businesses and enterprises looking to leverage this strategic and fast-growing sector.

Market opportunities and technological trends

Citing its recently published Secure SATCOM Market and User Technology Report, which has already recorded over 6,000 downloads, EUSPA noted that user demand for fixed satellite services (FSS) in the EU will increase by a factor of 14 between 2025 and 2040, reaching around 186 Gbps by 2040. 

Presenters also highlighted how the Key Infrastructure category is set to generate the highest level of demand, representing around 50% of total capacity demand by 2040. The two largest use cases within this segment are Institutional Communications and Other Critical Infrastructures.

User demand for secure SATCOM from mobile satellite services (MSS), on the other hand, is expected to increase from around 1.2 Gbps (2025) to 3.9 Gbps (2040), with the majority coming from the maritime surveillance use case.

Looking ahead, EUSPA noted that new digital technologies, along with new market players, will impact both the demand for and use of secure SATCOM services. The Agency also presented examples of how such dynamics could impact the way these services are utilised within various use cases.   

Secure SATCOM within the EU Space Programme

The webinar included an in-depth overview of the secure SATCOM components of the EU Space Programme. These include GOVSATCOM, which aims to provide secure and cost-efficient communications capabilities to security and safety-critical missions and operations, along with the recently launched IRIS² initiative. That programme will offer secure, reliable and cost-effective satellite communication services for authorised government users and facilitate commercial services.

Be part of our emerging end-user network focusing on secure satellite communications! 

As to GOVSATCOM, EUSPA has been entrusted with several preparatory activities, including the establishment, growth, coordination and management of the network of future EU secure Satellite Communication users. The network, coordinated by EUSPA and managed by the EUSPA-led ENTRUSTED project, aims to compile and understand user needs and define a detailed roadmap for developing innovative user technology. It is the continuation of the previously established network of users in the ENTRUSTED project.

According to the EUSPA Market Downstream and Innovation representative, this new network of users will have access to a wide range of opportunities, from sharing experiences to discussing and assessing innovative use cases and requirements and identifying challenges and opportunities for the use of secure SATCOM. The network also plans to launch pilot activities and hold workshops and training opportunities. 

If you're interested, send an email to join the new network at ENTRUSTED@euspa.europa.eu. It is open for all end-users.

Synergies and funding opportunities 

The webinar closed with a brief overview of the synergies that exist across the EU Space Programme which, in addition to SATCOM (GOVSATCOM and in the future IRIS2), includes GNSS (Galileo, EGNOS) and Earth Observation (Copernicus).

EUSPA also announced several funding opportunities, including GOVSATCOM specific HORIZON Europe calls.   

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

On the heels of its new Secure SATCOM Market and User Technology Report, EUSPA recently held a webinar covering everything from market opportunities to the latest technological trends.

Challenge accepted

16.1.2024 14:41  
The Cassini Challenge is looking for innovative, space-based solutions and ideas ready to help solve some of today’s most pressing issues.
Published: 
16 January 2024

Think you have what it takes to solve some of today’s most pressing issues using EU Space? If your answer is an unequivocal ‘challenge accepted’, then the CASSINI Challenges are open for your prototypes and/or products. 

The CASSINI Challenges aim to support the development of innovative commercial solutions – such as mobile apps or hardware-based solutions – that leverage EU Space data from Galileo and/or Copernicus

Prototypes and products wanted

If the Idea Track is now closed with more than 100 proposals received, we are now looking for prototypes and products. 

You can submit till 9 February your prototype under the "Submission of a Prototype" track. The application should showcase a tested solution in a relevant environment, detailing its typical use case, addressing customer needs, and highlighting the value proposition. The targeted Technology Readiness Level (TRL) for applications in this track is TRL4-TRL7.

For the Product Track, submission is expected on 19 April. More details can be found here

Still EUR 800 thousand in prize money on the table!

Choose your challenge!

One of the three thematic challenges have to be addressed when proposing your prototype or your product: 

  1. Next Generation Challenge: applicants are asked to leverage Galileo and Copernicus data to craft value adding solutions to improve the well-being, safety, security and connectivity of EU citizens.
  2. Sustainable Future Challenge: participants are tasked with developing innovative solutions for the conservation of ecosystems, sustainable agriculture and management of energy and resources.
  3. Emerging Technologies Challenge: innovators must develop disruptive solutions combining EU Space data with deep technologies such as Artificial Intelligence (AI), Quantum technologies (quantum computing, sensing, simulation, encryption, etc.), Blockchain technology and Extended Reality or the Metaverse (Augmented Reality (AR), Mixed Reality (MR), Virtual Reality (VR).

EUSPA’s got your back 

For those ready to accept the challenge, you can find all the information you need – including the contest timeline, criteria, rules and application process – here

If you’re still on the fence about applying, know this: throughout the entire competition, you’ll have the full support of EUSPA’s team of Market Development experts, who will offer advice and guidance to participants. You can also attend the webinar planned on January 23rd

If that’s not enough to send you searching for the ‘apply now’ button, you’ll also have access to our treasure trove of tools, market intelligence and publications, including such titles as the EO and GNSS Market Report, GNSS User Technology Report, EU Space for Green Transformation and the GNSS Investment Reportamongst others

Say it with us: ‘Challenge accepted’

Think you have what it takes to be the next SeaCras or Orioos

Not only did these two past winners go on to become successful companies, today they’re making a real impact on society – all while using the data and services coming from EU Space. 

Accept the CASSINI Challenge and apply today

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The Cassini Challenge is looking for innovative, space-based solutions and ideas ready to help solve some of today’s most pressing issues.

Belgium takes over the Presidency of the Council of the European Union for the next 6 months

10.1.2024 10:25  
By fostering the development of an innovative, competitive and independent space sector, EU Space is set to contribute to each of the priorities set by the Belgian Presidency of the Council of the European Union.
Published: 
10 January 2024

The theme of the Belgian Presidency of the Council of the European Union is ‘Protect, Strengthen, Prepare’. 

“The vision of the Belgian Presidency is intended to be holistic, focusing on protecting people and the achievements of the EU, strengthening its economy, structures and capabilities, and proactively preparing for future challenges,” says Prime Minister of Belgium Alexander De Croo.

The Council presidency rotates among the EU Member States every six months. During this time, the presidency chairs meetings at every level in the Council, helping ensure the continuity of the EU’s work in the Council. 

Those priorities include everything from defending democracy to strengthening EU competitiveness, pursuing the green transition, protecting people, supporting Europe’s health agenda and promoting a global Europe – six priorities that will all benefit from the EU Space Programme

“By fostering the development of an innovative, competitive, secure and independent space sector, the EU Space Programme is set to contribute to each of the priorities set by the Belgian Presidency – all while reinforcing the EU’s autonomy, resilience and democratic principles,” adds EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa.

Priority 1: Defending the rule of law, democracy and unity 

Defending the principles of democracy, the rule of law and fundamental rights will be an essential element in the Belgian Presidency’s work – work that will involve, amongst other aspects, exploring the links between culture, heritage and European identity.

EU Space can play a key role in protecting the unique cultural heritage and rich history that defines what it means to be European. For example, archaeologists use the precise positioning provided by GNSS to quickly survey a field site and accurately map the location of any uncovered artefacts. They can also use the Earth Observation data provided by Copernicus to monitor artefacts, prevent damage to monuments and adopt effective conservation measures.

Priority 2: Strengthening EU competitiveness 

The Belgian Presidency is also prioritising the role of research, development and innovation in developing and commercialising tailored solutions that boost EU resilience and competitiveness – a priority that is right up EUSPA’s alley. 

That’s because the Agency offers a wide range of funding opportunities, including the very successful Horizon Europe Calls, Fundamental Elements R&D funding mechanism and CASSINI activities, all of which are geared towards supporting research and innovation. In addition to cash prizes, many of these initiatives come with additional perks like mentoring, business support and incubation. 

Priority 3: Pursuing a green and just transition

In line with the Green Deal, the Belgian Presidency will place the green transition at the heart of its priorities.

While EU Space and the data and services it provides are important assets to supporting the implementation of the Green Deal, the EU Space Programme is particularly well-positioned to help companies take a deep look at their internal operations and supply chains to identify opportunities for reducing their own environmental footprints. For example, Copernicus, Galileo and EGNOS supply the information companies need to monitor environmental indicators, reduce their environmental impact, comply with relevant policies and regulations, become more sustainable and drive the green transition.

Priority 4: Reinforcing Europe’s social and health agenda

As the Belgian Presidency looks to support the evaluation of the EU’s crisis preparedness, strengthen the security of medicines supply and develop a strategy to boost the EU’s health and care workforce, it can turn to Copernicus for help. 

The Copernicus Health Hub, which was launched last year, is an innovative tool designed to help the health sector better leverage all the Earth Observation data, information, products and services available to them. Having access to such information could play a key role in preventing future pandemics, mapping diseases, addressing air pollution and monitoring allergens. 

Priority 5: Protecting people and borders

It’s not only the Belgian Presidency that is looking towards Europe’s borders, EU Space is too. For instance, GOVSATCOM, Europe’s Governmental Satellite Communications programme, will allow the EU to enhance surveillance, including border and maritime surveillance and the surveillance of illegal trafficking. 

The Copernicus service for security applications also plays a border surveillance role. Its main objectives are to reduce the death toll of illegal immigrants arriving by sea while also increasing the EU’s internal security and mitigating cross-border crime. The service is operated by the European Border and Coast Guard Agency (FRONTEX) and provides the external border surveillance information exchange network (EUROSUR) with near real time data on activity happening around the EU’s land and sea borders.  

Priority 6: Promoting a global Europe

The Belgian Presidency begins during a period when the multilateral system and the rules-based international order face increasing strain from geopolitical confrontation.

"In aligning with the thematic pillars of 'Protect, Strengthen, Prepare,' the EU Space Programme stands as a pivotal contributor across all fronts. By fostering innovation, resilience and unity, the EU Space Programme reinforces our commitment to a prosperous, secure and interconnected European landscape," declared Julien Béclard, Chair of the Space Working Party for the Belgian Presidency of the Council of the European Union 2024.

 

“At its heart, the EU Space Programme is a European programme, built by Europe, for Europe,” concludes da Costa. “Whether it be boosting Europe’s competitiveness, supporting its energy independence, mitigating the effects of climate change, protecting citizens from security threats and natural disasters, or simply keeping us connected with one another, EU Space is a key tool for promoting a global Europe.”

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

By fostering the development of an innovative, competitive and independent space sector, EU Space is set to contribute to each of the priorities set by the Belgian Presidency of the Council of the European Union.

The 12 Days of EU Space

21.12.2023 13:42  
2023 was an eventful year for EUSPA thanks to milestones such as the EU SST takeover or the implementation of Galileo HAS
Published: 
22 December 2023

It’s hard to believe that another year has come and gone. But as they say, time flies when you’re having fun – and busy getting things done. And 2023 was another fun yet busy year for EUSPA and the EU Space Programme.

So, in the spirit of the season, let’s recap the year that was to the tune of a popular holiday song.

On the first day of space EUSPA sent to me 

A brand-new responsibility

On 1 July 2023, EUSPA took responsibility for the EU Space Surveillance and Tracking (EU SST) Front Desk operations. The Front Desk is the main interface to deliver SST information and services between the SST Partnership and the user community, including activities related to user coordination, service performance, engagement and communication. EUSPA is also contributing to the system’s security monitoring.

On the second day of space EUSPA sent to me

2 exciting funding opportunities

2023 saw the start of a new Horizon Europe call. With an overall budget of EUR 34.5 million, the third EUSPA Horizon Europe Call includes five topics and aims to support the development of innovative space downstream applications.  

We also kicked off the CASSINI Challenges The competition supports the development of innovative commercial solutions that leverage EU Space data from EGNOS, Galileo and/or Copernicus.

On the third day of space EUSPA sent to me

A Copernicus anniversary

This year Copernicus celebrated 25 years of looking at our planet and its environment for the benefit of all European citizens. 

By developing new markets and applications for Copernicus, EUSPA helps turn Earth Observation (EO) data into action. For example, using numerical modelling and EO images, including those provided by Copernicus, oceanographers were able to forecast that the marine heat waves that plagued the Mediterranean region last summer will only continue to increase in intensity, frequency and scope.

Copernicus data is also being used to help select the right site for renewable energy infrastructure, reduce the agricultural sector’s use of pesticides and monitor Europe’s forests – to name only a few of the service’s many uses. 

On the fourth day of space EUSPA sent to me

Galileo High Accuracy 

When Galileo began delivering its High Accuracy Service (HAS) in January, it became the first GNSS programme to provide free-of-charge, high accuracy Precise Point Positioning (PPP) corrections worldwide both through the Galileo signal-in-space (E6-B) and via the internet.  

The precise corrections provided by the Galileo HAS allow users to improve the accuracy associated with the orbit, clocks and biases provided through the Galileo Open Service broadcast navigation messages and the GPS Standard Positioning Service navigation data. These corrections enable the computation of a high accuracy positioning solution in real-time when processed by an appropriate algorithm in the users’ receivers tracking the Galileo signal.

On the fifth day of space EUSPA sent to me

5 flagship reports

Thanks to such publications as the EO and GNSS Market Report (new edition coming soon!), GNSS User Technology Report and the GNSS Investment Report, EUSPA has positioned itself as the leading provider of critical market intelligence.

This year, the Agency added two new titles with the launch of the inaugural Secure SATCOM Market and User Technology Report and the first EU Space for Green Transformation Report.

On the sixth day of space EUSPA sent to me

A more secure space sector

EUSPA plays an important security role, a role that has given it the moniker of ‘security gatekeeper of the EU Space Programme’. As such, EUSPA continues to take steps to ensure the security of the Programme and the confidentiality, integrity and availability of the data and services it provides. 

In March, EUSPA participated in the EU’s Space Threat Response Architecture (STRA) exercise, during which it demonstrated that its mission of implementing the operational security of Galileo is fulfilled.

EUSPA’s security expertise also makes it well-positioned to support the objectives of the recently adopted EU Space Strategy for Security and Defence, which proposes actions to strengthen the resilience and protection of space systems and services in the EU. 

On the seventh day of space EUSPA sent to me

EGNOS V3 test signals

With a new payload in service, the EGNOS space segment is ready to transmit the first EGNOS version 3 test signals. This next generation of EGNOS will augment both GPS and Galileo in the L1 and L5 bands. It is also set to provide additional SBAS service capabilities through a new channel on L5 and will deliver increased EGNOS service availability within and beyond the EU to support a growing number of users.

On the eighth day of space EUSPA sent to me

Support for space-based entrepreneurs 

As the go-to-source for all things EU Space, EUSPA has supported more than 1000 companies with information, funding, expertise and market intelligence that they can use when integrating European space solutions into their business solutions. 

On the ninth day of space EUSPA sent to me

Good news about GOVSATCOM

The implementation of GOVSATCOM continues to move forward. This year, EUSPA helped the European Commission prepare three Implementing Acts, which provide the legal foundation for the services that GOVSATCOM, along with IRIS2, will offer. 

The Agency also lent their technical expertise and provided input from governmental users, the latter of which came from the EUSPA-supported ENTRUSTED project who, earlier this year, successfully demonstrated four operational GOVSATCOM use cases.

On the tenth day of space EUSPA sent to me

Space-based solutions for smarter – and safer – mobility

EU Space is changing how Europe moves. For instance, in the rail sector, more than 150,000 freight wagons are equipped with Galileo/EGNOS receivers to provide more accurate positioning information. 

Meanwhile, in the sky, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) adopted international standards for Galileo and future Satellite Based Augmentation Systems – a major milestone in the aviation industry as it enables us to fully leverage the potential of satellite navigation services developed in Europe in combination with GPS.

EU Space is even having an impact on the high seas. Whether it be EO data from Copernicus, the precise positioning offered by Galileo and EGNOS, or the secure communications of IRIS2 and GOVSATCOM, the services and data provided by the EU Space Programme are playing a key role in securing the maritime transport sector.

On the eleventh day of space EUSPA sent to me

More lives being saved

This year saw the successful demonstration of the new Emergency Warning Satellite Service (EWSS). The service utilises Galileo’s messaging function to transmit emergency alerts and instructions to smartphones, in-vehicle navigation units and even public billboards.   

Meanwhile, in Cyprus, EUSPA participated in a Search and Rescue exercise highlighting the role of the EU Space Programme in maritime operations.

On the twelfth day of space EUSPA sent to me

More ways to go green

As the world gathered for the COP28 in Dubai, here in Europe EU Space is already helping us achieve many of our environmental objectives. For instance, EU Space data and services are important assets to implementing the Green Deal, the Energy Performance of Buildings Directive and the RePowerEU strategy, amongst others.

Furthermore, Copernicus, Galileo and EGNOS supply the information companies need to monitor environmental indicators, reduce their environmental impact, comply with relevant policies and regulations, become more sustainable and drive their green transformations. 

From all of us at EUSPA, happy holidays! 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

2023 was an eventful year for EUSPA thanks to milestones such as the EU SST takeover or the implementation of Galileo HAS

The 12 Days of EU Space

21.12.2023 13:42  
2023 was an eventful year for EUSPA thanks to milestones such as the EU SST takeover or the implementation of Galileo HAS
Published: 
22 December 2023

It’s hard to believe that another year has come and gone. But as they say, time flies when you’re having fun – and busy getting things done. And 2023 was another fun yet busy year for EUSPA and the EU Space Programme.

So, in the spirit of the season, let’s recap the year that was to the tune of a popular holiday song.

On the first day of space EUSPA sent to me 

A brand-new responsibility

On 1 July 2023, EUSPA took responsibility for the EU Space Surveillance and Tracking (EU SST) Front Desk operations. The Front Desk is the main interface to deliver SST information and services between the SST Partnership and the user community, including activities related to user coordination, service performance, engagement and communication. EUSPA is also contributing to the system’s security monitoring.

On the second day of space EUSPA sent to me

2 exciting funding opportunities

2023 saw the start of a new Horizon Europe call. With an overall budget of EUR 34.5 million, the third EUSPA Horizon Europe Call includes five topics and aims to support the development of innovative space downstream applications.  

We also kicked off the CASSINI Challenges The competition supports the development of innovative commercial solutions that leverage EU Space data from EGNOS, Galileo and/or Copernicus.

On the third day of space EUSPA sent to me

A Copernicus anniversary

This year Copernicus celebrated 25 years of looking at our planet and its environment for the benefit of all European citizens. 

By developing new markets and applications for Copernicus, EUSPA helps turn Earth Observation (EO) data into action. For example, using numerical modelling and EO images, including those provided by Copernicus, oceanographers were able to forecast that the marine heat waves that plagued the Mediterranean region last summer will only continue to increase in intensity, frequency and scope.

Copernicus data is also being used to help select the right site for renewable energy infrastructure, reduce the agricultural sector’s use of pesticides and monitor Europe’s forests – to name only a few of the service’s many uses. 

On the fourth day of space EUSPA sent to me

Galileo High Accuracy 

When Galileo began delivering its High Accuracy Service (HAS) in January, it became the first GNSS programme to provide free-of-charge, high accuracy Precise Point Positioning (PPP) corrections worldwide both through the Galileo signal-in-space (E6-B) and via the internet.  

The precise corrections provided by the Galileo HAS allow users to improve the accuracy associated with the orbit, clocks and biases provided through the Galileo Open Service broadcast navigation messages and the GPS Standard Positioning Service navigation data. These corrections enable the computation of a high accuracy positioning solution in real-time when processed by an appropriate algorithm in the users’ receivers tracking the Galileo signal.

On the fifth day of space EUSPA sent to me

5 flagship reports

Thanks to such publications as the EO and GNSS Market Report (new edition coming soon!), GNSS User Technology Report and the GNSS Investment Report, EUSPA has positioned itself as the leading provider of critical market intelligence.

This year, the Agency added two new titles with the launch of the inaugural Secure SATCOM Market and User Technology Report and the first EU Space for Green Transformation Report.

On the sixth day of space EUSPA sent to me

A more secure space sector

EUSPA plays an important security role, a role that has given it the moniker of ‘security gatekeeper of the EU Space Programme’. As such, EUSPA continues to take steps to ensure the security of the Programme and the confidentiality, integrity and availability of the data and services it provides. 

In March, EUSPA participated in the EU’s Space Threat Response Architecture (STRA) exercise, during which it demonstrated that its mission of implementing the operational security of Galileo is fulfilled.

EUSPA’s security expertise also makes it well-positioned to support the objectives of the recently adopted EU Space Strategy for Security and Defence, which proposes actions to strengthen the resilience and protection of space systems and services in the EU. 

On the seventh day of space EUSPA sent to me

EGNOS V3 test signals

With a new payload in service, the EGNOS space segment is ready to transmit the first EGNOS version 3 test signals. This next generation of EGNOS will augment both GPS and Galileo in the L1 and L5 bands. It is also set to provide additional SBAS service capabilities through a new channel on L5 and will deliver increased EGNOS service availability within and beyond the EU to support a growing number of users.

On the eighth day of space EUSPA sent to me

Support for space-based entrepreneurs 

As the go-to-source for all things EU Space, EUSPA has supported more than 1000 companies with information, funding, expertise and market intelligence that they can use when integrating European space solutions into their business solutions. 

On the ninth day of space EUSPA sent to me

Good news about GOVSATCOM

The implementation of GOVSATCOM continues to move forward. This year, EUSPA helped the European Commission prepare three Implementing Acts, which provide the legal foundation for the services that GOVSATCOM, along with IRIS2, will offer. 

The Agency also lent their technical expertise and provided input from governmental users, the latter of which came from the EUSPA-supported ENTRUSTED project who, earlier this year, successfully demonstrated four operational GOVSATCOM use cases.

On the tenth day of space EUSPA sent to me

Space-based solutions for smarter – and safer – mobility

EU Space is changing how Europe moves. For instance, in the rail sector, more than 150,000 freight wagons are equipped with Galileo/EGNOS receivers to provide more accurate positioning information. 

Meanwhile, in the sky, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) adopted international standards for Galileo and future Satellite Based Augmentation Systems – a major milestone in the aviation industry as it enables us to fully leverage the potential of satellite navigation services developed in Europe in combination with GPS.

EU Space is even having an impact on the high seas. Whether it be EO data from Copernicus, the precise positioning offered by Galileo and EGNOS, or the secure communications of IRIS2 and GOVSATCOM, the services and data provided by the EU Space Programme are playing a key role in securing the maritime transport sector.

On the eleventh day of space EUSPA sent to me

More lives being saved

This year saw the successful demonstration of the new Emergency Warning Satellite Service (EWSS). The service utilises Galileo’s messaging function to transmit emergency alerts and instructions to smartphones, in-vehicle navigation units and even public billboards.   

Meanwhile, in Cyprus, EUSPA participated in a Search and Rescue exercise highlighting the role of the EU Space Programme in maritime operations.

On the twelfth day of space EUSPA sent to me

More ways to go green

As the world gathered for the COP28 in Dubai, here in Europe EU Space is already helping us achieve many of our environmental objectives. For instance, EU Space data and services are important assets to implementing the Green Deal, the Energy Performance of Buildings Directive and the RePowerEU strategy, amongst others.

Furthermore, Copernicus, Galileo and EGNOS supply the information companies need to monitor environmental indicators, reduce their environmental impact, comply with relevant policies and regulations, become more sustainable and drive their green transformations. 

From all of us at EUSPA, happy holidays! 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

2023 was an eventful year for EUSPA thanks to milestones such as the EU SST takeover or the implementation of Galileo HAS

The GIMS Project – Paving the way for more detailed monitoring through EU Space synergies

20.12.2023 11:54  
One of the GIMS station deployed on the landslide over Koroška Bela
Published: 
20 December 2023

The GIMS Project started in November 2017 and utilised satellite navigation systems to create a low-cost monitoring service that can detect landslide motion. It was the first EUSPA project to combine GNSS, Earth Observation radar data (SAR) and Inertial Measurement Units (IMUs) technologies, paving the way for more effective and widespread land monitoring. The project was coordinated by GReD, a spin-off SME of the Politecnico di Milano.

How does GIMS work?

GIMS stations are light, independent structures and can be easily installed close to landslide areas. Each solar-powered station has software fully equipped to process the data of GNSS, SAR and IMUs. The software can harness data from Galileo GNSS signals through the internet and Sentinel-1 SAR data directly from Copernicus servers, using cost-effective antennas and receivers. Inertial sensors are placed inside to raise alarms for sudden movements. Once all this data has been collected, any land deformation can be identified, and a comprehensive report can be made to the relevant authorities. 

Key achievements so far

GIMS stations were built for testing purposes by project partners in two known landslide areas in Slovenia. These GIMS stations proved vital in 2023 when a potential landslide was detected after a period of heavy rainfall in the village of Koroška Bela. GReD and end-user GeoZS, the Geological Agency of Slovenia were able to provide the authorities with real-time information on the landslide, which led to the evacuation of approximately 900 residents for 3 days. Although other devices such as drones were used during the operation, the terrain was too overgrown for GNSS on its own to provide accurate information. Thanks to GIMS ability to use Galileo’s satellite system, GIMS coordinator GReD was able to provide hourly updates and confirm the need for an evacuation. 

The upkeep of the GIMS stations in this area was made possible by GeoZS, who continued to purchase the monitoring service from GReD and the stations maintenance from Saphyrion after the project ended. 

The EUSPA Horizon Europe GIMS Project delivered tangible benefits of innovative technology for citizen safety. This success highlights the vital role of SMEs like GReD and should act as a motivation for other companies to collaborate to answer the ongoing Horizon Europe call, fostering continued advancements in Earth monitoring.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

One of the GIMS station deployed on the landslide over Koroška Bela

A very BIG week for EU Space

14.12.2023 16:41  
Published: 
15 December 2023

 

EU Space Week 2023 welcomed over 3,000 visitors and presenters who joined either in person or virtually from home to discuss everything from using space technology to become the first climate-neutral continent to leveraging satellite services to shield Europe’s security and autonomy.   

Needless to say, it was a very busy week, with far too much happening to summarise in a single article. So, instead, here are just some of the highlights that we took away from three big days in Seville.  

1. Big expectations 

Europe expects big things from the EU Space Programme. According to speakers from the European Commission, EUSPA, the Spanish Space Agency and the European Space Agency (ESA), the space sector is undergoing a massive transformation. To stay competitive, EU Space must adapt to ensure that the EU Space Programme and its various components evolve to continue delivering state-of-the-art space-based services that answer actual user needs. The User Consultation Platforms, dedicated to gather the user needs, are one of the essential means to this end. 

2. A big rocket

Staying competitive also means developing innovative launchers capable of meeting the New Space sector’s demand for advanced payloads. One such launcher is the MIURA 1, a 13-metre-tall rocket designed by European New Space company PLD Space. The suborbital launch vehicle is the first space system capable of carrying payloads into space and then bringing them safely back to Earth.

The MIURA 1 was on display during EU Space Week as part of the annual Demo Day.

3. Big opportunities 

But it’s not just the launchers that are big – New Space itself represents a very big opportunity for European companies. According to some estimates, the New Space economy will hit the USD 1 trillion mark by 2040!

Thanks to such EUSPA-supported funding opportunities as the CASSINI Business Accelerator, CASSINI Challenges and Horizon Europe, European start-ups are already claiming a piece of this lucrative market. For example, Vyoma is developing in-orbit telescopes that, by observing potentially dangerous space objects and debris, will help protect satellites and other New Space assets from being damaged. The CASSINI Prize for digital space applications is another example of how the Entrepreneurship funding scheme of the European Union can be so powerful for companies. 

4. A big impact

Another area where space is having a big impact is climate change and helping the EU achieve its sustainability-related objectives – including the transition to renewable energy. For instance, the energy sector is using Copernicus data to make informed decisions on where to build such critical infrastructure as solar panels, wind turbines and tidal power generation plants.

EGNSS such as Galileo and EGNOS also has a big role to play in the fight against climate change. For instance, the aviation sector is turning to EGNOS to help reduce emissions. According to EUSPA, an EGNOS-based approach at Almeria airport in Spain has helped reduce aircraft emissions by 38%. 

5. A bigger EU Space Programme

EU Space is also set to play a big part in Europe’s safety and security. This means keeping Europe’s space assets secure – a role that is a core part of EUSPA’s mission and safe. 

But it also means using EU Space to provide security-related services, which is why the EU Space Programme is about to get bigger. 

GOVSATCOM and IRIS2 are the latest additions to the EU Space family. The former aims to provide secure and cost-efficient communications capabilities to security and safety critical missions and operations while the latter looks to offer secure, reliable and cost-effective satellite communication services for authorised government users and to facilitate commercial services. In this context, EUSPA produced the first-ever Secure SATCOM Market and User Technology Report to help relevant public and private actors identify business opportunities, set the basis for developing the market, and enable the realization of benefits from satellite communications.

Want to see more highlights from EUSW23? Be sure to check out our X (i.e., Twitter) feed

See you soon for the next edition of the EU Space Week!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EUSW 2023 wrap up

Galileo Timing Service Workshop, when time is of the essence

13.12.2023 14:42  
The primary objective of the workshop is to present the ongoing standardisation activities for timing receivers.
Published: 
13 December 2023

In a joint effort, EUSPA and the European Commission will host an interactive workshop dedicated to the standardisation of timing receivers and the upcoming Galileo Timing Service with its implications for Timing and Synchronisation (T&S) applications.

The availability of accurate and secure timing information is crucial for a range of strategic activities. This is especially the case for critical infrastructures, like telecommunication networks, energy distribution grids, financial markets and commercial aviation systems and networks. All of these benefit from the timing and positioning information provided by Galileo.

As timing and synchronization become increasingly indispensable in our lives, EUSPA and the EC are bringing together key stakeholders in T&S, including users and receiver manufacturers. This effort aims to facilitate discussions on standardisation of timing receivers on user needs and requirements for the future Galileo Timing Service.

An online workshop on the Standardisation of Timing Receivers will take place on 2 February 2024. EUSPA and the European Commission will present the upcoming Galileo Timing Receiver Standard and the activities conducted within the STARLITE Project and the CEN/CENELEC/JTC5 Working Group 9, Additionally, another important objective of the workshop is to validate hypotheses adopted in the development of the Galileo Timing Service.  

You can join the workshop by following this link

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The primary objective of the workshop is to present the ongoing standardisation activities for timing receivers.

Workshop on Standardization of Galileo Timing Receivers, when time is of the essence

13.12.2023 14:42  
The primary objective of the workshop is to present the ongoing standardisation activities for timing receivers.
Published: 
13 December 2023

The availability of accurate and secure timing information is crucial for a range of strategic sectors. This is especially the case for critical infrastructures, like telecommunication networks, energy distribution grids, financial markets. All of these will benefit from the future Galileo Timing Service.

In a joint effort, EUSPA and the European Commission will host  a workshop dedicated present the ongoing standardisation activities for timing receivers, aimed at the publication of the first ever Standard in 2024, a key component of the upcoming Galileo Timing Service. The workshop will provide a great opportunity for discussing with Stakeholders on the benefits for Timing and Synchronisation (T&S) applications, and on the user needs of the Timing community.

The workshop will be hybrid, taking place online and at EUSPA HQ. More information will be available soon. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The primary objective of the workshop is to present the ongoing standardisation activities for timing receivers.

Galileo Timing Service Workshop, when time is of the essence

13.12.2023 14:42  
The primary objective of the workshop is to validate hypotheses adopted in the development of the Galileo Timing Service
Published: 
13 December 2023

In a joint effort, EUSPA and the European Commission will host an interactive workshop dedicated to the upcoming Galileo Timing Service and its implications for Timing and Synchronisation (T&S) applications.

The availability of accurate and secure timing information is crucial for a range of strategic activities. This is especially the case for critical infrastructures, like telecommunication networks, energy distribution grids, financial markets and commercial aviation systems and networks. All of these benefit from the timing and positioning information provided by Galileo.

As timing and synchronization become increasingly indispensable in our lives, EUSPA and the EC are bringing together key stakeholders in T&S, including users and receiver manufacturers. This effort aims to facilitate discussions on user needs and requirements for the future Galileo Timing Service.

An online workshop on the Standardisation of Timing Receivers will take place on 2 February 2024. The primary objective of the workshop is to validate hypotheses adopted in the development of the Galileo Timing Service. Additionally, EUSPA and the European Commission will present the upcoming Galileo Timing Receiver Standard and the activities conducted within the STARLITE Project and the CEN/CENELEC/JTC5 Working Group 9. 

You can join the workshop by following this link

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The primary objective of the workshop is to validate hypotheses adopted in the development of the Galileo Timing Service

Workshop on Standardization of Galileo Timing Receivers, when time is of the essence

13.12.2023 14:42  
The primary objective of the workshop is to present the ongoing standardisation activities for timing receivers.
Published: 
13 December 2023

The availability of accurate and secure timing information is crucial for a range of strategic sectors. This is especially the case for critical infrastructures, like telecommunication networks, energy distribution grids, financial markets. All of these will benefit from the future Galileo Timing Service.

In a joint effort, EUSPA and the European Commission will host  a workshop dedicated present the ongoing standardisation activities for timing receivers, aimed at the publication of the first ever Standard in 2024, a key component of the upcoming Galileo Timing Service. The workshop will provide a great opportunity for discussing with Stakeholders on the benefits for Timing and Synchronisation (T&S) applications, and on the user needs of the Timing community.

The workshop will be hybrid, taking place online and at EUSPA HQ. You can participate online here

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The primary objective of the workshop is to present the ongoing standardisation activities for timing receivers.

Demonstrating the power of EU Space

12.12.2023 15:48  
EU Space Week Demo Day featured showstoppers such as an interactive virtual reality experience, GNSS receivers, ground monitoring solutions and even a 13-metre-tall rocket ship.
Published: 
12 December 2023

More than plenaries, panel discussions and keynote addresses, EU Space Week is also a chance to showcase some of the latest innovations that leverage the power of EU Space. 

The Demo Day is usually an exciting opportunity for visitors to get a first-hand look at an array of applications using data from Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus.    

This year’s lineup of demos did not disappoint.

Funding innovation

Through such funding mechanisms as Horizon Europe, Fundamental Elements and dedicated calls to Accelerate Adoption in Transport, along with a range of competitions and awards, EUSPA actively supports projects and initiatives developing innovative European products and applications based on the EU Space Programme

One such project is IWETT

With the goal of supporting the adoption of EGNOS in the inland waterway transport sector, this project is integrating EGNOS within River Information Services across Europe, including on the Danube River in Hungary, the Spree-Oder Waterway in Germany and the Guadalquivir River in Spain.

Two other EUSPA supported projects featured at EU Space Week were TRENI and DEGREE led by QUASCOM. The former is using data from EGNOS and signals from Galileo and other constellations to develop a GNSS receiver platform capable of providing a robust positioning and navigation solution for railways. QUASCOM, on the other hand, is working on Galileo-enabled GNSS receivers that can be used in drones, trains and space applications. 

GEODESY, a EUSPA-funded drone navigation solution based on a Galileo multi-constellation and multi-frequency receiver, leveraging the Galileo OS-NMA and HAS differentiators was also on hand.

Showcasing solutions 

Other companies, agencies, organisations and initiatives were in Sevilla to showcase their latest applications. These included e-GEOS, a leading international player in the Earth Observation and geo-spatial information business, who demonstrated an application for generating flood maps based on Copernicus data and services. 

Speaking of Copernicus, Mercator Ocean showed off the MyOcean Viewer, an online interactive tool that allows users to view oceanographic data coming from Copernicus and featuring such variables as temperature, salinity and sea level for any region in the world. The organisation, which delivers the Copernicus Marine Service (CMEMS), also brought its immersive virtual reality experience that uses Earth Observation data to help users better understand the interaction between the ocean and the climate.  

The European Environment Agency (EEA), the EU’s agency delivering knowledge and data to support Europe's environment and climate goals, showed how the European Ground Motion Service (EGMS) uses Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) data derived from Copernicus Sentinel-1 to detect and measure ground movements with millimetre precision.

The Agency also discussed how the pan-European CORINE Land Cover inventory serves a multitude of use cases, including environmental monitoring, land use planning, climate change assessments and emergency management.

Both EEA applications are part of the Copernicus Land Monitoring Service (CLMS).

Other Copernicus-related solutions featured during Demo Day included the Copernicus Health Hub, Copernicus Arctic Hub, Copernicus Energy Hub and Copernicus Coastal Hub.  

A BIG impact

While all these applications created a substantial amount of buzz and excitement, Demo Day was dominated by the MIURA 1. And we don’t mean that figuratively. At a whopping 13 metres tall, it was hard to miss this rocket!

Designed by PLD Space, a European New Space company, the suborbital MIURA 1 launch vehicle is the first space system capable of carrying payloads into space and then bringing them safely back to Earth.

“Regardless of their size, the projects, applications and solutions featured at Demo Day will all have a very big impact on Europe’s space industry and European society,” says da Costa.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EU Space Week Demo Day featured showstoppers such as an interactive virtual reality experience, GNSS receivers, ground monitoring solutions and even a 13-metre-tall rocket ship.

Getting dirty – from space

8.12.2023 11:55  
EU Space plays a key role in the restoration and preservation of healthy soils as part of the fight against climate change.
Published: 
08 December 2023

It’s World Soil Day, so let's talk about actual dirt.

Like the fact that 95% of our food comes from soils, and how just one cubic metre of healthy soil can retain over 250 litres of water. Healthy soil also plays a crucial role as a natural filter, purifying and storing water as it infiltrates into the ground, not to mention its ability to support biodiversity and help regulate climate.

Unfortunately, the world’s soils aren’t in very good shape. In the face of climate change, human activity and excessive pesticide use, soils have become degraded, which has had a domino effect, impacting everything from water resources to erosion and food production.

The good news is that it’s not too late. 

With sustainable soil management practices, such as minimum tillage, crop rotation, organic matter addition and cover cropping, we can improve soil health, reduce erosion and pollution and enhance water infiltration and storage. These practices also preserve soil biodiversity, improve fertility and contribute to carbon sequestration – playing a crucial role in the fight against climate change.

This is why the European Commission, through its EU Soil Strategy for 2030, is taking concrete steps to not only protect and restore soils, but to ensure that they are used sustainably.

Supporting this strategy is EU Space.

At the forefront of sustainable soil management

EU Space is at the forefront of sustainable soil management. Take Earth Observation for instance. With data gathered by Copernicus satellites, combined with various ground measurements, researchers can monitor and verify soil conditions including soil moisture, soil sealing and temperature. 

Having access to such information can help farmers increase yields and productivity while also reducing their environmental impact. It does this by essentially letting them ‘see’ which crops would benefit most from the use of pesticides and allowing them to apply pesticides to just those crops. The net result is a decrease in the amount of contaminating pesticides being put into the ground and an overall increase in soil health. 

Read more: Can we halve the use of pesticides in the EU by 2030?

EU Space’s soil-saving capabilities go beyond the agricultural sector. For example, with EGNSS and Copernicus, and the European Ground Motion Service (EGMS) scientists can monitor ground movement and deformation, allowing them to take steps to prevent the erosion of our precious topsoil. This same data can be used to provide early warnings for such natural disasters as earth and mudslides.     

EU Space is the key

If having healthy soil is the lock to a healthy, sustainable society, then EU Space is the key. 

Learn more: 10 ways EU Space helps fight global hunger

“By helping the agriculture sector sustainably manage its soil resources, EU Space helps increase crop yields to ensure we have enough food to feed the world’s growing population,” says EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. “Furthermore, because healthy soil can naturally remove and store carbon dioxide, by protecting it, EU Space is helping balance the global carbon budget and slowing the pace of global warming.”      

So, as we celebrate the dirt below our feet, let’s take a moment to look up and remember the important role EU Space plays in protecting and restoring our soils.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EU Space plays a key role in the restoration and preservation of healthy soils as part of the fight against climate change.

EUSpace4Ukraine publishes a White Paper and interactive maps to showcase Copernicus supported agricultural insights linked to Ukraine for NGOs

4.12.2023 13:06  
EUSpace capabilities via Copernicus data have the potential to support NGOs in areas of war and crises.
Published: 
04 December 2023

The newly published EUSpace4Ukraine white paper and interactive maps, called StoryMap help interested parties understand how EU space capabilities especially Earth Observation can benefit NGOs in areas of war and crises.

For example, Copernicus-derived insights regarding agricultural parameters such as variations of crop type and cropland extent in time and space in Ukraine can inform short-term operations (e.g., directing remediation efforts) and medium to long-term strategies (e.g., anticipating possible food shortages).

The European Union (EU) Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) launched the EUSpace4Ukraine initiative in April 2022 in response to the war in Ukraine. The objective is to support innovation and uptake of EU Space Programme solutions by humanitarian aid actors working in Ukraine, with the new white paper and StoryMap on Copernicus-enabled impact assessment as one of three demonstrators within the initiative. 

As part of the EU Space Programme, the Copernicus Programme relies upon the EU Sentinels and third party Earth Observation (EO) satellites, in-situ (non-space based) data, and data-derived products available via the Copernicus Services. EO data in general and Copernicus in particular can be utilised for various use cases across several market segments, including agriculture.

The white paper provides context regarding the importance of the agricultural sector within Ukraine, and then dives into a quantitative assessment of the impacts of war on agriculture derived from Copernicus data. Sentinel data was used to estimate cropland extent before and during the intensification of the war (2022). The total cropland area in 2022 compared to 2017-2021 mean across all crops decreased by ~7% (nearly 2 million ha), while the most affected crops (wheat / barley, sunflower and corn) experienced up to ~13% drop in cropland extent. Regional differences and temporal evolution suggest that war activities directly impact cropland extent for important crops. The data can be explored in more detail in the accompanying interactive online StoryMap.

The decline in cropland extent as assessed via Sentinel data comes with implications for local, regional and global food security as well as people’s economic circumstances and livelihoods. Furthermore, such insights derived from the Copernicus Programme can support operational decision-making for NGOs in areas where remediation is most critical to enable the continuation of agricultural activities that ultimately support lives.

Additional examples of Copernicus capabilities showcase applications beyond agriculture to inspire the uptake of existing solutions and the development of new use cases. The paper also presents key stakeholders within the EUSpace4Ukraine initiative and their relevant capabilities to give a flavour of the variety and depth of technical EO-related expertise available within the EU. In addition, example end-user perspectives validate the usefulness and give an idea of how the Copernicus-enabled insights can be implemented.

Stakeholders interested in learning more about the solutions or being part of the EUSpace4Ukraine network can get in touch via euspace4ukraine@euspa.europa.eu.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EUSpace capabilities via Copernicus data have the potential to support NGOs in areas of war and crises.

EUSpace4Ukraine publishes a White Paper and interactive maps to showcase Copernicus supported agricultural insights linked to Ukraine for NGOs

4.12.2023 13:06  
EUSpace capabilities via Copernicus data have the potential to support NGOs in areas of war and crises.
Published: 
04 December 2023

The newly published EUSpace4Ukraine white paper and interactive maps, called StoryMap help interested parties understand how EU space capabilities especially Earth Observation can benefit NGOs in areas of war and crises.

For example, Copernicus-derived insights regarding agricultural parameters such as variations of crop type and cropland extent in time and space in Ukraine can inform short-term operations (e.g., directing remediation efforts) and medium to long-term strategies (e.g., anticipating possible food shortages).

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) launched the EUSpace4Ukraine initiative in April 2022 in response to the war in Ukraine. The objective is to support innovation and uptake of EU Space Programme solutions by humanitarian aid actors working in Ukraine, with the new white paper and StoryMap on Copernicus-enabled impact assessment as one of three demonstrators within the initiative. 

As part of the EU Space Programme, the Copernicus Programme relies upon the EU Sentinels and third party Earth Observation (EO) satellites, in-situ (non-space based) data, and data-derived products available via the Copernicus Services. EO data in general and Copernicus in particular can be utilised for various use cases across several market segments, including agriculture.

The white paper provides context regarding the importance of the agricultural sector within Ukraine, and then dives into a quantitative assessment of the impacts of war on agriculture derived from Copernicus data. Sentinel data was used to estimate cropland extent before and during the intensification of the war (2022). The total cropland area in 2022 compared to 2017-2021 mean across all crops decreased by ~7% (nearly 2 million ha), while the most affected crops (wheat / barley, sunflower and corn) experienced up to ~13% drop in cropland extent. Regional differences and temporal evolution suggest that war activities directly impact cropland extent for important crops. The data can be explored in more detail in the accompanying interactive online StoryMap.

The decline in cropland extent as assessed via Sentinel data comes with implications for local, regional and global food security as well as people’s economic circumstances and livelihoods. Furthermore, such insights derived from the Copernicus Programme can support operational decision-making for NGOs in areas where remediation is most critical to enable the continuation of agricultural activities that ultimately support lives.

Additional examples of Copernicus capabilities showcase applications beyond agriculture to inspire the uptake of existing solutions and the development of new use cases. The paper also presents key stakeholders within the EUSpace4Ukraine initiative and their relevant capabilities to give a flavour of the variety and depth of technical EO-related expertise available within the EU. In addition, example end-user perspectives validate the usefulness and give an idea of how the Copernicus-enabled insights can be implemented.

Stakeholders interested in learning more about the solutions or being part of the EUSpace4Ukraine network can get in touch via euspace4ukraine@euspa.europa.eu.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EUSpace capabilities via Copernicus data have the potential to support NGOs in areas of war and crises.

Safeguarding space operations with STM

30.11.2023 15:05  
During EU Space Week, participants learned how EU Space Traffic Management (STM) is working to mitigate the threat of space debris colliding with satellites.
Published: 
30 November 2023

Haven’t heard of Space Traffic Management? Well, it’s time you get familiar. After all, it has a direct impact on your everyday life. 

“From communication to navigation, observation to aviation, all of these depend on the data and services coming from satellites in space,” said João Alves, SST Team Leader at EUSPA, who moderated a panel discussion on EU Space Traffic Management during EU Space Week. “As a result, keeping these systems safe and operational is paramount.”     

But doing so is becoming increasingly more challenging. That’s because as the number of satellites being put into space continues to grow, so too does the amount of debris floating around space. 

In fact, there are now more than 1 million pieces of space debris orbiting the Earth. If one of these tiny pieces of old launchers or satellites happens to collide with a satellite, not only could it damage the satellite itself, end users could lose access to the services those satellites provide. 

Helping answer this threat is Space Traffic Management (STM). 

Space Surveillance and Tracking as the backbone of Space Traffic Management

Space Traffic Management encompasses the means and the rules to access, conduct activities in and return from outer space safely, sustainably and securely. “With STM, the EU is at the forefront of shaping a new era of space governance, safeguarding EU interests in full respect of the respective competencies of the EU and its Member States,” said Rodolphe Muñoz, a Legal Officer at the European Commission.

However, for STM to work, it needs to be able to continuously observe space traffic. This is why the EU has made Space Surveillance and Tracking (SST) the operational backbone of its approach to STM. 

“Between the European Commission, the SST partnership of  15 Member States and EUSPA, all of whom are working together, I can assure you that we are in very good hands when it comes to delivering EU SST’s services,” said Pascal Faucher, Chair of the EU SST Partnership and Head of Defence and Security at CNES

A key component of the EU Space Programme, EU SST safeguards Europe’s space assets – including Galileo, EGNOS, Copernicus and GOVSATCOM satellites – along with those of its Member States and other space operators. To do so, it uses a network of ground-based sensors capable of surveying and tracking artificial space objects, together with processing capabilities aiming to provide data, information and services on space objects orbiting the Earth. 

“One of the main pillars of EU STM in general and EU SST in particular is technology – radars, sensors, lasers, telescopes, etc.,” remarked Alberto Águeda, Director of Space Surveillance and Traffic Management at GMV. “This requires having the best European companies working on the technology that gives us the ability to build the best STM system.” 

Here, as mentioned by Rodolphe Munoz and Pascal Faucher, the EU Industry and Start-ups Forum on STM (EISF) was established with the purpose of bringing together EU stakeholders and industry to jointly develop R&D priorities. “This fosters the industrial ecosystem, strengthens operational STM capabilities and enhances EU autonomy,” said Águeda.

EUSPA responsible for SST Front Desk operations 

EUSPA is responsible for the SST Front Desk. The Front Desk is the main interface for delivering SST information and services between the SST Partnership and the user community, including activities related to user coordination, service performance, engagement and communication.

Those services, which currently include collision avoidance, re-entry analysis and fragmentation analysis, are already being leveraged by such satellite operators as EUMETSAT, the European operational satellite agency for monitoring weather, climate and the environment from space. “We regularly receive messages from EU SST that make us aware of potential risks and allow our team to analyse the problem and, when necessary, take mitigation action,” explained EUMETSAT Flight Dynamics Manager Pierluigi Righetti.

In addition to its SST Front Desk responsibilities, EUSPA also contributes to the system’s security monitoring, including establishing the security requirements needed to shape the SST network in support of the European Commission and the EU SST Partnership. 

You can learn more about EUSPA’s role here

    Did you know?

    Did you know that the increase in space activity has the potential to impact air travel and safety? 

    That’s because the launches and re-entries of space assets often go through controlled airspace, causing flight delays and creating a potential safety risk.

    “Although very congested, Europe is the safest region for aviation in the world – and we would like this to continue,” said Nathalie Le Cam, Project Manager Higher Airspace Operations at the European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA).

    According to Le Cam, the key to ensuring the safety of both space and air travel is to create a level of harmonisation between space and air traffic management – something that EU SST could help do.   

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

During EU Space Week, participants learned how EU Space Traffic Management (STM) is working to mitigate the threat of space debris colliding with satellites.

EGNOS and Galileo User Satisfaction Survey 2023 is open, and we want to hear from you!

24.11.2023 11:11  
The EGNSS User Satisfaction Surveys aim at collecting valuable feedback from current and potential users.
Published: 
24 November 2023

Continuing from the combined survey model launched last year, this multiple-choice survey only takes a few minutes to complete but your contribution can have a huge impact on the future performance of EGNOS and Galileo. 

"Through our User Satisfaction Survey 2023, we are empowering industries to shape the future of EGNOS and GALILEO. From assessing new features to gauging usefulness, every opinion counts,” recalled Carmen Aguilera, Operational Market Development Manager at EUSPA.

Market segment questions tailored to your industry

The survey is designed to tailor questions to suit you or your company by assessing specific market segments. Choose from one or multiple market segments such as maritime and inland waterways, surveying and mapping, location-based services (e.g. smartphones, IoT), agriculture, rail, and more. You will be then asked some simple questions based on your chosen market segments and you are done! 

This year, the Galileo part of the survey also includes questions on satisfaction on the High Accuracy Service (HAS), a new service implemented in January 2023 and HAS and Open Service Navigation Message Authentication (OSNMA) reports. The EGNOS part of the survey covers all EGNOS services and the usefulness of notifications of outages and degradation. Current non-users are also welcome to take the survey and report their past experiences with compatibility or performance. 

See how easy it is for yourself and take the User Satisfaction Survey 2023

The deadline to answer is End of February 2024.

Results 

The results of the survey will be compiled into a survey report and will be available in 2024. 

Last year’s user performance report for EGNOS is now available. Galileo user reports (2022 report available soon) can be found here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The EGNSS User Satisfaction Surveys aim at collecting valuable feedback from current and potential users.

EUSPA Open Days 2023, where space becomes more than space

20.11.2023 16:51  
During 1-2 December, take one of Prague’s Galileo-enabled trams and make your way over to EUSPA Headquarters for our annual Open Days to learn more about the Agency and the EU Space Programme!
Published: 
21 November 2023

The EUSPA Open Days offer the public an opportunity to learn about and experience applications based on the EU Space Programme and its components, Galileo, EGNOS, Copernicus, GOVSATCOM/IRIS2 and SSA

This year we invite you to our Prague headquarters from 1 to 2 December 2023

Hop on Galileo-enabled trams: 6, 8, 12, 17, 25, 1 and get off at Strossmayerovo Náměstí or take a ride down the metro line C and stop at Vltavska.

What to expect?

  • Unique insights into the agency’s work
  • An immersive Copernicus exhibition which will make your social media feed blow up
  • Discover our approach to space debris management
  • Fun learning opportunities for youngsters or adults wanting to experience childlike playfulness 
  • Exciting seminars, space workshops, competitions, and prizes
  • Discussions with EUSPA experts about career or space entrepreneurship opportunities

"EUSPA Open Days is our agency’s signature event specifically conceived for the general public to highlight the role of EU Space Programme as well our agency, in the lives of Europeans," says EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa. "I look forward to welcoming you!"

Stay tuned for more information and keep an eye on our EUSPA Open Days 2023 page.

We are looking forward to welcoming you onboard!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

During 1-2 December, take one of Prague’s Galileo-enabled trams and make your way over to EUSPA Headquarters for our annual Open Days to learn more about the Agency and the EU Space Programme!

EUSPA Open Days 2023, where space becomes more than space

20.11.2023 16:51  
During 1-2 December, take one of Prague’s Galileo-enabled trams and make your way over to EUSPA Headquarters for our annual Open Days to learn more about the Agency and the EU Space Programme!
Published: 
20 November 2023

The EUSPA Open Days offer the public an opportunity to learn about and experience applications based on the EU Space Programme and its components, Galileo, EGNOS, Copernicus, GOVSATCOM/IRIS2 and SSA

This year, our Prague headquarters will be open to all on 1 December from 4.00 pm to 6.00 pm and on 2 December 2023 from 9.00 am to 6.00 pm

Hop on Galileo-enabled trams: 6, 8, 12, 17, 25, 1 and get off at Strossmayerovo Náměstí or take a ride down the metro line C and stop at Vltavska.

What to expect?

  • Unique insights into the agency’s work
  • An immersive Copernicus exhibition which will make your social media feed blow up
  • Discover our approach to space debris management
  • Fun learning opportunities for youngsters or adults wanting to experience childlike playfulness 
  • Exciting seminars, space workshops, competitions, and prizes
  • Discussions with EUSPA experts about career or space entrepreneurship opportunities

"EUSPA Open Days is our agency’s signature event specifically conceived for the general public to highlight the role of EU Space Programme as well our agency, in the lives of Europeans," says EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa. "I look forward to welcoming you!"

Stay tuned for more information and keep an eye on our EUSPA Open Days 2023 page.

We are looking forward to welcoming you!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

During 1-2 December, take one of Prague’s Galileo-enabled trams and make your way over to EUSPA Headquarters for our annual Open Days to learn more about the Agency and the EU Space Programme!

EUSPA Open Days 2023, where space becomes more than space

20.11.2023 16:51  
During 1-2 December, take one of Prague’s Galileo-enabled trams and make your way over to EUSPA Headquarters for our annual Open Days to learn more about the Agency and the EU Space Programme!
Published: 
20 November 2023

The EUSPA Open Days offer the public an opportunity to learn about and experience applications based on the EU Space Programme and its components, Galileo, EGNOS, Copernicus, GOVSATCOM/IRIS2 and SSA. 

This year, our Prague headquarters will be open to all on 1 December from 4.00 pm to 6.00 pm and on 2 December 2023 from 9.00 am to 6.00 pm

Hop on Galileo-enabled trams: 6, 8, 12, 17, 25, 1 and get off at Strossmayerovo Náměstí or take a ride down the metro line C and stop at Vltavska.

What to expect?

  • Unique insights into the agency’s work
  • An immersive Copernicus exhibition which will make your social media feed blow up
  • Discover our approach to space debris management
  • Fun learning opportunities for youngsters or adults wanting to experience childlike playfulness 
  • Exciting seminars, space workshops, competitions, and prizes
  • Discussions with EUSPA experts about career or space entrepreneurship opportunities

"EUSPA Open Days is our agency’s signature event specifically conceived for the general public to highlight the role of EU Space Programme as well our agency, in the lives of Europeans," says EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa. "I look forward to welcoming you!"

Stay tuned for more information and keep an eye on our EUSPA Open Days 2023 page.

We are looking forward to welcoming you!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

During 1-2 December, take one of Prague’s Galileo-enabled trams and make your way over to EUSPA Headquarters for our annual Open Days to learn more about the Agency and the EU Space Programme!

EUSPA Open Days 2023, where space becomes more than space

20.11.2023 16:51  
During 1-2 December, take one of Prague’s Galileo-enabled trams and make your way over to EUSPA Headquarters for our annual Open Days to learn more about the Agency and the EU Space Programme!
Published: 
20 November 2023

The EUSPA Open Days offer the public an opportunity to learn about and experience applications based on the EU Space Programme and its components, Galileo, EGNOS, Copernicus, GOVSATCOM/IRIS2 and SSA. 

This year, our Prague headquarters will be open to all on 1 December from 4.00 pm to 6.00 pm and on 2 December 2023 from 9.00 am to 6.00 pm

Hop on Galileo-enabled trams: 6, 8, 12, 17, 25, 1 and get off at Strossmayerovo Náměstí or take a ride down the metro line C and stop at Vltavska.

What to expect?

  • Unique insights into the agency’s work
  • An immersive Copernicus exhibition which will make your social media feed blow up
  • Discover our approach to space debris management
  • Fun learning opportunities for youngsters or adults wanting to experience childlike playfulness 
  • Exciting seminars, space workshops, competitions, and prizes
  • Discussions with EUSPA experts about career or space entrepreneurship opportunities

"EUSPA Open Days is our agency’s signature event specifically conceived for the general public to highlight the role of EU Space Programme as well our agency, in the lives of Europeans," says EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa. "I look forward to welcoming you!"

Stay tuned for more information and keep an eye on our EUSPA Open Days 2023 page.

We are looking forward to welcoming you!

Read in Czech

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

During 1-2 December, take one of Prague’s Galileo-enabled trams and make your way over to EUSPA Headquarters for our annual Open Days to learn more about the Agency and the EU Space Programme!

Unlocking the Future: Secure SATCOM in the EU - A Comprehensive Overview

16.11.2023 11:32  
The webinar focusing on Secure SATCOM will explore market opportunities and trends as well as promoting EUSPA's user network for secure SATCOM.
Published: 
16 November 2023

Demand for secure satellite communications (SATCOM) is on the rise. The use of SATCOM supporting Crisis Management, Surveillance, and Key Infrastructure in the EU will increase by a factor of 14 between 2025 and 2040, reaching around 186 Gbps by 2040 (Fixed Satellite Services only). 

Such a large increase is driven by geopolitical trends, climate change, economic growth, national and international regulations, and EU policies such as the EU Space for Security and Defence strategy, recently approved by the Council

In this context, and with GOVSATCOM and IRIS2 underway, experts at the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) produced the first-ever Secure SATCOM Market and User Technology Report. The long study aims to help relevant public and private actors identify business opportunities, set the basis for developing the market, and enable the realization of benefits from satellite communications, both in the EU and worldwide.

Download the report here

To further communicate the importance of secure SATCOM across sectors and support users in their safety and security-sensitive missions, EUSPA is planning to wrap up on the recently concluded ENTRUSTED and shed some light on what is coming next. 

Eventually, as a promoter of Research and Innovation, EUSPA published last month a Horizon Europe call, which features a specific topic dedicated to GOVSATCOM.

Check this out: GOVSATCOM Horizon Europe funding opportunity of 10 M€

EUSPA is organising a dedicated webinar focusing on Secure SATCOM on December 12, 2023 from 10:00 to 12:00.

In this webinar, you will:

  • Explore market opportunities enabled by secure Satellite Communications in the EU
  • Discover relevant trends that will drive the market, as well as innovation and technological advancements in the field 
  • Know more about the EUSPA network of users for secure SATCOM and how to become a member to join events, share experience and voice your opinion
  • Learn more about funding opportunities provided by EUSPA

See the full agenda is here.

Join us here

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The webinar focusing on Secure SATCOM will explore market opportunities and trends as well as promoting EUSPA's user network for secure SATCOM.

Unlocking the Future: Secure SATCOM in the EU - A Comprehensive Overview

16.11.2023 11:32  
The webinar focusing on Secure SATCOM will explore market opportunities and trends as well as promoting EUSPA's user network for secure SATCOM.
Published: 
16 November 2023

Demand for secure satellite communications (SATCOM) is on the rise. The use of SATCOM supporting Crisis Management, Surveillance, and Key Infrastructure in the EU will increase by a factor of 14 between 2025 and 2040, reaching around 186 Gbps by 2040 (Fixed Satellite Services only). 

Such a large increase is driven by geopolitical trends, climate change, economic growth, national and international regulations, and EU policies such as the EU Space for Security and Defence strategy, recently approved by the Council

In this context, and with GOVSATCOM and IRIS2 underway, experts at the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) produced the first-ever Secure SATCOM Market and User Technology Report. The long study aims to help relevant public and private actors identify business opportunities, set the basis for developing the market, and enable the realization of benefits from satellite communications, both in the EU and worldwide.

Download the report here

To further communicate the importance of secure SATCOM across sectors and support users in their safety and security-sensitive missions, EUSPA is planning to wrap up on the recently concluded ENTRUSTED and shed some light on what is coming next. 

Eventually, as a promoter of Research and Innovation, EUSPA published last month a Horizon Europe call, which features a specific topic dedicated to GOVSATCOM.

Check this out: GOVSATCOM Horizon Europe funding opportunity of 10 M€

EUSPA is organising a dedicated webinar focusing on Secure SATCOM on December 12, 2023 from 10:00 to 12:00.

In this webinar, you will:

  • Explore market opportunities enabled by secure Satellite Communications in the EU
  • Discover relevant trends that will drive the market, as well as innovation and technological advancements in the field 
  • Know more about the EUSPA network of users for secure SATCOM and how to become a member to join events, share experience and voice your opinion
  • Learn more about funding opportunities provided by EUSPA

See the full agenda is here.

Join us here

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The webinar focusing on Secure SATCOM will explore market opportunities and trends as well as promoting EUSPA's user network for secure SATCOM.

Security in and from Space, a priority for Europe

10.11.2023 17:14  
The session EU Space: towards greater resilience and security, The EU Space Strategy for Security and Defence: Challenges and Opportunities taking place at EU Space Week 2023
Published: 
09 November 2023

Resilient positioning, timing and synchronisation services together with high-resolution imagery are vital tools during times of uncertainty and geopolitical tension. When coupled with secure satellite communications capabilities, these three technologies can support humanitarian and other military operations of the European Union and its Member States.  

In recognition of the important role of space in defence and military operations, top EU legislators adopted the EU Space Strategy for Security and Defence (EUSSD) in March 2023. The EUSSD is a direct implementation of the EU Strategic Compass, in which space, together with cyber and maritime, were identified as contested strategic domains, the security of which must be ensured. 

In a roundtable discussion moderated by Guillaume de La Brosse, Head of Unit Innovation & New Space - Space defence at DG DEFIS from the European Commission panellists representing OHB (Marcus Moeller), ICEYE (Rafal Modrzewski), the Exploration Company (Pierre Faucoup) and the Spanish Armed Forces (General Isaac Crespo Zaragoza) discussed challenges and opportunities. 

OHB was involved in the design and development of the first generation of Galileo satellites and is currently contributing to the development of the new Secure Connectivity flagship constellation, IRIS2. Two essential elements according to Moeller are to enhance the dual use of space assets and the roll out tools so that Europe can ‘’act in space’’. For instance, he mentioned the development of an early warning system to be able to detect missiles from space. His views were shared by General Isaac Crespo Zaragoza, Chief of the Spanish Spatial Command who stressed the need to know what is happening in space, especially in such a congested environment.

During times of active conflict, such as the war in Ukraine, satellite products such as Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images are indispensable tools for decision makers. SAR images can be captured through clouds and at night, providing a source of valuable intelligence for relevant military and governmental actors.  According to the CEO of ICEYE, Rafal Modrzewski, the real added value of SAR in military operations is the high revisit time which constellations like ICEYE offer. 

EUSPA, a fundamental security actor in European space

EUSPA has a large portfolio to deliver on, which includes the security of the EU Space Programme and its components in space and on the ground. As Philippe Bertrand, chair of the EU Space Programme Security Accreditation Board (SAB) explained, the Board evaluates the resilience and protection of the EU space systems and services, including the responses to threat attacks.

He noted that the development of accreditation standards by the SAB has helped to spread a security culture within the space industrial sector, where cyber security is key.

"The SAB’s independence gives insurance to users that security is independently assessed, and they can confidently utilise EU space services," concluded Bertrand.

The EU Space Week 2023 has been concluded by Elisa Rivera, Head of Cabinet of the Secretary General for Innovation, Ministry of Science and Innovation on behalf of the Spanish Presidency of the Council who recalled how important is the Space Programme of the EU to serve our fundamental European values, #Peace, #Security, #Sustainability, #WellBeing, #HumanRights… and how from the Space we can contribute to a more Stronger, United and Sustainable Europe closer to its citizens.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The session EU Space: towards greater resilience and security, The EU Space Strategy for Security and Defence: Challenges and Opportunities taking place at EU Space Week 2023

Security in and from Space, a priority for Europe

10.11.2023 17:14  
The session EU Space: towards greater resilience and security, The EU Space Strategy for Security and Defence: Challenges and Opportunities taking place at EU Space Week 2023
Published: 
09 November 2023

Resilient positioning, timing and synchronisation services together with high-resolution imagery are vital tools during times of uncertainty and geopolitical tension. When coupled with secure satellite communications capabilities, these three technologies can support humanitarian and other military operations of the European Union and its Member States.  

In recognition of the important role of space in defence and military operations, top EU legislators adopted the EU Space Strategy for Security and Defence (EUSSD) in March 2023. The EUSSD is a direct implementation of the EU Strategic Compass, in which space, together with cyber and maritime, were identified as contested strategic domains, the security of which must be ensured. 

In a roundtable discussion moderated by Guillaume de La Brosse, Head of Unit Innovation & New Space - Space defence at DG DEFIS from the European Commission panellists representing OHB (Marcus Moeller), ICEYE (Rafal Modrzewski), the Exploration Company (Pierre Faucoup) and the Spanish Armed Forces (General Isaac Crespo Zaragoza) discussed challenges and opportunities. 

OHB was involved in the design and development of the first generation of Galileo satellites and is currently contributing to the development of the new Secure Connectivity flagship constellation, IRIS2. Two essential elements according to Moeller are to enhance the dual use of space assets and the roll out tools so that Europe can ‘’act in space’’. For instance, he mentioned the development of an early warning system to be able to detect missiles from space. His views were shared by General Isaac Crespo Zaragoza, Chief of the Spanish Spatial Command who stressed the need to know what is happening in space, especially in such a congested environment.

During times of active conflict, such as the war in Ukraine, satellite products such as Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images are indispensable tools for decision makers. SAR images can be captured through clouds and at night, providing a source of valuable intelligence for relevant military and governmental actors.  According to the CEO of ICEYE, Rafal Modrzewski, the real added value of SAR in military operations is the high revisit time which constellations like ICEYE offer. 

EUSPA, a fundamental security actor in European space

EUSPA has a large portfolio to deliver on, which includes the security of the EU Space Programme and its components in space and on the ground. As Philippe Bertrand, chair of the EU Space Programme Security Accreditation Board (SAB) explained, the Board evaluates the resilience and protection of the EU space systems and services, including the responses to threat attacks.

He noted that the development of accreditation standards by the SAB has helped to spread a security culture within the space industrial sector, where cyber security is key.

"The SAB’s independence gives insurance to users that security is independently assessed, and they can confidently utilise EU space services," concluded Bertrand.

The EU Space Week 2023 has been concluded by Elisa Rivera, Head of Cabinet of the Secretary General for Innovation, Ministry of Science and Innovation on behalf of the Spanish Presidency of the Council who recalled how important is the Space Programme of the EU to serve our fundamental European values, #Peace, #Security, #Sustainability, #WellBeing, #HumanRights… and how from the Space we can contribute to a more Stronger, United and Sustainable Europe closer to its citizens.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The session EU Space: towards greater resilience and security, The EU Space Strategy for Security and Defence: Challenges and Opportunities taking place at EU Space Week 2023

Resilience, sustainability and access to funds all ingredients for a stronger EU Space Sector

10.11.2023 12:30  
#EUSW 2023 brought together the entire EU Space community under one roof in Sevilla
Published: 
10 November 2023

Artificial satellites are able to endure in space thanks to the unique materials used to create them. The production of satellite components relies on some of the much needed critical raw materials such as germanium and gallium. Both materials are used to produce important satellite components from transistors to solar panels. 

As Geert Vandenhoeck of Umicore, a leading circular materials technology company explained, around 90% of gallium and germanium is produced in and exported from Asia. "If China imposes export controls for these two materials, Europe could be in a vulnerable position" he said. 

His opinion was echoed by CEO of Semi Zabala, Dr. Simon Wainwright who firmly supported the creation a purely European supply chain to feed the EU Space Economy and ensure its autonomy. 

Becoming greener and more sustainable thanks to #EUspace 

During a Green Deal themed session moderated by the Head of Earth Observation at DG DEFIS, Mauro Facchini, panellists presented ways the Copernicus programme contributes to the implementation of the Union’s most ambitious plan to turn our continent climate neutral by 2050. 

Investing in renewables is a growing necessity. Geopolitical tensions and persistently soaring energy (gas) prices are pushing the Union to accelerate its transition to clean energy production, not only to deliver on Green Deal objectives (e.g., energy mix optimisation) but also to strengthen its energy sovereignty.

Copernicus can help here too, with a dedicated Copernicus Climate Service product called "reanalysis". As ECMWF’s Carlo Buontempo explained ‘’using reanalysis, decision makers in the energy sector can be well informed on energy investments, such as the optimal location for solar or wind farms or tidal power generation plants.’’

Climate reanalysis is a way of creating “maps without gaps” - a scientific method for developing a comprehensive record of climate trends and how the climate is changing over time. Reanalysis allows scientists to have the best possible understanding of what happened during a particular event, such as a heatwave or storm. Most importantly, it represents a comprehensive historical record of the Earth’s climate and provides an accurate way to monitor how fast it is changing.

Carmen Aguilera from EUSPA also explained that by implementing EGNOS approaches across European airports we’re able to drastically reduce aviation emissions. "In Almeria airport, the LPV approach procedure with EGNOS, together with efficient descent techniques, was able to reduce emissions by 38% with respect to ILS with conventional operational techniques”. 

Improving Access to Public funds 

The second half of Day 2 of EU Space Week was also focused on the much-needed funds for new Space companies to develop downstream or upstream applications. The European Commission, together with ESA, is exploring new ways of procuring directly from New Space companies. 

The Dynamic Purchasing System launched by the Directorate General for the Defence Industry already yielded positive results for many new space companies like Satlantis, which was one of the 9 companies that were awarded a €5 million contract for the Copernicus Contributing Missions.

As Guillaume de la Brosse pointed out the Commission has embarked into a new business model, the public-private partnership, to join forces directly with industry for the deployment of a programme with specific objectives and roles. This will be the case for the upcoming constellation for secure connectivity, IRIS2

All speakers of the session concluded that innovative procurement schemes should be maximised in the future so that public institutions act as anchor customers and are less involved the development phase.

The importance of access to funding was also highlighted during a dedicated CASSINI session where companies such IENAI SPACE and EOMAP shared their experience.

Honing skills and becoming more inclusive

While the space economy is growing fast, it is important to develop, hire and retain talent in the EU for a more resilient, green and digitally transformed space sector. 

During a session on skills and inclusion, a panel of diverse EU organisation, academia, industry and associations shared their thoughts on the skill gaps and inclusion when engaging in a space-related education and careers and what needs to be done to develop and retain the right talent in Europe.

"We have a massive challenge finding and retaining talent in the space sector. We cannot afford to miss out on talent by not being a diverse and inclusive industry," said board member Diana Pueyo at Women in Aerospace. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

#EUSW 2023 brought together the entire EU Space community under one roof in Sevilla

Resilience, sustainability and access to funds all ingredients for a stronger EU Space Sector

10.11.2023 12:30  
#EUSW 2023 brought together the entire EU Space community under one roof in Sevilla
Published: 
10 November 2023

Artificial satellites are able to endure in space thanks to the unique materials used to create them. The production of satellite components relies on some of the much needed critical raw materials such as germanium and gallium. Both materials are used to produce important satellite components from transistors to solar panels. 

As Geert Vandenhoeck of Umicore, a leading circular materials technology company explained, around 90% of gallium and germanium is produced in and exported from Asia. "If China imposes export controls for these two materials, Europe could be in a vulnerable position" he said. 

His opinion was echoed by CEO of Semi Zabala, Dr. Simon Wainwright who firmly supported the creation a purely European supply chain to feed the EU Space Economy and ensure its autonomy. 

Becoming greener and more sustainable thanks to #EUspace 

During a Green Deal themed session moderated by the Head of Earth Observation at DG DEFIS, Mauro Facchini, panellists presented ways the Copernicus programme contributes to the implementation of the Union’s most ambitious plan to turn our continent climate neutral by 2050. 

Investing in renewables is a growing necessity. Geopolitical tensions and persistently soaring energy (gas) prices are pushing the Union to accelerate its transition to clean energy production, not only to deliver on Green Deal objectives (e.g., energy mix optimisation) but also to strengthen its energy sovereignty.

Copernicus can help here too, with a dedicated Copernicus Climate Service product called "reanalysis". As ECMWF’s Carlo Buontempo explained ‘’using reanalysis, decision makers in the energy sector can be well informed on energy investments, such as the optimal location for solar or wind farms or tidal power generation plants.’’

Climate reanalysis is a way of creating “maps without gaps” - a scientific method for developing a comprehensive record of climate trends and how the climate is changing over time. Reanalysis allows scientists to have the best possible understanding of what happened during a particular event, such as a heatwave or storm. Most importantly, it represents a comprehensive historical record of the Earth’s climate and provides an accurate way to monitor how fast it is changing.

Carmen Aguilera from EUSPA also explained that by implementing EGNOS approaches across European airports we’re able to drastically reduce aviation emissions. "In Almeria airport, the LPV approach procedure with EGNOS, together with efficient descent techniques, was able to reduce emissions by 38% with respect to ILS with conventional operational techniques”. 

Improving Access to Public funds 

The second half of Day 2 of EU Space Week was also focused on the much-needed funds for new Space companies to develop downstream or upstream applications. The European Commission, together with ESA, is exploring new ways of procuring directly from New Space companies. 

The Dynamic Purchasing System launched by the Directorate General for the Defence Industry already yielded positive results for many new space companies like Satlantis, which was one of the 9 companies that were awarded a €5 million contract for the Copernicus Contributing Missions.

As Guillaume de la Brosse pointed out the Commission has embarked into a new business model, the public-private partnership, to join forces directly with industry for the deployment of a programme with specific objectives and roles. This will be the case for the upcoming constellation for secure connectivity, IRIS2

All speakers of the session concluded that innovative procurement schemes should be maximised in the future so that public institutions act as anchor customers and are less involved the development phase.

The importance of access to funding was also highlighted during a dedicated CASSINI session where companies such IENAI SPACE and EOMAP shared their experience.

Honing skills and becoming more inclusive

While the space economy is growing fast, it is important to develop, hire and retain talent in the EU for a more resilient, green and digitally transformed space sector. 

During a session on skills and inclusion, a panel of diverse EU organisation, academia, industry and associations shared their thoughts on the skill gaps and inclusion when engaging in a space-related education and careers and what needs to be done to develop and retain the right talent in Europe.

"We have a massive challenge finding and retaining talent in the space sector. We cannot afford to miss out on talent by not being a diverse and inclusive industry," said board member Diana Pueyo at Women in Aerospace. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

#EUSW 2023 brought together the entire EU Space community under one roof in Sevilla

Resilience, sustainability and access to funds all ingredients for a stronger EU Space Sector

10.11.2023 12:30  
#EUSW 2023 brought together the entire EU Space community under one roof in Sevilla
Published: 
10 November 2023

Artificial satellites are able to endure in space thanks to the unique materials used to create them. The production of satellite components relies on some of the much needed critical raw materials such as germanium and gallium. Both materials are used to produce important satellite components from transistors to solar panels. 

As Geert Vandenhoeck of Umicore, a leading circular materials technology company explained, around 90% of gallium and germanium is produced in and exported from Asia. "If China imposes export controls for these two materials, Europe could be in a vulnerable position" he said. 

His opinion was echoed by CEO of Semi Zabala, Dr. Simon Wainwright who firmly supported the creation a purely European supply chain to feed the EU Space Economy and ensure its autonomy. 

Becoming greener and more sustainable thanks to #EUspace 

During a Green Deal themed session moderated by the Head of Earth Observation at DG DEFIS, Mauro Facchini, panellists presented ways the Copernicus programme contributes to the implementation of the Union’s most ambitious plan to turn our continent climate neutral by 2050. 

Investing in renewables is a growing necessity. Geopolitical tensions and persistently soaring energy (gas) prices are pushing the Union to accelerate its transition to clean energy production, not only to deliver on Green Deal objectives (e.g., energy mix optimisation) but also to strengthen its energy sovereignty.

Copernicus can help here too, with a dedicated Copernicus Climate Service product called "reanalysis". As ECMWF’s Carlo Buontempo explained ‘’using reanalysis, decision makers in the energy sector can be well informed on energy investments, such as the optimal location for solar or wind farms or tidal power generation plants.’’

Climate reanalysis is a way of creating “maps without gaps” - a scientific method for developing a comprehensive record of climate trends and how the climate is changing over time. Reanalysis allows scientists to have the best possible understanding of what happened during a particular event, such as a heatwave or storm. Most importantly, it represents a comprehensive historical record of the Earth’s climate and provides an accurate way to monitor how fast it is changing.

Carmen Aguilera from EUSPA also explained that by implementing EGNOS approaches across European airports we’re able to drastically reduce aviation emissions. "In Almeria airport, the LPV approach procedure with EGNOS, together with efficient descent techniques, was able to reduce emissions by 38% with respect to ILS with conventional operational techniques”. 

Improving Access to Public funds 

The second half of Day 2 of EU Space Week was also focused on the much-needed funds for new Space companies to develop downstream or upstream applications. The European Commission, together with ESA, is exploring new ways of procuring directly from New Space companies. 

The Dynamic Purchasing System launched by the Directorate General for the Defence Industry already yielded positive results for many new space companies like Satlantis, which was one of the 9 companies that were awarded a €5 million contract for the Copernicus Contributing Missions.

As Guillaume de la Brosse pointed out the Commission has embarked into a new business model, the public-private partnership, to join forces directly with industry for the deployment of a programme with specific objectives and roles. This will be the case for the upcoming constellation for secure connectivity, IRIS2

All speakers of the session concluded that innovative procurement schemes should be maximised in the future so that public institutions act as anchor customers and are less involved the development phase.

The importance of access to funding was also highlighted during a dedicated CASSINI session where companies such IENAI SPACE and EOMAP shared their experience.

Honing skills and becoming more inclusive

While the space economy is growing fast, it is important to develop, hire and retain talent in the EU for a more resilient, green and digitally transformed space sector. 

During a session on skills and inclusion, a panel of diverse EU organisation, academia, industry and associations shared their thoughts on the skill gaps and inclusion when engaging in a space-related education and careers and what needs to be done to develop and retain the right talent in Europe.

"We have a massive challenge finding and retaining talent in the space sector. We cannot afford to miss out on talent by not being a diverse and inclusive industry," said board member Diana Pueyo at Women in Aerospace. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

#EUSW 2023 brought together the entire EU Space community under one roof in Sevilla

Resilience, sustainability and access to funds all ingredients for a stronger EU Space Sector

10.11.2023 12:30  
#EUSW 2023 brought together the entire EU Space community under one roof in Sevilla
Published: 
10 November 2023

Artificial satellites are able to endure in space thanks to the unique materials used to create them. The production of satellite components relies on some of the much needed critical raw materials such as germanium and gallium. Both materials are used to produce important satellite components from transistors to solar panels. 

As Geert Vandenhoeck of Umicore, a leading circular materials technology company explained, around 90% of gallium and germanium is produced in and exported from Asia. "If China imposes export controls for these two materials, Europe could be in a vulnerable position" he said. 

His opinion was echoed by CEO of Semi Zabala, Dr. Simon Wainwright who firmly supported the creation a purely European supply chain to feed the EU Space Economy and ensure its autonomy. 

Becoming greener and more sustainable thanks to #EUspace 

During a Green Deal themed session moderated by the Head of Earth Observation at DG DEFIS, Mauro Facchini, panellists presented ways the Copernicus programme contributes to the implementation of the Union’s most ambitious plan to turn our continent climate neutral by 2050. 

Investing in renewables is a growing necessity. Geopolitical tensions and persistently soaring energy (gas) prices are pushing the Union to accelerate its transition to clean energy production, not only to deliver on Green Deal objectives (e.g., energy mix optimisation) but also to strengthen its energy sovereignty.

Copernicus can help here too, with a dedicated Copernicus Climate Service product called "reanalysis". As ECMWF’s Carlo Buontempo explained ‘’using reanalysis, decision makers in the energy sector can be well informed on energy investments, such as the optimal location for solar or wind farms or tidal power generation plants.’’

Climate reanalysis is a way of creating “maps without gaps” - a scientific method for developing a comprehensive record of climate trends and how the climate is changing over time. Reanalysis allows scientists to have the best possible understanding of what happened during a particular event, such as a heatwave or storm. Most importantly, it represents a comprehensive historical record of the Earth’s climate and provides an accurate way to monitor how fast it is changing.

Carmen Aguilera from EUSPA also explained that by implementing EGNOS approaches across European airports we’re able to drastically reduce aviation emissions. "In Almeria airport, the LPV approach procedure with EGNOS, together with efficient descent techniques, was able to reduce emissions by 38% with respect to ILS with conventional operational techniques”. 

Improving Access to Public funds 

The second half of Day 2 of EU Space Week was also focused on the much-needed funds for new Space companies to develop downstream or upstream applications. The European Commission, together with ESA, is exploring new ways of procuring directly from New Space companies. 

The Dynamic Purchasing System launched by the Directorate General for the Defence Industry already yielded positive results for many new space companies like Satlantis, which was one of the 9 companies that were awarded a €5 million contract for the Copernicus Contributing Missions.

As Guillaume de la Brosse pointed out the Commission has embarked into a new business model, the public-private partnership, to join forces directly with industry for the deployment of a programme with specific objectives and roles. This will be the case for the upcoming constellation for secure connectivity, IRIS2

All speakers of the session concluded that innovative procurement schemes should be maximised in the future so that public institutions act as anchor customers and are less involved the development phase.

The importance of access to funding was also highlighted during a dedicated CASSINI session where companies such IENAI SPACE and EOMAP shared their experience.

Honing skills and becoming more inclusive

While the space economy is growing fast, it is important to develop, hire and retain talent in the EU for a more resilient, green and digitally transformed space sector. 

During a session on skills and inclusion, a panel of diverse EU organisation, academia, industry and associations shared their thoughts on the skill gaps and inclusion when engaging in a space-related education and careers and what needs to be done to develop and retain the right talent in Europe.

"We have a massive challenge finding and retaining talent in the space sector. We cannot afford to miss out on talent by not being a diverse and inclusive industry," said board member Diana Pueyo at Women in Aerospace. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

#EUSW 2023 brought together the entire EU Space community under one roof in Sevilla

EU Space Applications to Fish Plastics Out of our Oceans and Rivers

9.11.2023 9:50  
Discover the CASSINI Prize for digital space applications, dedicated in seeking winning, innovative, space-based solutions ready to detect, monitor and remove plastics, microplastics and other litter from our oceans and waterways.
Published: 
09 November 2023

Did you know that of the 300 million tonnes of plastic produced every year, an estimated 26 million eventually ends up in the ocean? As a result, some estimates suggest there are 5.25 trillion pieces of plastic floating around the oceans and washing up onto beaches and coastal areas. 

There are options to tackle this plastic sea party! Thanks to initiatives like the CASSINI Prize for digital space applications, we now have a range of innovative, space-based solutions ready to detect, monitor and remove plastics, microplastics and other litter from our oceans and waterways.  

“Addressing the ocean's plastic problem starts with identifying and tracking the debris, which is exactly what each of our winning applications is doing, essential information for authorities or NGOs,” says Rodrigo da Costa, Executive Director of the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA). 

CASSINI is the European Commission’s initiative to support entrepreneurs, start-ups and SMEs developing innovative applications and services that leverage the EU Space Programme. Dedicated to promoting the commercialisation of Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus data and services, EUSPA is actively involved in the initiative.

With a total prize purse of EUR 2.85 million, the Maritime CASSINI Prize for Digital Space Applications sought innovative commercial solutions that leverage Copernicus, Europe’s Earth Observation programme; Galileo, the EU’s Global Navigation Satellite System; and/or EGNOS, the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay System – used in combination with other data sources – to track and remove marine plastic pollution.   

Because the contest aimed to create a new ecosystem of entrepreneurs, applications were limited to SMEs having a close-to-market solution. 

After a rigorous review process and a challenging demonstration requirement where applicants had to prove their solution’s effectiveness in real-world conditions, EUSPA and the European Commission announced the winners during the EU Space Week 2023 in Sevilla, Spain.

The winners

  • Coastal Marine Litter Observatory by SCIDRONES: Using an innovative combination of Copernicus multi-spectral data with high-resolution drone imagery and advanced AI-algorithms, this application helps differentiate between plastic pollution and natural debris sources such as driftwood and seaweed. Local authorities can use the application to guide their cleanup operations, allocating resources to those beaches and environments most affected by plastic pollution. Learn more.
  • Eyes on Plastic by EOMAP: This data-driven web app combines Sentinel-2 optical imagery and commercial optical satellite imagery, on-site cameras, cloud-based big data processing chains, Earth Observation analytics and crowdsourcing to identify, map and monitor plastic pollution in near real-time. The solution looks to help governmental stakeholders meet their mandates for managing and reporting plastic pollution, including that found in rivers.  Learn more.
  • Ocean Plastic Alert and Tracking by GEOMATYS Combining satellite images with meteorological and oceanographic models, this application is designed to detect debris at sea from space and predict its drift. By coupling ocean current and wind models with satellite observations, the solution can make forecasts both forwards and backwards in time. This allows coastal authorities to locate and predict where the front of plastic and debris is after a major weather crisis that causes navigational safety issues. It also optimises the collection of debris in collaboration with the likes of fishing boats. Learn more.

All three winners received a EUR 950,000.00 cash prize, which will be used to further develop, scale up and, ultimately, give the real push for the commercialisation and promotion of their applications.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Discover the CASSINI Prize for digital space applications, dedicated in seeking winning, innovative, space-based solutions ready to detect, monitor and remove plastics, microplastics and other litter from our oceans and waterways.

EU Space Applications to Fish Plastics Out of our Oceans and Rivers

9.11.2023 9:50  
Discover the CASSINI Prize for digital space applications, dedicated in seeking winning, innovative, space-based solutions ready to detect, monitor and remove plastics, microplastics and other litter from our oceans and waterways.
Published: 
09 November 2023

Did you know that of the 300 million tonnes of plastic produced every year, an estimated 26 million eventually ends up in the ocean? As a result, some estimates suggest there are 5.25 trillion pieces of plastic floating around the oceans and washing up onto beaches and coastal areas. 

There are options to tackle this plastic sea party! Thanks to initiatives like the CASSINI Prize for digital space applications, we now have a range of innovative, space-based solutions ready to detect, monitor and remove plastics, microplastics and other litter from our oceans and waterways.  

“Addressing the ocean's plastic problem starts with identifying and tracking the debris, which is exactly what each of our winning applications is doing, essential information for authorities or NGOs,” says Rodrigo da Costa, Executive Director of the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA). 

CASSINI is the European Commission’s initiative to support entrepreneurs, start-ups and SMEs developing innovative applications and services that leverage the EU Space Programme. Dedicated to promoting the commercialisation of Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus data and services, EUSPA is actively involved in the initiative.

With a total prize purse of EUR 2.85 million, the Maritime CASSINI Prize for Digital Space Applications sought innovative commercial solutions that leverage Copernicus, Europe’s Earth Observation programme; Galileo, the EU’s Global Navigation Satellite System; and/or EGNOS, the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay System – used in combination with other data sources – to track and remove marine plastic pollution.   

Because the contest aimed to create a new ecosystem of entrepreneurs, applications were limited to SMEs having a close-to-market solution. 

After a rigorous review process and a challenging demonstration requirement where applicants had to prove their solution’s effectiveness in real-world conditions, EUSPA and the European Commission announced the winners during the EU Space Week 2023 in Sevilla, Spain.

The winners

  • Coastal Marine Litter Observatory by SCIDRONES: Using an innovative combination of Copernicus multi-spectral data with high-resolution drone imagery and advanced AI-algorithms, this application helps differentiate between plastic pollution and natural debris sources such as driftwood and seaweed. Local authorities can use the application to guide their cleanup operations, allocating resources to those beaches and environments most affected by plastic pollution. 
  • Eyes on Plastic by EOMAP: This data-driven web app combines Sentinel-2 optical imagery and commercial optical satellite imagery, on-site cameras, cloud-based big data processing chains, Earth Observation analytics and crowdsourcing to identify, map and monitor plastic pollution in near real-time. The solution looks to help governmental stakeholders meet their mandates for managing and reporting plastic pollution, including that found in rivers.  
  • Ocean Plastic Alert and Tracking by GEOMATYS Combining satellite images with meteorological and oceanographic models, this application is designed to detect debris at sea from space and predict its drift. By coupling ocean current and wind models with satellite observations, the solution can make forecasts both forwards and backwards in time. This allows coastal authorities to locate and predict where the front of plastic and debris is after a major weather crisis that causes navigational safety issues. It also optimises the collection of debris in collaboration with the likes of fishing boats.

All three winners received a EUR 950,000.00 cash prize, which will be used to further develop, scale up and, ultimately, give the real push for the commercialisation and promotion of their applications.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Discover the CASSINI Prize for digital space applications, dedicated in seeking winning, innovative, space-based solutions ready to detect, monitor and remove plastics, microplastics and other litter from our oceans and waterways.

EU Space Week kicks off in Seville

7.11.2023 20:28  
EU Space Week, happening now in Seville, is putting the spotlight on Europe’s dynamic – and rapidly growing – space sector
Published: 
08 November 2023

Top EU policymakers, space industry actors and entrepreneurs from all walks of life convene in Sevilla, Spain to share knowledge and experiences on how businesses, governments, and society at large benefit from the EU Space Programme and its existing components, Galileo, EGNOS, Copernicus but also new ones such as GOVSATCOM and IRIS2

Key themes in the 2023 edition of the conference are the use of space technology in our quest to become the first climate-neutral continent by 2050 and the importance of satellite services to shield Europe’s security and autonomy.   

Autonomy and security for the Union

During the inaugural ceremony of the EU Space Week, Spanish Minister for Science and Innovation, Diana Morant, highlighted the crucial role of space in spurring innovation across all sectors of the economy: ‘’Space innovation plays a key role in solving some of our greatest challenges as a society, such as climate emergency. Space also ensures the autonomy of the Union and its Member States.’’

Director General for Defence Industry and Space at the European Commission, Timo Pesonen, reiterated the Union’s commitments to strengthening the resilience of its space infrastructures. “The space sector is undergoing a massive transformation. To maintain the leadership of Europe, we must rethink our resilience, our technological non-dependence and our business models. We need to consolidate and evolve our space assets.”

Eyes on 2035 

During a roundtable discussion, top executives from the European Commission, EUSPA, the Spanish Space Agency and ESA shared their vision regarding the evolution of the EU Space Programme and the industry by 2035.

The Director of the Spanish Space Agency, Miguel Belló, said that Spain will continue contributing to the Programme by supporting future Copernicus missions and the upcoming satellite communications constellation IRIS2 and by working on developing more advanced surveillance systems which will be used for the European Space Surveillance and Tracking.

When asked what the key ingredient for the EU Space Programme is to be successful, Director-General for Defence Industry and Space, Timo Pesonen highlighted competitiveness. The Space sector is undergoing a massive transformation. To maintain the leadership of Europe, we must rethink our resilience, our technological non-dependence and business models,’’ he said

Present at the roundtable were EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa, and Director General of the European Space Agency Josef Aschbacher.

Staying true to the mission of the agency he leads, da Costa said that "adaptability is what will make the EU Space Programme and its various components evolve and deliver cutting edge space-based services. This can only be achieved through continuous dialogue with the users."

"Europe has realised the importance of the New Space economy which is projected to reach 1 trillion dollars by the year 2040. By 2035, I expect to see much bigger changes in the area of launchers among others," said Josef Aschbacher. ‘’Europe should develop innovative launchers able to carry various payloads he concluded.’’  

New Space actors to the front! 

As the global economy continues its multifaceted transformation, so does Europe’s space economy throughout its full value chain, upstream, midstream and downstream. A dedicated session called ‘’Interactive Discussion with Inspiring Entrepreneurs and Innovators’’ brought to the fore milestones achieved by the vibrant European New Space economy.

Space safety is becoming critical as the number of satellites in orbit grows exponentially. New space companies like Vyoma are now more and more contributing to the management of the space traffic caused either by debris or by functioning satellites. As Luisa Buinhas explained, Vyoma is looking to develop in-orbit optical telescopes to observe space objects and map the orbital environment at a high frequency, thus providing SSA data and services with near-zero latency. 

In the area of micro-launchers, Europe made a significant leap with the launch of Miura-1 a suborbital launch vehicle, privately developed. As Raul Verdu explained "micro launchers in reshaping the European launchers industry but also are democratising access to space.’’

Orbify CEO Jakub Dziwisz praised the role of the CASSINI Business Accelerator and other EUSPA funding initiatives in giving start-ups the necessary tools to upscale. As Dziwisz explained his company automates the analysis of satellite imagery through AI and ML models to streamline the measurement and assessment of natural assets, providing environmental insights within a few clicks.

Another highlight of the day was an inspirational speech by Laia Romero, Co-founder and CEO of Lobelia Earth who emphasised the importance of Earth Observation in addressing climate change. 

We’re just getting started! 

EU Space Week day No2 is going to be a packed one so better get some rest!

Be sure to tune in tomorrow for an agenda that includes among others "New Ways of Doing Space’’, "Space 4 EU Green Deal’’ award ceremonies and networking events.

Could not make it to Spain? You can always participate online and network with other virtual participants through our interactive platform.  

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EU Space Week, happening now in Seville, is putting the spotlight on Europe’s dynamic – and rapidly growing – space sector

EUSPA launches first Secure SATCOM Market and User Technology Report

7.11.2023 9:12  
Demand for secure SATCOM services is on the rise. Learn more by downloading our brand-new Secure SATCOM Market and User Technology Report today!
Published: 
07 November 2023

Thanks to such publications as the EO and GNSS Market Report, GNSS User Technology Report, EU Space for Green Transformation and the GNSS Investment Report, EUSPA has positioned itself as the leading provider of critical market intelligence. 

The secure SATCOM Market and User Technology Report intends to build upon the growing investments made by the EU with forthcoming EU GOVSATCOM, which aims to provide secure and cost-efficient communication capabilities to security and safety critical missions and operations, and the recently launched IRIS² initiative that will further expand the EU space-based connectivity capabilities of the EU Space Programme.

“As the go-to-source for all things EU Space, EUSPA has a well-earned reputation for being a trusted provider of insightful information and expertise that policymakers, entrepreneurs and major corporations can rely on,” says EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa.

Today, the Agency adds a new title to its already rich library of publications with the launch of the 1st Secure SATCOM Market and User Technology Report.  

“The EU needs autonomous, secure, resilient and high-speed, space-based connectivity to satisfy the requirements of its institutions, bodies, agencies and Member States,” adds Fiammetta Diani, EUSPA Head of Market Downstream and Innovation. “Secure SATCOM answers this need by providing one or two-way resilient and guaranteed satellite capacity and services for communication purposes.” 

The report is intended for such secure SATCOM users as governmental entities from Member States and EU agencies and organisations, as well as for small businesses and established enterprises willing to make investments into this strategic and fast-growing sector.

Greatest demand for secure SATCOM to come from key infrastructure 

The Secure SATCOM Market and User Technology Report characterises users within the framework of 13 use cases organised into four categories: 

  1. Surveillance (Land Border and Maritime)
  2. Crisis Management (Maritime Emergency, Humanitarian Aid, Civil Protection, Law Enforcement Interventions, EU External Actions and Forces Deployment)
  3. Key Infrastructure (Transport, Space, Institutional Communications and Other Critical infrastructures)
  4. One transversal specific use case focusing on secure Satellite Communications in Polar Regions.

According to the Report, the user demand for fixed satellite services (FSS) in the EU will increase by a factor of 14 between 2025 and 2040, reaching around 186 Gbps by 2040. In 2025, the FSS capacity demand for Crisis Management is expected to count for around half of all FSS capacity demand. The Report further estimates that the Key Infrastructure category is set to generate the highest level of demand by 2040, representing around 50% of total capacity demand. The two largest use cases within this segment are Institutional Communications and Other Critical Infrastructures. About two-thirds of the estimated FSS capacity demand will come from Europe and waters geographical area and will include the need for permanent operational missions and for backup communications, with an increasing need to guarantee additional resilience to communication networks. The demand forecasted for EU missions and operations in Middle East and Africa is the second geographical area for the FSS capacity demand. It is worth noting that the vast majority of demand in this region comes from three uses cases from the Crisis Management category: Humanitarian Aid, EU External Action and Forces Deployment.

User demand for secure SATCOM from mobile satellite services (MSS) is expected to increase from around 1.2 Gbps (2025) to 3.9 Gbps (2040), with the majority coming from the maritime surveillance use case.

Digital technologies responsible for transforming secure SATCOM  

The Secure SATCOM Market and User Technology Report further discusses the various structural drivers that are transforming and increasing the volume of telecommunication capacity offered through satellite assets, which will also necessarily impact the capacity and services for secured connectivity. 

According to the Report, digital technologies are at the heart of this transformation, alongside the use of multi-orbital solutions, higher frequency bands and other features. However, as with any technology, new space-based connectivity solutions can be subject to certain limits and/or require cycles of adoptions. Examples include the need to deploy new interoperable terminals either because the new networks make use of new frequency bands or because access to Non-Geostationary Orbit (NGSO) requires a fast-tracking antenna. 

Changes ahead 

The Report goes on to note that the introduction of new technologies and business models, as well as the advent of new entrants, is strongly impacting the market. To name a few examples, the deployment of NGSO Geostationary constellations will significantly increase the volume and diversity of capacity available. Furthermore, the organisations are moving toward a vertical integration and the market landscape is overall experiencing a consolidation bringing to life stronger and more competitive groups. 

Other elements that could impact the use of secure SATCOM include geopolitical trends, climate change, economic growth or stagnation, the rise of the digital economy, national and international regulations and EU policy.

The Report further highlights the potential impact of the so-called New Space actors. “These companies bring innovative and cost-effective solutions at a high pace, enriching the market ecosystem which will have to be increasingly able to deliver secure and resilient SATCOM capabilities and products tailored to a variety of users” says Flavio Sbardellati, EUSPA Market Downstream and Innovation.

To learn more, be sure to download your free copy of EUSPA’s Secure SATCOM Market and User Technology Report today!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Demand for secure SATCOM services is on the rise. Learn more by downloading our brand-new Secure SATCOM Market and User Technology Report today!

The new Horizon Europe Call is now open

2.11.2023 14:40  
The 3rd Horizon Europe Call is ongoing with an overall budget of 34.5 miilion EUR
Published: 
02 November 2023

With a commitment to advancing innovation in the European space sector, EUSPA continues to pave the way for the development of space downstream applications. By launching the third EUSPA call under Horizon Europe, EUSPA champions market development within the EU space downstream sector and fosters the adoption of space-based solutions. This initiative falls under Cluster 4 of the Horizon Europe Work Programme, dedicated to Digital, Industry, and Space, and promises fresh opportunities for innovation and growth.

The deadline for applications to the call is 14 February 2024.

This call features five compelling topics collectively aiming to advance space-based technologies and applications that address a range of critical challenges, from post-pandemic recovery to closing market gaps and enhancing security.

"The new Horizon Europe call represents a remarkable opportunity for collaboration between the European space downstream industry and users. It offers SMEs, large players, academia, and public actors the chance to pioneer space-based applications that will yield tangible benefits for EU citizens, industries, and society as a whole, addressing pressing challenges ahead" affirms EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. Details for the Call can be found here

We are looking forward to consortia which will drive cutting-edge solutions based on EU Space Programme components.

Learn more during the Space Downstream Innovation Day on 21 November 2023

EUSPA's experts will provide in-depth insights into the current Horizon Europe call, highlighting the most relevant aspects and showcasing the results achieved. 

Other funding opportunities related to the Fundamental Elements Programme, and the CASSINI initiative will also be tackled.

Register here. Deadline for the mandatory registration is 16 November. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The 3rd Horizon Europe Call is ongoing with an overall budget of 34.5 miilion EUR

The new Horizon Europe Call is now open

2.11.2023 14:40  
The 3rd Horizon Europe Call is ongoing with an overall budget of 34.5 miilion EUR
Published: 
02 November 2023

With a commitment to advancing innovation in the European space sector, EUSPA continues to pave the way for the development of space downstream applications. By launching the third EUSPA call under Horizon Europe, EUSPA champions market development within the EU space downstream sector and fosters the adoption of space-based solutions. This initiative falls under Cluster 4 of the Horizon Europe Work Programme, dedicated to Digital, Industry, and Space, and promises fresh opportunities for innovation and growth.

The deadline for applications to the call is 14 February 2024.

This call features five compelling topics collectively aiming to advance space-based technologies and applications that address a range of critical challenges, from post-pandemic recovery to closing market gaps and enhancing security.

"The new Horizon Europe call represents a remarkable opportunity for collaboration between the European space downstream industry and users. It offers SMEs, large players, academia, and public actors the chance to pioneer space-based applications that will yield tangible benefits for EU citizens, industries, and society as a whole, addressing pressing challenges ahead" affirms EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. Details for the Call can be found here

We are looking forward to consortia which will drive cutting-edge solutions based on EU Space Programme components.

Learn more during the Space Downstream Innovation Day on 21 November 2023

EUSPA's experts will provide in-depth insights into the current Horizon Europe call, highlighting the most relevant aspects and showcasing the results achieved. 

Other funding opportunities related to the Fundamental Elements Programme, and the CASSINI initiative will also be tackled.

Register here. Deadline for the mandatory registration is 19 November. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The 3rd Horizon Europe Call is ongoing with an overall budget of 34.5 miilion EUR

UCP 2023: 8 industries meet to discuss Earth Observation, GNSS and Satcom trends and developments

25.10.2023 17:18  
The User Consultation Platform 2023 brings together actors from 8 industries to discuss their needs for applications relying on Earth Observation, satnav and satcom.
Published: 
26 October 2023

End users are the core of the EU Space Programme which is why the EU Space Week features a set of industry focused sessions, the User Consultation Platform.

The User Consultation Platform (UCP) is a periodic forum organised by the European Commission (EC) and the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), where users from different market segments meet to discuss their needs for applications, services and data relying on Position, Navigation and Time (PNT), Earth observation and secure governmental communications. 

The event involves end users, user associations and representatives of the value chain, such as receiver and chipset manufacturers, application developers and end users. It also gathers organisations and institutions dealing, directly and indirectly, with the European Global Navigation Satellite System (EGNSS), encompassing Galileo and EGNOS, the EU Earth Observation system, Copernicus, and with GOVSATCOM, the upcoming system for secure governmental communications. The UCP event is a part of the process developed at EUSPA to collect user needs and requirements and take them as inputs for the provision of user driven space data-based services by the EU Space Programme. 

 

Check this out: EUSPA Releases User Consultation Platform 2022 Reports

 

The input collected from UCP does not stay in Sevilla but feeds the EU Space Programme: results are compiled in a set of reports  that helps policymakers at DG DEFIS market development professionals and satellite engineers at EUSPA, evaluate the current and potential future user needs and requirements to improve existing or introduce new services based on Galileo, EGNOS, Copernicus and GOVSATCOM/IRIS2.

"The UCP is one of the most important events for us at EUSPA as it’s a platform where the real beneficiaries of the EU Space Programme gather to analyse their needs, reflect and debate" says EUSPA’s Fiammetta Diani, Head of Market, Downstream & Innovation. "The feedback from stakeholders in rail, agriculture, forestry, maritime just to name a few, is what makes the satellite services evolve. I look forward to meeting you all in Sevilla" she concluded. 

 

Enrol in your preferred User Consultation Platform session here

8 sessions, 8 different sectors  

Agriculture and forestry, rail and public transport and road and automotive are just some of the sessions where relevant stakeholders will confer about how Earth Observation, satellite navigation and satellite communications their sectors more sustainable, secured and efficient. 

For the first time, and with its new role there will be a dedicated session Space Surveillance and Tracking (SST). This session focuses on the evolution of the EU SST capability and its services. Users will be consulted on their views on a proposal of advanced services complementary to the existing EU SST services, which may be developed by the EU industry. To stimulate the discussion there will be a roundtable with spacecraft operators representing all orbital regimes.

Register here and help shape the future of the EU Space Programme.  

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The User Consultation Platform 2023 brings together actors from 8 industries to discuss their needs for applications relying on Earth Observation, satnav and satcoms.

10 ways EU Space helps fight global hunger

19.10.2023 14:50  
As the world puts the spotlight on the importance of sustainable food systems and combating global hunger, we look at how EUSpace has become a proven ally in the fight against food insecurity
Published: 
19 October 2023

The world’s population is growing, meaning there’s more mouths to feed. With climate change wreaking havoc on global food supply chains, doing so in a sustainable manner becomes increasingly difficult. That’s why initiatives like the World Food Day are so critical.

Celebrated every 16 October, World Food Day puts the spotlight on the importance of sustainable food systems and combating global hunger. It highlights actions happening across the world where the EU is taking steps to strengthen global food systems through humanitarian and international assistance and cooperation. 

Supporting these steps is the EU Space Programme

Here are 10 concrete ways EU Space helps address the global food security challenge:

1. Earth Observation data is regularly used to monitor crop seasons. For example, when satellite imagery coverage is integrated with field surveys, one can quantify the areas to be planted and, later to be harvested. 

2. The use of GNSS together with Earth observation for planting crops can determine where to apply fertilisers and pesticides, thereby reducing their use. In fact, it is estimated that using Earth Observation and GNSS together can help increase yields by more than 10% while reducing the use of fuel, fertiliser and pesticides by up to 20%.

Read More: Can we halve the use of pesticides in the EU by 2030?

3. Galileo and Copernicus data are also behind operational solutions as farm machinery guidance, precision irrigation and variable rate application. These tools increase the productivity of agricultural cultivation by supporting informed management processes and optimising the use of land, seeds, plant protection agents and water. 

4. Earth Observation is the most accessible and effective way of acquiring information on site-specific crop properties over broad areas – information that can help increase the efficiency of farming operations. Specifically, the Copernicus Land Monitoring Service (CLMS) provides data on vegetation, water cycle, crop yield forecasting and soil condition monitoring. 

5. As a key enabler of precision farming, Galileo and EGNOS allow farmers to optimise the space between planted seeds, which further boosts productivity and yields and reduce energy use. 

6. Earth Observation images that are complemented by GNSS (including Galileo and EGNOS) can be used to evaluate and provide early warnings about drought and crop yields, giving governments a powerful tool to tackle famine in a timely fashion. 

7. The use of Galileo and Copernicus is proving useful in livestock management. For example, Galileo-enabled collars – used to monitor livestock – support the activities of the breeders while Copernicus data helps them identify the most suitable grazing area. 

8. Within fisheries, Copernicus is used to help assess fish stocks and to optimise fishing efforts. Together with GNSS, it can also help prevent illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing.

Read More: Partnering to promote sustainable fisheries and aquafarms

9. In the aquaculture sector, both Earth Observation and GNSS applications contribute to the optimisation and planning of aquaculture operations by providing a host of information to aquafarmers. This information is used to select the best site for their fish farms and determine water quality in lakes and reservoirs or along coastal areas. 

10. EGNSS constitutes a vital link within the food supply chain, providing the precise positioning needed to, for example, track food products being transported by air, land and sea.

Clearly, sustainable food systems start with EU Space. “Leveraging the power of EU Space puts us in a better position to answer the food security challenge and paves the way to being able to sustainably feed the world’s growing population,” concludes da Costa.

Want to learn more about how the EU Space Programme benefits agriculture and food supply chains? Then be sure to download our EU Space for Agriculture brochure and read our joint report with the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA) entitled EU Space Supporting a World of 8 Billion People.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

As the world puts the spotlight on the importance of sustainable food systems and combating global hunger, we look at how EU Space has become a proven ally in the fight against food insecurity

After upgrading the constellation, EUSPA re-opens the call for INAV improvements testing

17.10.2023 11:11  
The present European GNSS (Galileo) Open Service Signal-In-Space Interface Control Document (OS SIS ICD) Issue 2.0 contains publicly available information on the Galileo Signal-In-Space.
Published: 
17 October 2023

The Galileo Open Service (OS) has been upgraded with three new features added to its I/NAV message, one of the four message types broadcast by Galileo satellites. Collectively referred to simply as “I/NAV improvements”, these features are now available to all Open Service users. On 12 August 2023, the gradual process of upgrading the operational Galileo FOC constellation satellites was finalized. The I/NAV improvements are openly accessible through the I/NAV message carried by the E1-B signal.

The testing will cover any of the three I/NAV improvements (SSP, FEC-2, RedCED), that will be tested in laboratories using simulated realistic scenarios, including open sky as well as impaired environments, but also using Signal-in-Space. The tests will allow the participants to have confirmation of the correct implementation of the OSSISICD 2.0. 

The characteristics of the testing campaign are described here

The interested participants may be invited to provide their product(s) before 15 November 2023, 15 March 2024 or 15 June 2024 to the premises indicated below according to the terms and conditions that will be communicated by the agency and be ready to provide any remote technical assistance needed during the testing as well as all the necessary interface documentation required for the testing. 

The tests will be executed at the laboratories of the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy, and of the European Space Agency ESA/ESTEC in Noordwijk, The Netherlands. Each applicant will be assigned by EUSPA to any of the two laboratories depending on the specific conditions and availability.

Express your interest 

If you are interested in participating in the testing campaign above, please express your interest by sending an email at least 15 days before any of the testing windows indicated above (i.e. 30/10/2023, 29/02/2024 and 31/05/2024, 17:00 (Prague local time) respectively) to the following email address: market@euspa.europa.eu. The subject of the email shall be “INAV improvements implementation testing campaign: 3rd call”.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The present European GNSS (Galileo) Open Service Signal-In-Space Interface Control Document (OS SIS ICD) Issue 2.0 contains publicly available information on the Galileo Signal-In-Space.

Improving rail operations in Europe requires teamwork and access to space data

12.10.2023 9:34  
EU top rail stakeholders gather in Madrid to discuss how space can level up train operations and safety.
Published: 
12 October 2023

Trains, contribute only 1% of transport-related pollution, compared to 71% for cars and 12% for planes. They can make a valuable contribution to the fight against climate change and in achieving the Commission’s pledge of climate-neutrality in Europe by 2050. 

This, of course, requires informing and incentivising European citizens not only on the benefits but also on the safety and efficiency of the greenest means of transportation. To improve safety and efficiency of railways various operators across Europe are currently performing upgrades on their operating systems and rail infrastructure.  The Belgian government, for instance, recently announced the mobilisation of 240 million euros to construct and upgrade the rail link between Terneuzen and Ghent with the support of the EU. 

Many of these solutions rely on data and services coming from the EU’s positioning systems Galileo/EGNOS and Copernicus. In the future, rail operators could also be able to utilise satcom or high-speed internet provided by the new multiorbital constellation, IRIS2

#EUSpace solution for failsafe rail operations 

A recent example of GNSS adoption in rail operations is the innovative odometry solution deployed by the French rolling stock manufacturer Alstom to measure the location and speed of its trains. The company introduced a new sensor type, which fuses satellite information and inertial sensors. The solution is primarily using GNSS Doppler information, derived from Galileo, GPS and GLONASS constellations (configurable). Such use increases the confidence in the resulting measured speed, along with specific algorithms to improve the accuracy of the measured location.

When it comes to managing rail infrastructure, optical data from the Copernicus constellation can provide valuable information on the status of rail tracks and their surrounding environments. For instance, railway operators can evaluate the danger of landslides or soil subsidence near tunnels and railway tracks.

Interested in space and rail? Check this out!

A collective effort 

To highlight the added value of EU Space technologies the European Commission, Europe's Rail Joint Undertaking (EU-Rail), the European Union Agency for Railways (ERA), and the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) jointly hosted an event in Madrid, under the auspices of the Spanish Presidency.

The event, attended by more than 300 participants, showcased the collective and synergetic strengths of the EU bodies that boost efficiency, safety, and sustainability in European rail transportation. By merging the EU's vision for a connected transport network, EU-RAIL’s extensive R&I results, EU Space technologies, and ERA's regulatory expertise, we are reshaping the future of rail travel. 

"During this event we committed to improving the European Union’s rail infrastructure by relying on space technologies to ensure the safety of passengers and freight across the Union" said EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. 

Conclusion of the event can be found here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EU top rail stakeholders gather in Madrid to discuss how space can level up train operations and safety.

EUSpace4Ukraine Demonstrator Day: Enhancing Humanitarian Support for Ukrainian People

9.10.2023 14:57  
The EUSpace4Ukraine Demo Day showcased EU Space technology's potential in enhancing humanitarian aid
Published: 
09 October 2023

In a demonstration of humanitarian synergy, the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), alongside the Ukrainian Red Cross and the European innovators Global Smart Rescue and CloudFerro, recently held a demonstrator day in Lublin, Poland within the framework of the EUSpace4Ukraine initiative.

The EUSpace4Ukraine initiative is mobilising the EU Space innovation community that can provide technological solutions to enhance humanitarian support for the Ukrainian people. The recent event served as a platform to present a range of EU Space-enabled solutions, illustrating how innovations can elevate humanitarian aid for Ukraine.

Providing awareness for fieldwork navigation thanks to Copernicus

The first presented demonstrator was the Copernicus enhanced map application, developed with the Polish innovator CloudFerro. The web application provides up-to-date, accurate Copernicus imagery that can be used for mission planning under conditions of destroyed infrastructure or natural disasters, aiding humanitarian workers in navigating challenging terrains faster and more effectively. The presentation led to a discussion on the role of Copernicus in improving fieldwork mission planning and the Ukrainian Red Cross will test this solution in the coming weeks in their fieldwork.

Enhancing Search and Rescue with Galileo

Enabled by Galileo, drones equipped with a thermal camera and optical zoom are invaluable assets for assessing the structural integrity of damaged buildings, searching for people in remote locations, or various other Search & Rescue missions after man-made or natural disasters. In these critical moments, this drone technology can swiftly and precisely navigate even the most challenging terrains, ensuring that help reaches those in distress as fast as possible. This technology will also be thoroughly tested by the Emergency Response Team of the Ukrainian Red Cross in their fieldwork in the coming weeks.

To show the further innovations in urban Search and Rescue tools, the French innovator Global Smart Rescue showcased their geo-locatable “Little Alert Box” - the system uses sensors to detect unusual environmental conditions, ensuring reliable communication even in emergencies. They also presented an advanced solution enabling to geolocate smartphones of individuals in distress (e.g. trapped inside buildings). The Galileo-enabled drone variant of this technology further enhances autonomy and reach, and thus has immense potential for search and rescue operations.

The Ukrainian Red Cross took these cutting-edge solutions for a test in a simulated emergency environment near Lublin. This hands-on experience allowed Global Smart Rescue to gain deeper insights into the users’ needs, enabling them to tailor their technology for a more responsive approach.

The Road Ahead

To conclude, the EUSpace4Ukraine Demonstrator Day was a powerful display of innovation and cooperation, showcasing how space technology can make a tangible impact on humanitarian aid. From advanced mapping solutions to Galileo-enabled drones and cutting-edge communication systems, the potential for positive change is evident.

The Emergency Response Team of the Ukrainian Red Cross will conduct rigorous testing of these technologies in real-world scenarios. The primary objective is to showcase their effectiveness and implement necessary adjustments for optimal performance in emergency situations.

Beyond the technology, this initiative highlights how in moments of crisis, unity and innovation can go together to create a safer and more resilient world.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The EUSpace4Ukraine Demo Day showcased EU Space technology's potential in enhancing humanitarian aid

Breaking into space entrepreneurship with "Cassini Challenges"

6.10.2023 9:22  
The Cassini Challenge (formerly known as #myeuspace competition) is the one stop shop for both experienced and inexperienced innovators who want to break into the space industry!
Published: 
06 October 2023

Space has become one of the most exciting ecosystems to generate revenue. Yet, when most people hear the term "space business" the first thing that pops into their head is a rocket blasting off of a launch pad and a control room. 

"And yes, part of space business is about sending rovers to Mars and putting satellites in orbit but there is so much more that space technology can offer." explains Fiammetta Diani, head at EUSPA Market, Downstream & Innovation Department. "Thanks to the large amount of Earth Observation, satellite navigation and satcom data offered by satellites we can develop myriads of applications to serve millions of users down on Earth," she adds.  

A "downstream space entrepreneur" can be anyone from any sector that is looking into space data to innovate and add value to their or someone else’s business model. It could be a startup monitoring the environmental impact of tourism using Earth Observation data or a drone operator integrating secured satellite navigation services to deliver first aid products. 

According to Diani, space downstream entrepreneurs are able to find solutions to problems that have not been solved before and reap the rewards associated by being early movers. 

Now, one can wonder: How? And with what cost?  

Commercialising space technology with CASSINI Challenges 

EUSPA has an answer to that, and it’s now called CASSINI Challenges!

The Cassini Challenge (formerly known as #myeuspace competition) is the one stop shop for both experienced and inexperienced innovators who want to break into the space industry. It is a competition which tasks innovators with developing cutting-edge solutions to solve some of today’s most pressing societal issues using satellite data/services from Galileo and Copernicus. The reward? A cash prize pool of 1,000,000 euros to take their solution to the next level.

The competition consists of three thematic challenges and three tracks (based on the maturity of the solution proposed) encourage even more innovators to participate: 

  • Next Generation Challenge: applicants are asked to leverage Galileo and Copernicus data to craft value adding solutions to improve the well-being, safety, security and connectivity of EU citizens.
  • Sustainable Future Challenge: participants are tasked with developing innovative solutions for the conservation of ecosystems, sustainable agriculture and management of energy and resources.
  • Emerging Technologies Challenge: innovators must develop disruptive solutions combining EU space data with deep technologies such as Artificial Intelligence (AI), Quantum technologies (quantum computing, sensing, simulation, encryption, etc.), Blockchain technology and Extended Reality or the Metaverse (Augmented Reality (AR), Mixed Reality (MR), Virtual Reality (VR).

Throughout the competition, EUSPA Market Development professionals will offer guidance to participants through dedicated webinars. Participants will also have access to a wealth of tools and publications of space intelligence generated by EUSPA such as the EUSPA EO and GNSS Marker Report and the EU Space For Green Transformation report, among others. 

The Cassini Challenges are open to teams from the EU27 plus Switzerland, Norway and Iceland.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The Cassini Challenge (formerly known as #myeuspace competition) is the one stop shop for both experienced and inexperienced innovators who want to break into the space industry!

Breaking into space entrepreneurship with "Cassini Challenges"

6.10.2023 9:22  
The Cassini Challenge (formerly known as #myeuspace competition) is the one stop shop for both experienced and inexperienced innovators who want to break into the space industry!
Published: 
06 October 2023

Space has become one of the most exciting ecosystems to generate revenue. Yet, when most people hear the term "space business" the first thing that pops into their head is a rocket blasting off of a launch pad and a control room. 

"And yes, part of space business is about sending rovers to Mars and putting satellites in orbit but there so much more than space technology can offer." explains Fiammetta Diani, head at EUSPA Market, Downstream & Innovation Department. "Thanks to the large amount of Earth Observation, satellite navigation and satcom data offered by satellites we can develop myriads of applications to serve millions of users down on Earth," she adds.  

A "downstream space entrepreneur" can be anyone from any sector that is looking into space data to innovate and add value to their or someone else’s business model. It could be a startup monitoring the environmental impact of tourism using Earth Observation data or a drone operator integrating secured satellite navigation services to deliver first aid products. 

According to Diani, space downstream entrepreneurs are able to find solutions to problems that have not been solved before and reap the rewards associated by being early movers. 

Now, one can wonder: How? And with what cost?  

Commercialising space technology with CASSINI Challenges 

EUSPA has an answer to that, and it’s now called CASSINI Challenges!

The Cassini Challenge (formerly known as #myeuspace competition) is the one stop shop for both experienced and inexperienced innovators who want to break into the space industry. It is a competition which tasks innovators with developing cutting-edge solutions to solve some of today’s most pressing societal issues using satellite data/services from Galileo and Copernicus. The reward? A cash prize pool of 1,000,000 euros to take their solution to the next level.

The competition consists of three thematic challenges and three tracks (based on the maturity of the solution proposed) encourage even more innovators to participate: 

  • Next Generation Challenge: applicants are asked to leverage Galileo and Copernicus data to craft value adding solutions to improve the well-being, safety, security and connectivity of EU citizens.
  • Sustainable Future Challenge: participants are tasked with developing innovative solutions for the conservation of ecosystems, sustainable agriculture and management of energy and resources.
  • Emerging Technologies Challenge: innovators must develop disruptive solutions combining EU space data with deep technologies such as Artificial Intelligence (AI), Quantum technologies (quantum computing, sensing, simulation, encryption, etc.), Blockchain technology and Extended Reality or the Metaverse (Augmented Reality (AR), Mixed Reality (MR), Virtual Reality (VR).

Throughout the competition, EUSPA Market Development professionals will offer guidance to participants through dedicated webinars. Participants will also have access to a wealth of tools and publications of space intelligence generated by EUSPA such as the EUSPA EO and GNSS Marker Report and the EU Space For Green Transformation report, among others. 

The Cassini Challenges are open to teams from the EU27 plus Switzerland, Norway and Iceland.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The Cassini Challenge (formerly known as #myeuspace competition) is the one stop shop for both experienced and inexperienced innovators who want to break into the space industry!

Uno, dos, tres… Registrations for EU Space Week are open!

4.10.2023 16:04  
The registration for the EU Space Week 2023 go live!
Published: 
03 October 2023

Organised by the EU Agency for the Space Programme and the European Commission, under the auspices of the Spanish Presidency of the Council of the European Union, the EU Space Week 2023 is taking place in Sevilla from the 7th to 9th of November. The top European Union space conference is a unique opportunity to get an up-close look at how European businesses – and society in general – benefit from the EU Space Programme. 

"The EU Space Week is the hallmark of the European space sector, bringing together top policy and decision makers across the EU, scientists, space industry experts and entrepreneurs from all walks of life. It’s a platform where actors involved or interested in the EU Space Programme can share knowledge, experiences and reflect on how we can improve the services currently offered by Galileo, EGNOS, Copernicus and GOVSATCOM/IRIS2. I am excited to announce that the registrations for the EU Space Week 2023 are officially open as of today! I look forward to welcoming you all in Sevilla" remarked EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. 

REGISTER HERE

What to expect? 

While more details will be revealed in the coming weeks, here’s a sneak peek of what awaits you:  

  • Keynote speeches by Diana Morant, Minister of Science and Innovation and Thierry Breton, European Commissioner for Internal Market  
  • New and insightful sessions including sessions on Space Traffic Management and Space Security
  • New ways to do space and innovate 
  • Live demonstrations of applications powered by the EU Space Programme 
  • Social events and networking opportunities 

Latitude: 37.40347465 Longitude: -5.93310621

The EU Space Week will be hosted at the Fibes Conference and Exhibition centre, just two kilometres from the picturesque city of Sevilla. 

To find your way to the conference centre use your Galileo-enabled, mobile phone or wearable.

Can’t make it to Sevilla? No worries, we will be livestreaming the event.

The EU Space Week is jointly organised by the European Commission and the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) and held under the auspices of the Spanish Presidency of the Council of European Union.  

Make sure you follow  EUSPA (@EU4Space), DG DEFIS (@DEFIS_eu), and the Spanish Presidency (@eu2023es) on Twitter for updates. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The registration for the EU Space Week 2023 goes live!

Reinforcing European space autonomy with the EU Space Information Sharing Centre (ISAC)

2.10.2023 13:06  
The EU Space ISAC will be membership-driven organisation, engaging industry, public sector institutions and academia.
Published: 
02 October 2023

Space plays a crucial role in EU strategic autonomy, economy, citizens’ welfare, security and defence, scientific development and other vital areas. Considering the Union’s increasing reliance on space data and services, safeguarding the security of space systems and the communication and information networks they rely upon is of utmost importance.

On March 2023, the European Commissioner for Internal Market, Thierry Breton and the High Representative, Josep Borrel presented in March 2023 the first-ever EU Space Strategy for Security and Defence. The strategy is a direct implementation of the EU Strategic Compass adopted less than a year ago and which defined space, together with cyber and maritime, as contested strategic domains, the security of which must be ensured. 

The strategy foresees -among others- the creation of a Sharing and Analysis Centre (EU Space ISAC) to raise awareness and facilitate the exchange of best practices among commercial and relevant public entities on resilience measures for space capabilities.

Increasing EUSPA’s security responsibilities 

EUSPA has a large portfolio to deliver on, which includes the security of the EU Space Programme and its components in space and on the ground. The agency guarantees that Europe’s positioning systems, Galileo and EGNOS emit secure signals and that their respective ground infrastructures (sensors, antennas, stations) remain intact. It does so by performing risk and threat analysis and monitoring the compliance to the general security requirements of the space components.

Moreover, EUSPA provides security expertise to other components of the Space Programme, such as GOVSATCOM and the Space Situational Awareness

As of June 2023, the agency also manages the EU Space Surveillance and Tracking (SST) Front Desk. Highly qualified EUSPA staff interfaces with spacecraft owners and operators, EU institutions and EU Member States and supports them in using the web portal and the services SST offers.

Read this: EUSPA grows further to support EU Space Traffic Management

“Working towards the establishment of the EU space ISAC is an important task for our agency, and we are proud to work with the European Commission on this’’ says EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. “Given our excellence in managing the operational security of Galileo and our new role in the EU SST, we are excited to be able to share our knowledge with interested stakeholders and contribute to a safer and more secure EU space.’’ he concludes.

So, what is the EU space Sharing and Analysis Centre?

The EU Space ISAC will be membership-driven organisation, engaging industry, public sector institutions and academia. The main objective of it is to contribute to the security and resilience of space systems and their supply chain.

It will serve as the primary communication channel for the space sector with regard to security related information and sharing of best practices, and will provide relevant knowledge, services and resources to enable participants to prevent, tackle and mitigate security challenges to the space sector more effectively and efficiently. 

The centre will be composed of “Members'”, which can include Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs), startups and academia. It will also include the so called “Public partners,’’ i.e., legal public entities of relevance for the EU Space sector and which are directly or indirectly contributing to the activity and regulation of ISAC.

Why Participate?

Stay Informed: engage in information sharing about security related information, incidents*, cyber trends, vulnerabilities, and threats.

Stay Ahead: benefit from early warning systems, getting timely alerts on security threats, enabling swift responses.

Develop Together: enhance collective cybersecurity resilience through knowledge sharing, best practices, and expertise pooling.

Access Expertise: engage with cybersecurity experts, public sector agencies, and other stakeholders for guidance and support.

Network: build connections with industry peers and public partners, fostering collaborative solutions to common challenges.

Analytical information can be found here.

We encourage applicants to read carefully the call before submitting. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The EU Space ISAC will be membership-driven organisation, engaging industry, public sector institutions and academia.

ASGARD: The ultimate response to maritime spoofing attacks

29.9.2023 11:39  
The global shipping industry, the backbone of the world economy, is particularly vulnerable to a range of security threats. One of those threats is GNSS spoofing.
Published: 
29 September 2023

GNSS is a critical technology used in maritime navigation systems. It enables vessels to determine their position, speed and time by receiving signals from satellites. Unfortunately, malicious actors can rather easily spoof these signals to provide unreliable or even fake positioning information. 

Such false information can cause a ship to change course, which is exactly what happened to ATRIA, a 37,500-ton tanker, in 2017. The ship’s captain thought he was near Gelendzhik Airport – at least that’s where the ship’s GNSS coordinates told him. In reality, it was positioned just off the port of Novorossiysk, about 20 nautical miles (37 kilometres) from the airport. ATRIA was by no means alone, at least 20 other nearby and equally unaware ships were in the same location. 

Not only can spoofing lead to accidents and other safety hazards, it also opens the door to potential threats to national security. In 2019, Iran seized a UK-flagged oil tanker located in the Strait of Hormuz on the grounds that it had violated international law. After careful analysis of the ship’s positioning data, it was confirmed that spoofing was involved.    

Protection by detection 

These are by no means isolated incidents. Spoofing attacks happen all the time and around the world. In an increasingly sophisticated landscape of aggression, they’ll likely happen more often and be even more complex. 

Without proper countermeasure methods, spoofing attacks will continue to pose a serious threat to maritime safety. The challenge is that in order to mitigate a spoofing attack, a ship first needs to be aware of the attack.

Enter ASGARD, the ultimate anti-spoofing weapon for maritime security.

Co-funded by EUSPA and coordinated by Saab and GMV, the ASGARD project is developing cutting-edge technology to counter ongoing GNSS spoofing activities. “ASGARD functions using a protection by detection strategy,” says Ana Cezón, who heads the Advance Navigation Division at GMV. “It is designed to detect and prevent GNSS spoofing attacks in real environment, ensuring that ships can navigate safely and securely.” 

GMV and Saab are two leading companies with a long-standing reputation in the field of maritime communication and navigation.

Leveraging the Galileo OSNMA service

At the heart of this protection by detection strategy is a multi-constellation, anti-spoofing GNSS receiver that leverages the Galileo Open Service Navigation Message Authentication (OSNMA) service to authenticate the navigation message. The free access service complements the Galileo Open Service (OS) by delivering authenticated data, assuring users that the received Galileo navigation message is coming from the system itself and has not been modified.

Thanks to its use of the OSNMA service, Galileo satellites can send a key and digital signature that the ASGARD receiver uses to verify the authenticity of the signal via its own public key. If the receiver detects a signal that cannot be authenticated, it immediately alerts the operator of a potential spoofing attack and prompts them to take alternative measures to validate the vessel’s position. 

The system also offers an innovative integrity solution that ensures the reliability and safety of the system. 

Ensuring the safety and security of crew and cargo 

Still in development, ASGARD will soon undergo real-time testing where it will be put through a series of spoofing attacks to ensure it delivers within set specifications. Once complete, the system is expected to have a significant impact on the maritime industry, improving safety and security for both vessels and crews.

“ASGARD will provide an effective response to spoofing attacks by ensuring that vessels stay on course and are not lured off by attackers,” says Peter Bergljung, Head of Strategy at Saab. “With ASGARD, vessel owners and operators can have peace of mind knowing that their vessels are equipped with cutting-edge technology that provides protection against spoofing attacks and helps ensure the safety and security of the crew and cargo.”

Once certified according to maritime safety regulations (SOLAS) and maritime standards (IEC), ASGARD is also expected to boost the uptake of Galileo within the maritime sector.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The global shipping industry, the backbone of the world economy, is particularly vulnerable to a range of security threats. One of those threats is GNSS spoofing.

Linking #EUSpace to governmental user needs

27.9.2023 9:46  
European Union, Copernicus Sentinel-2 imagery: Helsinki covered in snow, Finland, February 2022
Published: 
27 September 2023

Access to space data and services has become an absolute essential for governmental actors ranging from diplomatic missions to maritime authorities. Space capabilities, be it communications, satellite navigation or Earth Observation are a cost-efficient way for the Union to manage security incidents, mitigate the effects of climate change and ensure the wellbeing of its citizens.

During a workshop in Helsinki, organised by the Association of Finnish Defence and Aerospace Industries - AFDA, Rodrigo da Costa, EUSPA Executive Director answered information needs and highlighted the growing importance of using certain services from Galileo, Copernicus and in the future GOVSATCOM and IRIS2.

“One of the cornerstones of Finland’s space policy is the vast participation of new space companies and start-ups. The EUSPA workshop was a valuable opportunity to learn about the relevant leveraging options on the interface between Finnish companies and authorities and the EU,” confirmed Ilona Lundström, Chair of the Finnish Space Committee. 

Resilience and Robustness with Galileo Public Regulated Service 

Galileo's Public Regulated Service (PRS) is an encrypted navigation system designed for authorized governmental users and sensitive applications. PRS ensures a resilient and robust navigation experience, particularly in situations where other services may be unavailable or compromised. Unlike Galileo Open service, PRS features a unique signal and system architecture that enhances its resistance to malicious interference, such as spoofing and jamming. EUSPA is actively involved in developing the PRS user segment to meet user needs and promote its secure and widespread use. In the meantime, EUSPA is continuing the development and maintenance of the Galileo services. After the Galileo High Accuracy Service available since January 2023, the new Open Service with Navigation Message Authentication (OSNMA) is planned to be made available in the first trimester of 2024.

Read this: Successful demonstration of New Emergency Warning Satellite Service takes place in France & Germany

Secure connectivity anywhere, anytime

Satellite communications are a strategic asset for the Union and its Member States. Recent geopolitical tensions at the borders of our continent have only highlighted the need for secure, robust and rapidly deployable satellite communications capabilities.

To respond to this challenge, the European Commission introduced a new flagship programme for secure communications and high throughput connectivity called “IRIS2’’  or Infrastructure for Resilience, Interconnectivity and Security by Satellite. The new multi-orbital constellation will combine the benefits offered by Low Earth (LEO), Geostationary (GEO), and Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) satellites to provide secure communication services and broadband connectivity to European citizens, private companies and governmental authorities anywhere in the world. 

“The navigation, earth observation and secured communications capabilities of the EU Space Programme will unleash an array of opportunities and applications for government use. They can support the management of critical infrastructure, or security operations in remote areas among others’’, says EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa.

Seeing the “full picture’’ with Copernicus 

We often refer to Copernicus as “Europe’s eyes on Earth’’ and there’s a good reason behind this nickname. The EU Earth Observation Programme generates over 16 terabytes of optical and in-situ data which are translated into a wealth of information through its six thematic services.  

While all services are widely used by governmental actors such as CAP paying agencies or ministries of environment (i.e., C3S), the Security Service of Copernicus and its respective components the Maritime and Border Surveillance services have become the preferred security tool at the fingertips of law enforcement authorities. 

EUSPA: Delivering next generation governmental space applications 

Fiammetta Diani, EUSPA Head of Market Downstream and Innovation took the opportunity of the workshop to recall the mission of EUSPA towards entrepreneurs. “From funding to space market intelligence, EUSPA helps entrepreneurs, private and public actors create solutions that combine satellite communications, navigation, and Earth Observation to address challenges or improve the safety and wellbeing of EU citizens.”

EUSPA funds a series of research and innovation projects through Horizon Europe that are promising to deliver some of the most cutting edge, space applications to benefit government users. The next Horizon Europe call will be launched in the last trimester of 2023.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

European Union, Copernicus Sentinel-2 imagery: Helsinki covered in snow, Finland, February 2022

Copernicus services supports Global Pharmaceuticals

26.9.2023 15:35  
The global pharmaceutical company Teva is investigating the correlation between wildfire air pollution and asthma triggers with the aid of the Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS)The impact of climate change on triggering asthma attacks is being analysed
Published: 
26 September 2023

Asthma is a condition which impacts the daily lives of 30 million Europeans and 300 million people globally. People with asthma may experience coughing, wheezing and trouble breathing among other ailments. According to the European Federation of Asthma and Allergy Associations, the global asthma prevalence could increase to 400 million people worldwide by 2025. 

A 2021 Eurostat report on asthma rates found Finland on the top of the list, with 9% of people reporting to have asthma, followed by Germany and France (both at 8%). In contrast, only 2% of people in both Romania and Bulgaria reported having this disease. In addition to the burden of asthma on the lives of individuals and their families, it is asthma exacerbations that also impact health care systems and society due to their impact on work/school productivity and health care utilisation and costs.

Climate change triggering or worsening Asthma  

Climate change highly affects the air we breathe by increasing the risk that air pollution, including ozone and particle pollution, will worsen. Increasing temperatures, causes warm air to form ground-level ozone, which can be one of the main components of smog, a powerful air pollutant. In turn, as ozone irritates the lungs, it is likely to trigger an asthma attack.  

Likewise, hotter temperatures and drought are found to be important contributors to more frequent and intense wildfires as well as longer wildfire seasons. Wildfires generate smoke that deteriorates air quality, allowing tiny particles to reach far into the lungs and enter the bloodstream, causing asthma attacks. 

PODCAST: Can Copernicus help you with your seasonal allergies?

Space data to the rescue

As climate change continues to pose the greatest challenge for the Union, the scientific community and healthcare industry are looking for novel ways to understand the complex interactions between air quality and respiratory health. Approaches include the use of Earth Observation data – both in-situ and optical by Copernicus.

The global pharmaceutical company Teva is investigating the correlation between wildfire air pollution and asthma outcomes with the aid of the Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS).

CAMS provides consistent information on the atmosphere anywhere in the world, which allows users to assess the past and predict the next few days. CAMS adds value to air quality and atmospheric composition observations which are taken from satellites as well as from sensors on the ground, in the oceans and in the air (known as in-situ). The work of CAMS scientists focuses on the main areas of air quality and atmospheric composition: solar radiation, the ozone layer and ultraviolet radiation, emissions and surface fluxes of pollutants and greenhouse gases, and climate forcing.

Teva pharmaceuticals is studying global data on wildfires provided by the Global Fire Assimilation System (GFAS) of CAMS, as well as relevant air pollution parameters to better understand how Asthma patients are affected. The global pharmaceutical is correlating real-world data from its digital inhaler with Copernicus information in order to validate current known and hypothesized relationships between environment and patient outcome, as well as discover new ones. The studies have the potential to provide novel insights into our current understanding of asthma, offering the possibility to significantly advance patient care and well-being. 

CAMS uses near-real-time observations of the location and intensity of active wildfires to estimate the emissions of pollutants. This is done through its Global Fire Assimilation System (GFAS).

“EUSPA is in charge of promoting the use of Copernicus data and services to new commercial and business users and helping create value-adding applications that benefit end users” says Justyna Redelkiewicz, the Head of Section Consumer and Environment at EUSPA. “‘By leveraging Copernicus’ comprehensive data on air quality, healthcare stakeholders can collaboratively engage in targeted efforts to address this critical issue and proactively promote public well-being.” concludes Redelkiewicz.

As Copernicus takes a pivotal step into the healthcare sector, the cooperation between EUSPA and Teva Pharmaceutics indicates a significant advancement in addressing the complex challenges posed by respiratory diseases, in particular in the context of Climate Change. With the potential to unlock breakthrough insights into asthma triggers through the analysis of Copernicus data on wildfires and air quality, this collaboration holds promise for the development of innovative healthcare solutions. As the healthcare industry embraces the wealth of information Copernicus offers, a new era of understanding and tackling health-related challenges is set to unfold.

To maximise knowledge about the EU Space Programme and its growing potential in the healthcare sector EUSPA participated in AUTOMA+ 2023, in Zurich, Switzerland between 25-26 September.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The impact of climate change on triggering asthma attacks is being analysed

Let’s fly – with EU Space

26.9.2023 12:29  
Airspace Integration Week Madrid is happening 25 – 28 September and EUSPA will be there highlighting the essential role of the entire EU Space Programme
Published: 
26 September 2023

While many of us may dream of flying to space, everyone can fly with space. 

That’s because whenever you catch a flight, your aircraft is likely using a range of space-based technologies for everything from positioning to enabling the most fuel-efficient routes and navigating poor visibility conditions at low altitudes.

In fact, the EU Space Programme has its roots in aviation. EGNOS, the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service, was designed for flying. Since its launch in 2010, the programme has been increasing accuracy and integrity and improving accessibility, efficiency, sustainability and safety for operators and pilots at over 420 airports across Europe. 

“From the commercial, regional, general and business aviation sectors to OEMs, airports and the end user – everyone benefits from EGNOS,” says Carmen Aguilera, Head of Section Operational Market Development & Safety Critical Applications at EUSPA

Aguilera will be a featured speaker during Airspace Integration Week Madrid, of which EUSPA is also a partner, speaking about STM, ATM and UTM.

In light of an increasingly congested space, there is a compelling need to act in order to maintain space as a resource for future generations. Space Traffic Management therefore aims at keeping space operations safe, space orbits usable, and space accessible for decades to come while ensuring and further fostering the competitiveness of the EU industry. Dedicated panels on STM took place also including the presentation of EUSPA new responsibility on Space Surveillance and Tracking (SST) Front Desk.

Read more: EGNOS makes flying sustainably ‘easy’

Moreover, as Aguilera is quick to note, EGNOS is by no means the only component of the EU Space Programme that benefits aviation. “Galileo, the EU's global navigation satellite system, will soon provide advanced navigation capabilities to the aviation sector, greatly improving the availability and reliability of services,” she explains. 

EGNOS, Galileo and Copernicus open the door to a safe and efficient drone ecosystem 

EGNOS and Galileo differentiators (Authentication and High Accuracy) support efficient and safe drone operations. Commercial receivers with these capabilities are already in the market ready to be used. The integration in a drone platform and the mission, either in the autopilot or payload, may not be evident. Therefore, EUSPA is holding the first Hands on workshop on the integration of EGNOS and Galileo for drone operators. We will work with real receivers and drone models to show you how to use them in operations. No promotional material, just practical tools!

Join us on 26th September at 15h00 at the Spotlight theatre 

While Galileo and EGNOS enable the determination of a precise position anywhere, Copernicus, Europe’s Earth Observation programme, provides information on the Earth’s surface, atmosphere and oceans. For the aviation sector, this means being able to monitor volcanic ash clouds, emissions, terrain, flight procedure development and flight planning.

But where Copernicus really shines is its role in enabling safe drone operations. 

For instance, maps that integrate Earth Observation data can provide drone operators and regulators with insights on population density, allowing them to plan routes that avoid crowded areas. In Europe, regulators can use Copernicus data to help harmonise the way these ground risks are assessed, while developers can use this same data to strategically plan the building of such drone infrastructure as cargo drops, vertiports and charging stations.

 “Copernicus data, working in synergy with the accurate and secure positioning provided by Galileo and EGNOS, will enable an integrated, efficient and well-regulated drone ecosystem that allows operators and businesses to thrive while also ensuring the safety of those on the ground,” concludes Aguilera.   

Read more: EU Space key to enabling a harmonised drone ecosystem

Recognising its immense potential for enabling a harmonised drone ecosystem and complex drone operations, the European Commission’s Drone Strategy 2.0 puts EU Space front and centre. Responsible for the operational management of the EU Space Programme and for ensuring the continuous provision of its services, EUSPA plays a key role in the strategy’s implementation. You can learn more about the strategy and EUSPA’s role here.

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Airspace Integration Week Madrid is happening 25 – 28 September and EUSPA will be there highlighting the essential role of the entire EU Space Programme

New procurement to support EUSPA Quality, Programme Oversight and Information Security

22.9.2023 15:20  
EUSPA published a new public procurement to help achieve its objectives as they are defined in the Agency’s Quality and Oversight Policies. A dedicated workshop is taking place on October 2nd, 2023.
Published: 
27 September 2023

This procurement aims to provide support to EUSPA in maintaining its ISO 9001:2015 – certified Integrated Management System, implementing the oversight of the EU Space Programme components and exploring the adoption of the ISO 27000 standard for its information security.

To execute the Framework Contract, the Agency may request the contractors through specific contract(s), to provide the following services:

Service 1: Corporate Quality Management

This service is dedicated to the ongoing maintenance and improvement of EUSPA's Integrated Management System (IMS) that conforms to ISO 9001 standards, as proven by the associated certificate the Agency has held for nearly 10 years. The work will be executed under the direct supervision of EUSPA’s Corporate Quality Manager.

Service 2: Space Programmes' Oversight

Focused on the oversight of the implementation of the service provision management system (also called quality framework) for the EU Space Programme components managed by EUSPA, such as EGNOS and Galileo. The work will be directly managed by EUSPA’s Oversight Manager.

Service 3: ISO 27000 Preparation

This service, which can be optionally activated, aims to prepare EUSPA for ISO 27000 certification, including an initial assessment, gap analysis, and planning for the effort required to get the relevant certification.

Submission Deadline: Monday, October 16, 2023 - 23:59 (Brussels time)

A dedicated webinar for further clarification on the procurement will be hosted on the 2nd of October 2023, at 15h00 CET.

You can join the webinar here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EUSPA published a new public procurement to help achieve its objectives as they are defined in the Agency’s Quality and Oversight Policies. A dedicated workshop is taking place on October 2nd, 2023.

Empowering Security: The European Union Space Programme and EUSPA’s role in advancing resilience and innovation

21.9.2023 17:15  
The EU Space Programme serves as a cornerstone for various security applications thanks to its various components
Published: 
24 September 2023

The European Union Space Programme is  a pivotal pillar in advancing security applications, propelling research, and fostering innovation across Europe's space endeavours. The Programme serves as a cornerstone for various security applications thanks to its various components. The Copernicus Security Service delivers vital intelligence for external action, as well as border and maritime surveillance. The use of Galileo-protected services, including but not limited to its Public Regulated Service (PRS) which provides encrypted positioning and timing data, ensures secure and reliable operation of critical infrastructure and sensitive missions and applications. GOVSATCOM will enhance secure satellite communication for government authorised users, while the upcoming IRIS2 programme will further elevate satellite communication's resilience. Together, these initiatives will reinforce Europe's security capabilities and readiness, enabling more efficient operations for security actors.

The European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) supports the possibilities brought by the different components through a comprehensive array of initiatives to fortify security capabilities in diverse dimensions.  

Within the Agency, the Security Accreditation Board (SAB) operates as a distinct body responsible for accrediting security in the EU Space Programme's components. It takes its decisions in an independent manner including with regard to the Commission and the other bodies responsible for the implementation of the components and provision of service. EUSPA's proactive approach is vividly evident in its outreach to user communities, actively refining services based on their nuanced requirements. A prime example is the ENTRUSTED project, a collaborative venture that meticulously consolidates governmental user needs, subsequently tailoring services for enhanced effectiveness. The agency's interactions with security users, exemplified by the organisation of events like the first SatCom downstream event, underscore its dedication to comprehending and addressing user demands. Further showcasing this dedication is the EUSpace4Ukraine initiative, which lends support to crisis management actors and NGOs in a pivotal geopolitical region.

Anticipation builds around the recurrent User Consultation Platform (UCP) meetings, to take place in Spain in the framework of the EU Space Week in November 2023. Set to convene stakeholders, the UCP furnishes a platform for insightful deliberations, particularly emphasizing Resilient Societies. Here, stakeholders will converge to deliberate emerging challenges and chart strategies for heightening societal resilience. This undertaking mirrors EUSPA's commitment to bolstering security applications capable of countering evolving threats.

EUSPA's alignment with Horizon Europe adds a potent layer to its approach, fostering security application development. With the evaluation of the second Horizon Europe call concluded, expectations mount for upcoming projects geared toward addressing security use cases. This synergy exemplifies the agency's resolve to stimulate innovation and collaboration, spanning a wide gamut of security realms.

As the European Union Agency for the Space Programme perpetually evolves, its steadfast commitment to propelling security applications, nurturing research, and fostering innovation emerge as a guiding force, shaping a safer and more robust future. The stage is set for ground-breaking developments that promise to revolutionize security capabilities, fortifying Europe's readiness against intricate challenges.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The EU Space Programme serves as a cornerstone for various security applications thanks to its various components

EUSPA: The partner of choice for space-based entrepreneurs

15.9.2023 9:46  
EUSPA has become the partner of choice for Europe’s space-based entrepreneurs by supporting initiatives like the 6th CASSINI Hackathon.
Published: 
15 September 2023

Did you know that the GNSS and Earth Observation downstream market generated over EUR 200 billion in revenue in 2021? What’s more, this market is expected to hit the half trillion mark over the next decade.

Not only are these some big numbers – they also represent a BIG opportunity for European start-ups, scale-ups, SMEs, entrepreneurs, innovators and investors.  

Helping leverage this opportunity is EUSPA.

In addition to our responsibility for the operational management of the EU Space Programme and for ensuring the continuous provision of its services, EUSPA is also charged with supporting the development of innovative European products and applications and a competitive space industry based on Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus services. 

“EUSPA is the go-to hub for businesses seeking information, expertise, and support in integrating EU space technology into their business solutions,” says EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. 

To deliver on this mission, EUSPA offers such funding opportunities as the flagship Horizon Europe and Fundamental Elements mechanisms. Then there’s the EUSPA Space Academy, an online training platform open to those looking to learn the ins and outs of building a space application business. EUSPA also supports a wide range of contests and awards, including the #myEUSpce competition and the popular CASSINI Hackathon.

Space for International Development and Humanitarian Aid 

The 6th edition of the CASSINI Hackathon is focused on using EU Space to address the global challenges of international development and humanitarian aid. Galileo and Copernicus offer powerful solutions to ensure access to fundamental necessities such as clean water and a secure food supply, while also providing effective assistance during times of crisis.

Read more: Sustainably supporting 8 billion people with EU Space

Now open for registration, the CASSINI Hackathon challenges you to develop innovative concepts and products using European space data and services from Copernicus, Galileo and EGNOS. These novel solutions should support sustainable infrastructure development, strengthen food security and access to clean water, or aid in the forecasting and understanding of forced migration. 

The hackathon will take place simultaneously across 11 different locations from 3-5 November 2023, during which participants will gain access to European space data, information and signals, plus other valuable tools. The top ideas will be awarded at both the local and EU levels, with the overall winners earning a six-month mentoring programme that includes 100 hours of customised mentoring. 

From market intelligence to business success 

In addition to the CASSINI Hackathon, EUSPA also supports space entrepreneurs by providing the in-depth market intelligence they need to thrive. “We are well-known across the industry as a leading source of critical market intelligence, one that is regularly relied upon by policymakers, entrepreneurs and major corporations,” notes Fiammetta Diani, EUSPA Head of Market, Downstream and Innovation.

For example, EUSPA’s EO and GNSS Market Report analyses the latest global trends and developments, while the GNSS User Technology Report covers the development, purchasing and use of GNSS user technology. Other key publications include EU Space for Green Transformation and the GNSS Investment Report.

But EUSPA’s support doesn’t stop with market intelligence, we also help you translate that intelligence into business success. Through mentoring and business matchmaking, we are well-positioned to support start-ups throughout the entire product development process – from finetuning an idea to prototyping and testing it and even getting it ready for commercialisation. 

“Whether it's through financial support, mentorship, or providing valuable market insights, EUSPA remains steadfast in its commitment to nurturing innovative entrepreneurs, start-ups, and SMEs harnessing EU Space capabilities to drive Europe's technological advancement and green transformation,” concludes da Costa. 

You can learn about the many great ways EUSPA supports entrepreneurs here. Or contact our market development team at market@euspa.europa.eu.  

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EUSPA has become the partner of choice for Europe’s space-based entrepreneurs by supporting initiatives like the 6th CASSINI Hackathon.

Leveraging Copernicus data to enhance drone operations planning for European operators

14.9.2023 9:37  
Companies like RigiTech are leveraging the benefits of integrating both Galileo and Copernicus into their drone delivery solutions.
Published: 
14 September 2023

While Galileo enables the determination of a precise position anywhere, Copernicus, Europe’s Earth Observation programme, provides information on the Earth’s surface, atmosphere and oceans. Put the two together and what you get is an array of synergies that not only have significant commercial potential, but also the potential to have a powerful impact on society. 

Take RigiTech, for example. The Swiss aerial logistics company is leveraging both Galileo and Copernicus to create fully-integrated drone delivery solutions – including those capable of quickly delivering critical medical supplies when and where they matter most.   

With Galileo and Copernicus, RigiTech delivers 

A semi-finalist in the EUSPA MyGalileoDrone competition, RigiTech’s autonomous drone network utilises the positioning provided by Galileo to deliver lab tests and life-saving medicines between clinics and laboratories without the need for on-the-ground operators. 

Having successfully integrated the Copernicus Global Human Settlement Layer (GHSL) into their drone logistics software, the company’s drones are now also using Copernicus data to inform flight mission planning and management and to mitigate the ground-based risks posed by some drone operations. "The addition of Copernicus data significantly improves the efficiency of flight mission preparation, both in terms of finding the optimal flight trajectory with respect to locations with minimal population and for evaluating risks and safety measures over the terrain,” says RigiTech Head of Operations Alejandro Del Estal.

RigiTech is also a long-time user of the Copernicus Digital Elevation Model (DEM), which it uses both during route planning and to visualise the elevation profile of the planned flight. 

Using Copernicus data to plan safe and efficient drone operations 

GNSS and Earth Observation are powerful tools in their own right. But, as RigiTech has clearly demonstrated, drone operations stand to benefit the most when these solutions are used in synergy. That’s why, in addition to actively promoting the use of Galileo within drone operations, EUSPA also supports the uptake of Copernicus data for planning efficient – and safe – flight missions.  

Copernicus data is particularly beneficial for developing the population density maps used to evaluate ground risk – a critical component of a Specific Operation Risk Assessment (SORA). SORA is a methodology for classifying the risks posed by a drone flight in the specific category of operations and for identifying mitigations and safety objectives. 

This same Earth Observation data can also be used by National Aviation Authorities (NAAs) when reviewing and approving permits to, for example, fly beyond visual line of sight (BVLOS). In the future, Copernicus data will play a key role in Advanced Air Mobility, including for the planning and deployment of vertiports and other infrastructure.    

“Maps that integrate Earth Observation data provide operators and regulators with insights on population density, allowing them to plan routes that avoid crowded areas,” explains EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. “Furthermore, regulators can use Copernicus data to help harmonise the way these ground risks are assessed, and developers can use this same data to strategically plan the building of such infrastructure as cargo drops, vertiports and charging stations.”

In addition to supporting the European Commission’s Drone Strategy 2.0, EUSPA discussed the use cases for Copernicus data in drone operations during the Joint Authorities for Rulemaking on Unmanned Systems (JARUS) 2023 plenary meeting in Rome. In October of this year, it will participate in an EASA workshop on population density services for drone operations.  

To learn more about EU Space for drone operations, please download our free brochure

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Companies like RigiTech are leveraging the benefits of integrating both Galileo and Copernicus into their drone delivery solutions.

Leveraging Copernicus data to enhance drone operations planning for European operators

14.9.2023 9:37  
Companies like RigiTech are leveraging the benefits of integrating both Galileo and Copernicus into their drone delivery solutions.
Published: 
14 September 2023

While Galileo enables the determination of a precise position anywhere, Copernicus, Europe’s Earth Observation programme, provides information on the Earth’s surface, atmosphere and oceans. Put the two together and what you get is an array of synergies that not only have significant commercial potential, but also the potential to have a powerful impact on society. 

Take RigiTech, for example. The Swiss aerial logistics company is leveraging both Galileo and Copernicus to create fully-integrated drone delivery solutions – including those capable of quickly delivering critical medical supplies when and where they matter most.   

With Galileo and Copernicus, RigiTech delivers 

A semi-finalist in the EUSPA MyGalileoDrone competition, RigiTech’s autonomous drone network utilises the positioning provided by Galileo to deliver lab tests and life-saving medicines between clinics and laboratories without the need for on-the-ground operators. 

Having successfully integrated the Copernicus Global Human Settlement Layer (GHSL) into their drone logistics software, the company’s drones are now also using Copernicus data to inform flight mission planning and management and to mitigate the ground-based risks posed by some drone operations. "The addition of Copernicus data significantly improves the efficiency of flight mission preparation, both in terms of finding the optimal flight trajectory with respect to locations with minimal population and for evaluating risks and safety measures over the terrain,” says RigiTech Head of Operations Alejandro Del Estal.

RigiTech is also a long-time user of the Copernicus Digital Elevation Model (DEM), which it uses both during route planning and to visualise the elevation profile of the planned flight. 

ghsl

Using Copernicus data to plan safe and efficient drone operations 

GNSS and Earth Observation are powerful tools in their own right. But, as RigiTech has clearly demonstrated, drone operations stand to benefit the most when these solutions are used in synergy. That’s why, in addition to actively promoting the use of Galileo within drone operations, EUSPA also supports the uptake of Copernicus data for planning efficient – and safe – flight missions.  

Copernicus data is particularly beneficial for developing the population density maps used to evaluate ground risk – a critical component of a Specific Operation Risk Assessment (SORA). SORA is a methodology for classifying the risks posed by a drone flight in the specific category of operations and for identifying mitigations and safety objectives. 

This same Earth Observation data can also be used by National Aviation Authorities (NAAs) when reviewing and approving permits to, for example, fly beyond visual line of sight (BVLOS). In the future, Copernicus data will play a key role in Advanced Air Mobility, including for the planning and deployment of vertiports and other infrastructure.    

“Maps that integrate Earth Observation data provide operators and regulators with insights on population density, allowing them to plan routes that avoid crowded areas,” explains EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. “Furthermore, regulators can use Copernicus data to help harmonise the way these ground risks are assessed, and developers can use this same data to strategically plan the building of such infrastructure as cargo drops, vertiports and charging stations.”

In addition to supporting the European Commission’s Drone Strategy 2.0, EUSPA discussed the use cases for Copernicus data in drone operations during the Joint Authorities for Rulemaking on Unmanned Systems (JARUS) 2023 plenary meeting in Rome. In October of this year, it will participate in an EASA workshop on population density services for drone operations.  

To learn more about EU Space for drone operations, please download our free brochure

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Companies like RigiTech are leveraging the benefits of integrating both Galileo and Copernicus into their drone delivery solutions.

Rokubun's new Galileo OSNMA Embedded Library delivers navigation message authentication

5.9.2023 13:53  
Introducing the Rokubun Galileo OSNMA Library: a cutting-edge solution for secure navigation.
Published: 
05 September 2023

“Are you looking for robust authenticated navigation information for your application? Do you trust the navigation information provided by the GNSS receiver in your solution? Do you trust it enough to use the data for billing in demand-responsive transport or surveillance applications? If you want to have the benefit of extra trust in the authenticity of the navigation data in your application, then look no further than the Rokubun Galileo OSNMA Library for embedded solutions,” says Rokubun CEO and co-founder Xavier Banqué Casanovas. 

Rokubun is a Spanish company specialising in accurate and scalable navigation solutions based on GNSS. 

According to a company news release, the Library is the ultimate solution for decoding and processing Galileo OSNMA for embedded platforms. “Adding our Library to your embedded project seamlessly enables the use of Galileo OSNMA service for authenticated navigation message,” adds Banqué.

The solution is part of the legacy of the EU-funded and EUSPA-supported Horizon Europe BANSHEE project. That project, of which Rokubun served as the coordinating partner, developed a hybrid technology that combines Wi-Fi ranging and satellite navigation (including the Galileo OSNMA) to allow for accurate and seamless indoor-outdoor navigation. 

The upcoming Galileo OSNMA is set to provide authenticated navigation data message against data-level spoofing attacks 

By delivering data authentication, the free-to-use Galileo OSNMA assures users that the received Galileo navigation message comes from the system itself and has not been modified by, for example, a spoofing attack. “In safety and security-focused sectors like drone traffic management, on-demand public transport or cadastral surveying, amongst others, the risk of spoofing poses significant threats with possible legal and economic implications,” says Banqué.

To address this risk, Rokubun’s ready-to-use library enables the Galileo OSNMA in embedded GNSS solutions. 

The cross-platform, small-footprint library has undergone extensive testing using official EUSPA test vectors, and all OSNMA algorithms have been validated in real conditions at the European Commission’s Galileo testing facilities located at the Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy.

“We have managed to develop and validate a Galileo OSNMA client for tiny embedded microcontrollers,”Banqué told Inside GNSS. “This opens the door to millions of devices with a GNSS chip and general purpose MCU to use the Galileo OSNMA to verify the authenticity of GNSS information used for navigation.”

Ready to power your navigation solutions 

The Library is organised to be as portable as possible, requiring only a working Assembler and C compiler that supports ISO C99. “This clean interface design ensures easy and fast integration,” says Banqué. 

In most GNSS solutions, both commercial-grade receivers along with survey grade receivers, output the ‘raw’ navigation message bits using proprietary messages/protocols. Alternatively, if the receiver supports it, the non-standard RTCM3 4075 (navigation data frame) message can be used to obtain these ‘raw’ navigation bits.

“To decode the OSNMA information contained in the navigation message, the user only needs to enable the corresponding message in their receiver and forward the payload of the message with minimal to no modifications to your embedded project,” notes Banqué.

To ensure optimal performance and validate user-specific enhancements, such as the utilisation of cryptographic accelerators or other System-on-Chip/Microcontroler specific resources, Rokubun has implemented a state-of-the-art hardware-in-the-loop continuous integration/deployment setup. This setup continuously tests the library against several reference MCU targets, assessing its performance and guaranteeing its reliability.

The Library is also designed to fit every build system, meaning it can be easily added to any project in a matter of minutes. “We have successfully built and packaged the Rokubun Galileo OSNMA Library and seamlessly integrated it into various embedded projects,” concludes Banqué. “It is now ready to empower your navigation solutions with enhanced authentication.”

The Galileo Open Service Navigation Message Authentication will soon become operational; for more information about OSNMA go to https://www.gsc-europa.eu/galileo/services/galileo-open-service-navigation-message-authentication-osnma

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Introducing the Rokubun Galileo OSNMA Library: a cutting-edge solution for secure navigation.

EUSPA Industry Day: Development of PRS Signal-in-Space Monitoring Tool

1.9.2023 10:25  
EUSPA actively contributes to the development of all areas of the PRS user segment
Published: 
01 September 2023

The Galileo Public Regulated Service (PRS) is an encrypted navigation service for authorised users and sensitive applications that require high continuity. EUSPA actively contributes to the development of all areas of the PRS user segment to continuously respond to user needs and support a wide and secure use of PRS. In line with this, the Agency has initiated a new procurement procedure for a PRS Signal-in-Space (SIS) Monitoring Tool – PRIMO.

The tender (OJ Contract Notice 2023/S 167-524816) is aimed at designing, developing, deploying, installing, testing, and maintaining two PRIMO tools. The indicative budget for this call is €7.000.000.


The tender documents are available here


The tool (hardware and software) will be able to monitor PRS Signal-in-Space (navigation and security message) that will be used to support PRS operations at the Galileo Security Monitoring Centre (GSMC) sites. 

PRIMO is completely independent of the Galileo System, and its use cases include:

  • PRS continuity and integrity monitoring, 
  • Verification of the PRS security message, and 
  • Radio Frequency monitoring

An informative webinar is scheduled for 12 September at 15:00 CEST, you can participate by following this link

Submissions to the call are due 9 October 2023 at 23:59 (Brussels time). 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EUSPA actively contributes to the development of all areas of the PRS user segment

EUSPA Industry Day: Development of PRS Signal-in-Space Monitoring Tool

1.9.2023 10:25  
EUSPA actively contributes to the development of all areas of the PRS user segment
Published: 
01 September 2023

The Galileo Public Regulated Service (PRS) is an encrypted navigation service for authorised users and sensitive applications that require high continuity. EUSPA actively contributes to the development of all areas of the PRS user segment to continuously respond to user needs and support a wide and secure use of PRS. In line with this, the Agency has initiated a new procurement procedure for a PRS Signal-in-Space (SIS) Monitoring Tool – PRIMO.

The tender (OJ Contract Notice 2023/S 167-524816) is aimed at designing, developing, deploying, installing, testing, and maintaining two PRIMO tools. The indicative budget for this call is €7.000.000.


The tender documents are available here


The tool (hardware and software) will be able to monitor PRS Signal-in-Space (navigation and security message) that will be used to support PRS operations at the Galileo Security Monitoring Centre (GSMC) sites. 

PRIMO is completely independent of the Galileo System, and its use cases include:

  • PRS continuity and integrity monitoring, 
  • Verification of the PRS security message, and 
  • Radio Frequency monitoring

Informative webinars are scheduled for 12 September and 13 September, both at 15:00 CEST, you can participate by following this link

Submissions to the call are due 9 October 2023 at 23:59 (Brussels time). 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EUSPA actively contributes to the development of all areas of the PRS user segment

EUSPA Industry Days: CASSINI Hackathons & Matchmaking Procurement in a nutshell

24.8.2023 10:54  
In support to the Procurement CASSINI Hackathons and Matchmaking, EUSPA is organising this Industry Day Workshop.
Published: 
24 August 2023

CASSINI is the European Union's initiative to support entrepreneurs, start-ups and SMEs in the space industry, including New Space, during 2021-2027. The initiative is open to all areas of the EU Space Programme, and covers both upstream (i.e. nanosats, launchers, etc. and downstream (i.e. products/services enabled by space data, etc.). CASSINI includes a €1 billion EU seeds and growth fund, hackathons and mentoring, prizes, a business accelerator, partnering and matchmaking.

A recently launched EUSPA procurement (OJ contract Notice 2023/S 139-441759) will cover two lots: Lot 1 CASSINI Hackathons (€4,700,000.00) and Lot 2 CASSINI Matchmaking (€2,800,000.00). 

The tender documents are available here 

CASSINI Hackathons

Europe-wide CASSINI Hackathons offer a chance to develop digital applications building on space data, including satellite images and positioning services. Lot 1 will cover the support in the hackathon implementation, including selecting and supporting the local organisers for two annual CASSINI hackathons, developing communication and promotion plans, ensuring event efficiency, and supporting EUSPA in the mentoring sessions for the hackathon winners.

CASSINI Matchmaking

CASSINI Matchmaking connects start-ups, scaleups and SMEs with corporates and investors to accelerate their business. This Lot will cover the organisation of a series of matchmaking events, aiming to expand professional networks and improve the start-ups and SMEs ability to enter new markets and achieve rapid revenue growth. The events will involve two types of matchmaking: i) investor matchmaking, and ii) industrial partnering.

A dedicated webinar will take place on 11 September 2023 at 11:00 CEST

The Q&A from the webinar will be available on the e-tender portal etendering.ted.europa.eu in due time. 

You can join the webinar here

The deadline for submissions to the call is 13 October 2023 – 17:00 (Brussels time)

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

In support to the Procurement CASSINI Hackathons and Matchmaking, EUSPA is organising this Industry Day Workshop.

EUSPA Industry Days: CASSINI Hackathons & Matchmaking Procurement in a nutshell

24.8.2023 10:54  
In support to the Procurement CASSINI Hackathons and Matchmaking, EUSPA is organising this Industry Day Workshop.
Published: 
24 August 2023

CASSINI is the European Union's initiative to support entrepreneurs, start-ups and SMEs in the space industry, including New Space, during 2021-2027. The initiative is open to all areas of the EU Space Programme, and covers both upstream (i.e. nanosats, launchers, etc. and downstream (i.e. products/services enabled by space data, etc.). CASSINI includes a €1 billion EU seeds and growth fund, hackathons and mentoring, prizes, a business accelerator, partnering and matchmaking.

A recently launched EUSPA procurement (OJ contract Notice 2023/S 139-441759) will cover two lots: Lot 1 CASSINI Hackathons (€4,700,000.00) and Lot 2 CASSINI Matchmaking (€2,800,000.00). 

The tender documents are available here 

CASSINI Hackathons

Europe-wide CASSINI Hackathons offer a chance to develop digital applications building on space data, including satellite images and positioning services. Lot 1 will cover the support in the hackathon implementation, including selecting and supporting the local organisers for two annual CASSINI hackathons, developing communication and promotion plans, ensuring event efficiency, and supporting EUSPA in the mentoring sessions for the hackathon winners.

CASSINI Matchmaking

CASSINI Matchmaking connects start-ups, scaleups and SMEs with corporates and investors to accelerate their business. This Lot will cover the organisation of a series of matchmaking events, aiming to expand professional networks and improve the start-ups and SMEs ability to enter new markets and achieve rapid revenue growth. The events will involve two types of matchmaking: i) investor matchmaking, and ii) industrial partnering.

A dedicated webinar will take place on 8 September 2023 at 14:00 CEST

You can join the webinar here

The deadline for submissions to the call is 13 October 2023 – 17:00 (Brussels time)

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

In support to the Procurement CASSINI Hackathons and Matchmaking, EUSPA is organising this Industry Day Workshop.

EUSPA Industry Days: CASSINI Hackathons & Matchmaking Procurement in a nutshell

24.8.2023 10:54  
In support to the Procurement CASSINI Hackathons and Matchmaking, EUSPA is organising this Industry Day Workshop.
Published: 
24 August 2023

CASSINI is the European Union's initiative to support entrepreneurs, start-ups and SMEs in the space industry, including New Space, during 2021-2027. The initiative is open to all areas of the EU Space Programme, and covers both upstream (i.e. nanosats, launchers, etc. and downstream (i.e. products/services enabled by space data, etc.). CASSINI includes a €1 billion EU seeds and growth fund, hackathons and mentoring, prizes, a business accelerator, partnering and matchmaking.

A recently launched EUSPA procurement (OJ contract Notice 2023/S 139-441759) will cover two lots: Lot 1 CASSINI Hackathons (€4,700,000.00) and Lot 2 CASSINI Matchmaking (€2,800,000.00). 

The tender documents are available here 

CASSINI Hackathons

Europe-wide CASSINI Hackathons offer a chance to develop digital applications building on space data, including satellite images and positioning services. Lot 1 will cover the support in the hackathon implementation, including selecting and supporting the local organisers for two annual CASSINI hackathons, developing communication and promotion plans, ensuring event efficiency, and supporting EUSPA in the mentoring sessions for the hackathon winners.

CASSINI Matchmaking

CASSINI Matchmaking connects start-ups, scaleups and SMEs with corporates and investors to accelerate their business. This Lot will cover the organisation of a series of matchmaking events, aiming to expand professional networks and improve the start-ups and SMEs ability to enter new markets and achieve rapid revenue growth. The events will involve two types of matchmaking: i) investor matchmaking, and ii) industrial partnering.

A dedicated webinar will take place on 8 September 2023 at 14:00 CEST

You can join the webinar here

The deadline for submissions to the call is 13 October 2023 – 17:00 (Brussels time)

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

In support to the Procurement CASSINI Hackathons and Matchmaking, EUSPA is organising this Industry Day Workshop.

I/NAV improvements are now available to all Galileo Open Service users

18.8.2023 9:44  
Published: 
18 August 2023

The Galileo OS has been upgraded with three new features added to its I/NAV message, one of the four message types broadcast by Galileo satellites. Collectively referred to simply as I/NAV improvements, these features are now available to all Galileo Open Service users.

Starting on 12 August 2023, the gradual process of upgrading the operational Galileo FOC constellation satellites has been finalized, and the I/NAV improvements are openly accessible through the I/NAV message carried by the E1-B signal.

"These new features improve the robustness and the time required for Galileo navigation data demodulation. In challenging environments, they enhance the Galileo OS capability to solve the user clock uncertainty", says Guerric Pont, EUSPA Galileo Exploitation Programme Manager.

In simple terms, in case you have experienced delays when turning on your GNSS device, the I/NAV improvements can reduce them significantly. Let’s have a look at the features more in detail.  

Faster and more robust positioning 

The Reed Solomon Outer Forward Error Correction (RS FEC2) increases demodulation robustness at all times and therefore enhances the sensitivity. It also improves the overall time to retrieve Clock and Ephemeris Data (time to CED) thanks to the broadcast of additional, redundant CED information, while allowing for the device to restore potentially corrupted data bits autonomously.

The Reduced Clock and Ephemeris Data (RedCED) allows for a fast-initial positioning, albeit with lower than nominal accuracy, by decoding one single I/NAV word, while waiting to receive the four I/NAV words carrying the full-precision CED.

The combination of these two features allows not only to obtain a first coarse position solution much faster (RedCED), but also to reduce significantly the time required to obtain a first full accuracy solution (RS FEC2). This translates into a much-reduced Time to First Fix (TTFF) for the OS users, particularly when operating in harsh environments.

Benefitting applications working in GNSS-assisted mode

The improvements also benefit applications working in assisted GNSS (A-GNSS) mode, through the Secondary Synchronisation Pattern (SSP). In A-GNSS mode, when navigation data is received from non-GNSS channels and the receiver’s knowledge of the Galileo System Time is affected by a relatively large error, typically in the order of a few seconds, the clock uncertainty must be resolved quickly and stably. 

With the I/NAV improvements, receivers will be able to do this via the new SSP feature, thus reducing the TTFF also in A-GNSS mode.

For more information, please see the I/NAV Navigation Message Improvements Info Note.

Testing campaign targeting receivers to follow

While the I/NAV improvements are fully operational, the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) will launch a testing campaign open to receiver manufacturers, that will consist of several testing windows.  The tests will allow the participants to have a confirmation of the correct implementation of the OS SIS ICD 2.0, i.e. the right processing of the three I/NAV improvements in their products.

The tests will be conducted at the laboratories of the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy, and of the European Space Agency ESA/ESTEC in Noordwijk, The Netherlands. EUSPA will assign each applicant to one of the two laboratories depending on the specific conditions and availability.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The I/NAV improvements are openly accessible through the I/NAV message carried by the E1-B signal

EUSPA procurement to support the security accreditation of the EU Space Programme

17.8.2023 15:28  
The security accreditation activities of the SAB encompass Galileo, EGNOS, GOVSATCOM, SSA, Copernicus and IRIS2
Published: 
17 August 2023

EUSPA’s mission is multifaceted and includes, among other responsibilities, the overall safety and security of the EU Space Programme and its components in space and on the ground. It guarantees that Europe’s positioning systems, Galileo and EGNOS emit secure signals and that their respective ground infrastructures (sensors, antennas, stations) remain intact. Moreover, EUSPA provides security expertise to other components of the Space Programme such as GOVSATCOM and the Space Situational Awareness

The issued procurement (OJ contract Notice 2023/S 140-447337) will cover support to the SAB secretariat including to the secretariat of its Subordinate Bodies and security assurance support with respect to the accreditation activities necessary for the governmental infrastructure and services of the new EU space Programme component, IRIS2.

The tender documents are available here

The security accreditation activities of the SAB encompass Galileo, EGNOS, GOVSATCOM, SSA, Copernicus and IRIS2. The tasks include, among others, support in core security accreditation activities such as assessment of compliance status of security requirements, security risk assessment, security audits including cyber audits, and penetration testing.

A dedicated webinar will take place on 22 August 2023 at 10:30 CEST. You can join the webinar here.

The deadline for submissions is 11 September 2023 - 23:59 (Brussels time).

About the Security Accreditation Board 

The SAB is the security accreditation authority for all of the EU Space Programme’s components. It ensures that systems comply with the relevant security requirements and provides statements of approval to operate the systems and services with the objective that the EU space-based services and data can be used by the EU citizens in a trusted way.

An independent body within EUSPA, the SAB is composed of a representative from each Member State, the Commission, and the High Representative for the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy. The SAB decisions are taken by professionals in a strictly independent manner including with regard to the European Commission and other bodies such as EUSPA or ESA that are responsible for the implementation of the components and provision of services.

More information on the SAB way of working can be found in the SAB Rules of Procedure

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The security accreditation activities of the SAB encompass Galileo, EGNOS, GOVSATCOM, SSA, Copernicus and IRIS2

Is the Mediterranean becoming too hot to handle?

31.7.2023 16:10  
Copernicus data shows that the Mediterranean is hot and, due to more frequent and intense Marine Heat Waves, is getting hotter.
Published: 
01 August 2023

The Mediterranean is in hot water – and we don’t mean that figuratively. 

According to Copernicus data, last summer was a particularly hot one for the Mediterranean. Not only did the entire region see record-breaking marine heat waves in terms of intensity, duration and area of impact, the western Med experienced at least one marine heat wave every month between May and August – something that’s never been seen before.

A marine heat wave (MHW) is an extreme rise in ocean temperature that last for an extended period. Due to global warming, both the magnitude and frequency of MHWs have been increasing in recent years. This is because the global ocean absorbs 90% of the excess heat produced by anthropogenic activities (e.g., human-caused pollution and greenhouse gas emissions). Once in the ocean, this heat doesn’t disappear. Instead, it is carried via currents around the world, triggering MHWs and melting sea ice and ice shelves as it goes.

Using numerical modelling and Earth Observation images, including those provided by Copernicus, oceanographers with the Copernicus Marine Service (CMEMS) forecast that MHW intensity, frequency and scope will only continue to increase. This is particularly worrisome for regions like the Mediterranean as MHWs can trigger floods, extreme heatwaves and cyclones, often with devastating consequences for marine ecosystems, industries and society – all of which highlights the need to take immediate action against climate change.

Here too, Copernicus can help. 

Turning climate data into climate action 

By developing new markets and applications for Copernicus, EUSPA helps turn climate data into climate action. As a result, decisionmakers can use Copernicus data to better adapt to the realities of climate change. This includes developing plans that can be triggered when specific heat stress conditions are forecasted. Such action plans can include things as simple as limiting outside activities and drinking plenty of fluids to actively monitoring at risk populations. 

In the near future, city planners could use this same information to better adapt cities, buildings and green spaces to heat-related risks, making cities more pleasant to live in – even in a hotter world. This is exactly what the project 100KTREEs aims at, to plant more trees in cities to become climate resilient and heatwaves proof.

Read more: Using Copernicus data to climate-proof cities

Want to learn more about how Copernicus data can benefit climate adaptation strategies? Then be sure to join EUSPA on 25 September for a dedicated workshop on Copernicus and Climate Adaptation

The workshop will review challenges and opportunities for climate adaptation across Copernicus, Earth observation and the policy landscape. It will also include a stakeholder engagement on climate adaptation and urban areas as part of the Knowledge Centre on Earth Observation (KCEO) deep dive on the subject.

The hybrid event will be held live in Brussels and online. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Copernicus data shows that the Mediterranean is hot and, due to more frequent and intense Marine Heat Waves, is getting hotter.

Save The Date: A Spanish Flavoured EU Space Week 2023, 7-9 November

26.7.2023 14:42  
EU Space Week brings together the EU Space community showcasing the latest updates on the EU Space Programme.
Published: 
27 July 2023

EU Space Week 2023, the hallmark event for the European space sector is a unique opportunity to get an up-close look at how European businesses – and society in general – benefit from the EU Space Programme. With an exciting line-up of networking, business matchmaking events, and application demos, this year's EU Space Week, themed "Sustainable Innovation for a Resilient Europe", promises to be an unmissable experience!

What’s in the mix this year? 

With a revamped, hybrid format, EU Space Week 2023 will include an array of sessions, plenaries, events and demonstrations covering everything from current and future trends to market forecasts, business opportunities, space-application demonstrations and updates on the Union’s Space Programme. 

This year edition will also include the User Consultation platforms (UCP). These UCP present a unique networking opportunity, fostering collaboration and knowledge exchange within the entire EU Space ecosystem. This dynamic platform enables stakeholders using the EU Space components, including Galileo, EGNOS, Copernicus, and for the first time GOVSATCOM and Space Surveillance and Tracking (SST), to not only share experiences and expertise but also actively provide valuable user requirements. By gathering and incorporating user inputs, the UCP is providing valuable insights to improve the EU Space Programme, empowering participants to strengthen capabilities, foster innovation, and enhance competitiveness across all aspects of the EU Space Programme. This year, 7 themes will be covered: Agriculture and Forestry; Environmental (Climate & Biodiversity); Rail; Public transport; Road and automotive; Space and Resilient societies.

The event will kick off with high-level policy discussions and an interactive panel discussion which will include innovators and entrepreneurs who utilise EU Space Programme data and services. 

The second day is dedicated to space entrepreneurship and funding opportunities for start-ups, SMEs and other innovators. Moreover, EUSPA and EU Commission representatives will also give an update on the latest initiatives supporting innovation in space. 

For the first time, the conference will shine a light on EU Space and Security, covering areas such as sustainable space traffic management and space assets for resilience.  

The event is jointly organised by the European Commission and the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) and held under the auspices of the Spanish Presidency of the Council of European Union.  

Make sure you follow DG DEFIS (@DEFIS_eu), EUSPA (@EU4Space) and the Spanish Presidency (@eu2023es) on Twitter for updates. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EU Space Week brings together the EU Space community showcasing the latest updates on the EU Space Programme.

Making European Railways fail-safe with the help from #EUSpace

25.7.2023 11:03  
The two-day event will gather Europe’s major rail stakeholders across the entire value chain to debate the introduction of the EU Space Programme assets in the railway domain.
Published: 
25 July 2023

To unleash its full potential for decarbonising European transport, the rail sector must operate more  efficiently and integrate the latest technologies to advance the digitalisation of the rail system, thereby providing high-quality customer services. ERTMS provides the European Union with a unique opportunity to create a safer, more resilient and interoperable railway network.

Among others, ERTMS aims to make rail transport more competitive by replacing Europe’s different national train control and command systems with a single, coordinated and highly digital solution. To do this, ERTMS aims to rely on data and services from the European Space Programme, namely, the European satellite navigation systems. 

Further, according to EUSPA, more than 150,000 freight wagons in Europe are equipped with Galileo/EGNOS receivers to provide more accurate information about the wagon position. Precise location is used for asset and fleet management purposes, becoming a crucial element for efficient supply chain operations and services to customers.

Not only does Galileo provide precise positioning and localisation, but when augmented by EGNOS and other data sources, it has the potential to replace the expensive physical balises used to monitor train speed and streamline rail operations.

Read this: EU Parliament calls for fast adoption of satellite-based train localization in railway signalling

Galileo and EGNOS potential become even greater when its positioning is complemented by Earth Observation. For example, railway operators can use the Copernicus Land Monitoring Services and Sentinel-1 data in particular to measure displacements, including landslides and ground subsidence to prevent rail damage or other risks that could endanger the safe operation of trains. 

A unique rail event with many opportunities 

space4rail

EUSPA, ERA and the European Commission are joining forces and invite you to the second edition ‘Space for Innovation in Rail – Towards Satellite Based ERTMS’

The two-day event will gather Europe’s major transport stakeholders, including key decision makers and railway sector representatives across the entire value chain to debate the introduction of the European Union’s Space Programme assets in the rail sector. The main focus of the event will be on the utilisation of the European Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) for fail-safe train localisation within the European Rail Traffic Management System (ERTMS) evolution.

On the 14th of September, after the official conference programme, the participants will have an opportunity to take part in four unique site visits. Space is limited and will be assigned on a first come, first served basis, so make sure to express your interest in the registration form available below.

"I believe this event will be the best opportunity to reflect on how the EU Space Programme can support railway sector to become digital, taking advantage of the EU Space assets and services to further improve its operational efficiency and reduce the cost of the signalling infrastructure" says EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa. 

You can register here and download the full programme here

The event is organised under the auspices of the Spanish Presidency of the Council of the European Union. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The two-day event will gather Europe’s major rail stakeholders across the entire value chain to debate the introduction of the EU Space Programme assets in the railway domain.

Making European Railways fail-safe with the help from #EUSpace

25.7.2023 11:03  
The two-day event will gather Europe’s major rail stakeholders across the entire value chain to debate the introduction of the EU Space Programme assets in the railway domain.
Published: 
25 July 2023

To unleash its full potential for decarbonising European transport, the rail sector must operate more  efficiently and integrate the latest technologies to advance the digitalisation of the rail system, thereby providing high-quality customer services. ERTMS provides the European Union with a unique opportunity to create a safer, more resilient and interoperable railway network.

Among others, ERTMS aims to make rail transport more competitive by replacing Europe’s different national train control and command systems with a single, coordinated and highly digital solution. To do this, ERTMS aims to rely on data and services from the European Space Programme, namely, the European satellite navigation systems. 

Further, according to EUSPA, more than 150,000 freight wagons in Europe are equipped with Galileo/EGNOS receivers to provide more accurate information about the wagon position. Precise location is used for asset and fleet management purposes, becoming a crucial element for efficient supply chain operations and services to customers.

Not only does Galileo provide precise positioning and localisation, but when augmented by EGNOS and other data sources, it has the potential to replace the expensive physical balises used to monitor train speed and streamline rail operations.

Read this: EU Parliament calls for fast adoption of satellite-based train localization in railway signalling

Galileo and EGNOS potential become even greater when its positioning is complemented by Earth Observation. For example, railway operators can use the Copernicus Land Monitoring Services and Sentinel-1 data in particular to measure displacements, including landslides and ground subsidence to prevent rail damage or other risks that could endanger the safe operation of trains. 

A unique rail event with many opportunities 

space4rail

EUSPA, ERA , EU-Rail and the European Commission are joining forces and invite you to the second edition ‘Space for Innovation in Rail – Towards Satellite Based ERTMS’

The two-day event will gather Europe’s major transport stakeholders, including key decision makers and railway sector representatives across the entire value chain to debate the introduction of the European Union’s Space Programme assets in the rail sector. The main focus of the event will be on the utilisation of the European Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) for fail-safe train localisation within the European Rail Traffic Management System (ERTMS) evolution.

On the 14th of September, after the official conference programme, the participants will have an opportunity to take part in four unique site visits. Space is limited and will be assigned on a first come, first served basis, so make sure to express your interest in the registration form available below.

"I believe this event will be the best opportunity to reflect on how the EU Space Programme can support railway sector to become digital, taking advantage of the EU Space assets and services to further improve its operational efficiency and reduce the cost of the signalling infrastructure" says EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa. 

You can register here and download the full programme here

The event is organised under the auspices of the Spanish Presidency of the Council of the European Union. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The two-day event will gather Europe’s major rail stakeholders across the entire value chain to debate the introduction of the EU Space Programme assets in the railway domain.

Using the EU Space Programme for disaster risk management in Hungary

21.7.2023 11:10  
Lake Balaton, as captured by Copernicus Sentinel-2 imagery. Credit: European Union
Published: 
21 July 2023

The recent severe droughts and extremely high temperatures in Hungary, led rivers and lakes to dry up, negatively impacting the country’s economy and ecosystem. With that in mind, EUSPA, together with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade of Hungary and Eurisy, co-organised a workshop on Satellite-based Services for Disaster Risk Management. Held in Budapest, the workshop brought together national and regional stakeholders to discuss how satellite-based services can support both disaster risk management and search and rescue operations.

Dr. Orsolya Ferencz, Ministerial Commissioner for Space Research at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade, presented an overview of Hungary's space strategy and outlined its implementation milestones. Speaking about the workshop, Dr Ferencz stated, "This gathering is important in addressing the challenges we face in emergency situations. By leveraging innovative tools and satellite technologies, we can make evidence-based decisions and better respond to disasters."

Visualising with Copernicus 

Copernicus, the EU Earth Observation programme provides up to date, near real-time optical information about disasters such as wildfires and floods. 

More precisely, the Copernicus Emergency Management Service (Copernicus EMS) uses data from a range of satellites and ground-based sensors to provide information about the location, extent, and behaviour of fires and floods. This information helps emergency responders make informed decisions regarding where to direct resources and in the case of fires, how to contain the blaze. The service is provided free of charge to all users.

But there’s more. Wildfires are a significant source of air pollution which poses a threat to human, animal, and plant populations. 

When a disaster such as a wildfire strikes a region, it is important to have access to precise and up-to-date information for the delivery of an effective disaster management response. The Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS) can monitor emissions which can, in turn, be used in smoke forecasts. These forecasts are used in air quality apps to help people limit their exposure to pollution, and by policymakers and local authorities to manage the impact of fires. 

pic1Sajó is a river that flows between Slovakia and Hungary turned orange in March 2022, probably due to an episode of iron pollution

Secure and reliable positioning with Galileo and EGNOS 

Galileo, the EU global navigation satellite system and EGNOS the EU’s regional navigation system have revolutionised various sectors of the European economy such as agriculture and transportation. But their contribution goes even further by helping to save lives. 

Take for example the European 112-emergency number. As of March 2022, it became mandatory for all mobile phones sold in the European Single Market to be Galileo enabled. When someone places an emergency call, the emergency responder will receive their location information with an accuracy down to just a few metres. The improved accuracy has a major impact in terms of response times, ultimately allowing for quicker intervention in emergency situations where every second counts – resulting in more lives being saved. The ability for 112 to communicate a caller’s location automatically to emergency services is possible thanks Advanced Mobile Location (AML) system which is already available in Hungary.  

Likewise, in case medical assistance is needed, helicopter operators and pilots can rely on EGNOS to land safely, especially when visibility is reduced due to fire smoke or fog. Additionally, services like the Galileo High Accuracy and OSNMA services ensure that drones deliver accurate mapping as well as assistance to inaccessible areas due to natural disasters such as earthquakes. 

pic2Equipped with a wide-range of sensors for capturing Earth Observation data and navigated using GNSS positioning, advanced drones can now provide firefighters with another layer of information – and protection.

Communicating with GOVSATCOM and IRIS2 programmes 

GOVSATCOM and IRIS2 will provide robustly protected communication, filling the gap for secure communication alongside Galileo and Copernicus. These solutions enable secure and cost-efficient communication for critical missions, operations, and infrastructure. EUSPA, in collaboration with Member States and other entities, oversees the procurement, operations, and user coordination of the secure ground segment (GOVSATCOM Hubs).

The power of synergy

Rodrigo da Costa, Executive Director of EUSPA, provided the European perspective on the integrative use of components from the European Space Programme. “Galileo, EGNOS, Copernicus, are powerful tools individually, but an exponential achievement is reached when used in synergy. Soon, the addition of GOVSATCOM and IRIS² will add an extra layer of efficiency in the management of disasters by providing secured and uninterrupted satellite communications to EU Member States. The Emergency Management and Disaster Response sector is one of the key sectors where this synergy is saving lives”. "As an agency focused on meeting user needs, EUSPA closely monitors this market and actively develops and delivers new space-enabled services to address its requirements" he stated.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Lake Balaton, as captured by Copernicus Sentinel-2 imagery. Credit: European Union

EU Space technologies and development tools revolutionize archaeological research

17.7.2023 14:24  
The Colosseum, Rome, as captured by Copernicus Sentinel-2 Satellite. Credit: European Commission
Published: 
18 July 2023

Just as Indiana Jones captivates audiences with his new adventures, EU Space technologies captivate modern archaeologists, offering new possibilities for exploration and discovery in the field of archaeology. 

Modern archaeologists have made GNSS and Earth Observation their tools of choice.

Take for example GNSS, which has emerged as the tool of trade for many archaeological projects. “Before GNSS, the archaeological excavation process was both cumbersome, hands-on and physically demanding,” Shane McCartney, a consultant archaeologist at Earthworks Archaeological Services Inc., tells XY Ht magazine. “We’d be out in the field with 50-metre tapes and pen and paper in hand trying to triangulate, grid and count off the number of paces from such reference points as ‘the big pine tree next to the fence.’”   

Not only is this process very slow, it’s also prone to error. That’s why archaeologists have largely ditched the tape and paper and instead rely on the precise positioning provided by GNSS. Using Galileo, Europe’s GNSS programme, they can now quickly survey a field site, accurately map the location of any uncovered artefacts and compile all the data into an easy-to-use GIS system.   

EO to the rescue 

The role of EU Space in archaeology doesn’t end with the excavation. After all, once an artefact or site is uncovered, it then needs to be preserved – something that’s becoming all the more challenging due to climate change. In fact, it’s estimated that as much as 5% of our 1,121 UNESCO World Heritage sites are in danger and in need of increased protection. 

Here too, EU Space can help. 

For instance, in Rhodes, archaeologists are using Earth Observation data provided by Copernicus Land Monitoring Service (CLMS) to monitor the impact settlement pressure is having on the island’s cultural heritage sites.

Founded in 408 B.C., the area’s rich history is still very much visible today – including parts of the ancient necropolis, monumental graves, cave sanctuaries and a Roman bridge. Unfortunately, all this important cultural heritage is being threatened by the island’s constantly shifting soil.  

As part of the pan-European component of the CLMS, the European Ground Motion Service (EGMS) provides an unprecedented opportunity to study geohazards and human-induced deformation such as slow-moving landslides, subsidence due to groundwater exploitation or underground mining, volcanic unrests and many more. The EGMS also serves as a starting point for investigation of ground motion affecting buildings and linear infrastructures.  

“To prevent further damage to the monuments and adopt effective conservation measures, we need accurate and up-to-date information on land deformation,” says Sotiris Patatoukos, Head of the Department of Conservation, Ephorate of Antiquities of the Dodecanese, in this video produced by Eurisy.  

With the support of the EU-funded HYPERION project, authorities in Rhodes are using Copernicus data to better understand land movement and how such movement is impacting various archaeological sites. After collecting more than 100 images between 2016 and 2019, researchers discovered that the area around the Rodini cultural site had experienced a 10 mm uplift. With this information in hand, archaeologists were able to take action to stabilise the most threatened monuments.

“Facilitating the early recognition of potential risks to the monuments and allowing us to regularly monitor land deformation in the area, Copernicus is an essential tool for preserving our cultural heritage,” Vassiliki Patsiada, an archaeologist at the Ephorate of Antiquities of the Dodecanese, tells Eurisy.    

So, when you’re out exploring Europe’s plethora of cultural heritage sights this summer, remember, while fedoras look great for selfies in front of the Colosseum or Acropolis, its EU Space that’s working to preserve those iconic backdrops.   

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The Colosseum, Rome, as captured by Copernicus Sentinel-2 Satellite. Credit: European Commission

Successful demonstration of New Emergency Warning Satellite Service takes place in France & Germany

12.7.2023 10:56  
Galileo EWSS offers an alternative solution in emergency scenarios.
Published: 
12 July 2023

Whether it’s wildfires in Canada or a deadly earthquake in Turkey, natural and manmade disasters highlight the importance of having innovative tools and solutions for resilient risk management and response.  With end-users always at the core, the EU Space Programme continues to evolve offering services that contribute to the safety and wellbeing of European citizens.

Developed by the Directorate General for Defence Industry and Space (DEFIS) of the European Commission, the Emergency Warning Satellite Service will support and complement the current civil protection services by taking advantage of the 24/7 availability of Galileo signals and the resilience of its infrastructures.

How will this new life-saving service work?

The Emergency Warning Satellite Service (EWSS) utilises Galileo’s messaging function to transmit an alert to smartphones with instructions to follow depending on the area the user is located in. The service is not based on the mobile network, it can reach any smartphone with a GNSS chip in a specific target area with satellite coverage. This feature enables the service to reach people in rural regions with poor mobile signal and can even be available during a disaster that affects the ground infrastructure.

EUSPA Chief Operating Officer, Pascal Claudel explains: ‘’The EWSS provides national civil protection authorities with a 24/7 “satellite” channel enabling them to broadcast alerts to the population. ‘’This comes in addition to the multiple existing national alert services such as mobile networks, TV, radio, sirens, internet or social networks, and is completely independent of terrestrial mobile networks,’’ he concludes.

This future Galileo alert service is designed to be received directly on any device capable of processing Galileo signals: smartphone, car navigation, fixed receiver on the roofs of buildings for display on public billboards, etc.

EWSS is not Galileo’s only emergency service. Galileo Search And Rescue Service (SAR) helps to save lives in emergency circumstances. Recently, a sailor in a solo round-the-world yacht race was saved thanks to the positioning given to rescuers by his emergency beacon after waves destroyed his vessel.

Two demonstrations based on a true disaster

The demonstration of the EWSS was carried out as part of a Horizon Europe STELLAR Project which has been receiving funding from the European Union. The first demo aimed to replicate the deadly explosion which occurred at the AZF facilities in September 2001 in Toulouse, France and claimed the lives of 31 people. 

This exercise took place in three different sites:

A: The operation centre of the Haute Garonne prefecture, responsible for issuing the alert

B:  The Galileo Search and Rescue service centre based at CNES facilities in Toulouse 

C: In the city of Toulouse where mobile phone users received the alert messages.

The EWSS demonstration conducted by the STELLAR consortium was met with great success and enthusiasm. The service efficiently transmitted distress messages to citizens' mobile phones within seconds of activation. With Galileo's superior accuracy, end users were able to visualize the affected area with precision.

The demonstration was carried out in the presence of the French Ministry of Interior, the Prefecture of Haute-Garonne, and civil protection authorities (SAMU, Town Hall, Firefighters/SDIS).

A similar exercise took place on June 30th, 2023, in Leverkusen, Germany replicating the Chempark explosion which occurred two years ago. 

STELLAR brings together a unique consortium of EU companies with expertise in satellite navigation and emergency management. It is led by Telespazio France, together with CNES, EENA, F24 and Thalès Alenia Space.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Galileo EWSS offers an alternative solution in emergency scenarios.

EUSPA welcomes the Spanish Presidency of the Council of the European Union

11.7.2023 10:32  
By fostering the development of an innovative, competitive and independent space sector, EU Space is set to contribute to each of the priorities set by the Spanish Presidency of the Council of the European Union.

As Spain takes over the Presidency of the Council of the European Union on 1 July, it has announced its key priorities for the semester

“We are going to promote the reindustrialisation and digitalisation of Europe, we are going to make decisive progress in this ecological transition, we will make the economy more prosperous but also fairer, and we will strengthen European unity with new tools and new agreements,” says President of the Government of Spain Pedro Sánchez.

By fostering the development of an innovative, competitive and independent space sector, the EU Space Programme is set to contribute to each of the priorities set by the Spanish Presidency – all while reinforcing the EU’s autonomy, resilience and democratic principles.   

“As the host of our European GNSS Service Centre and one of our Galileo Security Monitoring Centre, Spain is already very familiar with the EU Space Programme and EUSPA looks forward to building on this relationship during the Spanish Presidency,” adds EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. 

Reindustrialise the EU and ensure its open strategic autonomy

EU Space is a key enabler of European competitiveness. With an approximate 25% market share, Europe currently enjoys a strong position within the global GNSS downstream market – a market that is forecasted to see revenues reach EUR 510 billion by 2032. Europe is also seeing a vibrant Copernicus start-up scene unfolding, with hundreds of new ventures being created using Copernicus data and information. 

But success in the space and tech sectors also translates to the renewed competitiveness of such legacy industries as raw materials and energy. For example, the raw materials sector already leverages the benefits of GNSS and Earth Observation for everything from exploration to site approval, construction, operations and closure, helping European industry achieve the rare earth independence envisioned by the European Critical Raw Materials Act.

On the energy side, EU Space is set to be a key enabler of Europe’s energy transition. While Europe may lack fossil fuel resources, it has no shortage of natural resources like sunshine and wind. Using EU Space, the energy sector can choose the best location for the wind turbines, solar panels and smart grids needed to produce home grown renewable energy right here in the EU. 

“With the support of the EU Space Programme, which was conceived as a means of advancing European autonomy in space, we can build the renewable energy system that will power an energy independent and climate neutral future for Europe,” explains da Costa.  

Advance the green transition and environmental adaptation

Speaking of a climate neutral future for Europe, EU Space is also well-positioned to support the Spanish Presidency’s environmental priorities. In addition to driving the transition to clean energy, Copernicus and Galileo offer a host of services to help monitoring ecosystems and biodiversity, climate resilience with everything from industrial waste management to wildlife monitoring, urban planning, smart mobility and fleet management.  

The Spanish Presidency has specifically made the reduction of electricity prices part of its green priorities. A good place to start is by renovating Europe’s many inefficient buildings and homes – and Copernicus can help. The Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service helps monitor emissions in residential areas of cities, providing urban planners with the information they need to focus on renovating the worst-performing buildings first.

Promoting greater social and economic justice

Not only will energy efficient building renovations help lower energy bills, they are also a front-line defence against energy poverty. Defined as when a household suffers from inadequate energy services, energy poverty impacts an estimated 35 million European citizens

“By enabling energy-efficient home renovations and facilitating the construction of more efficient energy infrastructure, EU Space plays a crucial role in ensuring that Europe's green transformation is inclusive and leaves no one behind," adds da Costa. 

This highlights how EU Space can support the Spanish Presidency’s priority of promoting greater social and economic justice – a priority that aims to ensure everyone benefits from Europe’s competitiveness and success, including people with disabilities. 

Here too EU Space can help. Take for example the Galileo High Accuracy Service, which is set to improve urban navigation and wayfinding for people with disabilities. Companies are also leveraging the precise positioning offered by Galileo and EGNOS to develop innovative applications to help, for instance, the visually impaired navigate through busy city centres and safely use public transport. 

Strengthening European unity 

In a world of challenges and growing tensions, the EU must remain united. “In a geopolitical context marked by uncertainty, Europe must become an area of certainties, in which material welfare, freedom and democracy pave the way for the future of all people,” says Sánchez.

To help, the Spanish Presidency looks to develop the tools Member States and citizens need to face these uncertainties together. 

“At its heart, the EU Space Programme is a programme built by Europe, for Europe,” concludes da Costa. “Whether it be boosting Union’s competitiveness, supporting its energy independence, mitigating the effects of climate change, protecting citizens from security threats and natural disasters, or simply keeping us connected with one another, EU Space is a key tool for maintaining a united and thriving Europe.”  

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

By fostering the development of an innovative, competitive and independent space sector, EU Space is set to contribute to each of the priorities set by the Spanish Presidency of the Council of the European Union.

EUSPA welcomes the Spanish Presidency of the Council of the European Union

11.7.2023 10:32  
By fostering the development of an innovative, competitive and independent space sector, EU Space is set to contribute to each of the priorities set by the Spanish Presidency of the Council of the European Union.
Published: 
11 July 2023

As Spain takes over the Presidency of the Council of the European Union on 1 July, it has announced its key priorities for the semester

“We are going to promote the reindustrialisation and digitalisation of Europe, we are going to make decisive progress in this ecological transition, we will make the economy more prosperous but also fairer, and we will strengthen European unity with new tools and new agreements,” says President of the Government of Spain Pedro Sánchez.

By fostering the development of an innovative, competitive and independent space sector, the EU Space Programme is set to contribute to each of the priorities set by the Spanish Presidency – all while reinforcing the EU’s autonomy, resilience and democratic principles.   

“As the host of our European GNSS Service Centre and one of our Galileo Security Monitoring Centre, Spain is already very familiar with the EU Space Programme and EUSPA looks forward to building on this relationship during the Spanish Presidency,” adds EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. 

Reindustrialise the EU and ensure its open strategic autonomy

EU Space is a key enabler of European competitiveness. With an approximate 25% market share, Europe currently enjoys a strong position within the global GNSS downstream market – a market that is forecasted to see revenues reach EUR 510 billion by 2032. Europe is also seeing a vibrant Copernicus start-up scene unfolding, with hundreds of new ventures being created using Copernicus data and information. 

But success in the space and tech sectors also translates to the renewed competitiveness of such legacy industries as raw materials and energy. For example, the raw materials sector already leverages the benefits of GNSS and Earth Observation for everything from exploration to site approval, construction, operations and closure, helping European industry achieve the rare earth independence envisioned by the European Critical Raw Materials Act.

On the energy side, EU Space is set to be a key enabler of Europe’s energy transition. While Europe may lack fossil fuel resources, it has no shortage of natural resources like sunshine and wind. Using EU Space, the energy sector can choose the best location for the wind turbines, solar panels and smart grids needed to produce home grown renewable energy right here in the EU. 

“With the support of the EU Space Programme, which was conceived as a means of advancing European autonomy in space, we can build the renewable energy system that will power an energy independent and climate neutral future for Europe,” explains da Costa.  

Advance the green transition and environmental adaptation

Speaking of a climate neutral future for Europe, EU Space is also well-positioned to support the Spanish Presidency’s environmental priorities. In addition to driving the transition to clean energy, Copernicus and Galileo offer a host of services to help monitoring ecosystems and biodiversity, climate resilience with everything from industrial waste management to wildlife monitoring, urban planning, smart mobility and fleet management.  

The Spanish Presidency has specifically made the reduction of electricity prices part of its green priorities. A good place to start is by renovating Europe’s many inefficient buildings and homes – and Copernicus can help. The Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service helps monitor emissions in residential areas of cities, providing urban planners with the information they need to focus on renovating the worst-performing buildings first.

Promoting greater social and economic justice

Not only will energy efficient building renovations help lower energy bills, they are also a front-line defence against energy poverty. Defined as when a household suffers from inadequate energy services, energy poverty impacts an estimated 35 million European citizens

“By enabling energy-efficient home renovations and facilitating the construction of more efficient energy infrastructure, EU Space plays a crucial role in ensuring that Europe's green transformation is inclusive and leaves no one behind," adds da Costa. 

This highlights how EU Space can support the Spanish Presidency’s priority of promoting greater social and economic justice – a priority that aims to ensure everyone benefits from Europe’s competitiveness and success, including people with disabilities. 

Here too EU Space can help. Take for example the Galileo High Accuracy Service, which is set to improve urban navigation and wayfinding for people with disabilities. Companies are also leveraging the precise positioning offered by Galileo and EGNOS to develop innovative applications to help, for instance, the visually impaired navigate through busy city centres and safely use public transport. 

Strengthening European unity 

In a world of challenges and growing tensions, the EU must remain united. “In a geopolitical context marked by uncertainty, Europe must become an area of certainties, in which material welfare, freedom and democracy pave the way for the future of all people,” says Sánchez.

To help, the Spanish Presidency looks to develop the tools Member States and citizens need to face these uncertainties together. 

“At its heart, the EU Space Programme is a programme built by Europe, for Europe,” concludes da Costa. “Whether it be boosting Union’s competitiveness, supporting its energy independence, mitigating the effects of climate change, protecting citizens from security threats and natural disasters, or simply keeping us connected with one another, EU Space is a key tool for maintaining a united and thriving Europe.”  

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

By fostering the development of an innovative, competitive and independent space sector, EU Space is set to contribute to each of the priorities set by the Spanish Presidency of the Council of the European Union.

EUSPA grows further to support EU Space Traffic Management

30.6.2023 17:31  
Following a European Commission’s Decision of 3 June 2022, EUSPA is operating the Space Surveillance and Tracking (SST) Front Desk as of 1 July.
Published: 
03 July 2023

The abundance of satellites is not only responsible for "an unprecedented space traffic jam" but it’s also the cause of a large amount of space debris which is increasing at an alarming rate.

According to the European Commission, over 1 million debris items larger than 1cm are currently orbiting the Earth ranging from screws and dead satellites to space rocket components. To address the issue of space congestion, and as space debris can damage and potentially take out EU-owned functioning satellites such as Galileo, Copernicus, and EGNOS and privately owned, the Union recently proposed a holistic approach to Space Traffic Management

To support this initiative and given its expertise in service provision and security issues management, EUSPA, as of 1 July, will be operating the Space Surveillance and Tracking (SST) Front Desk, following a European Commission’s Decision of 3 June 2022.

What will EUSPA do? 

The EU SST Front Desk team will continue interfacing with SST users – which include spacecraft owners and operators, EU institutions and EU Member States – to support them in using the dedicated Portal and benefitting from their services. The Front Desk also provides service performance information to certain stakeholders and promotes the use of the SST services. 

Together with the EU SST Partnership composed of 15 EU Member States, EUSPA will support the provision of space safety services to more than 190 registered organisations and contribute to the coordination of space traffic by protecting more than 400 satellites from the risk of collision with space debris or other operational satellites. Moreover, they will be detecting and monitoring break-ups in space and the uncontrolled re-entry of space objects into Earth’s atmosphere.

The transfer from the previous operator, SatCen, was performed seamlessly to minimize as much as possible the impact on users. Following the switch-over, services are being provided as expected, and the new contact details of the SST Helpdesk have been communicated to the users. 

The new premises of the EU SST Front Desk are located at EUSPA’s Galileo Security Monitoring Centre (GSMC) in San Martín de la Vega, Madrid, Spain.

"By managing the EU SST front desk, EUSPA contributes to the EU Space Traffic Management approach, as to support developing an EU strategy to ensure safe and sustainable use of space while preserving the EU space industry’s competitiveness" highlights EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa.

“The EU SST Partnership is committed to delivering public services in collision avoidance, re-entry and fragmentation analysis, through the EU SST Front Desk, to improve safety of space operations and contribute to the long-term sustainability of outer space activities. Together with EUSPA, we will continue to put the users at the centre of our commitment,” declared Pascal Faucher, Chairman, EU SST Partnership, Defence and security, CNES.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Following a European Commission’s Decision of 3 June 2022, EUSPA is operating the Space Surveillance and Tracking (SST) Front Desk as of 1 July.

Full house for the first Galileo High Accuracy Days

30.6.2023 10:09  
Attendees to Galileo HAS Days received a status update on the services, discussed market opportunities and experienced live demos.
Published: 
30 June 2023

Held in a hybrid mode, the Galileo HAS Days was an opportunity for stakeholders, application developers, and international experts to receive an update on the status, performance, and evolution plans of this new groundbreaking service, which operational since January 2023. It was also the opportunity to receive feedbacks from the key pioneers using the added value of the high accuracy positioning from space (Beyond Gravity) to transportation (Anavs), agriculture (Hemisphere) to surveying and mapping (EOS Positioning) and location-based applications (Google). 

The event served as a platform where participants exchanged technical knowledge and views on the market opportunities HAS brings as well as the challenges various industries are facing. 

Attendees could take part in a series of live demos to experience firsthand the added value of Galileo HAS.

You can find the presentations delivered here.

In addition, participants could visit the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) premises, the single interface between the Galileo system and the users. The GSC is a centre of expertise, knowledge sharing, custom performance assessment, information dissemination, and support to the provision of value-added services enabled by the Galileo services. For the particular case of Galileo HAS, the GSC hosts the High Accuracy Data Generator (HADG), which computes the HAS orbit and clock corrections as well as the signal biases which are broadcast through the Galileo constellation and over the internet.

“The workshop provided an excellent opportunity to reflect on our service performance and share our ambitious roadmap for the future. The strong attendance demonstrates the significant interest and appreciation for our user-centered approach. It highlights our commitment to bringing our services closer to those who rely on them,” stated Javier de Blas, Galileo High Accuracy and Commercial Authentication Services Manager at EUSPA.

The added value of Galileo HAS

The new ground-breaking service of the EU’s positioning system offers users an unprecedented level of horizontal accuracy down to 25cm over most parts of the globe in nominal conditions. It is transmitted directly via the Galileo signal in space (E6-B) and through the internet. With HAS, Galileo becomes the first constellation worldwide able to provide a high-accuracy service globally and directly through the Signal in Space.

"Emerging technologies such as real time precise orbit determination, UAVs and autonomous vehicles require stringent levels of accuracy for better navigation and positioning experience." says Carmen Aguilera, Head of Section, Operational market development and Safety critical applications at EUSPA. Furthermore, an increased accuracy positioning feeds innovative applications in agriculture, geomatics, location based services and many other market segments.

The Galileo HAS will become a pillar for applications needing precise and reliable position information. This includes EU sectorial policies and also national policies by EU Member States.

The Galileo HAS is provided by the EU Agency for the Space Programme and was developed and tested together with the European Commission (DG DEFIS and the JRC) and the European Space Agency. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Attendees to Galileo HAS Days received a status update on the services, discussed market opportunities and experienced live demos.

Trailblazing EU Space Start-ups claim victory in #myEUspace Competition and set to soar to new heights

27.6.2023 16:03  
#myEUspace Track Product winners during CASSINI Entrepreneurship Days.
Published: 
28 June 2023

After a long, exciting and challenging prize contest, five innovative start-ups have emerged as rising stars of the European Union's space downstream innovation. The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), under the European Commission's CASSINI – Space Entrepreneurship Initiative, recently organized the #myEUspace competition, offering a substantial cash prize of 100,000 euros to each winning team. This generous prize aims to propel their businesses to greater heights.

The #myEUspace competition called upon creative innovators and entrepreneurs to develop groundbreaking commercial solutions that leverage data from Galileo, Copernicus, or both. Spanning a wide spectrum of ideas, participants presented mobile applications, hardware-based solutions, and more. All proposals were aligned with one of three targeted innovation areas: Space My Life, Our Green Planet, or Dive in deep tech. It is the last winners of this unique competition which has been divided into three different prize tracks (Ideas, Prototypes and Commercial Products).

Hailing from diverse geographical locations across Europe, the victorious teams represent a range of sectors crucial to our economy and society, including tourism and health. Each of the winners was awarded a substantial cash prize of 100,000 euros, providing them with the necessary resources to scale up their businesses and launch their products on a global scale.

Rodrigo da Costa, EUSPA Executive Director, commended the winners for their impressive business plans and the remarkable market potential exhibited by their solutions. He also extended his congratulations to all participants in the product track, acknowledging their diligent efforts. "It was impressive to see how robust the business plans of the winning solutions were, but also the level of market maturity and business potential, such an encouragement for the future development of our European economy" he remarked, concluding his statement.

During the CASSINI Entrepreneurship Days, where the winners have been announced, the participants had the unique opportunity to showcase live demonstrations of their products and engage in valuable networking sessions with investors, accelerators, corporations and the European space start-up community.

Let us introduce the outstanding winners of the #myEUspace competition:

  • Murmuration: This start-up aims to monitor the environmental impact of tourism by utilizing satellite data, paving the way for sustainable practices in the industry.
  • j-Snow: Leveraging high-resolution satellite data, j-Snow provides near real-time snow monitoring, revolutionizing snow-related services and applications.
  • Ajuma: Focused on skin cancer prevention, Ajuma employs satellite data for UV monitoring, empowering individuals to safeguard their health.
  • ClearkSky vision: This start-up employs deep learning algorithms to deliver daily cloud-free Sentinel-2 images, ensuring accurate and timely information for various applications.
  • Onocoy: By harnessing the power of Web3 technology, Onocoy establishes a community-powered dense network of GNSS reference stations for ultra-accurate positioning, opening new possibilities in navigation and beyond.

These exceptional start-ups have set a new benchmark in the EU space industry, leveraging the wealth of data provided by Galileo and Copernicus. As they scale up their operations and prepare to launch their products globally, their success promises to propel Europe's space entrepreneurship to greater heights, inspiring future innovators and entrepreneurs alike.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

#myEUspace Track Product winners during EUSPA Entrepreneurship Days.

EDG²E and the optimisation of aviation navigation with Galileo

23.6.2023 17:18  
This EDG²E workshop will present the achievements of the project for optimising aviation navigation with Galileo
Published: 
26 June 2023

The EU-funded project, EDG2E, managed by the European Union Agency for the Space Programme made significant strides in optimizing aviation navigation with the integration of Galileo, the European GNSS system. By leveraging the advanced capabilities of Galileo and incorporating them into avionics technology, the project aims to enhance safety, precision, and reliability in air travel, ultimately benefiting the aviation industry as a whole.

The project has recently demonstrated the capabilities of the new DFMC Navigation modes using GPS + Galileo in the L1/L5 and E1/E5a frequencies. The DFMC Navigation modes showcased their functionality under various flight plans, including different latitudes and approaches such as RNP (Required Navigation Performance). The tests were conducted using a prototype avionic GNSS Receiver using high reliability hardware components in design. Realistic installation conditions were simulated on an ATR72-600 aircraft, considering installation constraints like DFMC antenna characteristics, analog front end architecture device losses, and the effects of vibrations and dynamic factors.

The EDG2E project, and the MUGG project, stand out as the only initiatives to achieve successful proof of concept through flight trials, even in scenarios with a limited number of GPS L1/L5 satellites available. This achievement has not impeded the project's ability to accomplish RNP0.1 and RNP0.3 operations, demonstrating its robustness and effectiveness.

One of the other key outcomes of the EDG2E project is the validation and consolidation of the DFMC SBAS MOPS (Minimum Operational Performance Standards) identified as EUROCAE ED-259A / RTCA DO-401. This provides a concrete means to advance and refine the receiver standard, paving the way for improved aviation navigation systems.

A webinar is now being organised to learn more about the advancements made by the EDG2E project, and discuss further the achievements in aviation navigation optimization. The webinar aims to accomplish several objectives:

  • Present Galileo and EGNOS V3, highlighting the specific advantages they offer to the aviation industry. This will provide attendees with valuable insights into the potential benefits of integrating these programs into aviation navigation systems.
  • Showcase the EDG2E project and share the outcomes of the recently completed flight trials using the prototype receiver that tested DFMC Navigation modes. 
  • Engage the audience in a discussion about the advantages of the SBAS DFMC receiver for aviation. Attendees will have the opportunity to provide feedback and share their perspectives on the benefits of this technology. 
  • Present the results of a questionnaire posted on the project website, further enriching the understanding of the receiver's potential impact.

The webinar will provide a platform to disseminate the results and discuss their implications for the aviation sector providing confidence among stakeholders regarding the imminent availability of DFMC signals and receivers in aviation. 

Join us here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

This EDG²E workshop will present the achievements of the project for optimising aviation navigation with Galileo

EDG²E and the optimisation of aviation navigation with Galileo

23.6.2023 17:18  
This EDG²E workshop will present the achievements of the project for optimising aviation navigation with Galileo

The EU-funded project, EDG2E, managed by the European Union Agency for the Space Programme made significant strides in optimizing aviation navigation with the integration of Galileo, the European GNSS system. By leveraging the advanced capabilities of Galileo and incorporating them into avionics technology, the project aims to enhance safety, precision, and reliability in air travel, ultimately benefiting the aviation industry as a whole.

The project has recently demonstrated the capabilities of the new DFMC Navigation modes using GPS + Galileo in the L1/L5 and E1/E5a frequencies. The DFMC Navigation modes showcased their functionality under various flight plans, including different latitudes and approaches such as RNP (Required Navigation Performance). The tests were conducted using a prototype avionic GNSS Receiver using high reliability hardware components in design. Realistic installation conditions were simulated on an ATR72-600 aircraft, considering installation constraints like DFMC antenna characteristics, analog front end architecture device losses, and the effects of vibrations and dynamic factors.

The EDG2E project, and the MUGG project, stand out as the only initiatives to achieve successful proof of concept through flight trials, even in scenarios with a limited number of GPS L1/L5 satellites available. This achievement has not impeded the project's ability to accomplish RNP0.1 and RNP0.3 operations, demonstrating its robustness and effectiveness.

One of the other key outcomes of the EDG2E project is the validation and consolidation of the DFMC SBAS MOPS (Minimum Operational Performance Standards) identified as EUROCAE ED-259A / RTCA DO-401. This provides a concrete means to advance and refine the receiver standard, paving the way for improved aviation navigation systems.

A webinar is now being organised to learn more about the advancements made by the EDG2E project, and discuss further the achievements in aviation navigation optimization. The webinar aims to accomplish several objectives:

  • Present Galileo and EGNOS V3, highlighting the specific advantages they offer to the aviation industry. This will provide attendees with valuable insights into the potential benefits of integrating these programs into aviation navigation systems.
  • Showcase the EDG2E project and share the outcomes of the recently completed flight trials using the prototype receiver that tested DFMC Navigation modes. 
  • Engage the audience in a discussion about the advantages of the SBAS DFMC receiver for aviation. Attendees will have the opportunity to provide feedback and share their perspectives on the benefits of this technology. 
  • Present the results of a questionnaire posted on the project website, further enriching the understanding of the receiver's potential impact.

The webinar will provide a platform to disseminate the results and discuss their implications for the aviation sector providing confidence among stakeholders regarding the imminent availability of DFMC signals and receivers in aviation. 

Join us here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

This EDG²E workshop will present the achievements of the project for optimising aviation navigation with Galileo

EDG²E and the optimisation of aviation navigation with Galileo

23.6.2023 17:18  
This EDG²E workshop will present the achievements of the project for optimising aviation navigation with Galileo

The EU-funded project, EDG2E, managed by the European Union Agency for the Space Programme made significant strides in optimizing aviation navigation with the integration of Galileo, the European GNSS system. By leveraging the advanced capabilities of Galileo and incorporating them into avionics technology, the project aims to enhance safety, precision, and reliability in air travel, ultimately benefiting the aviation industry as a whole.

The project has recently demonstrated the capabilities of the new DFMC Navigation modes using GPS + Galileo in the L1/L5 and E1/E5a frequencies. The DFMC Navigation modes showcased their functionality under various flight plans, including different latitudes and approaches such as RNP (Required Navigation Performance). The tests were conducted using a prototype avionic GNSS Receiver using high reliability hardware components in design. Realistic installation conditions were simulated on an ATR72-600 aircraft, considering installation constraints like DFMC antenna characteristics, analog front end architecture device losses, and the effects of vibrations and dynamic factors.

The EDG2E project, and the MUGG project, stand out as the only initiatives to achieve successful proof of concept through flight trials, even in scenarios with a limited number of GPS L1/L5 satellites available. This achievement has not impeded the project's ability to accomplish RNP0.1 and RNP0.3 operations, demonstrating its robustness and effectiveness.

One of the other key outcomes of the EDG2E project is the validation and consolidation of the DFMC SBAS MOPS (Minimum Operational Performance Standards) identified as EUROCAE ED-259A / RTCA DO-401. This provides a concrete means to advance and refine the receiver standard, paving the way for improved aviation navigation systems.

A webinar is now being organised to learn more about the advancements made by the EDG2E project, and discuss further the achievements in aviation navigation optimization. The webinar aims to accomplish several objectives:

  • Present Galileo and EGNOS V3, highlighting the specific advantages they offer to the aviation industry. This will provide attendees with valuable insights into the potential benefits of integrating these programs into aviation navigation systems.
  • Showcase the EDG2E project and share the outcomes of the recently completed flight trials using the prototype receiver that tested DFMC Navigation modes. 
  • Engage the audience in a discussion about the advantages of the SBAS DFMC receiver for aviation. Attendees will have the opportunity to provide feedback and share their perspectives on the benefits of this technology. 
  • Present the results of a questionnaire posted on the project website, further enriching the understanding of the receiver's potential impact.

The webinar will provide a platform to disseminate the results and discuss their implications for the aviation sector providing confidence among stakeholders regarding the imminent availability of DFMC signals and receivers in aviation. 

Join us here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

This EDG²E workshop will present the achievements of the project for optimising aviation navigation with Galileo

GOVSATCOM implementation continues to advance

19.6.2023 10:37  
New Implementing Acts, which EUSPA contributed to, help advance the GOVSATCOM and IRIS2 programmes
Published: 
19 June 2023

The implementation of GOVSATCOM, Europe’s Governmental Satellite Communications programme, continues to move forward. Most recently, on 30 May 2023, the European Commission adopted three Implementing Acts. These Acts provide the legal foundation for the services that GOVSATCOM, along with IRIS2 (Infrastructure for Resilience, Interconnectivity and Security by Satellite), will offer. 

GOVSATCOM, the fourth pillar of the EU Space Programme, will provide secure and cost-efficient communication capabilities to security and safety critical missions and operations managed by the EU and its Member States, including national security actors and EU agencies and institutions. EUSPA has been entrusted with the procurement of GOVSATCOM’s secure operational ground segment (GOVSATCOM Hubs), its operations and the coordination of the user-related aspects of the programme, all in close collaboration with Member States and other involved entities.

Check this: EUSPA is hiring a GOVSATCOM Hub Operations Manager

The IRIS2 satellite constellation will provide secure communication services to the EU and its Member States, as well as broadband connectivity for European citizens, private companies and governmental authorities. The EUSPA Security Accreditation Board (SAB), where Members States take accreditation decisions, will become the IRIS2 security accreditation authority, providing security assurance to users with regards to IRIS2 services and infrastructure.

EUSPA contributes to Implementing Acts 

Through the Implementing Acts, the Commission establishes which satellite communications service categories are to be pooled and shared and defines the services IRIS2 will provide. The Acts also outline the GOVSATCOM Hubs’ functionalities and operational aspects, presentation of the pooled capacities to the users through the service portfolio, service selection process and use of GOVSATCOM services by the users.  

EUSPA supported the Commission in preparing the Acts, contributing to their drafting and helping assess and integrate comments from the Member States. The Agency also lent their technical expertise and provided input from governmental users, the latter of which came from the EU-funded ENTRUSTED project. The project was established to provide a concrete set of governmental user requirements for GOVSATCOM services.

The full text of the Implementing Acts, as published in the Official Journal of the EU, can be found via the following links: 

  • Commission Implementing Decision (EU) 2023/1054 of 30 May 2023 laying down rules for the application of Regulation (EU) 2021/696 of the European Parliament and of the Council as regards the service portfolio for the Governmental Satellite Communications services offered by the system established under the Union Space Programme OJ L 141, 31.5.2023, p. 49–56.
  • Commission Implementing Decision (EU) 2023/1055 of 30 May 2023 setting out the rules on the sharing and prioritisation of satellite communication capacities, services, and user equipment to fulfil the function referred to in Article 66(2) of Regulation (EU) 2021/696 of the European Parliament and of the Council OJ L 141, 31.5.2023, p. 57–66.
  • Commission Implementing Decision (EU) 2023/1053 of 30 May 2023 laying down rules for the application of Regulation (EU) 2023/588 of the European Parliament and of the Council as regards operational requirements for governmental services provided under Union Secure Connectivity Programme and its service portfolio OJ L 141, 31.5.2023, p. 44–48.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

New Implementing Acts, which EUSPA contributed to, help advance the GOVSATCOM and IRIS2 programmes

Fundamental Elements Industry Days Workshop: Developing cutting-edge devices for connectivity

16.6.2023 16:00  
This Fundamental Elements Industry Days workshop will include in-depth information on the funding programme and the application process a well as insights about the calls.
Published: 
16 June 2023

EUSPA plays a crucial role in supporting the EU Space industry throughout the innovation cycle, providing funding and market intelligence. One of the notable tools that has significantly contributed to the adoption of Galileo is the Fundamental Elements programme. This R&D funding mechanism is specifically designed to support the development of innovative chipset, antenna, and receiver technologies.

By leveraging the Fundamental Elements programme, EUSPA accelerates the integration of Galileo into market-ready devices and solutions. 

The objectives can be summarized as follows:

  • Facilitate the adoption of EGNSS (European Global Navigation Satellite Systems), leveraging innovative services and differentiators.
  • Enhance the competitiveness of the EU industry in the global market.
  • Address user needs in critical market segments.
  • Maximize the benefits of Galileo for European citizens.

Projects funded through the Fundamental Elements programme play a pivotal role in EUSPA's mission to drive the development and market uptake of Galileo-enabled receivers. These initiatives contribute to the growth and success of the EU Space industry, fostering innovation and ensuring the wide availability of reliable and advanced positioning, navigation, and timing services.

The new call currently open is looking to support the development of a hybrid terminal for connectivity for cutting-edge devices.

Connectivity: Enabling next generation NAV/COM Hybrid Terminal

As the number of connected devices is growing exponentially, the focus has shifted to solution owners locating all assets simultaneously with minimal power drain. It's no longer about individual assets locating themselves, but about efficient, centralized asset tracking solutions. This approach optimizes power consumption while providing real-time visibility and operational efficiency.

In this context, integrating Terrestrial Networks (TN) and Non-Terrestrial Networks (NTN) have the potential of connecting the unconnected and enhancing the user experience for the already-connected devices, with technological and societal implications of the greatest long-term significance. 

Objectives: 

Development of a unified hybrid user terminal, that shall support (and process):

  • From communication perspective: TN and NTN communication signals
  • From Navigation perspective: signals from GNSS and LEO for PNT

And optionally can support (and process):

  • From communication to navigation perspective (COM2NAV): communication signals to provide localization services according to several wireless communication methods
  • From navigation to communication perspective (NAV2COM): (considering GNSS and all other PNT functions) positioning, ranging and time synchronization to improve data acquisition task by channel estimation, beam alignment, medium access control, routing, and network optimization.

Foreseen result:

Unified hybrid user terminal capable to support TN and NTN communication together with GNSS, and Galileo in particular, and LEO satellite signals in order to support joint Data & PNT services, reaching TRL 7. 

The maximum budget is set to 3 M€ and the indicative number of projects to be awarded is four.

Deadline for submission: 15 September 2023

More details about this call will be made available during EUSPA’s upcoming Fundamental Elements online Workshop via Webex, to be held on 30 June from 11.00 to 12.30 CEST. The workshop will include in-depth information on the funding programme and the application process. More information is available at this link

The Fundamental Elements Industry Days Workshop: Developing cutting-edge devices for connectivity, will include in-depth information on the funding programme and the application process as well as insights about the calls.

Join us here

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

This Fundamental Elements Industry Days workshop will include in-depth information on the funding programme and the application process a well as insights about the calls.

EUSPA Releases User Consultation Platform 2022 Reports

14.6.2023 12:18  
The UCP 2022 Reports on User needs are now available for download.
Published: 
14 June 2023

The annual User Consultation Platform (UCP) led by EUSPA, is a forum in which the EU Space Programme user community meets to share their experiences, reflect on needs and discuss market trends in satellite navigation, earth observation and satellite communications. The input gathered during the UCP is essential for the evolution of Galileo/EGNOS, Copernicus and GOVSATCOM/IRIS2 systems and the services they provide.  

The last UCP which was held during EU Space Week 2022 gathered over 300 attendees from 7 different market segments including Infrastructure, Renewable Energy and Raw Materials, Consumer Applications, Aviation and Drones, Maritime and Fisheries, Emergency Management and Humanitarian Aid, as well as Insurance and Finance. 

"The outcomes of the UCP are crucial for service definition and service provision of the EU Space Programme. The input from users allows EU decision-makers and us service providers to design and develop EO, GNSS and Satcom services that bring added value to a broad range of our economy and society," says Head of Market Downstream and Innovation Department, Fiammetta Diani. 

The results of the UCP were used to compile and update a series of Reports on User Needs and Requirements per market including for the first time those related to COPERNICUS and are now available here:

Sneak a peek at UCP 2023 

The UCP is a one-of-a-kind networking opportunity that allows the entire space ecosystem to explore new synergies and keep abreast of the latest developments in this fast-paced sector. The Platform’s format allows all the various space stakeholders to share their experiences and expertise and learn from each other, helping them to grow stronger and become more innovative and competitive.

The 5th edition of the User Consultation Platform (UCP) for the European Space Programme will take place on 7 November 2023 in Sevilla, Spain. It will be a one-day event composed of 7 parallel sessions in which users will be grouped by market segment:

  • Agriculture and Forestry
  • Environmental Climate & Biodiversity
  • Rail
  • Public Transport
  • Road and Automotive
  • Space 
  • Resilient Societies

More details will be announced soon, so stay tuned!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The UCP 2022 Reports on User needs are now available for download.

EUSPA Releases User Consultation Platform 2022 Reports

14.6.2023 12:18  
Published: 
14 June 2023

The annual User Consultation Platform (UCP) led by EUSPA, is a forum in which the EU Space Programme user community meets to share their experiences, reflect on needs and discuss market trends in satellite navigation, earth observation and satellite communications. The input gathered during the UCP is essential for the evolution of Galileo/EGNOS, Copernicus and GOVSATCOM/IRIS2 systems and the services they provide.  

The last UCP which was held during EU Space Week 2022 gathered over 300 attendees from 7 different market segments including Infrastructure, Renewable Energy and Raw Materials, Consumer Applications, Aviation and Drones, Maritime and Fisheries, Emergency Management and Humanitarian Aid, as well as Insurance and Finance. 

"The outcomes of the UCP are crucial for service definition and service provision of the EU Space Programme. The input from users allows EU decision-makers and us service providers to design and develop EO, GNSS and Satcom services that bring added value to a broad range of our economy and society," says Head of Market Downstream and Innovation Department, Fiammetta Diani. 

The results of the UCP were used to compile and update a series of Reports on User Needs and Requirements per market including for the first time those related to Copernicus and are now available here.

Sneak a peek at UCP 2023 

The UCP is a one-of-a-kind networking opportunity that allows the entire space ecosystem to explore new synergies and keep abreast of the latest developments in this fast-paced sector. The Platform’s format allows all the various space stakeholders to share their experiences and expertise and learn from each other, helping them to grow stronger and become more innovative and competitive.

The 5th edition of the User Consultation Platform (UCP) for the European Space Programme will take place on 7 November 2023 in Sevilla, Spain. It will be a one-day event composed of 7 parallel sessions in which users will be grouped by market segment:

  • Agriculture and Forestry
  • Environmental Climate & Biodiversity
  • Rail
  • Public Transport
  • Road and Automotive
  • Space 
  • Resilient Societies

More details will be announced soon, so stay tuned!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The UCP 2022 Reports on User needs are now available for download.
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