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EUSPA celebrates “406Day”, the International Search and Rescue Beacon Day by lifting the veil on new life-saving features.

6.4.2022 12:40  
The Galileo SAR reached new heights with a record-breaking location accuracy performance of 98.12% below 2km. The EU constellation is the biggest contributor to the Cospas-Sarsat MEOSAR system.
Published: 
06 April 2022

Beacon Awareness Day (#406Day) is an opportunity to celebrate the amazing work carried out by Search and Rescue teams across the globe that risk their lives daily to save people in distress. It also aims to remind the owners of Search and Rescue beacons of the need to register their beacons and test them regularly.

On #406Day2021, we celebrate Search and Rescue teams all around the world. But why 406? Well, 406 Day, as April 6th is written in the US where the initiative emerged, is a reference to the 406 MHz frequency of the Search and Rescue beacons used by the international rescue organisation Cospas-Sarsat. These beacons help save an average of seven lives every day around the world.

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), the European Commission, and their partners, the European Space Agency (ESA), is proud to celebrate Galileo’s contribution to this international effort.

The Search and Rescue (SAR) transponders installed onboard the Galileo satellites decrease the detection and location time of a distress beacon dramatically, speeding up the rescue response and augmenting the chances of survival. Galileo/SAR is the only system delivering the Return Link Service (RLS). This feature provides the user in distress with an acknowledgment indication on the beacon that the distress signal was received and its position located.

Today, Galileo provides more than 90% of the approved L-band satellite-based search and rescue capabilities with 24/7 worldwide coverage. On top, Galileo is also the largest search and rescue ground segment provider with a committed performance of over 20% of the Earth's surface.

It is a great European achievement, which shows that Europe is not only a major space power but also an actor continuously working on people's well-being. The 406 Day is also the perfect occasion to pay tribute to all the members of the Rescue teams around the world.

As announced last year, and based on the feedback received from more than 250 operational Search and Rescue units, Galileo is designing new features to answer their operational needs as closely as possible, to save even more lives. The Remote Beacon Activation Service (e.g. in the case of the disappearance of a plane or a vessel) and the Two-Way communication functionality (that allows rescue coordinators to send pre-programmed questions and instructions to the person in distress) is due to enter into preliminary testing shortly.

Click here for more info.

Watch our first ever short documentary to see how Galileo-enabled Emergency Position-Indicating Radiobeacon (EPIRB) is used to save lives in the Arctic Circle, and what benefits the EU Space Programme brings to better understand and fight the challenges climate change is causing, from affecting communities and ecosystems to disrupting maritime operations in the Arctic Circle. 

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The Galileo SAR reached new heights with a record-breaking location accuracy performance of 98.12% below 2km. The EU constellation is the biggest contributor to the Cospas-Sarsat MEOSAR system.

EUSPA celebrates “406Day”, the International Search and Rescue Beacon Day by lifting the veil on new life-saving features.

6.4.2022 12:40  
The Galileo SAR reached new heights with a record-breaking location accuracy performance of 98.12% below 2km. The EU constellation is the biggest contributor to the Cospas-Sarsat MEOSAR system.
Published: 
06 April 2022

Beacon Awareness Day (#406Day) is an opportunity to celebrate the amazing work carried out by Search and Rescue teams across the globe that risk their lives daily to save people in distress. It also aims to remind the owners of Search and Rescue beacons of the need to register their beacons and test them regularly.

On #406Day2021, we celebrate Search and Rescue teams all around the world. But why 406? Well, 406 Day, as April 6th is written in the US where the initiative emerged, is a reference to the 406 MHz frequency of the Search and Rescue beacons used by the international rescue organisation Cospas-Sarsat. These beacons help save an average of seven lives every day around the world.

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), the European Commission, and their partners, the European Space Agency (ESA), is proud to celebrate Galileo’s contribution to this international effort.

The Search and Rescue (SAR) transponders installed onboard the Galileo satellites decrease the detection and location time of a distress beacon dramatically, speeding up the rescue response and augmenting the chances of survival. Galileo/SAR is the only system delivering the Return Link Service (RLS). This feature provides the user in distress with an acknowledgment indication on the beacon that the distress signal was received and its position located.

Today, Galileo provides more than 90% of the approved L-band satellite-based search and rescue capabilities with 24/7 worldwide coverage. On top, Galileo is also the largest search and rescue ground segment provider with a committed performance of over 20% of the Earth's surface.

It is a great European achievement, which shows that Europe is not only a major space power but also an actor continuously working on people's well-being. The 406 Day is also the perfect occasion to pay tribute to all the members of the Rescue teams around the world.

As announced last year, and based on the feedback received from more than 250 operational Search and Rescue units, Galileo is designing new features to answer their operational needs as closely as possible, to save even more lives. The Remote Beacon Activation Service (e.g. in the case of the disappearance of a plane or a vessel) and the Two-Way communication functionality (that allows rescue coordinators to send pre-programmed questions and instructions to the person in distress) is due to enter into preliminary testing shortly.

Click here for more info.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The Galileo SAR reached new heights with a record-breaking location accuracy performance of 98.12% below 2km. The EU constellation is the biggest contributor to the Cospas-Sarsat MEOSAR system.

EUSPA celebrates “406Day”, the International Search and Rescue Beacon Day by lifting the veil on new life-saving features.

6.4.2022 12:40  
The Galileo SAR reached new heights with a record-breaking location accuracy performance of 98.12% below 2km. The EU constellation is the biggest contributor to the Cospas-Sarsat MEOSAR system.
Published: 
06 April 2022

Beacon Awareness Day (#406Day) is an opportunity to celebrate the amazing work carried out by Search and Rescue teams across the globe that risk their lives daily to save people in distress. It also aims to remind the owners of Search and Rescue beacons of the need to register their beacons and test them regularly.

On #406Day2021, we celebrate Search and Rescue teams all around the world. But why 406? Well, 406 Day, as April 6th is written in the US where the initiative emerged, is a reference to the 406 MHz frequency of the Search and Rescue beacons used by the international rescue organisation Cospas-Sarsat. These beacons help save an average of seven lives every day around the world.

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), the European Commission, and their partners, the European Space Agency (ESA), is proud to celebrate Galileo’s contribution to this international effort.

The Search and Rescue (SAR) transponders installed onboard the Galileo satellites decrease the detection and location time of a distress beacon dramatically, speeding up the rescue response and augmenting the chances of survival. Galileo/SAR is the only system delivering the Return Link Service (RLS). This feature provides the user in distress with an acknowledgment indication on the beacon that the distress signal was received and its position located.

Today, Galileo provides more than 90% of the approved L-band satellite-based search and rescue capabilities with 24/7 worldwide coverage. On top, Galileo is also the largest search and rescue ground segment provider with a committed performance of over 20% of the Earth's surface.

It is a great European achievement, which shows that Europe is not only a major space power but also an actor continuously working on people's well-being. The 406 Day is also the perfect occasion to pay tribute to all the members of the Rescue teams around the world.

As announced last year, and based on the feedback received from more than 250 operational Search and Rescue units, Galileo is designing new features to answer their operational needs as closely as possible, to save even more lives. The Remote Beacon Activation Service (e.g. in the case of the disappearance of a plane or a vessel) and the Two-Way communication functionality (that allows rescue coordinators to send pre-programmed questions and instructions to the person in distress) is due to enter into preliminary testing shortly.

Click here for more info.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The Galileo SAR reached new heights with a record-breaking location accuracy performance of 98.12% below 2km. The EU constellation is the biggest contributor to the Cospas-Sarsat MEOSAR system.

EUSPA celebrates “406Day”, the International Search and Rescue Beacon Day by lifting the veil on new life-saving features.

6.4.2022 12:40  
The Galileo SAR reached new heights with a record-breaking location accuracy performance of 98.12% below 2km. The EU constellation is the biggest contributor to the Cospas-Sarsat MEOSAR system.
Published: 
06 April 2022

Beacon Awareness Day (#406Day) is an opportunity to celebrate the amazing work carried out by Search and Rescue teams across the globe that risk their lives daily to save people in distress. It also aims to remind the owners of Search and Rescue beacons of the need to register their beacons and test them regularly.

On #406Day2021, we celebrate Search and Rescue teams all around the world. But why 406? Well, 406 Day, as April 6th is written in the US where the initiative emerged, is a reference to the 406 MHz frequency of the Search and Rescue beacons used by the international rescue organisation Cospas-Sarsat. These beacons help save an average of seven lives every day around the world.

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), the European Commission, and their partners, the European Space Agency (ESA), is proud to celebrate Galileo’s contribution to this international effort.

The Search and Rescue (SAR) transponders installed onboard the Galileo satellites decrease the detection and location time of a distress beacon dramatically, speeding up the rescue response and augmenting the chances of survival. Galileo/SAR is the only system delivering the Return Link Service (RLS). This feature provides the user in distress with an acknowledgment indication on the beacon that the distress signal was received and its position located.

Today, Galileo provides more than 90% of the approved L-band satellite-based search and rescue capabilities with 24/7 worldwide coverage. On top, Galileo is also the largest search and rescue ground segment provider with a committed performance of over 20% of the Earth's surface.

It is a great European achievement, which shows that Europe is not only a major space power but also an actor continuously working on people's well-being. The 406 Day is also the perfect occasion to pay tribute to all the members of the Rescue teams around the world.

As announced last year, and based on the feedback received from more than 250 operational Search and Rescue units, Galileo is designing new features to answer their operational needs as closely as possible, to save even more lives. The Remote Beacon Activation Service (e.g. in the case of the disappearance of a plane or a vessel) and the Two-Way communication functionality (that allows rescue coordinators to send pre-programmed questions and instructions to the person in distress) is due to enter into preliminary testing shortly.

Click here for more info.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The Galileo SAR reached new heights with a record-breaking location accuracy performance of 98.12% below 2km. The EU constellation is the biggest contributor to the Cospas-Sarsat MEOSAR system.

Space-based solutions set to address some of today’s most pressing challenges

4.4.2022 11:45  
EUSPA launched earlier in 2020 this Horizon Europe call to transform the digital economy, increase the Union’s resilience and support the Green Deal.
Published: 
04 April 2022

Having received 50 proposals, the first Horizon Europe call is set to turn space technologies like Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus into innovative applications and solutions.

The results of the first Horizon Europe call are in, with the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), who manages the call, receiving 50 proposals.

While the proposals come from across Europe, each shares the common goal of developing innovative downstream solutions that leverage data and information from the EU Space Programme, including Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus.

“Linking space to user needs starts with research and innovation,” says EUSPA Head of Market Development Innovation department, Fiammetta Diani. “By facilitating research that leverages the EU Space Programme, Horizon Europe supports the development of space-based solutions to some of today’s most pressing challenges.”

Those challenges are transforming the digital economy, improving safety and security services and mitigating the risk of climate change – and the proposals received for this first call address all three.

For instance, for the Digital Age, EUSPA received 10 innovative applications proposals focusing on this particular topic. Taking advantage of European GNSS’ (EGNSS) superb multipath resistance and authentication, these proposals look to address a range of societal challenges, including health and wellbeing, smart mobility and the sharing economy.

EUSPA also received 12 proposals for using Earth Observation and EGNSS to better protect European citizens from natural disasters and other emergencies. Many of these proposals, highlight the important of timing and synchronisation services offered by Galileo. “In the unfortunate event of wildfires, floods or earthquakes, having ready access to precise location and up-to-date geospatial information are vital to conducting an effective emergency response,” says Diani. “The synergies between Copernicus, Galileo and EGNOS have the potential to offer just that, and these proposals aim to turn that potential into practical solutions.”

As to mitigating the risk of climate change, the first call received 28 proposals for using EGNSS and Earth Observation data to support the objectives of the EU’s Green Deal. “From curbing CO2 emissions to fighting illegal logging, monitoring biodiversity and tracking oil spills, Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus are essential tools for delivering on the Green Deal’s ambitious environmental goals,” adds Diani.

The total indicative budget allocated for these first call proposals is EUR 32.6 million.

The second Horizon Europe call is planned to be opened for submissions in October 2022. With an overall budget of EUR 48.1 million, this second call will focus on supporting the development of innovative space-based downstream applications.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EUSPA launched earlier in 2020 this Horizon Europe call to transform the digital economy, increase the Union’s resilience and support the Green Deal.

Save the date: EUSpace4Ukraine humanitarian help webinar on 12 April

31.3.2022 12:58  
Data from the EU Space Programme are provided freely to users around the globe.
Published: 
31 March 2022

EUSPA to mobilise the EU Space innovation community and provide solutions to enhance humanitarian support for the Ukrainian people.

The European Union, its Member States, and Europeans across the continent have joined efforts to support Ukrainians fleeing the devastating war. EUSPA is mobilizing the EU Space innovation community who can provide solutions to enhance humanitarian support for Ukraine people. We are creating a platform to match the innovators with the NGOs and other helpers.

If you are a start-up, an innovator, an NGO or a helper providing humanitarian support for Ukraine, save the date for our webinar on 12 April - 10:00 am - 11:00 am, to discover how you can be part of the platform and the upcoming opportunities!

Register here.

Meanwhile, EUSPA, being a user-oriented agency is currently setting up a first version of the platform grouping applications and solutions that leverage freely accessible data of Galileo and Copernicus to enhance humanitarian support for Ukraine people. In the webinar you will discover how to contribute to growing this first platform.

The applications/solutions will cover a wide range of uses, from supporting NGOs delivering medical goods via drones to practical solutions to support the integration in EU countries of people fleeing the war.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Data from the EU Space Programme are provided freely to users around the globe.

Save the date: EUSpace4Ukraine humanitarian help webinar on 12 April

31.3.2022 12:58  
Data from the EU Space Programme are provided freely to users around the globe.
Published: 
31 March 2022

EUSPA to mobilise the EU Space innovation community and provide solutions to enhance humanitarian support for the Ukrainian people.

The European Union, its Member States, and Europeans across the continent have joined efforts to support Ukrainians fleeing the devastating war. EUSPA is mobilizing the EU Space innovation community who can provide solutions to enhance humanitarian support for Ukraine people. We are creating a platform to match the innovators with the NGOs and other helpers.

If you are a start-up, an innovator, an NGO or a helper providing humanitarian support for Ukraine, save the date for our webinar on 12 April - 10:00 am - 11:00 am, to discover how you can be part of the platform and the upcoming opportunities!

Register here.

Meanwhile, EUSPA, being a user-oriented agency is currently setting up a first version of the platform grouping applications and solutions that leverage freely accessible data of Galileo and Copernicus to enhance humanitarian support for Ukraine people. In the webinar you will discover how to contribute to growing this first platform.

The applications/solutions will cover a wide range of uses, from supporting NGOs delivering medical goods via drones to practical solutions to support the integration in EU countries of people fleeing the war.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Data from the EU Space Programme are provided freely to users around the globe.

Save the date: EUSpace4Ukraine humanitarian help webinar on 12 April

31.3.2022 12:58  
Data from the EU Space Programme are provided freely to users around the globe.
Published: 
31 March 2022

EUSPA to mobilise the EU Space innovation community and provide solutions to enhance humanitarian support for the Ukrainian people.

The European Union, its Member States, and Europeans across the continent have joined efforts to support Ukrainians fleeing the devastating war. EUSPA is mobilizing the EU Space innovation community who can provide solutions to enhance humanitarian support for Ukrainian people. We are creating a platform to match the innovators with the NGOs and other helpers.

If you are a start-up, an innovator, an NGO or a helper providing humanitarian support for Ukraine, save the date for our webinar on 12 April - 10:00 am - 11:00 am, to discover how you can be part of the platform and the upcoming opportunities!

Register here.

Meanwhile, EUSPA, being a user-oriented agency is currently setting up a first version of the platform grouping applications and solutions that leverage freely accessible data of Galileo and Copernicus to enhance humanitarian support for Ukraine people. In the webinar you will discover how to contribute to growing this first platform.

The applications/solutions will cover a wide range of uses, from supporting NGOs delivering medical goods via drones to practical solutions to support the integration in EU countries of people fleeing the war.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Data from the EU Space Programme are provided freely to users around the globe.

Save the date: EUSpace4Ukraine humanitarian help webinar on 12 April

31.3.2022 12:58  
Data from the EU Space Programme are provided freely to users around the globe.
Published: 
31 March 2022

EUSPA to mobilise the EU Space innovation community and provide solutions to enhance humanitarian support to those fleeing the war.

The European Union, its Member States, and Europeans across the continent have joined efforts to support people fleeing the devastating war. EUSPA is mobilizing the EU Space innovation community who can provide solutions to enhance humanitarian support. We are creating a platform to match the innovators with the NGOs and other helpers.

If you are a start-up, an innovator, an NGO or a helper providing humanitarian support for Ukraine, save the date for our webinar on 12 April - 10:00 am - 11:00 am, to discover how you can be part of the platform and the upcoming opportunities!

Register here.

Meanwhile, EUSPA, being a user-oriented agency is currently setting up a first version of the platform grouping applications and solutions that leverage freely accessible data of Galileo and Copernicus to enhance humanitarian support for Ukraine people. In the webinar you will discover how to contribute to growing this first platform.

The applications/solutions will cover a wide range of uses, from supporting NGOs delivering medical goods via drones to practical solutions to support the integration in EU countries of people fleeing the war.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Data from the EU Space Programme are provided freely to users around the globe.

Save the date: EUSpace4Ukraine humanitarian help webinar on 12 April

31.3.2022 12:58  
Data from the EU Space Programme are provided freely to users around the globe.

The European Union, its Member States, and Europeans across the continent have joined efforts to support Ukrainians fleeing the devastating war. EUSPA is mobilizing the EU Space innovation community who can provide solutions to enhance humanitarian support for Ukraine people. We are creating a platform to match the innovators with the NGOs and other helpers.

If you are a start-up, an innovator, an NGO or a helper providing humanitarian support for Ukraine, save the date for our webinar on 12 April - 10:00 am - 11:00 am, to discover how you can be part of the platform and the upcoming opportunities!

Register here.

Meanwhile, EUSPA, being a user-oriented agency is currently setting up a first version of the platform grouping applications and solutions that leverage freely accessible data of Galileo and Copernicus to enhance humanitarian support for Ukraine people. In the webinar you will discover how to contribute to growing this first platform.

The applications/solutions will cover a wide range of uses, from supporting NGOs delivering medical goods via drones to practical solutions to support the integration in EU countries of people fleeing the war.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Data from the EU Space Programme are provided freely to users around the globe.

Save the date: EUSpace4Ukraine humanitarian help webinar on 12 April

31.3.2022 12:58  
Published: 
31 March 2022

The European Union, its Member States, and Europeans across the continent have joined efforts to support Ukrainians fleeing the devastating war. EUSPA is mobilizing the EU Space innovation community who can provide solutions to enhance humanitarian support for Ukraine people. We are creating a platform to match the innovators with the NGOs and other helpers.

If you are a start-up, an innovator, an NGO or a helper providing humanitarian support for Ukraine, save the date for our webinar on 12 April - 10:00 am - 11:00 am, to discover how you can be part of the platform and the upcoming opportunities!

Register here.

Meanwhile, EUSPA, being a user-oriented agency is currently setting up a first version of the platform grouping applications and solutions that leverage freely accessible data of Galileo and Copernicus to enhance humanitarian support for Ukraine people. In the webinar you will discover how to contribute to growing this first platform.

The applications/solutions will cover a wide range of uses, from supporting NGOs delivering medical goods via drones to practical solutions to support the integration in EU countries of people fleeing the war.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Data from the EU Space Programme are provided freely to users around the globe.

Save the date: EUSpace4Ukraine humanitarian help webinar on 12 April

31.3.2022 12:58  
Data from the EU Space Programme are provided freely to users around the globe.
Published: 
30 March 2022

EUSPA to mobilise the EU Space innovation community and provide solutions to enhance humanitarian support to those fleeing the war.

The European Union, its Member States, and Europeans across the continent have joined efforts to support people fleeing the devastating war. EUSPA is mobilizing the EU Space innovation community who can provide solutions to enhance humanitarian support. We are creating a platform to match the innovators with the NGOs and other helpers.

If you are a start-up, an innovator, an NGO or a helper providing humanitarian support for Ukraine, save the date for our webinar on 12 April - 10:00 am - 11:00 am, to discover how you can be part of the platform and the upcoming opportunities!

Register here.

Meanwhile, EUSPA, being a user-oriented agency is currently setting up a first version of the platform grouping applications and solutions that leverage freely accessible data of Galileo and Copernicus to enhance humanitarian support for Ukraine people. In the webinar you will discover how to contribute to growing this first platform.

The applications/solutions will cover a wide range of uses, from supporting NGOs delivering medical goods via drones to practical solutions to support the integration in EU countries of people fleeing the war.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Data from the EU Space Programme are provided freely to users around the globe.

Deadline for Galileo Reference Centre procurement approaching

23.3.2022 12:02  
The deadline for the procurement on “GRC Infrastructure evolution, nominal operations support, and maintenance’’ is on April 11 23:59 CET.
Published: 
23 March 2022

Located in Noordwijk, the Netherlands, the Galileo Reference Centre (GRC) is a cornerstone of the Galileo service provision. From Initial Services to full operational capability and beyond, it provides EUSPA with an independent service facility to evaluate the quality of the signals in space and the overall performance of the different Galileo services. In doing so, it helps the EUSPA ensure the delivery of world-class navigation services so users can better rely on and benefit from Galileo. EUSPA is responsible for the management of the GRC, including its development and operations. The GRC helps ensure that Galileo users are provided with very high-quality signals for use by an array of the new navigation applications, but it also monitors, where feasible, other GNSSs.

Read this: The Galileo Reference Centre evolves to support the constellation’s growing needs (europa.eu)

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) published a procurement on the “GRC Nominal Operations Support, Infrastructure Development, Evolution, and Maintenance”. To encourage large participation, EUSPA held a workshop to present the details of the call on 10 March 2022. Presentations delivered during this workshop are available here.

Q&A followed the presentation during this successful workshop. The questions and our answers can be found here.

With this procurement, EUSPA is looking for partners to provide services and supplies to support the agency in shaping the future versions of the GRC infrastructure to support the evolutions of several GNSS services.

Application deadline is on April 11 2022 at 23:59 CET.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The deadline for the procurement on “GRC Infrastructure evolution, nominal operations support, and maintenance’’ is on April 11 23:59 CET.

The world has a water problem, and space may have a solution

22.3.2022 13:50  
Both Copernicus, for EO, and Galileo, for GNSS, are also being used to support Europe’s growing aquaculture sector.
Published: 
22 March 2022

The world has a water problem. At present, according to the World Health Organisation (WHO) there are 785 million people who lack access to clean water – that’s one in every 10 people on the planet. But the problem goes well beyond the water we drink; it also affects the food we eat. For example, water scarcity, due in part to the increase in droughts caused by climate change, means farmers have less water to grow their crops with.

In parallel, people are increasingly looking to our oceans, lakes and rivers for food – a shift that causes another problem: overfishing. According to some estimates, nearly 30% of all commercially fished species are now considered to be overfished. In the Mediterranean and Black seas, that number is closer to 88%.

With climate change set to exacerbate the water crisis, there’s an urgent need for new solutions.

Two of those solutions are Earth Observation (EO) and Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS).

Go fish

According to the latest edition of the EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report, Earth Observation is already being used to assess the location of fish stocks, while GNSS is used to track the location of vessels in an effort to prevent illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing – an important component of the EU’s Common Fisheries Policy (CFP). 

Both Copernicus, for EO, and Galileo, for GNSS, are also being used to support Europe’s growing aquaculture sector. For instance, by providing information and data on environmental conditions and long-term weather forecasts, EO-based applications play a key role in selecting ideal locations to establish aquafarms. Once the aquafarm is up and running, Copernicus, together with Galileo, is used to optimise operations and provide aquafarmers with a wide range of insight and information.

Keeping an eye on our oceans’ health

While sustainable fisheries and aquaculture are important to securing food production, and are key components to the European Union’s Green Deal, they both depend on having healthy oceans. Here too, GNSS and especially EO play an important role.

Oceans, which account for about 71% of the Earth’s surface, are at the centre of climate change. That’s because oceans act as a natural carbon sink, essentially absorbing much of the carbon being emitted into the atmosphere. As the oceans absorb more carbon, their temperatures go up, which can lead to a whole host of problems, including rising sea levels, changes in fish migration, the killing of coral reefs and alterations to the world’s climate patterns.

To mitigate these issues, the Copernicus Marine and Climate Change Services monitor a number of key climate indicators, such as sea level, temperature, currents and salinity. This data can then be used to drive global climate policy decisions.

 Phytoplankton are microscopic plants that grow in the sunlit surface waters of the ocean. When their concentration reaches a certain level, the bloom becomes visible from space.

Phytoplankton are microscopic plants that grow in the sunlit surface waters of the ocean. When their concentration reaches a certain level, the bloom becomes visible from space.

For freshwater too

EO’s usefulness doesn’t stop with salt water, it’s being used to monitor the quality of freshwater sources too. Today, scientists and policymakers regularly use data coming from Copernicus satellites to, for example, measure water surface temperature, which can tell us a lot about a lake or river’s overall health.

This same data can be used to track how rising global temperatures and more extreme weather events increase a body of water’s acidity, cause a build-up of pathogens, and change its nutrient concentration. And because quality freshwater is essential to drinking water, this same data can play a key role in achieving the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal of ensuring access to water and sanitation for all

So on this World Water Day, as you’re enjoying a fresh glass of H2O, be sure to look up and remember how space-based solutions are working to ensure the healthy climate, healthy oceans, and healthy freshwater systems that make our water sustainable, safe and sanitary.

--

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (https://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Both Copernicus, for EO, and Galileo, for GNSS, are also being used to support Europe’s growing aquaculture sector.

The world has a water problem, and space may have a solution

22.3.2022 13:50  
Both Copernicus, for EO, and Galileo, for GNSS, are also being used to support Europe’s growing aquaculture sector.
Published: 
22 March 2022

The world has a water problem. At present, according to the World Health Organisation (WHO) there are 785 million people who lack access to clean water – that’s one in every 10 people on the planet. But the problem goes well beyond the water we drink; it also affects the food we eat. For example, water scarcity, due in part to the increase in droughts caused by climate change, means farmers have less water to grow their crops with.

In parallel, people are increasingly looking to our oceans, lakes and rivers for food – a shift that causes another problem: overfishing. According to some estimates, nearly 30% of all commercially fished species are now considered to be overfished. In the Mediterranean and Black seas, that number is closer to 88%.

With climate change set to exacerbate the water crisis, there’s an urgent need for new solutions.

Two of those solutions are Earth Observation (EO) and Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS).

Go fish

According to the latest edition of the EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report, Earth Observation is already being used to assess the location of fish stocks and to track the location of vessels in an effort to prevent illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing – an important component of the EU’s Common Fisheries Policy (CFP). 

Both Copernicus, for EO, and Galileo, for GNSS, are also being used to support Europe’s growing aquaculture sector. For instance, by providing information and data on environmental conditions and long-term weather forecasts, EO-based applications play a key role in selecting ideal locations to establish aquafarms. Once the aquafarm is up and running, Copernicus, together with Galileo, is used to optimise operations and provide aquafarmers with a wide range of insight and information.

Keeping an eye on our oceans’ health

While sustainable fisheries and aquaculture are important to securing food production, and are key components to the European Union’s Green Deal, they both depend on having healthy oceans. Here too, GNSS and especially EO play an important role.

Oceans, which account for about 71% of the Earth’s surface, are at the centre of climate change. That’s because oceans act as a natural carbon sink, essentially absorbing much of the carbon being emitted into the atmosphere. As the oceans absorb more carbon, their temperatures go up, which can lead to a whole host of problems, including rising sea levels, changes in fish migration, the killing of coral reefs and alterations to the world’s climate patterns.

To mitigate these issues, the Copernicus Marine and Climate Change Services monitor a number of key climate indicators, such as sea level, temperature, currents and salinity. This data can then be used to drive global climate policy decisions.

 Phytoplankton are microscopic plants that grow in the sunlit surface waters of the ocean. When their concentration reaches a certain level, the bloom becomes visible from space.

Phytoplankton are microscopic plants that grow in the sunlit surface waters of the ocean. When their concentration reaches a certain level, the bloom becomes visible from space.

For freshwater too

EO’s usefulness doesn’t stop with salt water, it’s being used to monitor the quality of freshwater sources too. Today, scientists and policymakers regularly use data coming from Copernicus satellites to, for example, measure water surface temperature, which can tell us a lot about a lake or river’s overall health.

This same data can be used to track how rising global temperatures and more extreme weather events increase a body of water’s acidity, cause a build-up of pathogens, and change its nutrient concentration. And because quality freshwater is essential to drinking water, this same data can play a key role in achieving the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal of ensuring access to water and sanitation for all

So on this World Water Day, as you’re enjoying a fresh glass of H2O, be sure to look up and remember how space-based solutions are working to ensure the healthy climate, healthy oceans, and healthy freshwater systems that make our water sustainable, safe and sanitary.

--

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (https://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Both Copernicus, for EO, and Galileo, for GNSS, are also being used to support Europe’s growing aquaculture sector.

The best time to invest in space – EUSPA launches info session for fund managers

18.3.2022 16:21  
The event will be held live at EUSPA’s headquarters in Prague, as well as online. Attendance is free, but registration is required.
Published: 
18 March 2022

The best time to invest in space – EUSPA launches info session for fund managers.

According to the latest edition of the EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report, in 2021, the GNSS and Earth Observation downstream market generated over EUR 200 billion in revenue.

What’s more, this market is expected to reach nearly half a trillion euros within the next decade. Add this up and what you have is a very lucrative investment opportunity.

But to take advantage of this opportunity, you need the right information and the right market intelligence – which is exactly what the Space Investments Capacity Building Programme is set to provide.

Organised by the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), in collaboration with the European Commission, European Space Agency (ESA) and European Investment Fund (EIF), this series of five workshops is designed to provide venture capitalists, fund managers and other investors with in-depth information on the space sector, including:

  • Results from the latest European space market and investment studies
  • Advice from the EIF on fund setup, investment strategy and building an investment team
  • A platform to discuss business models and best practices
  • Opportunities to network with other fund managers
  • Details on the European Commission’s EUR 1 billion CASSINI Facility, an InvestEU initiative offering capital for establishing space-focused investment funds

The first workshop, scheduled for 28 March 2022 from 14:00 – 17:00 CET, will focus on how EU space technology – including Galileo and Copernicus – can be used to support the construction sector, optimise the green transformation and maintain critical infrastructure.

If you want to become an active investor in this exciting field or simply want to gather more information before deciding to raise a new fund, then this capacity building programme is for you”, says Fiammetta Diani, EUSPA Head of Market Downstream and Innovation.

The event will be held live at EUSPA’s headquarters in Prague, as well as online. Attendance is free, but registration is required. For participants able to attend physically in Prague, please send an email to market@euspa.europa.eu to secure your place in the venue. Questions related to the workshop series or requests for additional information can be directed to this email address as well.

Mark Your Calendars: Space Investments Capacity Building Programme 2022

  • Episode 1: Infrastructure lifecycle support from space, EUSPA, Prague, Monday 28 March 2022
  • Episode 2: Security and defence (in and from space), COM, Brussels, Monday 2 May 2022
  • Episode 3: Consumer space solutions: well-being, education and entertainment, EUSPA, Prague, Monday 23 May 2022
  • Episode 4: Access to space (launchers, ground systems, modular technology, etc), ESA, Paris, Tuesday 7 June 2022
  • Episode 5: Fund setup, investment strategy, investment team, exit strategy, EIF, Luxemburg, Monday 27 June 2022

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The event will be held live at EUSPA’s headquarters in Prague, as well as online. Attendance is free, but registration is required.

The best time to invest in space – EUSPA launches info session for fund managers

18.3.2022 16:21  
The event will be held live at EUSPA’s headquarters in Prague, as well as online. Attendance is free, but registration is required.
Published: 
18 March 2022

The best time to invest in space – EUSPA launches info session for fund managers.

According to the latest edition of the EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report, in 2021, the GNSS and Earth Observation downstream market generated over EUR 200 billion in revenue.

What’s more, this market is expected to reach nearly half a trillion euros within the next decade. Add this up and what you have is a very lucrative investment opportunity.

But to take advantage of this opportunity, you need the right information and the right market intelligence – which is exactly what the Space Investments Capacity Building Programme is set to provide.

Organised by the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), in collaboration with the European Commission, European Space Agency (ESA) and European Investment Fund (EIF), this series of five workshops is designed to provide venture capitalists, fund managers and other investors with in-depth information on the space sector, including:

  • Results from the latest European space market and investment studies
  • Advice from the EIF on fund setup, investment strategy and building an investment team
  • A platform to discuss business models and best practices
  • Opportunities to network with other fund managers
  • Details on the European Commission’s EUR 1 billion CASSINI Facility, an InvestEU initiative offering capital for establishing space-focused investment funds

The first workshop, scheduled for 28 March 2022 from 14:00 – 17:00 CET, will focus on how EU space technology – including Galileo and Copernicus – can be used to support the construction sector, optimise the green transformation and maintain critical infrastructure.

If you want to become an active investor in this exciting field or simply want to gather more information before deciding to raise a new fund, then this capacity building programme is for you”, says Fiammetta Diani, EUSPA Head of Market Downstream and Innovation.

The event will be held live at EUSPA’s headquarters in Prague, as well as online. Attendance is free, but registration is required. For participants able to attend physically in Prague, please send an email to market@euspa.europa.eu to secure your place in the venue. Questions related to the workshop series or requests for additional information can be directed to this email address as well.

Mark Your Calendars: Space Investments Capacity Building Programme 2022

  • Episode 1: Infrastructure lifecycle support from space, EUSPA, Prague, Monday 28 March 2022
  • Episode 2: Security and defence (in and from space), COM, Brussels, Monday 2 May 2022
  • Episode 3: Consumer space solutions: well-being, education and entertainment, EUSPA, Prague, Monday 23 May 2022
  • Episode 4: Access to space (launchers, ground systems, modular technology, etc), ESA, Paris, Tuesday 7 June 2022
  • Episode 5: Fund setup, investment strategy, investment team, exit strategy, EIF, Luxemburg, Monday 27 June 2022

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The event will be held live at EUSPA’s headquarters in Prague, as well as online. Attendance is free, but registration is required.

BroadGNSS Request for Tender now open, deadline is 2 May 2022

18.3.2022 11:57  
BroadGNSS is a Pre-Commercial Procurement (PCP) project which will procure Innovation activity for Applications, Synchronisation and Monitoring of Critical Mobile Broadband Communication Infrastructure and Information Assets for Public Protection and Disaster Recovery (PPDR) Operations.
Published: 
18 March 2022

BroadGNSS, the Pre-Commercial Procurement action funded by the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), moves into the Request for Tender phase.

Launched in December 2020, the EUSPA-funded BroadGNSS  project dedicates EUR 2.1 million for the pre-commercial procurement (PCP) of innovative solutions that use European GNSS (EGNSS) to improve public safety and disaster relief services.

BroadGNSS now moves into the Request for Tender (RFT) phase.

Download: BroadGNSS RFT documents (available in English and French)

With the 2 May 2022 deadline fast approaching for the submission of tenders, the project recently held informational briefings. The events focused on preparing and submitting the tender, along with providing an overview of how received tenders will be evaluated.

The project puts also at your disposal the BroadGNSS Partnering Tool. This tool is a convenient way for companies to share information on both the expertise they offer and the expertise they require to build up consortia.

The Group of Procurers will then evaluate the tenders submitted and a maximum of 10 (and a minimum of four) suppliers/supply teams will be selected.

The Contract Notice can be viewed in full on TED.

To submit your tender: https://www.marches-publics.gouv.fr/app.php/entreprise/consultation/1973325?orgAcronyme=g6l.

More details on the PCP process can be found here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

BroadGNSS will procure Innovation activity for Applications, Synchronisation & Monitoring of Critical Mobile Broadband Communication Infrastructure & Information Assets for Public Protection & Disaster Recovery Operations

BroadGNSS Request for Tender now open, deadline is 2 May 2022

18.3.2022 11:57  
BroadGNSS is a Pre-Commercial Procurement (PCP) project which will procure Innovation activity for Applications, Synchronisation and Monitoring of Critical Mobile Broadband Communication Infrastructure and Information Assets for Public Protection and Disaster Recovery (PPDR) Operations.
Published: 
18 March 2022

BroadGNSS, the Pre-Commercial Procurement action funded by the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), moves into the Request for Tender phase.

Launched in December 2020, the EUSPA-funded BroadGNSS  project has dedicated EUR 2.5 million for the pre-commercial procurement (PCP) of innovative solutions that use European GNSS (EGNSS) to improve public safety and disaster relief services.

As the Contract Notice has been published in the Official Journal of the European Union (OJEU), BroadGNSS now moves into the Request for Tender (RFT) phase.

Download: BroadGNSS RFT documents (available in English and French)

With the 2 May 2022 deadline fast approaching, the project recently held informational briefings. The events focused on preparing and submitting the tender, along with providing an overview of how received tenders will be evaluated.

Anyone considering submitting a tender should be sure to add their company name to the BroadGNSS Partnering Tool. This tool is a convenient way for potential consortium members to share information on both the expertise they offer and the expertise they require.

Once registered, you can start browsing other listed companies. When you see a company that you want to contact, simply send a message via the Contact Page specifying the name of the company you want to contact. You will receive the requested information within two business days.

A maximum of 10 (and a minimum of four) suppliers/supply teams will be selected based on the evaluation of the tenders to be submitted by the 2nd of May 2022, with a joint framework agreement and contract for the Design Phase to follow.

The Contract Notice can be viewed in full on TED.

More details on the PCP process can be found here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

BroadGNSS is a Pre-Commercial Procurement (PCP) project which will procure Innovation activity for Applications, Synchronisation and Monitoring of Critical Mobile Broadband Communication Infrastructure and Information Assets for Public Protection and Disa

BroadGNSS Request for Tender now open, deadline is 2 May 2022

18.3.2022 11:57  
BroadGNSS is a Pre-Commercial Procurement (PCP) project which will procure Innovation activity for Applications, Synchronisation and Monitoring of Critical Mobile Broadband Communication Infrastructure and Information Assets for Public Protection and Disaster Recovery (PPDR) Operations.
Published: 
18 March 2022

BroadGNSS, the Pre-Commercial Procurement action funded by the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), moves into the Request for Tender phase.

Launched in December 2020, the EUSPA-funded BroadGNSS  project has dedicated EUR 2.5 million for the pre-commercial procurement (PCP) of innovative solutions that use European GNSS (EGNSS) to improve public safety and disaster relief services.

As the Contract Notice has been published in the Official Journal of the European Union (OJEU), BroadGNSS now moves into the Request for Tender (RFT) phase.

Download: BroadGNSS RFT documents (available in English and French)

With the 2 May 2022 deadline fast approaching, the project recently held informational briefings. The events focused on preparing and submitting the tender, along with providing an overview of how received tenders will be evaluated.

Anyone considering submitting a tender should be sure to add their company name to the BroadGNSS Partnering Tool. This tool is a convenient way for potential consortium members to share information on both the expertise they offer and the expertise they require.

Once registered, you can start browsing other listed companies. When you see a company that you want to contact, simply send a message via the Contact Page specifying the name of the company you want to contact. You will receive the requested information within two business days.

A maximum of 10 (and a minimum of four) suppliers/supply teams will be selected based on the evaluation of the tenders to be submitted by the 2nd of May 2022, with a joint framework agreement and contract for the Design Phase to follow.

The Contract Notice can be viewed in full on TED.

More details on the PCP process can be found here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

BroadGNSS will procure Innovation activity for Applications, Synchronisation & Monitoring of Critical Mobile Broadband Communication Infrastructure & Information Assets for Public Protection & Disaster Recovery Operations

Investing in GNSS is key to European competitiveness

17.3.2022 17:03  
The report sets out recommendations to support the EU’s future competitiveness in the GNSS downstream market. These recommendations include the need to mobilise significant investment envelopes through tailored instruments, supported by technical capacity building activities towards fund managers
Published: 
17 March 2022

Through investment opportunities, market intelligence and business support, EUSPA plays an important role in ensuring Europe keeps its competitive position in the fast-growing, global GNSS downstream market. 

With an approximate 25% market share, Europe currently enjoys a strong position within the global GNSS downstream market – a market that is forecasted to see revenues reach EUR 220 billion this year and up to EUR 510 billion by 2032. 

The GNSS downstream market includes any application, device or service where GNSS based positioning, navigation and/or timing is a significant enabler or key to the application’s functionality. While the location based services (LBS) and road segments dominate in terms of total revenues earned, European GNSS (EGNSS) also plays a major role in the aviation, rail, maritime, agriculture, mapping and surveying and timing and synchronisation market segments.  

Europe performs particularly well in the road, maritime and agricultural sectors. In fact, several European companies are global leaders in the manufacturing of GNSS components and receivers for road and maritime applications and the development of the system integrators used by the agricultural industry. 

However, European companies tend to lag in such fast-growing sectors as consumer solutions and drones. According to the recently published GNSS Investment Report, this, combined with increased, across-the-board competition from the downstream GNSS market, could chip away at Europe’s market share and future competitiveness.    

 “It is more important than ever that Europe keep on top of GNSS market trends by seeking more funds, developing strategic oversight and promoting risk-taking,” said Rodrigo da Costa, Executive Director of the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA). 

Da Costa made his remarks during the GNSS Investment Day event, which was co-organised by EUSPA and the European Investment Bank (EIB). The two organisations also co-authored the GNSS Investment Report, which was officially launched at the event. 

The report, the first of its kind, quantifies the investment needs of major companies and looks at the impact the acquisition of EU companies by foreign investors has on Europe’s overall competitiveness. The study also examines the full innovation ecosystem, exploring the funding and support gaps that EU GNSS start-ups and companies face.  

According to da Costa, EUSPA is leading the way in filling some of these gaps. For instance, in addition to providing numerous funding opportunities – including Horizon Calls and innovation competitions – EUSPA is constantly helping European companies best leverage EGNSS data, information and services.  

EUSPA is also a leading source of critical market intelligence. For example, the EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report offers in-depth analyses of the latest global trends and developments through illustrated examples and use cases. Discover other EUSPA reports and publications.

“As the go-to-source for all things EGNSS, EUSPA is well positioned to be the single point of information, expertise and market intelligence that companies from across Europe can depend on when integrating European space solutions into their business solutions,” said da Costa. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The report sets out recommendations to support the EU’s future competitiveness in the GNSS downstream market.

CASSINI Hackathon VOL 3: (Re)Visit Europe with help from the EU Space Programme

15.3.2022 13:18  
The #myEUSpace competition is part of the of the European Commission’s CASSINI initiative to support entrepreneurship in space-related businesses across the EU
Published: 
15 March 2022

The CASSINI Hackathons and Mentoring, initiated by the European Union is a series of six hackathons aimed to tackle global challenges using services and data from the EU Space Programme. In its third edition, this hackathon provides access to European space data and services from Copernicus, Galileo, and EGNOS to help participants take on various challenges and uplift Europe’s tourism industry. 

Europe’s tourism industry is bursting with potential. In the last four years alone, the continent has welcomed over 2 billion global tourists, providing a primary source of income for European economies. 

From the medieval streets of Prague and the beaches of Barcelona to the modern skyline of Oslo, Europe truly holds something for everyone. Because of this, the 3rd CASSINI Hackathon will focus on preserving these unforgettable destinations and how we access them. You will be challenged to develop ideas that support sustainable travel, enhance the experience in local cities and cultures, and promote thoughtful exploration of Europe’s nature.

The top ideas will be awarded at both local and EU levels, and the overall winners will enter a six-month mentoring programme that includes 100 hours of customised expert mentoring.

What’s the plat du jour? 

If you are a rising innovator in Europe, you are invited to participate in the CASSINI Hackathon at one of our ten locations. Each hackathon location features its own unique set of experts, prizes, and additional special features. Once you select a location, it’s time for registration, team formation and ideation! 

Your team will choose to solve one of three challenges, all related to the theme of European tourism:

  1. Creating sustainable destinations: Develop innovative ideas, design new products or services that reduce the carbon footprint of tourism travel. For this challenge, participants are encouraged to explore the areas of carbon footprint measurement, alternative destinations or modes of transport, online travel agents and other intermediaries, disruptive travel concepts, and understanding travel patterns between cities or countries.
  2. Experiencing lesser-known cities and cultures: Develop innovative ideas or design new products or services to offer travellers a unique and sustainable way to experience local destinations while supporting local businesses and communities. For this challenge, participants are encouraged to explore the areas of crowd management and slow tourism, personal recommendations and itineraries, social recognition and social media, state-of-the-art virtual travel experiences, and supporting local businesses and communities.
  3. Exploring nature with care: Develop innovative ideas or design new products or services to offer tourists a unique and sustainable opportunity to explore our nature. For this challenge, participants are encouraged to explore the areas of conservation of local nature and biodiversity, social recognition, and social media, supporting local businesses and communities, the generation of (new) routes and points of interest, and tourist information about the environmental state of areas.

Remember, no previous space experience is required! This is your chance to engage with the EUSpace sectors even if it’s for the first time. The application process couldn’t be easier: Simply choose a challenge and decide how you’ll leverage EU space technologies to reshape European tourism. Register here: hackathons.cassini.eu 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The #myEUSpace competition is part of the of the European Commission’s CASSINI initiative to support entrepreneurship in space-related businesses across the EU

43 innovative space-based solutions shortlisted in the #myEUspace competition

11.3.2022 13:03  
With a prize pool of € 1 million and over 50 awards up for grabs, #myEUspace competition - part of the European Commission Cassini initiative will help innovators develop and market  disruptive, space-based commercial solutions to respond to emerging societal needs!
Published: 
28 March 2022

With over EUR 1 million in prize money on the line, #myEUspace is one of the biggest competitions ever organised by EUSPA

The #myEUspace competition supports the development of innovative commercial applications that leverage data coming from the EU Space Programme. To get there, it’s put over EUR 1 million in prize money on the table, and the best of the opportunities to create successful start-ups on the European market.

Targets and tracks 

Applicants could choose to compete in one of two tracks, depending on the maturity of their solution. Track 1 focused on taking an idea to prototype or beta version, whilst Track 2 was for advancing prototypes/beta versions towards commercial readiness. The #myEUspace competition called for ideas on a number of thematic topics to support innovation on Europe. The 6 targeted areas of innovation included:   

smart mobility solutions 

consumer solutions for health, gaming, sports, leisure, tourism and everyday life.

solutions addressing environmental challenges, 

surveying solutions to shape the future of geomatics 

solutions that manage the variability of agricultural production  

and finally, innovative solutions applying quantum technologies 

Now, after receiving more than 200 applications the results are finally in. 43 projects have been selected for their potential to bring disruptive, space-based solutions onto the European market. 

The shortlisted teams are working on a range of novel solutions, new technologies, mobile apps and hardware. While the solutions cover such diverse sectors as location-based services, smart mobility, geomatics and smart agriculture, they all share a foundation in their use of Galileo or Copernicus data as well as their synergies between the two space programme components.

“Space data is at the heart of the technological revolution currently sweeping Europe, and this competition is another example of how EUSPA supports innovative entrepreneurs, start-ups and SMEs from across the EU who are leveraging Copernicus and Galileo data, information and services,” says Rodrigo da Costa, Executive Director, European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA). 

Click here to see the 43 semi-finalists

On to the development phase 

The 23 teams selected from Track 1 each received EUR 10,000, while the 20 Track 2 teams were awarded EUR 15,000. All teams will use the funding to continue developing their prototype or product. The 43 projects now advance into the development phase of the competition, where they will fine-tune their prototypes and products and refine their business plans. This intense nine-week phase culminates at the #myEUspace contest finals on 1 June.

During the finals, each team will have the opportunity to pitch and demonstrate their solution to invited guests. The winners of each innovation area will win an additional prize of EUR 25,000 and EUR 50,000 in Track 1 and Track 2 respectively.

#myEUspace is organised by EUSPA as part of the European Commission’s CASSINI - Space Entrepreneurship Initiative.   

Good luck to all the #myEUspace finalists!

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

With a prize pool of € 1 million and over 50 awards up for grabs, #myEUspace competition - part of the European Commission Cassini initiative will help innovators develop and market disruptive, space-based commercial solutions to respond to emerging soci

European space technology key to achieving a more sustainable future

9.3.2022 16:02  
In addition to joint studies, EUSPA and UNOOSA will coordinate to conduct pilot projects, facilitate knowledge sharing and education on the EU Space Programme, and foster a space economy that best supports the UN SDGs.
Published: 
09 March 2022

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) and the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOSSA) team up to leverage space technology.

Most are familiar with the United Nations (UN) Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the collection of 17 goals designed to serve as a blueprint for achieving a better, more sustainable future for everyone. But did you know that achieving these goals depends in part on the use of European space technologies?

That’s the conclusion reached by a joint report authored by the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) and the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA). “Galileo and EGNOS determine a precise position anytime, anywhere and Copernicus provides information on the Earth’s surface, atmosphere and oceans,” says EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. “However, the joint use of these programmes unleashes an array of synergies that can have a substantial impact.”

“Together, Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus deliver key information supporting the selection of the best location for infrastructures, implement the most fuel-efficient flight paths, monitor CO2 emissions, design efficient and autonomous transportation networks and increase agricultural yields to sustainably feed a growing population, to name just a few examples,” adds UNOOSA Director Simonetta Di Pippo. 

In other words, when it comes to determining how to best meet the UN SDGs, the answer can often be found in space. 

International collaboration on global goals 

Recognising the essential role that Earth Observation and European navigation and positioning services play in supporting sustainable development, and with the goal of leveraging their many benefits, EUSPA and UNOOSA have signed a new Memorandum of Understanding (MoU).

“I sign this MoU with great pride and excitement as UNOOSA is expanding its long-term cooperation with one of the leading space entities. The space sector in the European Union is strong and I look forward to working with EUSPA in extending our support to all Member States of our organisations. Space assets are transformative tools for achieving sustainable socio-economic development and together we aspire to tap into their full potential to ensure their benefits reach everyone, everywhere.” 

EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa, emphasized: “The collaboration between EUSPA and UNOOSA is further reinforced with this MoU, and fully aligned with our agency's commitment to contribute to the delivery of the EU priorities such as the EU Green Deal. Space data and services are more crucial than ever, and we will explore how synergies between satellite navigation systems such as Galileo, Earth observation technology such as Copernicus and satellite communication can help us address pressing societal challenges such as climate change and foster space economy.”

The MoU, which was signed on 9 March 2022, builds on the achievements of a prior MoU that the two organisations signed in 2016. Within the new MoU are provisions for conducting joint studies on the integration of not only EGNSS and Earth Observation, but also Satellite Communications and Space Situational Awareness (SSA). 

These studies will look at how the entire EU Space Programme can be used to manage natural resources and the environment, reduce the risks of disasters, develop new infrastructure and prepare the world for a growing population. 

As to the latter, EUSPA and UNOOSA are already working on a joint publication about the impact that a global population of 8 billion people will likely have on the environment, climate change, resource scarcity and urbanisation. The report, which is expected to be released later this year, will also address the role that space data and technology can play in mitigating such risks. 

In addition to the joint studies, EUSPA and UNOOSA will also coordinate to conduct pilot projects, facilitate knowledge sharing and education on the EU Space Programme, and foster a space economy that best supports the UN SDGs.  

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

In addition to joint studies, EUSPA and UNOOSA will coordinate to conduct pilot projects, facilitate knowledge sharing and education on the EU Space Programme, and foster a space economy that best supports the UN SDGs.

European space technology key to achieving a more sustainable future

9.3.2022 16:02  
In addition to joint studies, EUSPA and UNOOSA will coordinate to conduct pilot projects, facilitate knowledge sharing and education on the EU Space Programme, and foster a space economy that best supports the UN SDGs.
Published: 
09 March 2022

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) and the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOSSA) team up to leverage space technology.

Most are familiar with the United Nations (UN) Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the collection of 17 goals designed to serve as a blueprint for achieving a better, more sustainable future for everyone. But did you know that achieving these goals depends in part on the use of European space technologies?

That’s the conclusion reached by a joint report authored by the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) and the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA). “Galileo and EGNOS determine a precise position anytime, anywhere and Copernicus provides information on the Earth’s surface, atmosphere and oceans,” says EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. “However, the joint use of these programmes unleashes an array of synergies that can have a substantial impact.”

“Together, Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus deliver key information supporting the selection of the best location for infrastructures, implement the most fuel-efficient flight paths, monitor CO2 emissions, design efficient and autonomous transportation networks and increase agricultural yields to sustainably feed a growing population, to name just a few examples,” adds UNOOSA Director Simonetta Di Pippo. 

In other words, when it comes to determining how to best meet the UN SDGs, the answer can often be found in space. 

International collaboration on global goals 

Recognising the essential role that Earth Observation and European navigation and positioning services play in supporting sustainable development, and with the goal of leveraging their many benefits, EUSPA and UNOOSA have signed a new Memorandum of Understanding (MoU).

“I sign this MoU with great pride and excitement as UNOOSA is expanding its long-term cooperation with one of the leading space entities. The space sector in the European Union is strong and I look forward to working with EUSPA in extending our support to all Member States of our organisations. Space assets are transformative tools for achieving sustainable socio-economic development and together we aspire to tap into their full potential to ensure their benefits reach everyone, everywhere.” 

EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa, emphasized: “The collaboration between EUSPA and UNOOSA is further reinforced with this MoU, and fully aligned with our agency's commitment to contribute to the delivery of the EU priorities such as the EU Green Deal. Space data and services are more crucial than ever, and we will explore how synergies between satellite navigation systems such as Galileo, Earth observation technology such as Copernicus and satellite communication can help us address pressing societal challenges such as climate change and foster space economy.”

The MoU, which was signed on 9 March 2022, builds on the achievements of a prior MoU that the two organisations signed in 2016. Within the new MoU are provisions for conducting joint studies on the integration of not only EGNSS and Earth Observation, but also Satellite Communications and Space Situational Awareness (SSA). 

These studies will look at how the entire EU Space Programme can be used to manage natural resources and the environment, reduce the risks of disasters, develop new infrastructure and prepare the world for a growing population. 

As to the latter, EUSPA and UNOOSA are already working on a joint publication about the impact that a global population of 8 billion people will likely have on the environment, climate change, resource scarcity and urbanisation. The report, which is expected to be released later this year, will also address the role that space data and technology can play in mitigating such risks. 

In addition to the joint studies, EUSPA and UNOOSA will also coordinate to conduct pilot projects, facilitate knowledge sharing and education on the EU Space Programme, and foster a space economy that best supports the UN SDGs.  

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

In addition to joint studies, EUSPA and UNOOSA will coordinate to conduct pilot projects, facilitate knowledge sharing and education on the EU Space Programme, and foster a space economy that best supports the UN SDGs.

European space technology key to achieving a more sustainable future

9.3.2022 16:02  
In addition to joint studies, EUSPA and UNOOSA will coordinate to conduct pilot projects, facilitate knowledge sharing and education on the EU Space Programme, and foster a space economy that best supports the UN SDGs.
Published: 
09 March 2022

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) and the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOSSA) team up to leverage space technology.

Most are familiar with the United Nations (UN) Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the collection of 17 goals designed to serve as a blueprint for achieving a better, more sustainable future for everyone. But did you know that achieving these goals depends in part on the use of European space technologies?

That’s the conclusion reached by a joint report authored by the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) and the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA). “Galileo and EGNOS determine a precise position anytime, anywhere and Copernicus provides information on the Earth’s surface, atmosphere and oceans,” says EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. “However, the joint use of these programmes unleashes an array of synergies that can have a substantial impact.”

“Together, Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus deliver key information supporting the selection of the best location for infrastructures, implement the most fuel-efficient flight paths, monitor CO2 emissions, design efficient and autonomous transportation networks and increase agricultural yields to sustainably feed a growing population, to name just a few examples,” adds UNOOSA Director Simonetta Di Pippo. 

In other words, when it comes to determining how to best meet the UN SDGs, the answer can often be found in space. 

International collaboration on global goals 

Recognising the essential role that Earth Observation and European navigation and positioning services play in supporting sustainable development, and with the goal of leveraging their many benefits, EUSPA and UNOOSA have signed a new Memorandum of Understanding (MoU).

“I sign this MoU with great pride and excitement as UNOOSA is expanding its long-term cooperation with one of the leading space entities. The space sector in the European Union is strong and I look forward to working with EUSPA in extending our support to all Member States of our organisations. Space assets are transformative tools for achieving sustainable socio-economic development and together we aspire to tap into their full potential to ensure their benefits reach everyone, everywhere.” 

EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa, emphasized: “The collaboration between EUSPA and UNOOSA is further reinforced with this MoU, and fully aligned with our agency's commitment to contribute to the delivery of the EU priorities such as the EU Green Deal. Space data and services are more crucial than ever, and we will explore how synergies between satellite navigation systems such as Galileo, Earth observation technology such as Copernicus and satellite communication can help us address pressing societal challenges such as climate change and foster space economy.”

The MoU, which was signed on 9 March 2022, builds on the achievements of a prior MoU that the two organisations signed in 2016. Within the new MoU are provisions for conducting joint studies on the integration of not only EGNSS and Earth Observation, but also Satellite Communications and Space Situational Awareness (SSA). 

These studies will look at how the entire EU Space Programme can be used to manage natural resources and the environment, reduce the risks of disasters, develop new infrastructure and prepare the world for a growing population. 

As to the latter, EUSPA and UNOOSA are already working on a joint publication about the impact that a global population of 8 billion people will likely have on the environment, climate change, resource scarcity and urbanisation. The report, which is expected to be released later this year, will also address the role that space data and technology can play in mitigating such risks. 

In addition to the joint studies, EUSPA and UNOOSA will also coordinate to conduct pilot projects, facilitate knowledge sharing and education on the EU Space Programme, and foster a space economy that best supports the UN SDGs.  

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

In addition to joint studies, EUSPA and UNOOSA will coordinate to conduct pilot projects, facilitate knowledge sharing and education on the EU Space Programme, and foster a space economy that best supports the UN SDGs.

Updated agreement with Czech Republic gives EUSPA space to grow

8.3.2022 11:02  
The signing ceremony was also an opportunity for Minister Kupka to discuss several future initiatives, including the Czech Republic’s upcoming EU Presidency and its hosting of the 2022 EU Space Week.
Published: 
08 March 2022

The amended agreement, which was signed during an official ceremony at EUSPA’s Prague headquarters with Czech Republic Minister of Transport Martin Kupka, gives the agency the room and tools it needs to extend.

For the past 10 years, the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA, and its predecessor GSA) has had its base in the Czech Republic. 

Since then, both the EU Space Programme and the Czech Republic’s space sector have enjoyed continuous growth and development. For example, through various grants, Horizon calls and other funding mechanisms, EUSPA has provided - among other EU Member States - EUR 2.2 million to Czech start-ups, SMEs, enterprises and research initiatives – many of which are making a substantial contribution the EU’s robust space economy. 

EUSPA took new responsibilities in the frame of the EU Space Programme, and with thus itself continues to grow. The Agency will expand to around 300 staff from EU countries by 2024, to which are added in-house consultants and service providers, working across its various sites. 

The growth is driven by the new challenges the Agency faces – including the need for more space and advanced infrastructure, which is exactly what an amended host agreement between EUSPA and the Czech Republic provides.

"We have been working with the Czech authorities since day one and our relations have been excellent,” said EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. “This amended host agreement ensures that our home here in Prague aligns with our expanded mission and facilitates the ongoing growth of the EU Space Programme."

Da Costa made his remarks during an official signing ceremony held at EUSPA headquarters with Czech Minister of Transport Martin Kupka. 

"The Czech government has been working with EUSPA to secure appropriate new premises for the agency and I believe we are well on our way to achieve this goal. Today, we are here to take a necessary step along this way, to sign an amendment to the Host Agreement, which will allow us to relocate the seat of the agency to another site in Prague," confirmed Minister Kupka.

The amended host agreement includes provisions for a new headquarters, more robust ICT capabilities and enhanced security facilities, along with additional office space to accommodate EUSPA’s forecasted growth. 

The amendment follows a Memorandum of Understanding signed by EUSPA and the Czech government in April 2021, which was subsequently approved by the EUSPA Administrative Board in October 2021. Outside these amendments, all other conditions of the host agreement remain unchanged, including the provision that EUSPA cover 25% of local commercial leasing costs.     

“Prague offers a high quality of living, access to a skilled talent pool and great connections to the rest of Europe, making it a truly European city fit to host an EU agency,” added da Costa. “We look forward to developing our presence in continuing to call this vibrant city home and, together with the Ministry of Transport, contributing to growing the EU Space Programme and the European space economy.”   

The signing ceremony was also an opportunity for Minister Kupka to discuss several future initiatives, including the Czech Republic’s upcoming EU Presidency and its hosting of the 2022 EU Space Week.

In addition to its Prague headquarters, EUSPA has operations in France, Spain, the Netherlands, Germany, Italy and Belgium. 

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The signing ceremony was also an opportunity for Minister Kupka to discuss several future initiatives, including the Czech Republic’s upcoming EU Presidency and its hosting of the 2022 EU Space Week.

EUSPA welcomes ITRE committee members to its Prague headquarters

23.2.2022 17:21  
The ITRE Committee legislates on important policy areas of the European Union, such as industrial policy, EU research, and innovation policy, space policy, energy policy, and the application of new technologies.
Published: 
23 February 2022

The visit was an opportunity for EUSPA to highlight the many synergies between EGNSS and Copernicus, and how these synergies benefit EU businesses and citizens.

On 23 February, the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) welcomed representatives from the European Parliament’s Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE) to its Prague headquarters. The committee representatives were also joined by European Commission representatives for a full schedule of presentations, demonstrations and discussions.

The visit, the first since the new regulation on the EU Space Programme came into effect, was an opportunity for committee members and representatives to get a close-up look at how Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus support many of the activities and services that fall within the committee’s portfolio of responsibilities.   

“As custodians of the EU space policy, it’s crucial that the ITRE Committee continues to foster a strong partnership and collaboration with EUSPA’s team, who enable the policy to excel both here on earth and in space. We’re looking forward to hearing more about EUSPA’s management and protection of EU space infrastructure and how space-based innovation is increasingly brought in the daily lives of the EU citizens” declared ITRE Chair, Cristian Bușoi.

 A key topic of discussion was how best to leverage the EU Space Programme’s many synergies.

“The EU Space Programme benefits our society at many levels. For example, with EGNOS we improve the accessibility of our EU airports, whereas with certain Galileo features such as the OSNMA we can better protect critical infrastructures. Generating daily over 16TB of data, Copernicus is a helping hand in understanding climate change. With GOVSATCOM, Europe will be benefitting from a first of its kind secure and resilient satcom infrastructure for governmental users.” said EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. 

Security was also a key theme of the visit. EUSPA’s position as the gatekeeper of security for the EU Space Programme was emphasised, especially as it relates to the safeguarding of space-related assets, both in space and on the ground. The contribution of the EU Space Programme to the safety of European citizens was showcased through concrete applications, such as Galileo’s support to international Search and Rescue (SAR) satellite services, eCall technology and the Public Regulated Service (PRS).

EUSPA’s GOVSATCOM responsibilities were also highlighted. As the entity entrusted with the procurement of the secure operational ground segment (GOVSATCOM Hubs), its operations and the coordination of the user-related aspects of GOVSATCOM, EUSPA is focused on expanding infrastructure development and fostering technological innovation within the service.

In line with the recent report commissioned by the ITRE committee, which examined how to facilitate access and create an open and competitive space market, a presentation on the downstream market and its innovation was given. The presentation focused on the benefits of space products made within the EU, and included a hands-on demonstration of various space technologies and applications. Attendees were able to test out smartphone applications, drones and even a motorbike, all enabled by the EU Space Programme’s technology. 

Concluding the visit, the ITRE Committee and EUSPA agreed that maintaining alignment on the activities within the remit of the committee which are supported by EU space infrastructure will be key to further establishing a strong and competitive EU space sector. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The ITRE Committee legislates on important policy areas of the European Union, such as industrial policy, EU research, and innovation policy, space policy, energy policy, and the application of new technologies.

EUSPA welcomes ITRE committee members to its Prague headquarters

23.2.2022 17:21  
The ITRE Committee legislates on important policy areas of the European Union, such as industrial policy, EU research, and innovation policy, space policy, energy policy, and the application of new technologies.
Published: 
23 February 2022

The visit was an opportunity for EUSPA to highlight the many synergies between EGNSS and Copernicus, and how these synergies benefit EU businesses and citizens.

On 23 February, the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) welcomed representatives from the European Parliament’s Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE) to its Prague headquarters. The committee representatives were also joined by European Commission representatives for a full schedule of presentations, demonstrations and discussions.

The visit, the first since the new regulation on the EU Space Programme came into effect, was an opportunity for committee members and representatives to get a close-up look at how Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus support many of the activities and services that fall within the committee’s portfolio of responsibilities.   

“As custodians of the EU space policy, it’s crucial that the ITRE Committee continues to foster a strong partnership and collaboration with EUSPA’s team, who enable the policy to excel both here on earth and in space. We’re looking forward to hearing more about EUSPA’s management and protection of EU space infrastructure and how space-based innovation is increasingly brought in the daily lives of the EU citizens” declared ITRE Chair, Cristian Bușoi.

 A key topic of discussion was how best to leverage the EU Space Programme’s many synergies.

“The EU Space Programme benefits our society at many levels. For example, with EGNOS we improve the accessibility of our EU airports, whereas with certain Galileo features such as the OSNMA we can better protect critical infrastructures. Generating daily over 16TB of data, Copernicus is a helping hand in understanding climate change. With GOVSATCOM, Europe will be benefitting from a first of its kind secure and resilient satcom infrastructure for governmental users.” said EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. 

Security was also a key theme of the visit. EUSPA’s position as the gatekeeper of security for the EU Space Programme was emphasised, especially as it relates to the safeguarding of space-related assets, both in space and on the ground. The contribution of the EU Space Programme to the safety of European citizens was showcased through concrete applications, such as Galileo’s support to international Search and Rescue (SAR) satellite services, eCall technology and the Public Regulated Service (PRS).

EUSPA’s GOVSATCOM responsibilities were also highlighted. As the entity entrusted with the procurement of the secure operational ground segment (GOVSATCOM Hubs), its operations and the coordination of the user-related aspects of GOVSATCOM, EUSPA is focused on expanding infrastructure development and fostering technological innovation within the service.

In line with the recent report commissioned by the ITRE committee, which examined how to facilitate access and create an open and competitive space market, a presentation on the downstream market and its innovation was given. The presentation focused on the benefits of space products made within the EU, and included a hands-on demonstration of various space technologies and applications. Attendees were able to test out smartphone applications, drones and even a motorbike, all enabled by the EU Space Programme’s technology. 

Concluding the visit, the ITRE Committee and EUSPA agreed that maintaining alignment on the activities within the remit of the committee which are supported by EU space infrastructure will be key to further establishing a strong and competitive EU space sector. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The ITRE Committee legislates on important policy areas of the European Union, such as industrial policy, EU research, and innovation policy, space policy, energy policy, and the application of new technologies.

EUSPA helps European companies embrace Earth Observation

21.2.2022 13:00  
Published: 
21 February 2022

Speaking at last week’s Copernicus Horizon 2035 conference, EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa outlined how European businesses can benefit from Copernicus’ Earth observation services, data, and information.  

If you’ve ever watched a news story about a natural disaster, chances are, the satellite images shown in the story came from Copernicus, Europe’s Earth Observation programme. 

Why?

“Because Copernicus is the best Earth Observation system in the world,” said Thierry Breton, European Commissioner for the Internal Market, who made his remarks at Copernicus Horizon 2035

Organised by the French Presidency of the Council of the European Union and the European Commission, the conference, which was held 16 – 17 February, put the spotlight on Copernicus, its achievements, goals and opportunities.      

“By providing unique insights into the Earth and its environment, Copernicus helps governments, national agencies, institutions and researchers and of protect our planet for future generations,” said Rodrigo da Costa, Executive Director, European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA). ‘’But Copernicus is also of strategic importance to European SMEs, and we must ensure they make the most of the available date,’’ he concluded. Under the auspices of the European Commission, EUSPA is charged with promoting Copernicus’ services, data and market uptake.   

The commercial potential of Copernicus 

Beyond its use by governments and in emergency situations, Earth Observation also has significant commercial potential. For example, according to the latest edition of the EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report, SMEs and start-ups account for more than 93% of European Earth Observation companies. 

“Europe is seeing a vibrant Copernicus start-up scene unfolding, with hundreds of new ventures being created using Copernicus data and information,” noted Fiammetta Diani, EUSPA Head of Market, Downstream and Innovation, who also spoke at the conference.

With revenues set to double from approximately EUR 2.8 billion to over EUR 5.5 billion within the next decade, the market for Earth observation applications is boosted by a large pool of value-added services. This is especially the case within the climate services, urban development, energy, insurance, finance and agriculture segments.   

“Farmers can use Copernicus-derived information to monitor the health of their crops and study the quality of their soil,” explained da Costa. “And urban planners can use Earth Observation data to design sustainable smart cities and build infrastructure that is more resilient against the impact of climate change.”    

Copernicus also complements the other components of the EU Space Programmes, including Galileo and EGNOS. For example, construction companies can use European GNSS (EGNSS), together with Earth Observation, to first select locations with the best conditions and then monitor the building or infrastructure asset over its entire lifespan.   

Maximising Copernicus’ benefits

However, to truly maximise Copernicus’ economic and societal benefits, European companies must fully embrace the power of Earth Observation.

To help, EUSPA is in constant communication with European companies, helping them on how they can best leverage Copernicus data, information and services. 

“SMEs and start-ups are in the spotlight since they are key to enlarging the use of Copernicus. They are more agile, able to adjust new business models and technologies more swiftly. Besides, they can be closer to end-users and local authorities permitting them to innovate affordably,” said Diani.

EUSPA has also launched several Earth Observation focused funding opportunities for companies, including Horizon Calls and innovation competitions as part of the CASSINI programme focussing on entrepreneurs. 

“Our intent is to position EUSPA as the go-to-source for all things related to Earth Observation and EGNSS,” concluded da Costa. “That means to be the single point of information, expertise and market intelligence that companies from across Europe can depend on when integrating European space solutions into their start-ups, enterprises, innovations and research.”

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Organised by the European Commission and the French Presidency of the Council of the EU, the Copernicus horizon 2035 Conference presented the Copernicus component of the EU Space Programme and its achievements, and highlight future goals and opportunities

EUSPA helps European companies embrace Earth Observation

21.2.2022 13:00  
Organised by the European Commission and the French Presidency of the Council of the EU, the Copernicus horizon 2035 Conference presented the Copernicus component of the EU Space Programme and its achievements, and highlight future goals and opportunities
Published: 
21 February 2022

Speaking at last week’s Copernicus Horizon 2035 conference, EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa outlined how European businesses can benefit from Copernicus’ Earth observation services, data, and information.  

If you’ve ever watched a news story about a natural disaster, chances are, the satellite images shown in the story came from Copernicus, Europe’s Earth Observation programme. 

Why?

“Because Copernicus is the best Earth Observation system in the world,” said Thierry Breton, European Commissioner for the Internal Market, who made his remarks at Copernicus Horizon 2035

Organised by the French Presidency of the Council of the European Union and the European Commission, the conference, which was held 16 – 17 February, put the spotlight on Copernicus, its achievements, goals and opportunities.      

“By providing unique insights into the Earth and its environment, Copernicus helps governments, national agencies, institutions and researchers and of protect our planet for future generations,” said Rodrigo da Costa, Executive Director, European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA). ‘’But Copernicus is also of strategic importance to European SMEs, and we must ensure they make the most of the available date,’’ he concluded. Under the auspices of the European Commission, EUSPA is charged with promoting Copernicus’ services, data and market uptake.   

The commercial potential of Copernicus 

Beyond its use by governments and in emergency situations, Earth Observation also has significant commercial potential. For example, according to the latest edition of the EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report, SMEs and start-ups account for more than 93% of European Earth Observation companies. 

“Europe is seeing a vibrant Copernicus start-up scene unfolding, with hundreds of new ventures being created using Copernicus data and information,” noted Fiammetta Diani, EUSPA Head of Market, Downstream and Innovation, who also spoke at the conference.

With revenues set to double from approximately EUR 2.8 billion to over EUR 5.5 billion within the next decade, the market for Earth observation applications is boosted by a large pool of value-added services. This is especially the case within the climate services, urban development, energy, insurance, finance and agriculture segments.   

“Farmers can use Copernicus-derived information to monitor the health of their crops and study the quality of their soil,” explained da Costa. “And urban planners can use Earth Observation data to design sustainable smart cities and build infrastructure that is more resilient against the impact of climate change.”    

Copernicus also complements the other components of the EU Space Programmes, including Galileo and EGNOS. For example, construction companies can use European GNSS (EGNSS), together with Earth Observation, to first select locations with the best conditions and then monitor the building or infrastructure asset over its entire lifespan.   

Maximising Copernicus’ benefits

However, to truly maximise Copernicus’ economic and societal benefits, European companies must fully embrace the power of Earth Observation.

To help, EUSPA is in constant communication with European companies, helping them on how they can best leverage Copernicus data, information and services. 

“SMEs and start-ups are in the spotlight since they are key to enlarging the use of Copernicus. They are more agile, able to adjust new business models and technologies more swiftly. Besides, they can be closer to end-users and local authorities permitting them to innovate affordably,” said Diani.

EUSPA has also launched several Earth Observation focused funding opportunities for companies, including Horizon Calls and innovation competitions as part of the CASSINI programme focussing on entrepreneurs. 

“Our intent is to position EUSPA as the go-to-source for all things related to Earth Observation and EGNSS,” concluded da Costa. “That means to be the single point of information, expertise and market intelligence that companies from across Europe can depend on when integrating European space solutions into their start-ups, enterprises, innovations and research.”

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Organised by the European Commission and the French Presidency of the Council of the EU, the Copernicus horizon 2035 Conference presented the Copernicus component of the EU Space Programme and its achievements, and highlight future goals and opportunities

EUSPA helps European companies embrace Earth Observation

21.2.2022 13:00  
Organised by the European Commission and the French Presidency of the Council of the EU, the Copernicus horizon 2035 Conference presented the Copernicus component of the EU Space Programme and its achievements, and highlight future goals and opportunities.
Published: 
21 February 2022

Speaking at last week’s Copernicus Horizon 2035 conference, EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa outlined how European businesses can benefit from Copernicus’ Earth observation services, data, and information.  

If you’ve ever watched a news story about a natural disaster, chances are, the satellite images shown in the story came from Copernicus, Europe’s Earth Observation programme. 

Why?

“Because Copernicus is the best Earth Observation system in the world,” said Thierry Breton, European Commissioner for the Internal Market, who made his remarks at Copernicus Horizon 2035

Organised by the French Presidency of the Council of the European Union and the European Commission, the conference, which was held 16 – 17 February, put the spotlight on Copernicus, its achievements, goals and opportunities.      

“By providing unique insights into the Earth and its environment, Copernicus helps governments, national agencies, institutions and researchers and of protect our planet for future generations,” said Rodrigo da Costa, Executive Director, European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA). ‘’But Copernicus is also of strategic importance to European SMEs, and we must ensure they make the most of the available date,’’ he concluded. Under the auspices of the European Commission, EUSPA is charged with promoting Copernicus’ services, data and market uptake.   

The commercial potential of Copernicus 

Beyond its use by governments and in emergency situations, Earth Observation also has significant commercial potential. For example, according to the latest edition of the EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report, SMEs and start-ups account for more than 93% of European Earth Observation companies. 

“Europe is seeing a vibrant Copernicus start-up scene unfolding, with hundreds of new ventures being created using Copernicus data and information,” noted Fiammetta Diani, EUSPA Head of Market, Downstream and Innovation, who also spoke at the conference.

With revenues set to double from approximately EUR 2.8 billion to over EUR 5.5 billion within the next decade, the market for Earth observation applications is boosted by a large pool of value-added services. This is especially the case within the climate services, urban development, energy, insurance, finance and agriculture segments.   

“Farmers can use Copernicus-derived information to monitor the health of their crops and study the quality of their soil,” explained da Costa. “And urban planners can use Earth Observation data to design sustainable smart cities and build infrastructure that is more resilient against the impact of climate change.”    

Copernicus also complements the other components of the EU Space Programmes, including Galileo and EGNOS. For example, construction companies can use European GNSS (EGNSS), together with Earth Observation, to first select locations with the best conditions and then monitor the building or infrastructure asset over its entire lifespan.   

Maximising Copernicus’ benefits

However, to truly maximise Copernicus’ economic and societal benefits, European companies must fully embrace the power of Earth Observation.

To help, EUSPA is in constant communication with European companies, helping them on how they can best leverage Copernicus data, information and services. 

“SMEs and start-ups are in the spotlight since they are key to enlarging the use of Copernicus. They are more agile, able to adjust new business models and technologies more swiftly. Besides, they can be closer to end-users and local authorities permitting them to innovate affordably,” said Diani.

EUSPA has also launched several Earth Observation focused funding opportunities for companies, including Horizon Calls and innovation competitions as part of the CASSINI programme focussing on entrepreneurs. 

“Our intent is to position EUSPA as the go-to-source for all things related to Earth Observation and EGNSS,” concluded da Costa. “That means to be the single point of information, expertise and market intelligence that companies from across Europe can depend on when integrating European space solutions into their start-ups, enterprises, innovations and research.”

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Organised by the European Commission and the French Presidency of the Council of the EU, the Copernicus horizon 2035 Conference presented the Copernicus component of the EU Space Programme and its achievements, and highlight future goals and opportunities

The Galileo Reference Centre evolves to support the constellation’s growing needs

18.2.2022 16:57  
Participants will also have the opportunity to learn more about the mission of the GRC’s, the procurement documentation and the submission process.
Published: 
18 February 2022

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) publishes procurement on “GRC Infrastructure evolution, nominal operations support, and maintenance”. To encourage the widest participation possible, the Agency is organizing an industry day to present the details of the call on 10 March 2022 at 10.00 CET

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) published a procurement on the “GRC Nominal Operations Support, Infrastructure Development, Evolution, and Maintenance”. To encourage large participation, EUSPA is organising an industry day to present the details of the call on 10 March 2022 at 10.00 CET. 

A service facility, located in Noordwijk, the Netherlands, the GRC performs independent service performance monitoring and reporting, service performance investigation and support, and campaign-based monitoring and experimentation, by itself and through cooperation with the EU Member States, Norway, and Switzerland. The GRC monitors not only Galileo but also other GNSSs and reports to various stakeholders.

The scope of the GRC Infrastructure Evolution, Nominal Operations Support, and Maintenance Framework Contract is to provide a turn-key service for GRC infrastructure releases (including operational validation activities), support the nominal operations, and follow up with the maintenance of the release in operation. It will include the design and implement an innovative solution for the next generation of the GRC. This will also include implementing a real-time solution into the GRC that will be capable of providing real-time monitoring of all Galileo services, precise reference time, and PRS navigation monitoring functionalities.

The GRC has a variety of tools developed for use within the facility as well as a strong operational team with a broad professional knowledge of GNSS systems and for these reasons greater functionalities are currently identified to be developed within the next generation of the GRC. 

With this important procurement, EUSPA is looking for one or more partners to provide services and supplies to support the agency in shaping the future versions of the GRC infrastructure to support the evolutions of several GNSS services. 

EUSPA is committed to promoting the widest participation possible by economic operators, including new entrants, in particular start-ups and SMEs. The agency is thus organising an industry day on 10 March 2022 at 10.00 to detail the procurement on “GRC Nominal Operations Support, Infrastructure Development, Evolution, and Maintenance”. 

Participants will also have the opportunity to learn more about the mission of the GRC, the procurement documentation, and the submission process.

To attend the event, please register here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Participants will also have the opportunity to learn more about the mission of the GRC’s, the procurement documentation and the submission process.

The Galileo Reference Centre evolves to support the constellation’s growing needs

18.2.2022 16:57  
Participants will also have the opportunity to learn more about the mission of the GRC’s, the procurement documentation and the submission process.
Published: 
17 February 2022

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) publishes procurement on “GRC Infrastructure evolution, nominal operations support, and maintenance”. To encourage the widest participation possible, the Agency is organizing an industry day to present the details of the call on 10 March 2022 at 10.00 CET

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) published a procurement on the “GRC Nominal Operations Support, Infrastructure Development, Evolution, and Maintenance”. To encourage large participation, EUSPA is organising an industry day to present the details of the call on 10 March 2022 at 10.00 CET. 

A service facility, located in Noordwijk, the Netherlands, the GRC performs independent service performance monitoring and reporting, service performance investigation and support, and campaign-based monitoring and experimentation, by itself and through cooperation with the EU Member States, Norway, and Switzerland. The GRC monitors not only Galileo but also other GNSSs and reports to various stakeholders.

The scope of the GRC Infrastructure Evolution, Nominal Operations Support, and Maintenance Framework Contract is to provide a turn-key service for GRC infrastructure releases (including operational validation activities), support the nominal operations, and follow up with the maintenance of the release in operation. It will include the design and implement an innovative solution for the next generation of the GRC. This will also include implementing a real-time solution into the GRC that will be capable of providing real-time monitoring of all Galileo services, precise reference time, and PRS navigation monitoring functionalities.

The GRC has a variety of tools developed for use within the facility as well as a strong operational team with a broad professional knowledge of GNSS systems and for these reasons greater functionalities are currently identified to be developed within the next generation of the GRC. 

With this important procurement, EUSPA is looking for one or more partners to provide services and supplies to support the agency in shaping the future versions of the GRC infrastructure to support the evolutions of several GNSS services. 

EUSPA is committed to promoting the widest participation possible by economic operators, including new entrants, in particular start-ups and SMEs. The agency is thus organising an industry day on 10 March 2022 at 10.00 to detail the procurement on “GRC Nominal Operations Support, Infrastructure Development, Evolution, and Maintenance”. 

Participants will also have the opportunity to learn more about the mission of the GRC, the procurement documentation, and the submission process.

To attend the event, please register here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Participants will also have the opportunity to learn more about the mission of the GRC’s, the procurement documentation and the submission process.

Galileo Service Operator: a vital link between space and user needs

17.2.2022 13:33  
27 and 29 January 2022 marked an important milestone in the life of Galileo GSAT0223 and GSAT0224 launched on 5 December 2021.
Published: 
17 February 2022

With a robust and secure ground and space segment, EUSPA ensures that Galileo’s 2.5 billion users benefit from the world’s most precise positioning system

Not only is the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) charged with the development and provision of Galileo’s range of services, it also serves as the gatekeeper for the programme’s security. 

This means protecting Galileo’s space and ground operations against threats such as cyber-attacks, interference and damage by space debris – a job EUSPA does in collaboration with its industry partners.    

One of those partners is Spaceopal, a joint venture between Telespazio in Italy and DLR-GfR mbH in Germany. 

Under EUSPA’s leadership, Spaceopal serves as the Galileo Service Operator, a role that involves operating and maintaining Galileo’s ground and space segments, along with ensuring that all of Galileo’s 2.5 billion users continue to benefit from the world’s most precise positioning system. The company’s role as Galileo Service Operator has just been confirmed for the next 5 years.

High performance services worldwide 

Launched in 2016, Galileo is Europe’s Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). In addition to providing positioning information with greater precision than other GNSS systems, Galileo also offers a Search and Rescue (SAR) service. This important service allows emergency first responders to quickly locate and help people in distress while giving them feedback that the call has been received by its unique … etc.

EUSPA is also developing new Galileo services, including a High Accuracy Service (HAS) for high accuracy corrections, and the a authentication service Open Service Navigation Message Authentication service (OSNMA), which will provide receivers with a first level of protection against manipulation and spoofing. 

A robust and secure ground and space segment 

All these services depend on having a robust and secure ground and space segment, which is exactly what EUSPA’s contract with Spaceopal guarantees. For example, as the Galileo Service Operator, Spaceopal will run EUSPA’s Galileo Control Centres (GCC) in Fucino, Italy and Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany. 

Backed by a network of ground stations and facilities spread around the globe, the GCCs allow EUSPA to monitor and control Galileo’s current constellation of satellites, along with the addition of new ones (such as Galileo Launch 12 expected later this year, which – like every additional satellite added to the constellation - will bring an additional layer of accuracy to Galileo services).  

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

27 and 29 January 2022 marked an important milestone in the life of Galileo GSAT0223 and GSAT0224 launched on 5 December 2021.

Galileo Service Operator: a vital link between space and user needs

17.2.2022 13:33  
27 and 29 January 2022 marked an important milestone in the life of Galileo GSAT0223 and GSAT0224 launched on 5 December 2021.
Published: 
17 February 2022

With a robust and secure ground and space segment, EUSPA ensures that Galileo’s 2.5 billion users benefit from the world’s most precise positioning system

Not only is the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) charged with the development and provision of Galileo’s range of services, it also serves as the gatekeeper for the programme’s security. 

This means protecting Galileo’s space and ground operations against threats such as cyber-attacks, interference and damage by space debris – a job EUSPA does in collaboration with its industry partners.    

One of those partners is Spaceopal, a joint venture between Telespazio in Italy and DLR-GfR mbH in Germany. 

Under EUSPA’s leadership, Spaceopal serves as the Galileo Service Operator, a role that involves operating and maintaining Galileo’s ground and space segments, along with ensuring that all of Galileo’s 2.5 billion users continue to benefit from the world’s most precise positioning system. The company’s role as Galileo Service Operator has just been confirmed for the next 5 years.

High performance services worldwide 

Launched in 2016, Galileo is Europe’s Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). In addition to providing positioning information with greater precision than other GNSS systems, Galileo also offers a Search and Rescue (SAR) service. This important service allows emergency first responders to quickly locate and help people in distress while giving them feedback that the call has been received by its unique Return Link Service.

EUSPA is also developing new Galileo services, including a High Accuracy Service (HAS) for high accuracy corrections, and the authentication service Open Service Navigation Message Authentication service (OSNMA), which will provide receivers with a first level of protection against manipulation and spoofing. 

A robust and secure ground and space segment 

All these services depend on having a robust and secure ground and space segment, which is exactly what EUSPA’s contract with Spaceopal guarantees. For example, as the Galileo Service Operator, Spaceopal will run EUSPA’s Galileo Control Centres (GCC) in Fucino, Italy and Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany. 

Backed by a network of ground stations and facilities spread around the globe, the GCCs allow EUSPA to monitor and control Galileo’s current constellation of satellites, along with the addition of new ones (such as Galileo Launch 12 expected later this year, which – like every additional satellite added to the constellation - will bring an additional layer of accuracy to Galileo services).  

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

27 and 29 January 2022 marked an important milestone in the life of Galileo GSAT0223 and GSAT0224 launched on 5 December 2021.

GOVSATCOM adds secure governmental communications to the EU Space Programme

14.2.2022 16:38  
Complementing Copernicus, Galileo, EGNOS, and the forthcoming GOVSATCOM, this new EU flagship programme, will benefit a broad range of sectors, including road and maritime transport, air traffic and more.
Published: 
14 February 2022

When disaster strikes, communication, information and location are key. With the addition of GOVSATCOM, the EU Space Programme provides all three. 

Last summer, when Greece was ravaged by wildfires, public authorities relied on Copernicus’ Earth Observation services to detect and monitor the evolving situation. On the ground, firefighters and emergency first responders used EGNOS and Galileo to safely guide themselves through the smoke, fog and flames.     

That same summer, when once-in-a-century floods in Germany, Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg rendered transportation and communication infrastructure useless, satellite communication, working in synergy with Copernicus and European GNSS (EGNSS), provided rescue teams with the spatial awareness, connectivity and highly accurate positioning and navigation they needed to save lives.  

But what happens when an incident occurs where there are no ground stations, either because they were destroyed (e.g., during an earthquake) or because they never existed in the first place (e.g., in remote regions such as the Arctic)? Or what if the end users require secure communication? Such is the case during cyber-attacks and other security-related incidents.

For situations like these, there’s GOVSATCOM

Adding assured, secure communication to the EU Space Programme’s current capabilities 

GOVSATCOM is the fourth pillar of the EU Space Programme. While Copernicus and EGNSS provide the necessary data and positioning, some security incidents also require a means of communication that is robustly protected against interference, interception, intrusion and other risks. GOVSATCOM bridges this gap between the need for assured and secure communication and the capabilities already offered by Copernicus, Galileo and EGNOS.

Once active, GOVSATCOM will provide secure, cost-efficient communication capabilities to security and safety-critical missions, operations and infrastructure. The European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) has been entrusted with the procurement of the secure operational ground segment (GOVSATCOM Hubs), its operations and the coordination of the user-related aspects of GOVSATCOM, all in close collaboration with Member States and other involved entities.

As a user-centric programme, GOVSATCOM is designed to meet the unique requirements of governmental applications, including those used for crisis management, surveillance and the management of key infrastructures. Further, to successfully execute their missions, governmental actors must have access to secure satellite communication services, which is something commercial satellite communication services aren’t able to provide. 

Keeping EU citizens safe and secure 

GOVSATCOM users will likely include border and maritime authorities, law enforcement agencies, civil protection forces, search and rescue services, disaster relief and humanitarian missions, authorised infrastructure operators and military forces. The service will be available to EU institutions, relevant agencies and EU Member States. 

GOVSATCOM will also serve specific use cases, such as providing connectivity to the Arctic region and for Machine to Machine (M2M) and Internet of Things (IoT) communications. Furthermore, it will be a central component to the EU’s Secure Connectivity Initiative, which is expected to provide additional EU-owned satellite communications resources to complement existing assets. 

With its multiorbital design, Secure Connectivity will allow low latency governmental communications, while its use of quantum technologies will take the security of GOVSATCOM services to the next level. With such capabilities, GOVSATCOM could play an even bigger role in the air traffic control infrastructure that will enable the autonomous and remotely piloted aircraft systems of tomorrow, including drones and air taxis.  

Most importantly, by working in synergy with Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus, GOVSATCOM will further enhance the EU Space Programme’s ability to keep European citizens safe and secure.  

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Complementing Copernicus, Galileo, EGNOS, and the forthcoming GOVSATCOM, this new EU flagship programme, will benefit a broad range of sectors, including road and maritime transport, air traffic and more.

GOVSATCOM adds secure governmental communications to the EU Space Programme

14.2.2022 16:38  
Complementing Copernicus, Galileo, EGNOS, and the forthcoming GOVSATCOM, this new EU flagship programme, will benefit a broad range of sectors, including road and maritime transport, air traffic and more.
Published: 
14 February 2022

When disaster strikes, communication, information and location are key. With the addition of GOVSATCOM, the EU Space Programme provides all three. 

Last summer, when Greece was ravaged by wildfires, public authorities relied on Copernicus’ Earth Observation services to detect and monitor the evolving situation. On the ground, firefighters and emergency first responders used EGNOS and Galileo to safely guide themselves through the smoke, fog and flames.     

That same summer, when once-in-a-century floods in Germany, Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg rendered transportation and communication infrastructure useless, satellite communication, working in synergy with Copernicus and European GNSS (EGNSS), provided rescue teams with the spatial awareness, connectivity and highly accurate positioning and navigation they needed to save lives.  

But what happens when an incident occurs where there are no ground stations, either because they were destroyed (e.g., during an earthquake) or because they never existed in the first place (e.g., in remote regions such as the Arctic)? Or what if the end users require secure communication? Such is the case during cyber-attacks and other security-related incidents.

For situations like these, there’s GOVSATCOM

Adding assured, secure communication to the EU Space Programme’s current capabilities 

GOVSATCOM is the fourth pillar of the EU Space Programme. While Copernicus and EGNSS provide the necessary data and positioning, some security incidents also require a means of communication that is robustly protected against interference, interception, intrusion and other risks. GOVSATCOM bridges this gap between the need for assured and secure communication and the capabilities already offered by Copernicus, Galileo and EGNOS.

Once active, GOVSATCOM will provide secure, cost-efficient communication capabilities to security and safety-critical missions, operations and infrastructure. The European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) has been entrusted with the procurement of the secure operational ground segment (GOVSATCOM Hubs), its operations and the coordination of the user-related aspects of GOVSATCOM, all in close collaboration with Member States and other involved entities.

As a user-centric programme, GOVSATCOM is designed to meet the unique requirements of governmental applications, including those used for crisis management, surveillance and the management of key infrastructures. Further, to successfully execute their missions, governmental actors must have access to secure satellite communication services, which is something commercial satellite communication services aren’t able to provide. 

Keeping EU citizens safe and secure 

GOVSATCOM users will likely include border and maritime authorities, law enforcement agencies, civil protection forces, search and rescue services, disaster relief and humanitarian missions, authorised infrastructure operators and military forces. The service will be available to EU institutions, relevant agencies and EU Member States. 

GOVSATCOM will also serve specific use cases, such as providing connectivity to the Arctic region and for Machine to Machine (M2M) and Internet of Things (IoT) communications. Furthermore, it will be a central component to the EU’s Secure Connectivity Initiative, which is expected to provide additional EU-owned satellite communications resources to complement existing assets. 

With its multiorbital design, Secure Connectivity will allow low latency governmental communications, while its use of quantum technologies will take the security of GOVSATCOM services to the next level. With such capabilities, GOVSATCOM could play an even bigger role in the air traffic control infrastructure that will enable the autonomous and remotely piloted aircraft systems of tomorrow, including drones and air taxis.  

Most importantly, by working in synergy with Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus, GOVSATCOM will further enhance the EU Space Programme’s ability to keep European citizens safe and secure.  

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Complementing Copernicus, Galileo, EGNOS, and the forthcoming GOVSATCOM, this new EU flagship programme, will benefit a broad range of sectors, including road and maritime transport, air traffic and more.

GOVSATCOM adds secure governmental communications to the EU Space Programme

14.2.2022 16:38  
Complementing Copernicus, Galileo, EGNOS, and the forthcoming GOVSATCOM, this new EU flagship programme, will benefit a broad range of sectors, including road and maritime transport, air traffic and more.
Published: 
14 February 2022

When disaster strikes, communication, information and location are key. With the addition of GOVSATCOM, the EU Space Programme provides all three. 

Last summer, when Greece was ravaged by wildfires, public authorities relied on Copernicus’ Earth Observation services to detect and monitor the evolving situation. On the ground, firefighters and emergency first responders used EGNOS and Galileo to safely guide themselves through the smoke, fog and flames.     

That same summer, when once-in-a-century floods in Germany, Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg rendered transportation and communication infrastructure useless, satellite communication, working in synergy with Copernicus and European GNSS (EGNSS), provided rescue teams with the spatial awareness, connectivity and highly accurate positioning and navigation they needed to save lives.  

But what happens when an incident occurs where there are no ground stations, either because they were destroyed (e.g., during an earthquake) or because they never existed in the first place (e.g., in remote regions such as the Arctic)? Or what if the end users require secure communication? Such is the case during cyber-attacks and other security-related incidents.

For situations like these, there’s GOVSATCOM

Adding assured, secure communication to the EU Space Programme’s current capabilities 

GOVSATCOM is the fourth pillar of the EU Space Programme. While Copernicus and EGNSS provide the necessary data and positioning, some security incidents also require a means of communication that is robustly protected against interference, interception, intrusion and other risks. GOVSATCOM bridges this gap between the need for assured and secure communication and the capabilities already offered by Copernicus, Galileo and EGNOS.

Once active, GOVSATCOM will provide secure, cost-efficient communication capabilities to security and safety-critical missions, operations and infrastructure. The European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) has been entrusted with the procurement of the secure operational ground segment (GOVSATCOM Hubs), its operations and the coordination of the user-related aspects of GOVSATCOM, all in close collaboration with Member States and other involved entities.

As a user-centric programme, GOVSATCOM is designed to meet the unique requirements of governmental applications, including those used for crisis management, surveillance and the management of key infrastructures. Further, to successfully execute their missions, governmental actors must have access to secure satellite communication services, which is something commercial satellite communication services aren’t able to provide. 

Keeping EU citizens safe and secure 

GOVSATCOM users will likely include border and maritime authorities, law enforcement agencies, civil protection forces, search and rescue services, disaster relief and humanitarian missions, authorised infrastructure operators and military forces. The service will be available to EU institutions, relevant agencies and EU Member States. 

GOVSATCOM will also serve specific use cases, such as providing connectivity to the Arctic region and for Machine to Machine (M2M) and Internet of Things (IoT) communications. Furthermore, it will be a central component to the EU’s Secure Connectivity Initiative, which is expected to provide additional EU-owned satellite communications resources to complement existing assets. 

With its multiorbital design, Secure Connectivity will allow low latency governmental communications, while its use of quantum technologies will take the security of GOVSATCOM services to the next level. With such capabilities, GOVSATCOM could play an even bigger role in the air traffic control infrastructure that will enable the autonomous and remotely piloted aircraft systems of tomorrow, including drones and air taxis.  

Most importantly, by working in synergy with Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus, GOVSATCOM will further enhance the EU Space Programme’s ability to keep European citizens safe and secure.  

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (https://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Complementing Copernicus, Galileo, EGNOS, and the forthcoming GOVSATCOM, this new EU flagship programme, will benefit a broad range of sectors, including road and maritime transport, air traffic and more.

As of 17 March 2022, all smartphones placed in the European Single Market should be leveraging Galileo signals

11.2.2022 14:07  
Galileo-supported E112 will result in faster response times and more lives saved
Published: 
17 March 2022

As of 17 March 2022, all smartphones placed in the European single market should be leveraging Galileo signals, in addition to other Global Navigation Satellite Systems. The addition of the EU positioning system to enhance the 112-calls location will result in faster response times and consequently, more lives saved.

The European 112-emergency number is operational in nearly all EU Member States, as well as other countries. People in danger can call it 24/7 to reach the fire brigade, medical assistance and the police.

The majority of phone calls to the 112-emergency number are placed from mobile phones. These calls already support the sending of location information to emergency services. However, this information was not based on Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) capabilities until recently.

Three years ago, the Commission Delegated Regulation anticipated measures to get advantage of GNSS and WiFi location capabilities in smartphones placed on the European Union market from 17 March 2022 onward. This will enable smartphones to transfer caller location information from GNSS (at least Galileo) to the appropriate emergency service.

How does 112 work in Europe?

So far, in the event of a 112 call, the caller’s location information was established through identification technology based on the coverage area of a cellular network tower (cell-ID). The average accuracy of this information varies from two to ten kilometres, which can lead to significant search errors following emergency calls, often resulting in time wasted and potentially, lives lost. In contrast, location information based on GNSS provides an accuracy of down to a few metres. This level of accuracy will have a major impact in terms of response times, ultimately allowing for quicker intervention in emergency situations in which every second counts. 

Galileo contributing to saving lives across Europe

The ability for 112 to communicate a caller’s location to emergency services automatically is already being rolled out. The protocol designed for this purpose, called Advanced Mobile Location (AML) is currently being deployed across the European Union. When a caller dials 112 from their smartphone, AML uses the phone’s integrated functionalities and data from Galileo to accurately pinpoint the caller’s location and transmit it to a dedicated end-point, usually a Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP), which makes the caller location available to emergency responders in real-time.

According to the European Emergency Number Association (EENA), at least 18 EU Member States have already completed the AML deployment while others are in the process of doing so. This implementation is thanks to EU initiatives and projects such as the Help 112 project, which was set up to evaluate the merits of handset-based technologies in improving the location of emergency callers..

“On the occasion of European 112 Day, I would like to reiterate once again that the EU Space Programme and in this particular case, Galileo, were conceived to benefit and protect EU citizens. The EC regulation which enters into force today is another confirmation of the added value EU space data brings to our daily lives,’’ said EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa. ‘’On this day, let’s also praise our real-life heroes, emergency responders, across the EU for their courage and bravery,’’ he concluded.

 

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (https://www.euspa.europa.eu).
Galileo-supported E112 will result in faster response times and more lives saved

The European 112-emergency number to reach new heights thanks to Galileo

11.2.2022 14:07  
Galileo-supported E112 will result in faster response times and more lives saved
Published: 
11 February 2022

As of March 17, 2022, all smartphones sold in the European Union should be leveraging Galileo signals, in addition to other Global Navigation Satellite Systems. The addition of the EU positioning system to enhance the 112-calls location will result in faster response times and consequently, more lives saved.

The European 112-emergency number is operational in nearly all EU Member States, as well as other countries. People in danger can call it 24/7 to reach the fire brigade, medical assistance and the police. On February 11, which is European 112 Day, various awareness and networking activities are organised throughout the EU to promote the existence and use of Europe's single emergency number. 

The majority of phone calls to the 112-emergency number are placed from mobile phones. These calls already support the sending of location information to emergency services. However, this information was not based on Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) capabilities until recently.

Three years ago, the Commission Delegated Regulation anticipated measures to get advantage of GNSS and WiFi location capabilities in smartphones placed on the European Union market from 17 March 2022 onward. This will enable smartphones to transfer caller location information from GNSS (at least Galileo) to the appropriate emergency service.

How does 112 work in Europe?

So far, in the event of a 112 call, the caller’s location information was established through identification technology based on the coverage area of a cellular network tower (cell-ID). The average accuracy of this information varies from two to ten kilometres, which can lead to significant search errors following emergency calls, often resulting in time wasted and potentially, lives lost. In contrast, location information based on GNSS provides an accuracy of down to a few metres. This level of accuracy will have a major impact in terms of response times, ultimately allowing for quicker intervention in emergency situations in which every second counts. 

Galileo contributing to saving lives across Europe

The ability for 112 to communicate a caller’s location to emergency services automatically is already being rolled out. The protocol designed for this purpose, called Advanced Mobile Location (AML) is currently being deployed across the European Union. When a caller dials 112 from their smartphone, AML uses the phone’s integrated functionalities and data from Galileo to accurately pinpoint the caller’s location and transmit it to a dedicated end-point, usually a Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP), which makes the caller location available to emergency responders in real-time.

According to the European Emergency Number Association (EENA), at least 18 EU Member States have already completed the AML deployment while others are in the process of doing so. This implementation is thanks to EU initiatives and projects such as the Help 112 project, which was set up to evaluate the merits of handset-based technologies in improving the location of emergency callers..

“On the occasion of European 112 Day, I would like to reiterate once again that the EU Space Programme and in this particular case, Galileo, were conceived to benefit and protect EU citizens. The EC regulation which shall enter into force late next month is another confirmation of the added value EU space data brings to our daily lives,’’ said EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa. ‘’On this day, let’s also praise our real-life heroes, emergency responders, across the EU for their courage and bravery,’’ he concluded.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (https://www.euspa.europa.eu).
Galileo-supported E112 will result in faster response times and more lives saved

The European 112-emergency number to reach new heights thanks to Galileo

11.2.2022 14:07  
Galileo-supported E112 will result in faster response times and more lives saved
Published: 
11 February 2022

As of March 17, 2022, all smartphones sold in the European Union should be leveraging Galileo signals, in addition to other Global Navigation Satellite Systems. The addition of the EU positioning system to enhance the 112-calls location will result in faster response times and consequently, more lives saved.

The European 112-emergency number is operational in nearly all EU Member States, as well as other countries. People in danger can call it 24/7 to reach the fire brigade, medical assistance and the police. On February 11, which is European 112 Day, various awareness and networking activities are organised throughout the EU to promote the existence and use of Europe's single emergency number. 

The majority of phone calls to the 112-emergency number are placed from mobile phones. These calls already support the sending of location information to emergency services. However, this information was not based on Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) capabilities until recently.

Three years ago, the Commission Delegated Regulation anticipated measures to get advantage of GNSS and WiFi location capabilities in smartphones placed on the European Union market from 17 March 2022 onward. This will enable smartphones to transfer caller location information from GNSS (at least Galileo) to the appropriate emergency service.

How does 112 work in Europe?

So far, in the event of a 112 call, the caller’s location information was established through identification technology based on the coverage area of a cellular network tower (cell-ID). The average accuracy of this information varies from two to ten kilometres, which can lead to significant search errors following emergency calls, often resulting in time wasted and potentially, lives lost. In contrast, location information based on GNSS provides an accuracy of down to a few metres. This level of accuracy will have a major impact in terms of response times, ultimately allowing for quicker intervention in emergency situations in which every second counts. 

Galileo contributing to saving lives across Europe

The ability for 112 to communicate a caller’s location to emergency services automatically is already being rolled out. The protocol designed for this purpose, called Advanced Mobile Location (AML) is currently being deployed across the European Union. When a caller dials 112 from their smartphone, AML uses the phone’s integrated functionalities and data from Galileo to accurately pinpoint the caller’s location and transmit it to a dedicated end-point, usually a Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP), which makes the caller location available to emergency responders in real-time.

According to the European Emergency Number Association (EENA), at least 18 EU Member States have already completed the AML deployment while others are in the process of doing so. This implementation is thanks to EU initiatives and projects such as the Help 112 project, which was set up to evaluate the merits of handset-based technologies in improving the location of emergency callers..

“On the occasion of European 112 Day, I would like to reiterate once again that the EU Space Programme and in this particular case, Galileo, were conceived to benefit and protect EU citizens. The EC regulation which shall enter into force late next month is another confirmation of the added value EU space data brings to our daily lives,’’ said EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa. ‘’On this day, let’s also praise our real-life heroes, emergency responders, across the EU for their courage and bravery,’’ he concluded.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).
Galileo-supported E112 will result in faster response times and more lives saved

The European 112-emergency number to reach new heights thanks to Galileo

11.2.2022 14:07  
Galileo-supported E112 will result in faster response times and more lives saved
Published: 
11 February 2022

As of 17 March 2022, all smartphones placed in the European single market should be leveraging Galileo signals, in addition to other Global Navigation Satellite Systems. The addition of the EU positioning system to enhance the 112-calls location will result in faster response times and consequently, more lives saved.

The European 112-emergency number is operational in nearly all EU Member States, as well as other countries. People in danger can call it 24/7 to reach the fire brigade, medical assistance and the police. On February 11, which is European 112 Day, various awareness and networking activities are organised throughout the EU to promote the existence and use of Europe's single emergency number. 

The majority of phone calls to the 112-emergency number are placed from mobile phones. These calls already support the sending of location information to emergency services. However, this information was not based on Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) capabilities until recently.

Three years ago, the Commission Delegated Regulation anticipated measures to get advantage of GNSS and WiFi location capabilities in smartphones placed on the European Union market from 17 March 2022 onward. This will enable smartphones to transfer caller location information from GNSS (at least Galileo) to the appropriate emergency service.

How does 112 work in Europe?

So far, in the event of a 112 call, the caller’s location information was established through identification technology based on the coverage area of a cellular network tower (cell-ID). The average accuracy of this information varies from two to ten kilometres, which can lead to significant search errors following emergency calls, often resulting in time wasted and potentially, lives lost. In contrast, location information based on GNSS provides an accuracy of down to a few metres. This level of accuracy will have a major impact in terms of response times, ultimately allowing for quicker intervention in emergency situations in which every second counts. 

Galileo contributing to saving lives across Europe

The ability for 112 to communicate a caller’s location to emergency services automatically is already being rolled out. The protocol designed for this purpose, called Advanced Mobile Location (AML) is currently being deployed across the European Union. When a caller dials 112 from their smartphone, AML uses the phone’s integrated functionalities and data from Galileo to accurately pinpoint the caller’s location and transmit it to a dedicated end-point, usually a Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP), which makes the caller location available to emergency responders in real-time.

According to the European Emergency Number Association (EENA), at least 18 EU Member States have already completed the AML deployment while others are in the process of doing so. This implementation is thanks to EU initiatives and projects such as the Help 112 project, which was set up to evaluate the merits of handset-based technologies in improving the location of emergency callers..

“On the occasion of European 112 Day, I would like to reiterate once again that the EU Space Programme and in this particular case, Galileo, were conceived to benefit and protect EU citizens. The EC regulation which shall enter into force late next month is another confirmation of the added value EU space data brings to our daily lives,’’ said EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa. ‘’On this day, let’s also praise our real-life heroes, emergency responders, across the EU for their courage and bravery,’’ he concluded.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (https://www.euspa.europa.eu).
Galileo-supported E112 will result in faster response times and more lives saved

EUSPA launches testing campaign for INAV improvements implementation

9.2.2022 13:08  
The present European GNSS (Galileo) Open Service Signal-In-Space Interface Control Document (OS SIS ICD) Issue 2.0 contains the publicly available information on the Galileo Signal-In-Space.
Published: 
09 February 2022

The European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is launching a testing campaign for INAV improvements implementation and hereby invites external stakeholders to express their interest in participating in such testing campaign. 

The testing will cover any of the three I/NAV improvements (SSP, FEC-2, RedCED), that will be tested in laboratory using simulated realistic scenarios, including open sky as well as impaired environments. The tests will allow the participants to have confirmation of the correct implementation of the OSSISICD 2.0. In case of specific interest, legacy receivers (e.g. not implementing I/NAV improvements) could be also tested, solely at the scope of confirming that they are not impacted anyhow by the introduction of the new I/NAV capabilities (backward compatibility is in any case guaranteed “by design” for any receiver that is fully compliant with the Galileo OS SIS ICD provisions, and referring in particular to section 4.1.2). 

The characteristics of the testing campaign are described here.

The interested participants may be invited to provide their product(s) before 15 March, 1 May or 1 August to the premises indicated below according to the terms and conditions that will be communicated by the agency and be ready to provide any remote technical assistance needed during the testing as well as all the necessary interface documentation required for the testing. Any further detailed provision, including the possibility to provide the testing laboratories with ad-hoc receiver development platforms facilitating the testing activities, will be discussed with the interested participants.

The tests will be executed at the laboratories of the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy, and of the European Space Agency ESA/ESTEC in Noordwijk, The Netherlands. Each applicant will be assigned by EUSPA to any of the two laboratories depending on the specific conditions and availability.

Testing is currently foreseen to be done in three batches, starting on 15 March, 1 May and 1 August 2022. The EUSPA reserves the right to change the scope, and timeline of the procedure.

Express you interest 

If you are interested in participating in the testing campaign above, please express your interest by sending an email before 25/02/2022, 17:00 (Prague local time) to the following email address: market@euspa.europa.eu. The subject of the email shall be “INAV improvements implementation testing campaign”.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The present European GNSS (Galileo) Open Service Signal-In-Space Interface Control Document (OS SIS ICD) Issue 2.0 contains the publicly available information on the Galileo Signal-In-Space.

EUSPA launches testing campaign for INAV improvements implementation

9.2.2022 13:08  
The present European GNSS (Galileo) Open Service Signal-In-Space Interface Control Document (OS SIS ICD) Issue 2.0 contains the publicly available information on the Galileo Signal-In-Space.
Published: 
09 February 2022

The European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is launching a testing campaign for INAV improvements implementation and hereby invites external stakeholders to express their interest in participating in such testing campaign. 

The testing will cover any of the three I/NAV improvements (SSP, FEC-2, RedCED), that will be tested in laboratory using simulated realistic scenarios, including open sky as well as impaired environments. The tests will allow the participants to have confirmation of the correct implementation of the OSSISICD 2.0. In case of specific interest, legacy receivers (e.g. not implementing I/NAV improvements) could be also tested, solely at the scope of confirming that they are not impacted anyhow by the introduction of the new I/NAV capabilities (backward compatibility is in any case guaranteed “by design” for any receiver that is fully compliant with the Galileo OS SIS ICD provisions, and referring in particular to section 4.1.2). 

The characteristics of the testing campaign are described here.

The interested participants may be invited to provide their product(s) before 15 March, 1 May or 1 August to the premises indicated below according to the terms and conditions that will be communicated by the agency and be ready to provide any remote technical assistance needed during the testing as well as all the necessary interface documentation required for the testing. Any further detailed provision, including the possibility to provide the testing laboratories with ad-hoc receiver development platforms facilitating the testing activities, will be discussed with the interested participants.

The tests will be executed at the laboratories of the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy, and of the European Space Agency ESA/ESTEC in Noordwijk, The Netherlands. Each applicant will be assigned by EUSPA to any of the two laboratories depending on the specific conditions and availability.

Testing is currently foreseen to be done in three batches, starting on 15 March, 1 May and 1 August 2022. The EUSPA reserves the right to change the scope, and timeline of the procedure.

Express your interest 

If you are interested in participating in the testing campaign above, please express your interest by sending an email before 25/02/2022, 17:00 (Prague local time) to the following email address: market@euspa.europa.eu. The subject of the email shall be “INAV improvements implementation testing campaign”.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The present European GNSS (Galileo) Open Service Signal-In-Space Interface Control Document (OS SIS ICD) Issue 2.0 contains the publicly available information on the Galileo Signal-In-Space.

The European GNSS Service Centre is getting ready for next-gen Galileo services

4.2.2022 11:12  
Participants will also have the opportunity to learn more about the mission of the GSC, the procurement documentation and the submission process.
Published: 
04 February 2022

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) publishes a procurement on the “Evolution of the European GNSS Service Centre (E-GSC) Infrastructure”. To encourage the widest participation possible, the Agency is organizing an industry day to present the details of the call on 15 February 2022 at 10.00.

A key link between Galileo and its users is the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC). Located in a fully secured environment outside Madrid, the GSC is at the heart of Galileo´s service provision. The centre serves as a single interface between Galileo and the users of the Galileo Open Service (OS), that is also contributing to the Galileo Search and Rescue Service. In the future, it will play a key role for Galileo´s differentiators such as the Galileo High Accuracy Service and the OS Navigation Message Authentication Service. As an integral part of EUSPA, the GSC is a centre of expertise, knowledge sharing, data and information dissemination. 

With this important procurement, EUSPA is looking for a partner to provide services and supplies to support the Agency in shaping the future versions of the E-GSC infrastructure to enable the evolutions of several E-GNSS services. EUSPA is committed to promoting the widest participation possible by economic operators, including new entrants, in particular start-ups and SMEs. To do so, the agency is organizing an industry day on 15 February 2022 at 10.00 am to present the details of the procurement on “Evolution of the European GNSS Service Centre (E-GSC) Infrastructure”. 

Participants will also have the opportunity to learn more about the mission of the GSC, the procurement documentation and the submission process.

To attend the event, please register here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Participants will also have the opportunity to learn more about the mission of the GSC, the procurement documentation and the submission process.

Galileo SAR delivers the best performance since declared operational in December 2016

3.2.2022 10:46  
Actual footage from an Arctic Mass Rescue Operation organised by Norwegian authorities, just a few km off Svalbard. A Galileo-enabled EPIRB compatible with the Return Link Service was used.
Published: 
03 February 2022

The Galileo SAR, reached new heights with a record-breaking location accuracy performance of 98.12% below 2km. The EU constellation is the biggest contributor to the Cospas-Sarsat MEOSAR system. 

The Galileo Search and Rescue Service (SAR) was launched on 15 December 2016 to provide aid to people in distress or imminent danger. The Galileo SAR service relays highly accurate, timely, and reliable distress alert data to Cospas-Sarsat. 

Under EUSPA management, the Galileo SAR Service has been introducing breakthrough features such as the Galileo Return Link Service which was declared operational in January 2020. Since then, the service has been going from strength to strength, consistently exceeding the minimum performance levels committed in the SAR/Galileo Service Definition Document.

Similarly, the SAR Galileo Forward Link Service (FLS) has seen the addition of new elements such as the SAR/Galileo calibration beacons as well as continuous upgrades of its ground infrastructure that are significantly contributing to excellent operability, performance and therefore overall SAR Galileo Service delivery.

Unprecedented levels of location accuracy for Galileo

The EU Agency for the Space Programme is committed to delivering top-notch satellite services which is why the dedicated Galileo team performs continuous quantitative controls to monitor key performance parameters (KPI) of the Galileo SAR service. 

One of the most relevant performance parameters gauged is the "quality of the location service" or location accuracy. The said KPI measures the probability of success in locating any emergency distress with an error better than 2km and 10minutes within the declared SAR/Galileo Coverage Area. Thanks to a streamlined Galileo SAR service delivery and a robust infrastructure, the SAR/Galileo achieved an average location accuracy within a 2km value of 98.12% during December 2021, the best location accuracy performance since the start of the operations (see graph below).


 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Actual footage from an Arctic Mass Rescue Operation organised by Norwegian authorities, just a few km off Svalbard. A Galileo-enabled EPIRB compatible with the Return Link Service was used.

Galileo SAR delivers the best performance since declared operational in December 2016

3.2.2022 10:46  
Actual footage from an Arctic Mass Rescue Operation organised by Norwegian authorities, just a few km off Svalbard. A Galileo-enabled EPIRB compatible with the Return Link Service was used.
Published: 
03 February 2022

The Galileo SAR, reached new heights with a record-breaking location accuracy performance of 98.12% below 2km. The EU constellation is the biggest contributor to the Cospas-Sarsat MEOSAR system. 

The Galileo Search and Rescue Service (SAR) was launched on 15 December 2016 to provide aid to people in distress or imminent danger. The Galileo SAR service relays highly accurate, timely, and reliable distress alert data to Cospas-Sarsat. 

Under EUSPA management, the Galileo SAR Service has been introducing breakthrough features such as the Galileo Return Link Service which was declared operational in January 2020. Since then, the service has been going from strength to strength, consistently exceeding the minimum performance levels committed in the SAR/Galileo Service Definition Document.

Similarly, the SAR Galileo Forward Link Service (FLS) has seen the addition of new elements such as the SAR/Galileo calibration beacons as well as continuous upgrades of its ground infrastructure that are significantly contributing to excellent operability, performance and therefore overall SAR Galileo Service delivery.

Unprecedented levels of location accuracy for Galileo

The EU Agency for the Space Programme is committed to delivering top-notch satellite services which is why the dedicated Galileo team performs continuous quantitative controls to monitor key performance parameters (KPI) of the Galileo SAR service. 

One of the most relevant performance parameters gauged is the "quality of the location service" or location accuracy. The said KPI measures the probability of success in locating any emergency distress with an error better than 2km and 10minutes within the declared SAR/Galileo Coverage Area. Thanks to a streamlined Galileo SAR service delivery and a robust infrastructure, the SAR/Galileo achieved an average location accuracy within a 2km value of 98.12% during December 2021, the best location accuracy performance since the start of the operations (see graph below).


 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Actual footage from an Arctic Mass Rescue Operation organised by Norwegian authorities, just a few km off Svalbard. A Galileo-enabled EPIRB compatible with the Return Link Service was used.

Galileo SAR delivers best performance since declared operational in December 2016

3.2.2022 10:46  
Actual footage from an Arctic Mass Rescue Operation organised by Norwegian authorities, just a few km off Svalbard. A Galileo-enabled EPIRB compatible with the Return Link Service was used.
Published: 
03 February 2022

The Galileo SAR, reached new heights with a record-breaking location accuracy performance of 98.12% below 2km. The EU constellation is the biggest contributor to the Cospas-Sarsat MEOSAR system. 

The Galileo Search and Rescue Service (SAR) was launched on 15 December 2016 to provide aid to people in distress or imminent danger. The Galileo SAR service relays highly accurate, timely, and reliable distress alert data to Cospas-Sarsat. 

Under EUSPA management, the Galileo SAR Service has been introducing breakthrough features such as the Galileo Return Link Service which was declared operational in January 2020. Since then, the service has been going from strength to strength, consistently exceeding the minimum performance levels committed in the SAR/Galileo Service Definition Document.

Similarly, the SAR Galileo Forward Link Service (FLS) has seen the addition of new elements such as the SAR/Galileo calibration beacons as well as continuous upgrades of its ground infrastructure that are significantly contributing to excellent operability, performance and therefore overall SAR Galileo Service delivery.

Unprecedented levels of location accuracy for Galileo

The EU Agency for the Space Programme is committed to delivering top-notch satellite services which is why the dedicated Galileo team performs continuous quantitative controls to monitor key performance parameters (KPI) of the Galileo SAR service. 

One of the most relevant performance parameters gauged is the "quality of the location service" or location accuracy. The said KPI measures the probability of success in locating any emergency distress with an error better than 2km and 10minutes within the declared SAR/Galileo Coverage Area. Thanks to a streamlined Galileo SAR service delivery and a robust infrastructure, the SAR/Galileo achieved an average location accuracy within a 2km value of 98.12% during December 2021, the best location accuracy performance since the start of the operations (see graph below).


 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Actual footage from an Arctic Mass Rescue Operation organised by Norwegian authorities, just a few km off Svalbard. A Galileo-enabled EPIRB compatible with the Return Link Service was used.

Galileo SAR delivers best performance since declared operational in December 2016

3.2.2022 10:46  
Actual footage from an Arctic Mass Rescue Operation organised by Norwegian authorities, just a few km off Svalbard. A Galileo-enabled EPIRB compatible with the Return Link Service was used.
Published: 
03 February 2022

The Galileo SAR reached new heights with a record-breaking location accuracy performance of 98.12% below 2km. The EU constellation is the biggest contributor to the Cospas-Sarsat MEOSAR system. 

The Galileo Search and Rescue Service (SAR) was launched on 15 December 2016 to provide aid to people in distress or imminent danger. The Galileo SAR service relays highly accurate, timely, and reliable distress alert data to Cospas-Sarsat. 

Under EUSPA management, the Galileo SAR Service has been introducing breakthrough features such as the Galileo Return Link Service which was declared operational in January 2020. Since then, the service has been going from strength to strength, consistently exceeding the minimum performance levels committed in the SAR/Galileo Service Definition Document.

Similarly, the SAR Galileo Forward Link Service (FLS) has seen the addition of new elements such as the SAR/Galileo calibration beacons as well as continuous upgrades of its ground infrastructure that are significantly contributing to excellent operability, performance and therefore overall SAR Galileo Service delivery.

Unprecedented levels of location accuracy for Galileo

The EU Agency for the Space Programme is committed to delivering top-notch satellite services which is why the dedicated Galileo team performs continuous quantitative controls to monitor key performance parameters (KPI) of the Galileo SAR service. 

One of the most relevant performance parameters gauged is the "quality of the location service" or location accuracy. The said KPI measures the probability of success in locating any emergency distress with an error better than 2km and 10minutes within the declared SAR/Galileo Coverage Area. Thanks to a streamlined Galileo SAR service delivery and a robust infrastructure, the SAR/Galileo achieved an average location accuracy within a 2km value of 98.12% during December 2021, the best location accuracy performance since the start of the operations (see graph below).


 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Actual footage from an Arctic Mass Rescue Operation organised by Norwegian authorities, just a few km off Svalbard. A Galileo-enabled EPIRB compatible with the Return Link Service was used.

Galileo SAR delivers the best performance since declared operational in December 2016

3.2.2022 10:46  
Actual footage from an Arctic Mass Rescue Operation organised by Norwegian authorities, just a few km off Svalbard. A Galileo-enabled EPIRB compatible with the Return Link Service was used.
Published: 
03 February 2022

The Galileo SAR, reached new heights with a record-breaking location accuracy performance of 98.12% below 2km. The EU constellation is the biggest contributor to the Cospas-Sarsat MEOSAR system. 

The Galileo Search and Rescue Service (SAR) was launched on 15 December 2016 to provide aid to people in distress or imminent danger. The Galileo SAR service relays highly accurate, timely, and reliable distress alert data to Cospas-Sarsat. 

Under EUSPA management, the Galileo SAR Service has been introducing breakthrough features such as the Galileo Return Link Service which was declared operational in January 2020. Since then, the service has been going from strength to strength, consistently exceeding the minimum performance levels committed in the SAR/Galileo Service Definition Document.

Similarly, the SAR Galileo Forward Link Service (FLS) has seen the addition of new elements such as the SAR/Galileo calibration beacons as well as continuous upgrades of its ground infrastructure that are significantly contributing to excellent operability, performance and therefore overall SAR Galileo Service delivery.

Unprecedented levels of location accuracy for Galileo

The EU Agency for the Space Programme is committed to delivering top-notch satellite services which is why the dedicated Galileo team performs continuous quantitative controls to monitor key performance parameters (KPI) of the Galileo SAR service. 

One of the most relevant performance parameters gauged is the "quality of the location service" or location accuracy. The said KPI measures the probability of success in locating any emergency distress with an error better than 2km and 10minutes within the declared SAR/Galileo Coverage Area. Thanks to a streamlined Galileo SAR service delivery and a robust infrastructure, the SAR/Galileo achieved an average location accuracy within a 2km value of 98.12% during December 2021, the best location accuracy performance since the start of the operations (see graph below).


Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Actual footage from an Arctic Mass Rescue Operation organised by Norwegian authorities, just a few km off Svalbard. A Galileo-enabled EPIRB compatible with the Return Link Service was used.

The EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report is out! Did you get your copy?

26.1.2022 13:20  
EUSPA just published new Market Report on Earth Observation and Satellite Navigation
Published: 
26 January 2022

To help you better appreciate and reap the full benefits of space technology, EUSPA experts compiled the "EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report".  The 216-page long release is the ultimate guide to anyone who seeks to make the EU Space technologies part of their business plan, develop new space downstream applications and see a tangible return on investment.

More than ever society relies on innovative solutions to deal with the big data paradigm, respond to and mitigate climate change, natural and man-made disasters, curb the spread of diseases and strengthen a global supply chain that underpins our daily lives. Earth Observation (EO) and Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) data is becoming increasingly important to these innovative solutions through dozens of applications that are emerging or already in use by citizens, businesses, governments, industry, international organizations, NGOs, and researchers around the world. In 2021, GNSS and EO downstream market generated over 200 billion euros revenues and are set to reach almost half a trillion over the next decade.

The report provides analytical information on the dynamic GNSS and EO markets. It also offers in-depth analyses of the latest global trends and developments through illustrated examples and use cases. Using advanced econometric models, it also offers market evolution forecasts of GNSS shipments or EO revenues spanning to 2031.

Who is it for?

Practically, the report is useful to anyone who seeks to include GNSS or EO data in their operations to bring added value to their business. It is meant for businesses, entrepreneurs, innovators, academia, chipset manufacturers, researchers, and more. If you are looking to break through into the space downstream industry, this report is the ultimate guide, offering great insights on market trends as well as future forecasts.

Eyes on Sustainability 

Accelerating Europe’s engagement in space is pivotal to enable our green transition and reach climate neutrality by 2050. EUSPA is committed to helping the Union deliver on the Green Deal agenda, and the fight against climate change starting with embedding space data and services into our professional activities.

The report emphasises how the user of EO & GNSS contribute to compliance, monitoring, and efficiency of green investments, benefitting companies, regulators, and society as a whole.  It focuses on concrete examples across the 17 identified market segments. For instance, in the area of green energy, EU Space plays a role too! Copernicus helps optimize the performance of tidal power generators, by offering data on the rise and fall tides through tidal currents prediction systems. Galileo can provide smart power grids with robust timing and synchronization down to a nanosecond level and therefore improve their performance. 

Key Report findings:

  • Global GNSS and EO enabled revenues crossed 200 billion in 2021 set to reach almost 500 billion over the next decade; 
  • The global installed base of GNSS devices in use will reach more than 10 bn units in 2031; 
  • The market for Earth Observation applications is boosted by a large pool of value-added services (i.e. 85% of global revenue);
  • The European EO industry is dominated by SMEs and start-ups, from a supply perspective, European companies hold over 41% of the global EO market. 
  • The downstream space application market accompanied by the EU Space Programme will continue growing and thereby effectively contributing to European (e.g. European Green Deal, EU's Digital Decade), as well as Global policies (e.g. United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals and the Paris Agreement) in combination with other technologies. 

You can download the 2022 Market Report here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).
EUSPA just published new Market Report on Earth Observation and Satellite Navigation

The EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report is out! Did you get your copy?

26.1.2022 13:20  
EUSPA just published new Market Report on Earth Observation and Satellite Navigation
Published: 
26 January 2022

To help you better appreciate and reap the full benefits of space technology, EUSPA experts compiled the "EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report".  The 216-page long release is the ultimate guide to anyone who seeks to make the EU Space technologies part of their business plan, develop new space downstream applications and see a tangible return on investment.

More than ever society relies on innovative solutions to deal with the big data paradigm, respond to and mitigate climate change, natural and man-made disasters, curb the spread of diseases and strengthen a global supply chain that underpins our daily lives. Earth Observation (EO) and Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) data is becoming increasingly important to these innovative solutions through dozens of applications that are emerging or already in use by citizens, businesses, governments, industry, international organizations, NGOs, and researchers around the world. In 2021, GNSS and EO downstream market generated over 200 billion euros revenues and are set to reach almost half a trillion over the next decade.

The report provides analytical information on the dynamic GNSS and EO markets. It also offers in-depth analyses of the latest global trends and developments through illustrated examples and use cases. Using advanced econometric models, it also offers market evolution forecasts of GNSS shipments or EO revenues spanning to 2031.

Who is it for?

Practically, the report is useful to anyone who seeks to include GNSS or EO data in their operations to bring added value to their business. It is meant for businesses, entrepreneurs, innovators, academia, chipset manufacturers, researchers, and more. If you are looking to break through into the space downstream industry, this report is the ultimate guide, offering great insights on market trends as well as future forecasts.

Eyes on Sustainability 

Accelerating Europe’s engagement in space is pivotal to enable our green transition and reach climate neutrality by 2050. EUSPA is committed to helping the Union deliver on the Green Deal agenda, and the fight against climate change starting with embedding space data and services into our professional activities.

The report emphasises how the user of EO & GNSS contribute to compliance, monitoring, and efficiency of green investments, benefitting companies, regulators, and society as a whole.  It focuses on concrete examples across the 17 identified market segments. For instance, in the area of green energy, EU Space plays a role too! Copernicus helps optimize the performance of tidal power generators, by offering data on the rise and fall tides through tidal currents prediction systems. Galileo can provide smart power grids with robust timing and synchronization down to a nanosecond level and therefore improve their performance. 

Key Report findings:

  • Global GNSS and EO enabled revenues crossed 200 billion in 2021 set to reach almost 500 billion over the next decade; 
  • The global installed base of GNSS devices in use will reach more than 10 bn units in 2031; 
  • The market for Earth Observation applications is boosted by a large pool of value-added services (i.e. 85% of global revenue);
  • The European EO industry is dominated by SMEs and start-ups, from a supply perspective, European companies hold over 41% of the global EO market. 
  • The downstream space application market accompanied by the EU Space Programme will continue growing and thereby effectively contributing to European (e.g. European Green Deal, EU's Digital Decade), as well as Global policies (e.g. United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals and the Paris Agreement) in combination with other technologies. 

You can download the 2022 Market Report here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).
EUSPA just published new Market Report on Earth Observation and Satellite Navigation

The EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report is out! Did you get your copy?

26.1.2022 13:20  
EUSPA just published new Market Report on Earth Observation and Satellite Navigation
Published: 
26 January 2022

To help you better appreciate and reap the full benefits of space technology, EUSPA experts compiled the "EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report".  The 216-page long release is the ultimate guide to anyone who seeks to make the EU Space technologies part of their business plan, develop new space downstream applications and see a tangible return on investment.

More than ever society relies on innovative solutions to deal with the big data paradigm, respond to and mitigate climate change, natural and man-made disasters, curb the spread of diseases and strengthen a global supply chain that underpins our daily lives. Earth Observation (EO) and Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) data is becoming increasingly important to these innovative solutions through dozens of applications that are emerging or already in use by citizens, businesses, governments, industry, international organizations, NGOs, and researchers around the world. In 2021, GNSS and EO downstream market generated over 200 billion euros revenues and are set to reach almost half a trillion over the next decade.

The report provides analytical information on the dynamic GNSS and EO markets. It also offers in-depth analyses of the latest global trends and developments through illustrated examples and use cases. Using advanced econometric models, it also offers market evolution forecasts of GNSS shipments or EO revenues spanning to 2031.

Who is it for?

Practically, the report is useful to anyone who seeks to include GNSS or EO data in their operations to bring added value to their business. It is meant for businesses, entrepreneurs, innovators, academia, chipset manufacturers, researchers, and more. If you are looking to break through into the space downstream industry, this report is the ultimate guide, offering great insights on market trends as well as future forecasts.

Eyes on Sustainability 

Accelerating Europe’s engagement in space is pivotal to enable our green transition and reach climate neutrality by 2050. EUSPA is committed to helping the Union deliver on the Green Deal agenda, and the fight against climate change starting with embedding space data and services into our professional activities.

The report emphasises how the user of EO & GNSS contribute to compliance, monitoring, and efficiency of green investments, benefitting companies, regulators, and society as a whole.  It focuses on concrete examples across the 17 identified market segments. For instance, in the area of green energy, EU Space plays a role too! Copernicus helps optimize the performance of tidal power generators, by offering data on the rise and fall tides through tidal currents prediction systems. Galileo can provide smart power grids with robust timing and synchronization down to a nanosecond level and therefore improve their performance. 

Key Report findings:

  • Global GNSS and EO enabled revenues crossed 200 billion in 2021 set to reach almost 500 billion over the next decade; 
  • The global installed base of GNSS devices in use will reach more than 10 bn units in 2031; 
  • The market for Earth Observation applications is boosted by a large pool of value-added services (i.e. 85% of global revenue);
  • The European EO industry is dominated by SMEs and start-ups, from a supply perspective, European companies hold over 41% of the global EO market. 
  • The downstream space application market accompanied by the EU Space Programme will continue growing and thereby effectively contributing to European (e.g. European Green Deal, EU's Digital Decade), as well as Global policies (e.g. United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals and the Paris Agreement) in combination with other technologies. 

You can download the 2022 Market Report here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).
EUSPA just published new Market Report on Earth Observation and Satellite Navigation

EUSPA to further boost space investments with CASSINI

25.1.2022 14:44  
Josef Aschbacher, Timo Pesonen, Rodrigo da Costa, Alain Godard
Published: 
25 January 2022

The European Commission, the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), the European Space Agency (ESA), and the European Investment Fund (EIF) committed to multiplying the benefits of space technology to businesses. This initiative implies attracting more private investment funds, running capacity building activities, sharing expertise, organizing matchmaking, and promoting the markets. CASSINI is central to this endeavour.

DG DEFIS Director-General Timo Pesonen, EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa, ESA Director-General Josef Aschbacher, Chief Executive of the European Investment Fund Alain Godard gathered at the Egmont Palace in Brussels on the occasion of the 14th edition of the European Space Conference 2022. During this event, they agreed on the principles of cooperation to support SMEs in the space sector, fostering on exchange of information and engaging in joint cross-functional actions towards space entrepreneurship. 

Dedicated to promoting the commercialization of Galileo, EGNOS, and Copernicus data and services to increase the market share of the EU space actors, EUSPA has been engaging with companies of all sizes from a broad spectrum of industries, many of which had not used space services in their activities before. 

Through capacity-building, and supporting their access to financial resources, mentoring and market know-how, EUSPA helps to create breakthroughs for space entrepreneurship. 

Read this: The clock is ticking! Have you submitted your Horizon Europe proposal?

The ‘’New Space’’ paradigm is however reshaping the industry’s landscape resulting in a greater need for better access to risk capital and other forms of growth financing. Anticipating this need, EUSPA is ready to take EU space entrepreneurship to the next level by leveraging investments, its know-how and capacity building within CASSINI Space Entrepreneurship Growth Funding Initiative, together with European Investment Fund, the European Commission, and the European Space Agency.   

Read this: CASSINI hackathon leverages space to digitise green spaces

These organisations are committed to bringing together their expertise and experience to leverage new investment support for the European space-based economy. The common objective is to create high-skilled jobs in the EU and improve the day-to-day lives of Europeans by supporting innovative companies and accelerating the development of new applications that use European global navigation satellite systems and earth observation services.

‘’EUSPA has a long history of cooperation with the European Investment Bank group and other private and public investors. I am pleased to see that today we reinforce our collaboration to support developing innovative, creative, and successful companies using EU space technologies,’’ said EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa. ‘’It is another step to contribute to the growth of the EU Space industry and its market share to boost our common economy in this very competitive global environment,’’ he concluded.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Josef Aschbacher, Timo Pesonen, Rodrigo da Costa, Alain Godard

EUSPA to further boost space investments with CASSINI

25.1.2022 14:44  
Josef Aschbacher, Timo Pesonen, Rodrigo da Costa, Alain Godard
Published: 
25 January 2022

The European Commission, the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), the European Space Agency (ESA), and the European Investment Fund (EIF) committed to multiplying the benefits of space technology to businesses. This initiative implies attracting more private investment funds, running capacity building activities, sharing expertise, organizing matchmaking, and promoting the markets. CASSINI is central to this endeavour.

DG DEFIS Director-General Timo Pesonen, EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa, ESA Director-General Josef Aschbacher, Chief Executive of the European Investment Fund Alain Godard gathered at the Egmont Palace in Brussels on the occasion of the 14th edition of the European Space Conference 2022. During this event, they agreed on the principles of cooperation to support SMEs in the space sector, fostering on exchange of information and engaging in joint cross-functional actions towards space entrepreneurship. 

Dedicated to promoting the commercialization of Galileo, EGNOS, and Copernicus data and services to increase the market share of the EU space actors, EUSPA has been engaging with companies of all sizes from a broad spectrum of industries, many of which had not used space services in their activities before. 

Through capacity-building, and supporting their access to financial resources, mentoring and market know-how, EUSPA helps to create breakthroughs for space entrepreneurship. 

Read this: The clock is ticking! Have you submitted your Horizon Europe proposal?

The ‘’New Space’’ paradigm is however reshaping the industry’s landscape resulting in a greater need for better access to risk capital and other forms of growth financing. Anticipating this need, EUSPA is ready to take EU space entrepreneurship to the next level by leveraging investments, its know-how and capacity building within CASSINI Space Entrepreneurship Growth Funding Initiative, together with European Investment Fund, the European Commission, and the European Space Agency.   

Read this: CASSINI hackathon leverages space to digitise green spaces

These organisations are committed to bringing together their expertise and experience to leverage new investment support for the European space-based economy. The common objective is to create high-skilled jobs in the EU and improve the day-to-day lives of Europeans by supporting innovative companies and accelerating the development of new applications that use European global navigation satellite systems and earth observation services.

‘’EUSPA has a long history of cooperation with the European Investment Bank group and other private and public investors. I am pleased to see that today we reinforce our collaboration to support developing innovative, creative, and successful companies using EU space technologies,’’ said EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa. ‘’It is another step to contribute to the growth of the EU Space industry and its market share to boost our common economy in this very competitive global environment,’’ he concluded.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Josef Aschbacher, Timo Pesonen, Rodrigo da Costa, Alain Godard

Galileo satellites 27-28 reach final orbit; initiate testing phase

24.1.2022 10:59  
The Galileo satellites orbit Earth at an altitude of 23,222 km
Published: 
24 January 2022

The Payload In Orbit Testing activities is the last stage of the Early Operations Phase. It will enable the Galileo satellites 27-28 to enter service provision and their signals to become available to end-users down on Earth.

2022 is the year of delivery for EUSPA and the EU Space Programme.

Launched earlier in December from the European Spaceport in French Guyana, the Galileo satellites reached, on 21 January 2022, their orbital position at 23.222 km above the Earth after completing the drift stop and fine-positioning maneuvers. 

Earlier today, Payload in Orbit Testing activities began for satellite 27 to be followed by satellite 28 the next day. This last stage of the Early Operation Phase allows to test the health of the Galileo signals and therefore ensure the entry into service provision the following months. During the next month, the clocks onboard the two satellites will be tested and their signal analyzed to ensure that they are ready to be included in the Galileo constellation and contribute to the most accurate navigation service in the world. 

The addition of the latest batch of Galileo satellites allows for enhanced accuracy and robustness in navigation services and a better experience for the end-users. It is also another step towards the declarations of Open Service Full Operational Capability by the end of 2022 and of Public Regulated Service Initial Operational Capability by the end of 2023.

The next batch of Galileo satellites 29-30 is scheduled for launch at the beginning of the second quarter of 2022.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The Galileo satellites orbit Earth at an altitude of 23,222 km

Galileo satellites 27-28 reach final orbit; initiate testing phase

24.1.2022 10:59  
The Galileo satellites orbit Earth at an altitude of 23,222 km
Published: 
24 January 2022

The Payload In Orbit Testing activities is the last stage of the Early Operations Phase. It will enable the Galileo satellites 27-28 to enter service provision and their signals to become available to end-users down on Earth.

2022 is the year of delivery for EUSPA and the EU Space Programme.

Launched earlier in December from the European Spaceport in French Guyana, the Galileo satellites reached, on 22 January 21, their orbital position at 23.222 km above the Earth after completing the drift stop and fine-positioning maneuvers. 

Earlier today, Payload in Orbit Testing activities began for satellite 27 to be followed by satellite 28 the next day. This last stage of the Early Operation Phase allows to test the health of the Galileo signals and therefore ensure the entry into service provision the following months. During the next month, the clocks onboard the two satellites will be tested and their signal analyzed to ensure that they are ready to be included in the Galileo constellation and contribute to the most accurate navigation service in the world. 

The addition of the latest batch of Galileo satellites allows for enhanced accuracy and robustness in navigation services and a better experience for the end-users. It is also another step towards the declarations of Open Service Full Operational Capability by the end of 2022 and of Public Regulated Service Initial Operational Capability by the end of 2023.

The next batch of Galileo satellites 29-30 is scheduled for launch at the beginning of the second quarter of 2022.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The Galileo satellites orbit Earth at an altitude of 23,222 km

Galileo OSNMA Webinar: All you need to know about the Public Observation Test phase

21.1.2022 10:38  
The new pioneering service of Galileo will pave the way towards robust Position, Velocity and Time information (PVT) for the Galileo Open Service users.
Published: 
21 January 2022

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is hosting a webinar on the Public Observation Test Phase of Galileo OSNMA. Scheduled for 2 February 2022, this digital gathering will offer receiver manufacturers and application developers a comprehensive overview of the new Galileo differentiator and insights in the ongoing test phase.

Intentional satellite interference is not a new issue. Lately, however, the GNSS industry has been facing more and more incidents of jamming and spoofing, driven mainly by the growing awareness and the availability of low-cost, illegal disruption equipment. GNSS signal falsification can have disastrous impacts on applications and market sectors that rely on precise and reliable position, navigation, and timing information. The global economy could suffer tremendous losses in case of GNSS outage caused by various attacks, including spoofing.

To contribute to the detection of certain types of data-level GNSS attacks, EUSPA and the European Commission are currently testing the Galileo Open Service – Navigation Message Authentication (OSNMA). The OSNMA is a new, breakthrough feature of Europe’s positioning system which meets a clear user need: the provision of a more robust and trustworthy GNSS benefitting a broad range of applications. This forthcoming service is an authentication mechanism that allows Open Service users to verify the authenticity of its Navigation Message, making sure that the data the users receive is indeed from Galileo and has not been modified in any way.

Read this: GALILEO OPEN SERVICE NAVIGATION MESSAGE AUTHENTICATION (OSNMA) Info Note now available for download

To acquaint interested receiver manufacturers and application developers with the Galileo OSNMA functionalities, EUSPA is hosting a webinar on the upcoming Public Observation Test Phase of the Galileo OSNMA on 02 February 2022. EUSPA experts will provide an overview of the OSNMA service roadmap and receiver guidelines, present concrete use cases where the service can make a difference, explain how to join the Public Observation Test phase, and share your feedback.

By participating in the test phase, you will be able to:

  • test the performance of the new service in their solutions.
  • get hands-on experience on a long-awaited feature of Galileo and GNSS as a whole
  • Be part of a one-of-a-kind user community and gain exclusive insights from experts on the market
  • Give your OSNMA-enabled solution extra visibility.  
  • Have the chance to steer the service towards targeted enhancements

To find out more about the test phase register for the webinar here.

Please note that the OSNMA public observation phase is targeting receiver and device manufacturers. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The new pioneering service of Galileo will pave the way towards robust Position, Velocity and Time information (PVT) for the Galileo Open Service users.

The clock is ticking! Have you submitted your Horizon Europe proposal?

18.1.2022 9:54  
Synergies between Copernicus and Galileo support applications and the delivery of critical services when natural disasters strike such as volcano eruptions.
Published: 
18 January 2022

The deadline for the first EU Space-flavoured Horizon Europe Call is approaching. Don’t forget to submit by 16 February 2022 at 17:00:00 Brussels time!

   The EU Space downstream sector has been experiencing a large growth over the last years as space data is becoming increasingly available to end-users. Businesses turn into geospatial data from Copernicus or GNSS data from Galileo and EGNOS to optimize their operations, generate added value, and increase their return on investment. To facilitate access to EU Space data and services and create new downstream applications, in November 2021, the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) launched its first Horizon Europe call.  

This financial instrument of 32.6 million EUR is fully aligned with the EU priorities and leverages #EUspace to transform the digital economy, increase the Union’s resilience and support the Green Deal. The EUSPA-backed call stretches into three different areas:

EGNSS and Copernicus applications fostering the European Green deal

The EU Space Programme is the opportunity to create synergies between the space components and services to fuel the EU Green Deal. European industry, entrepreneurs, and user communities can rely on EGNSS and Copernicus to develop smart solutions and serve new markets, fully aligned with the EU sustainability goals. Check out here all you need to know about this area of the call.

EGNSS applications for Safety and Crisis management 

When an emergency or a disaster hits a city or region, the priorities are to care for the wounded, restore infrastructure, provide logistics and basic services, and then restore livelihoods and reconstruct communities. European GNSS – Galileo and EGNOS – supports applications and the delivery of critical services during the four key phases of the disaster management life cycle: preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation. Click here for more call details

EGNSS applications for the Digital Age 

This area aims at accelerating the adoption of Galileo and EGNOS in mass and professional markets and rolling out applications with innovative features such as better multipath resistance, authentication, and more. Applications addressing this topic should maximise public benefits by supporting the development of solutions that will address pressing societal challenges in areas such as health, citizen safety and security, mobility, and the sharing economy. Hit the button and make EU Space part of your digital solution.

Being a market-oriented, operational EU Agency, EUSPA is looking for proposals that put the users' needs at the top. Applicants should demonstrate user engagement in all three topics and include a comprehensive business plan.  

About Horizon Europe

Horizon Europe is the EU’s key funding mechanism that facilitates collaboration and strengthens the impact of research and innovation in developing, supporting, and implementing EU policies while tackling global challenges. Staying true to its mission, linking space to user needs, EUSPA will leverage this instrument to stimulate the EU Space Programme operational research and foster the creation of commercial value-adding solutions that contribute to EU policies and priorities. Read more 

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Synergies between Copernicus and Galileo support applications and the delivery of critical services when natural disasters strike such as volcano eruptions.

The clock is ticking! Have you submitted your Horizon Europe proposal?

18.1.2022 9:54  
Synergies between Copernicus and Galileo support applications and the delivery of critical services when natural disasters strike such as volcano eruptions.
Published: 
18 January 2022

The deadline for the first EU Space-flavoured Horizon Europe Call is approaching. Don’t forget to submit by 16 February 2022 at 17:00:00 Brussels time!

 The EU Space downstream sector has been experiencing a large growth over the last years as space data is becoming increasingly available to end-users. Businesses turn into geospatial data from Copernicus or GNSS data from Galileo and EGNOS to optimize their operations, generate added value, and increase their return on investment. To facilitate access to EU Space data and services and create new downstream applications, in November 2021, the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) launched its first Horizon Europe call.  

This financial instrument of 32.6 million EUR is fully aligned with the EU priorities and leverages #EUspace to transform the digital economy, increase the Union’s resilience and support the Green Deal. The EUSPA-backed call stretches into three different areas:

EGNSS and Copernicus applications fostering the European Green deal

The EU Space Programme is the opportunity to create synergies between the space components and services to fuel the EU Green Deal. European industry, entrepreneurs, and user communities can rely on EGNSS and Copernicus to develop smart solutions and serve new markets, fully aligned with the EU sustainability goals. Check out here all you need to know about this area of the call.

EGNSS applications for Safety and Crisis management 

When an emergency or a disaster hits a city or region, the priorities are to care for the wounded, restore infrastructure, provide logistics and basic services, and then restore livelihoods and reconstruct communities. European GNSS – Galileo and EGNOS – supports applications and the delivery of critical services during the four key phases of the disaster management life cycle: preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation. Click here for more call details

EGNSS applications for the Digital Age 

This area aims at accelerating the adoption of Galileo and EGNOS in mass and professional markets and rolling out applications with innovative features such as better multipath resistance, authentication, and more. Applications addressing this topic should maximise public benefits by supporting the development of solutions that will address pressing societal challenges in areas such as health, citizen safety and security, mobility, and the sharing economy. Hit the button and make EU Space part of your digital solution.

Being a market-oriented, operational EU Agency, EUSPA is looking for proposals that put the users' needs at the top. Applicants should demonstrate user engagement in all three topics and include a comprehensive business plan.  

About Horizon Europe

Horizon Europe is the EU’s key funding mechanism that facilitates collaboration and strengthens the impact of research and innovation in developing, supporting, and implementing EU policies while tackling global challenges. Staying true to its mission, linking space to user needs, EUSPA will leverage this instrument to stimulate the EU Space Programme operational research and foster the creation of commercial value-adding solutions that contribute to EU policies and priorities. Read more 

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Synergies between Copernicus and Galileo support applications and the delivery of critical services when natural disasters strike such as volcano eruptions.

The clock is ticking! Have you submitted your Horizon Europe proposal?

18.1.2022 9:54  
Synergies between Copernicus and Galileo support applications and the delivery of critical services when natural disasters strike such as volcano eruptions.
Published: 
18 January 2022

The deadline for the first EU Space-flavoured Horizon Europe Call is approaching. Don’t forget to submit by 16 February 2022 at 17:00:00 Brussels time!

The EU Space downstream sector has been experiencing a large growth over the last years as space data is becoming increasingly available to end-users. Businesses turn into geospatial data from Copernicus or GNSS data from Galileo and EGNOS to optimize their operations, generate added value, and increase their return on investment. To facilitate access to EU Space data and services and create new downstream applications, in November 2021, the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) launched its first Horizon Europe call.  

This financial instrument of 32.6 million EUR is fully aligned with the EU priorities and leverages #EUspace to transform the digital economy, increase the Union’s resilience and support the Green Deal. The EUSPA-backed call stretches into three different areas:

EGNSS and Copernicus applications fostering the European Green Deal

The EU Space Programme is the opportunity to create synergies between the space components and services to fuel the EU Green Deal. European industry, entrepreneurs, and user communities can rely on EGNSS and Copernicus to develop smart solutions and serve new markets, fully aligned with the EU sustainability goals. Check out here all you need to know about this area of the call.

EGNSS applications for Safety and Crisis Management 

When an emergency or a disaster hits a city or region, the priorities are to care for the wounded, restore infrastructure, provide logistics and basic services, and then restore livelihoods and reconstruct communities. European GNSS – Galileo and EGNOS – supports applications and the delivery of critical services during the four key phases of the disaster management life cycle: preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation. Click here for more call details

EGNSS applications for the Digital Age 

This area aims at accelerating the adoption of Galileo and EGNOS in mass and professional markets and rolling out applications with innovative features such as better multipath resistance, authentication, and more. Applications addressing this topic should maximise public benefits by supporting the development of solutions that will address pressing societal challenges in areas such as health, citizen safety and security, mobility, and the sharing economy. Hit the button and make EU Space part of your digital solution.

Being a market-oriented, operational EU Agency, EUSPA is looking for proposals that put the users' needs at the top. Applicants should demonstrate user engagement in all three topics and include a comprehensive business plan.  

About Horizon Europe

Horizon Europe is the EU’s key funding mechanism that facilitates collaboration and strengthens the impact of research and innovation in developing, supporting, and implementing EU policies while tackling global challenges. Staying true to its mission, linking space to user needs, EUSPA will leverage this instrument to stimulate the EU Space Programme operational research and foster the creation of commercial value-adding solutions that contribute to EU policies and priorities. Read more 

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Synergies between Copernicus and Galileo support applications and the delivery of critical services when natural disasters strike such as volcano eruptions.

President of the European Council, Charles Michel, visits EUSPA Prague Headquarters

13.1.2022 17:08  
EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa greets European Council President, Charles Michel.
Published: 
13 January 2022

Topics discussed between EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa and the President of the European Council included the new mandate of the agency and its role in the delivery of EU priorities such as the EU Green Deal and the digitization and growth of the European economy.

During his stay in Prague, President Michel met with EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa, to discuss the Agency’s new role one year after the entry into force of the EU Space Regulation, together with Matthias Petschke, Director of Space at the European Commission and Bruno Vermeire, Chairperson of the EU Space Security Accreditation Board. EUSPA has now extended responsibilities when it comes to the management, service provision, evolution, and protection of the EU’s flagship navigation systems, Galileo and EGNOS, and the development of the GOVSATCOM Hub, while being in charge of the promotion of services and data from the EU Space Programme – now extended also to the further utilization of Copernicus and GOVSATCOM user aspects. As a gatekeeper of space security, the agency’s Security Accreditation Board has the mandate to accredit all components of the EU Space Programme. 

“I am thrilled to see the scope of EUSPA ‘s missions because the EUS Space action is crucial. Indeed, strategic autonomy is essential for the EU, so is the innovation capacity coming from space inspired which is helping for our European priorities. A few years ago, we set the objective of a climate-neutral EU by 2050, which is the driving force of the Green Deal. And I believe that innovation and technology fostered by the EU Space Programme technology are essential to reach our European objectives including mitigating climate change,” declared President Charles MICHEL.

In line with the EU Green Deal, EUSPA supports the creation of solutions that mitigate the adverse effects of climate change and our environmental footprint on a wide range of areas, such as transport and agriculture. Synergies between Earth observation and navigation are central to the preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation of natural disasters. In the unfortunate event of wildfires, floods, or earthquakes access to a precise location and up-to-date geospatial information is vital to deliver an effective disaster management response. EUSPA recently launched a Horizon Europe call to develop space-based safety and crisis management applications.  

 

Fiammetta Diani, Head of EUSPA Market Development, acquainting President Charles Michel, with the features of H2020 funded GEAR project which leverages Galileo’s accurate signals. 

‘’Aside from our commitment to fostering the creation of solutions that make our planet greener, we also focus on innovation and technological progress with the help of our safe and secure Space Programme literally across all markets’’ said EUSPA Executive director Rodrigo da Costa’’. We offer the means to industry and academia, start-ups and SMEs to digitize their operations by relying on space services and data that are secure and accurate’’ da Costa concluded.

The security of safety-critical applications such as landing and navigating a plane,drones delivering medical equipment or ships transporting inflammable cargo trustworthy navigation data is crucial. Among others, EUSPA is currently testing the Galileo Open Service Navigation Message Authentication. A major differentiator for Europe’s positioning system, this service aims to meet a clear user need for a more robust and trustworthy GNSS solution that will bring benefit to a broad range of applications.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa greets European Council President, Charles Michel.

President of the European Council, Charles Michel, visits EUSPA Prague Headquarters

13.1.2022 17:08  
EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa greets European Council President, Charles Michel.
Published: 
13 January 2022

Topics discussed between EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa and the President of the European Council included the new mandate of the agency and its role in the delivery of EU priorities such as the EU Green Deal and the digitization and growth of the European economy.

During his stay in Prague, President Michel met with EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa, to discuss the Agency’s new role one year after the entry into force of the EU Space Regulation, together with Matthias Petschke, Director of Space at the European Commission and Bruno Vermeire, Chairperson of the EU Space Security Accreditation Board. EUSPA has now extended responsibilities when it comes to the management, service provision, evolution, and protection of the EU’s flagship navigation systems, Galileo and EGNOS, and the development of the GOVSATCOM Hub, while being in charge of the promotion of services and data from the EU Space Programme – now extended also to the further utilization of Copernicus and GOVSATCOM user aspects. As a gatekeeper of space security, the agency’s Security Accreditation Board has the mandate to accredit all components of the EU Space Programme. 

“I am thrilled to see the scope of EUSPA ‘s missions because the EUS Space action is crucial. Indeed, strategic autonomy is essential for the EU, so is the innovation capacity coming from space inspired which is helping for our European priorities. A few years ago, we set the objective of a climate-neutral EU by 2050, which is the driving force of the Green Deal. And I believe that innovation and technology fostered by the EU Space Programme technology are essential to reach our European objectives including mitigating climate change,” declared President Charles MICHEL.

In line with the EU Green Deal, EUSPA supports the creation of solutions that mitigate the adverse effects of climate change and our environmental footprint on a wide range of areas, such as transport and agriculture. Synergies between Earth observation and navigation are central to the preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation of natural disasters. In the unfortunate event of wildfires, floods, or earthquakes access to a precise location and up-to-date geospatial information is vital to deliver an effective disaster management response. EUSPA recently launched a Horizon Europe call to develop space-based safety and crisis management applications.  

 

Fiammetta Diani, Head of EUSPA Market Development, acquainting President Charles Michel, with the features of Fundamental Elements funded GEAR project which leverages Galileo’s accurate signals. 

‘’Aside from our commitment to fostering the creation of solutions that make our planet greener, we also focus on innovation and technological progress with the help of our safe and secure Space Programme literally across all markets’’ said EUSPA Executive director Rodrigo da Costa’’. We offer the means to industry and academia, start-ups and SMEs to digitize their operations by relying on space services and data that are secure and accurate’’ da Costa concluded.

The security of safety-critical applications such as landing and navigating a plane,drones delivering medical equipment or ships transporting inflammable cargo trustworthy navigation data is crucial. Among others, EUSPA is currently testing the Galileo Open Service Navigation Message Authentication. A major differentiator for Europe’s positioning system, this service aims to meet a clear user need for a more robust and trustworthy GNSS solution that will bring benefit to a broad range of applications.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa greets European Council President, Charles Michel.

French EU Presidency can rely on #EUSpace to support its priorities

7.1.2022 11:36  
The EU Space Programme is pivotal for the development of a renewed European model of growth.
Published: 
07 January 2022

Since 1st January 2022, France holds the reins of the EU Council Presidency. The priorities for the French Presidency involve the EU space activities, underlining the need for a more sovereign and humane Europe, with sustainable economic growth and job opportunities. 

After six months at the helm of the EU, Slovenia passed on the baton of the EU Council Presidency to France, which will preside until June 30th. France begins a new cycle and will work as a trio with the Czech Republic in the second half of 2022 and Sweden in the first half of 2023. During his opening speech at the Palais de l’Elysée on December 9th, 2021, President Macron presented the three axes around which the French Presidency will be spinning for the following six months : European sovereignty, a new European model of growth, and a more human Europe.

The French President outlined the pillars that will support the priorities, and new technologies such as the space technologies are central to their delivery.

EU Space equals sovereignty  

With the launch of the first Galileo satellite in 2011, Europe demonstrated its technological autonomy, but also redefined the international standards for global navigation satellite systems. Galileo offers superior performance and a broad range of value-adding services. Ten years later, cognizant of the strategic importance of space, the Union created its own, fully-fledged space programme to further boost its sovereignty.

Should existing satellite navigation services be disrupted or become less reliable, Europe has its state-of-the-art positioning system to act as a backup. Galileo, currently used by over 2.5 billion users, keeps the European economy up and running but - above all- ensures the safety of its citizens.

Unique features of Galileo, such as the Public Regulated Service (PRS), scheduled for Initial Capability Operations in 2023, will give an extra layer of security to governmental authorised users and sensitive applications that require high continuity.

Satellite navigation services are further enhanced by Copernicus. Data from the Copernicus Sentinel satellites and in situ data collected from ground-based, sea-borne, or air-borne monitoring systems provide precious insights to national governments and EU policymakers on climate change, for instance. Soon, the EU will bridge gaps in satellite communications with GOVSATCOM. The objective of the GOVSATCOM initiative is to ensure the long-term availability of reliable, secured, and cost-effective satellite communication (satcom) services to its users. Paving the way towards a new satcom solution for governmental applications, the initiative will benefit a broad range of EU and national entities in their day-to-day operations, and contribute to the security and safety of all EU citizens.

EU Space for a renewed European model

Space data and services are invisible infrastructures but generate a dearth of tangible benefits to Europeans daily. The EU Space Programme is becoming the basis for the construction of a new EU model of strategic growth that…

…spurs innovation and creates jobs

Over the past years, EUSPA created a vibrant ecosystem of startups and SMEs that rely on EU space technology to add value to their operations. Most companies are now scaling up, attracting new talents across Europe. From Galileo-enabled drones that perform atmospheric analysis to robotic solutions for pest management, EUSPA has been steering EU funds and knowhow to develop space downstream applications.

…digitizes and greens the economy 

Space enables us to rethink the way we produce and consume. The combination of Earth Observation and GNSS data, for example, enables various industries such as agribusiness to operate in an eco-friendlier way. Farmers are able to allocate resources such as water or fertilizers more responsibly thanks to the accurate guidance offered by Galileo and EGNOS and the information on soil fertility from Copernicus. Thanks to the cooperation between the EU Space assets, it is estimated that EU farmers can save up to 20% of pesticides and fertilisers.  

Satellite-based remote sensing from Copernicus is a cost-effective solution that keeps an eye on clean energy infrastructures, offering precious information on their integrity and targeted maintenance. Geospatial data by the EU Earth Observation system are used to enable better planning of these assets by offering greater situational awareness and helping mitigate risks such as vegetation encroachment on power grids and turbines. Moreover, Copernicus can optimize the performance of tidal power generators, by offering data on the rise and fall of tides through tidal currents prediction systems.

…promotes collaboration between the Member States 

A revisited EU model of growth requires robust synergies between various industrial and institutional actors but, above all EU Member States. To harness the power of our space assets knowledge-sharing is pivotal, EUSPA and the European Commission have put in place various initiatives such as Horizon Europe and Fundamental Elements to boost collaboration between EU countries. 

As of now, over 400 events are set to take place as part of the presidency's programme. The first, space-related event is scheduled on February 16 -17, 2022 in Toulouse and EUSPA will be present.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The EU Space Programme is pivotal for the development of a renewed European model of growth.

French EU Presidency can rely on #EUSpace to support its priorities

7.1.2022 11:36  
The EU Space Programme is pivotal for the development of a renewed European model of growth.
Published: 
07 January 2022

Since 1st January 2022, France holds the reins of the EU Council Presidency. The priorities for the French Presidency involve the EU space activities, underlining the need for a more sovereign and humane Europe, with sustainable economic growth and job opportunities. 

After six months at the helm of the EU, Slovenia passed on the baton of the EU Council Presidency to France, which will preside until June 30th. France begins a new cycle and will work as a trio with the Czech Republic in the second half of 2022 and Sweden in the first half of 2023. During his opening speech at the Palais de l’Elysée on December 9th, 2021, President Macron presented the three axes around which the French Presidency will be spinning for the following six months : European sovereignty, a new European model of growth, and a more human Europe.

The French President outlined the pillars that will support the priorities, and new technologies such as EU space data and services are central to their delivery.

EU Space equals sovereignty  

With the launch of the first Galileo satellite in 2011, Europe demonstrated its technological autonomy, but also redefined the international standards for global navigation satellite systems. Galileo offers superior performance and a broad range of value-adding services. Ten years later, cognizant of the strategic importance of space, the Union created its own, fully-fledged space programme to further boost its sovereignty.

Should existing satellite navigation services be disrupted or become less reliable, Europe has its state-of-the-art positioning system to act as a backup. Galileo, currently used by over 2.5 billion users, keeps the European economy up and running but - above all- ensures the safety of its citizens.

Unique features of Galileo, such as the Public Regulated Service (PRS), scheduled for Initial Capability Operations in 2023, will give an extra layer of security to governmental authorised users and sensitive applications that require high continuity.

Satellite navigation services are further enhanced by Copernicus. Data from the Copernicus Sentinel satellites and in situ data collected from ground-based, sea-borne, or air-borne monitoring systems provide precious insights to national governments and EU policymakers on climate change, for instance. Soon, the EU will bridge gaps in satellite communications with GOVSATCOM. The objective of the GOVSATCOM initiative is to ensure the long-term availability of reliable, secured, and cost-effective satellite communication (satcom) services to its users. Paving the way towards a new satcom solution for governmental applications, the initiative will benefit a broad range of EU and national entities in their day-to-day operations, and contribute to the security and safety of all EU citizens.

EU Space for a renewed European model

Space data and services are invisible infrastructures but generate a dearth of tangible benefits to Europeans daily. The EU Space Programme is becoming the basis for the construction of a new EU model of strategic growth that…

…spurs innovation and creates jobs

Over the past years, EUSPA created a vibrant ecosystem of startups and SMEs that rely on EU space technology to add value to their operations. Most companies are now scaling up, attracting new talents across Europe. From Galileo-enabled drones that perform atmospheric analysis to robotic solutions for pest management, EUSPA has been steering EU funds and knowhow to develop space downstream applications.

…digitizes and greens the economy 

Space enables us to rethink the way we produce and consume. The combination of Earth Observation and GNSS data, for example, enables various industries such as agribusiness to operate in an eco-friendlier way. Farmers are able to allocate resources such as water or fertilizers more responsibly thanks to the accurate guidance offered by Galileo and EGNOS and the information on soil fertility from Copernicus. Thanks to the cooperation between the EU Space assets, it is estimated that EU farmers can save up to 20% of pesticides and fertilisers.  

Satellite-based remote sensing from Copernicus is a cost-effective solution that keeps an eye on clean energy infrastructures, offering precious information on their integrity and targeted maintenance. Geospatial data by the EU Earth Observation system are used to enable better planning of these assets by offering greater situational awareness and helping mitigate risks such as vegetation encroachment on power grids and turbines. Moreover, Copernicus can optimize the performance of tidal power generators, by offering data on the rise and fall of tides through tidal currents prediction systems.

…promotes collaboration between the Member States 

A revisited EU model of growth requires robust synergies between various industrial and institutional actors but, above all EU Member States. To harness the power of our space assets knowledge-sharing is pivotal. EUSPA and the European Commission have put in place various initiatives such as Horizon Europe and Fundamental Elements to boost collaboration between EU countries. 

As of now, over 400 events are set to take place as part of the presidency's programme. The first, space-related event is scheduled on February 16 -17, 2022 in Toulouse and EUSPA will be present.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The EU Space Programme is pivotal for the development of a renewed European model of growth.

2021: A year of transformation for #EUSpace

21.12.2021 16:27  
Wishing a prosperous 2022 to all our EU Space users!

2021 was undeniably a year of change for the European Union in space. The Union now has at its disposal a policy framework that brings under the same roof all the space assets. EU citizens have a user-oriented operational agency that delivers secure, space-based services to citizens, governments, and businesses alike: the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA).

The entry into force of the Space Regulation brought many structural changes to EU Space Programme and led to the creation of EUSPA. The signature of the Financial Framework Partnership Agreement in June 2022 set out clear tasks and responsibilities between the European Commission, EUSPA, and the European Space Agency (ESA) but also reaffirmed the EU’s position as a leading space power.

Building on the know-how and GNSS expertise of its predecessor, EUSPA was entrusted with more responsibilities for EGNOS and Galileo, in terms of operations and service provision. The agency now acts as exploitation manager and System Prime for both satellite navigation systems in operation. It also acts as the gatekeeper of security for all Space Components. The mandate extension now includes the coordination of GOVSATCOM’s users and the development of the Hub, an important step into securing governmental communications. This comes along with Copernicus market uptake for commercial users. In short, EUSPA had its hands full throughout 2021.

New services bring new users

Throughout its transformation from the European GNSS Agency (GSA) to EUSPA, the Agency remained true to its mission: linking space to user needs. Anticipating the demand for secured services in markets such as Critical Infrastructure, EUSPA announced the testing phase of the Galileo Navigation Message Authentication (OSNMA). It is an authentication mechanism that allows Open Service users to verify the authenticity of GNSS information, making sure that the data they receive is indeed from Galileo and has not been modified in any way. 

A few months later, in collaboration with the European Commission, the Galileo High Accuracy Service (HAS) Info Note was made available to users. This service can benefit various applications that require higher performance than that offered by the Galileo Open Service such as autonomous vehicles.

EU Space services continued penetrating more sectors also thanks to EGNOS. In aviation, over 400 airports rely on Europe’s SBAS for safer approaches, and the trend is on the rise. Likewise, after having European farmers use EGNOS widely, now, steps towards the adoption of EGNOS are made also in the maritime and rail sectors.

Gatekeeping security 

Given the complexity and importance for the European Union of both the space and the ground segment, securing the EU Space Programme components is crucial. With more than 2,4 billion Galileo devices worldwide, one of EUSPA’s key tasks is to protect the system, enabling it to achieve its full potential to boost innovation for the European economy and its citizens. The security governance in place guarantees that the system, ground, and space segments are protected against such threats. 

The mandate of the Agency’s Security Accreditation Board covers all the programme components, such as Galileo, EGNOS, Copernicus, and GOVSATCOM. For Galileo specifically, the Galileo Security Monitoring Centre is an integral part of the EU’s positioning system. It monitors and acts in relation to security threats, alerts, and the operational status of systems components. 

At the beginning of 2021, we were also reminded that increasing traffic and space debris are a risk to our valuable space assets. In March 2021, EUSPA, staying true to its mission to provide safe and secure satellite services, in collaboration with the European Commission and the Galileo operator, performed a collision avoidance manoeuvre to eliminate the risk of collision with an old launcher part. The action was performed successfully, and the satellite returned to service provision.

With secure satellite communication bring a trending topic among governmental users, the Agency ramped up its preparatory activities and completed the coordination of the public consultation for the collection of GOVSATCOM user requirements and use cases with more than 150 participants. The team in charge also prepared the Hubs documentation and launched the related procurement.  Related to that, EUSPA also supported the European Commission in other security activities, such as the preparations of the Secure Connectivity Initiative.

Boosting innovation and entrepreneurship

The last quarter of 2021 was the busiest for most of our EUSPA teams. To ensure the adoption of the EU Space Programme and to attract space entrepreneurial spirit, in 2022, we introduced the #myEUSpace competition – as part of the CASSINI Programme targeting mainly SME´s and start-ups. We challenged participants to develop space applications by fusing GNSS and Earth Observation data with new technologies such as AI, IoT, and, for the first time, quantum technologies. The contest followed the announcement of a 36.2 million euros Horizon Europe call to transform the digital economy, increase the Union’s resilience and support the Green Deal. The calls are designed in a way to include Copernicus and its market uptake in line with the Space Regulation. This comes along with the well-established innovation schemes “Fundamental Elements” for innovation at receiver and device-level. 

More launches planned for 2022 only to keep you on your toes!

Before waving goodbye to 2021, on December 5th, 2021, two more Galileo satellites lifted off from Kourou, French Guyana, increasing the number of Galileo satellites in space to 28. The satellites -now under EUSPA management- are being calibrated and tested before entering service provision in mid-2022. 

“As we are only a few days away from 2022, we can already start looking forward to the next Galileo launch, slated for the beginning of spring. I would like to thank my team at EUSPA for the extraordinary commitment they showcased during this new chapter for our Agency, our counterparts at the European Commission and ESA, and industry but above all you: our users. Thanks to your support and your inputs that help us deliver services tailored to your needs,” said EUSPA Director Rodrigo da Costa.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).
Wishing a prosperous 2022 to all our EU Space users!

2021: A year of transformation for #EUSpace

21.12.2021 16:27  
Wishing a prosperous 2022 to all our EU Space users!
Published: 
21 December 2021

2021 was undeniably a year of change for the European Union in space. The Union now has at its disposal a policy framework that brings under the same roof all the space assets. EU citizens have a user-oriented operational agency that delivers secure, space-based services to citizens, governments, and businesses alike: the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA).

The entry into force of the Space Regulation brought many structural changes to EU Space Programme and led to the creation of EUSPA. The signature of the Financial Framework Partnership Agreement in June 2022 set out clear tasks and responsibilities between the European Commission, EUSPA, and the European Space Agency (ESA) but also reaffirmed the EU’s position as a leading space power.

Building on the know-how and GNSS expertise of its predecessor, EUSPA was entrusted with more responsibilities for EGNOS and Galileo, in terms of operations and service provision. The agency now acts as exploitation manager and System Prime for both satellite navigation systems in operation. It also acts as the gatekeeper of security for all Space Components. The mandate extension now includes the coordination of GOVSATCOM’s users and the development of the Hub, an important step into securing governmental communications. This comes along with Copernicus market uptake for commercial users. In short, EUSPA had its hands full throughout 2021.

New services bring new users

Throughout its transformation from the European GNSS Agency (GSA) to EUSPA, the Agency remained true to its mission: linking space to user needs. Anticipating the demand for secured services in markets such as Critical Infrastructure, EUSPA announced the testing phase of the Galileo Navigation Message Authentication (OSNMA). It is an authentication mechanism that allows Open Service users to verify the authenticity of GNSS information, making sure that the data they receive is indeed from Galileo and has not been modified in any way. 

A few months later, in collaboration with the European Commission, the Galileo High Accuracy Service (HAS) Info Note was made available to users. This service can benefit various applications that require higher performance than that offered by the Galileo Open Service such as autonomous vehicles.

EU Space services continued penetrating more sectors also thanks to EGNOS. In aviation, over 400 airports rely on Europe’s SBAS for safer approaches, and the trend is on the rise. Likewise, after having European farmers use EGNOS widely, now, steps towards the adoption of EGNOS are made also in the maritime and rail sectors.

Gatekeeping security 

Given the complexity and importance for the European Union of both the space and the ground segment, securing the EU Space Programme components is crucial. With more than 2,4 billion Galileo devices worldwide, one of EUSPA’s key tasks is to protect the system, enabling it to achieve its full potential to boost innovation for the European economy and its citizens. The security governance in place guarantees that the system, ground, and space segments are protected against such threats. 

The mandate of the Agency’s Security Accreditation Board covers all the programme components, such as Galileo, EGNOS, Copernicus, and GOVSATCOM. For Galileo specifically, the Galileo Security Monitoring Centre is an integral part of the EU’s positioning system. It monitors and acts in relation to security threats, alerts, and the operational status of systems components. 

At the beginning of 2021, we were also reminded that increasing traffic and space debris are a risk to our valuable space assets. In March 2021, EUSPA, staying true to its mission to provide safe and secure satellite services, in collaboration with the European Commission and the Galileo operator, performed a collision avoidance manoeuvre to eliminate the risk of collision with an old launcher part. The action was performed successfully, and the satellite returned to service provision.

With secure satellite communication bring a trending topic among governmental users, the Agency ramped up its preparatory activities and completed the coordination of the public consultation for the collection of GOVSATCOM user requirements and use cases with more than 150 participants. The team in charge also prepared the Hubs documentation and launched the related procurement.  Related to that, EUSPA also supported the European Commission in other security activities, such as the preparations of the Secure Connectivity Initiative.

Boosting innovation and entrepreneurship

The last quarter of 2021 was the busiest for most of our EUSPA teams. To ensure the adoption of the EU Space Programme and to attract space entrepreneurial spirit, in 2022, we introduced the #myEUSpace competition – as part of the CASSINI Programme targeting mainly SME´s and start-ups. We challenged participants to develop space applications by fusing GNSS and Earth Observation data with new technologies such as AI, IoT, and, for the first time, quantum technologies. The contest followed the announcement of a 36.2 million euros Horizon Europe call to transform the digital economy, increase the Union’s resilience and support the Green Deal. The calls are designed in a way to include Copernicus and its market uptake in line with the Space Regulation. This comes along with the well-established innovation schemes “Fundamental Elements” for innovation at receiver and device-level. 

More launches planned for 2022 only to keep you on your toes!

Before waving goodbye to 2021, on December 5th, 2021, two more Galileo satellites lifted off from Kourou, French Guyana, increasing the number of Galileo satellites in space to 28. The satellites -now under EUSPA management- are being calibrated and tested before entering service provision in mid-2022. 

“As we are only a few days away from 2022, we can already start looking forward to the next Galileo launch, slated for the beginning of spring. I would like to thank my team at EUSPA for the extraordinary commitment they showcased during this new chapter for our Agency, our counterparts at the European Commission and ESA, and industry but above all you: our users. Thanks to your support and your inputs that help us deliver services tailored to your needs,” said EUSPA Director Rodrigo da Costa.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).
Wishing a prosperous 2022 to all our EU Space users!

2021: A year of transformation for #EUSpace

21.12.2021 16:27  
Wishing a prosperous 2022 to all our EU Space users!
Published: 
21 December 2021

2021 was undeniably a year of change for the European Union in space. The Union now has at its disposal a policy framework that brings under the same roof all the space assets. EU citizens have a user-oriented operational agency that delivers secure, space-based services to citizens, governments, and businesses alike: the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA).

The entry into force of the Space Regulation brought many structural changes to EU Space Programme and led to the creation of EUSPA. The signature of the Financial Framework Partnership Agreement in June 2022 set out clear tasks and responsibilities between the European Commission, EUSPA, and the European Space Agency (ESA) but also reaffirmed the EU’s position as a leading space power.

Building on the know-how and GNSS expertise of its predecessor, EUSPA was entrusted with more responsibilities for EGNOS and Galileo, in terms of operations and service provision. The agency now acts as exploitation manager and System Prime for both satellite navigation systems in operation. It also acts as the gatekeeper of security for all Space Components. The mandate extension now includes the coordination of GOVSATCOM’s users and the development of the Hub, an important step into securing governmental communications. This comes along with Copernicus market uptake for commercial users. In short, EUSPA had its hands full throughout 2021.

New services bring new users

Throughout its transformation from the European GNSS Agency (GSA) to EUSPA, the Agency remained true to its mission: linking space to user needs. Anticipating the demand for secured services in markets such as Critical Infrastructure, EUSPA announced the testing phase of the Galileo Navigation Message Authentication (OSNMA). It is an authentication mechanism that allows Open Service users to verify the authenticity of GNSS information, making sure that the data they receive is indeed from Galileo and has not been modified in any way. 

A few months later, in collaboration with the European Commission, the Galileo High Accuracy Service (HAS) Info Note was made available to users. This service can benefit various applications that require higher performance than that offered by the Galileo Open Service such as autonomous vehicles.

EU Space services continued penetrating more sectors also thanks to EGNOS. In aviation, over 400 airports rely on Europe’s SBAS for safer approaches, and the trend is on the rise. Likewise, after having European farmers use EGNOS widely, now, steps towards the adoption of EGNOS are made also in the maritime and rail sectors.

Gatekeeping security 

Given the complexity and importance for the European Union of both the space and the ground segment, securing the EU Space Programme components is crucial. With more than 2,4 billion Galileo devices worldwide, one of EUSPA’s key tasks is to protect the system, enabling it to achieve its full potential to boost innovation for the European economy and its citizens. The security governance in place guarantees that the system, ground, and space segments are protected against such threats. 

The mandate of the Agency’s Security Accreditation Board covers all the programme components, such as Galileo, EGNOS, Copernicus, and GOVSATCOM. For Galileo specifically, the Galileo Security Monitoring Centre is an integral part of the EU’s positioning system. It monitors and acts in relation to security threats, alerts, and the operational status of systems components. 

At the beginning of 2021, we were also reminded that increasing traffic and space debris are a risk to our valuable space assets. In March 2021, EUSPA, staying true to its mission to provide safe and secure satellite services, in collaboration with the European Commission and the Galileo operator, performed a collision avoidance manoeuvre to eliminate the risk of collision with an old launcher part. The action was performed successfully, and the satellite returned to service provision.

With secure satellite communication being a trending topic among governmental users, the Agency ramped up its preparatory activities and completed the coordination of the public consultation for the collection of GOVSATCOM user requirements and use cases with more than 150 participants. The team in charge also prepared the Hubs documentation and launched the related procurement.  Related to that, EUSPA also supported the European Commission in other security activities, such as the preparations of the Secure Connectivity Initiative.

Boosting innovation and entrepreneurship

The last quarter of 2021 was the busiest for most of our EUSPA teams. To ensure the adoption of the EU Space Programme and to attract space entrepreneurial spirit, in 2022, we introduced the #myEUSpace competition – as part of the CASSINI Programme targeting mainly SME´s and start-ups. We challenged participants to develop space applications by fusing GNSS and Earth Observation data with new technologies such as AI, IoT, and, for the first time, quantum technologies. The contest followed the announcement of a 32.6 million euros Horizon Europe call to transform the digital economy, increase the Union’s resilience and support the Green Deal. The calls are designed in a way to include Copernicus and its market uptake in line with the Space Regulation. This comes along with the well-established innovation schemes “Fundamental Elements” for innovation at receiver and device-level. 

More launches planned for 2022 only to keep you on your toes!

Before waving goodbye to 2021, on December 5th, 2021, two more Galileo satellites lifted off from Kourou, French Guyana, increasing the number of Galileo satellites in space to 28. The satellites -now under EUSPA management- are being calibrated and tested before entering service provision in mid-2022. 

“As we are only a few days away from 2022, we can already start looking forward to the next Galileo launch, slated for the beginning of spring. I would like to thank my team at EUSPA for the extraordinary commitment they showcased during this new chapter for our Agency, our counterparts at the European Commission and ESA, and industry but above all you: our users. Thanks to your support and your inputs that help us deliver services tailored to your needs,” said EUSPA Director Rodrigo da Costa.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).
Wishing a prosperous 2022 to all our EU Space users!

Galileo Open Service Definition Document version 1.2 now available for download

15.12.2021 16:12  
Published: 
16 December 2021

The "Galileo - Open Service - Service Definition Document" (Galileo OS SDD) defines the Minimum Performance Levels (MPLs) of the Galileo Open Service (OS). Find out what billions of users of Galileo can expect. 

The European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) together with the European Commission announce the publication of the latest version of the Galileo Open Service Definition Document (OS SDD). The Galileo Open Service Definition Document (OS SDD) was updated on November 2021 to reflect upgrades in the Galileo system since the publication of the previous version in May 2019. The latest version, 1.2, can be found on the GSC web portal on this link

The SDD has been updated to include improvements of the Open Service, accounting for the current constellation and updates in the ground infrastructure that increase its robustness. This is the last update foreseen before Galileo Open Service reaches Full Operational Capability (FOC).

The updated SDD provides better Minimum Performance Levels (MPLs) for signal and position availability, updated definitions of some timing MPLs, and establishes a more stringent commitment on the time to publish Notice Advisories to Galileo Users (NAGUs). In addition, the concept of auxiliary satellites has been added, while some sections have been reworded to improve clarity.

Galileo Open Service Definition Document (OS SDD) at glance 

As in previous versions, the main information in the SDD includes:

  • Service terms and conditions of use.
  • Service characteristics (scope, general concepts, assumptions, reference systems).
  • Service performance (Minimum Performance Levels and their associated conditions and constraints).
  • Annexes (providing further details on the parameters, expected performance evolutions, additional metrics and the description of NAGUs).

Users are invited to download and read the updated “Galileo Open Service Definition Document (SDD)” to discover the improvements of the Open Service and learn about its main characteristics and performance. For more details on Galileo performance and its services, please contact the Galileo Help Desk. Moreover, to receive NAGUs and notifications of new Galileo publications, please register to the GSC web portal and subscribe to our newsletters.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

5 Years of Galileo Services

15.12.2021 13:09  
As of today, more than 2.4 billion Galileo-enabled smartphones are sold worldwide.
Published: 
15 December 2021

On December 15th 2016 the Galileo Services were declared operational, marking a cornerstone in the field of satellite navigation for European citizens and worldwide. Since then, the EU Agency for the Space Programme has endeavored to increase the robustness of the system and services, enhance market adoption and offer new services to its users.

From the declaration of services, users worldwide from several domains have been reaping the benefits offered by European Union Galileo Programme. To celebrate its 5th anniversary, we want to share some Galileo milestones! 

1. Galileo Open Service performances rank 1 among all GNSS service providers worldwide

The Galileo state of the art Open Service (OS) is providing free of charge outstanding seamless performance to users worldwide, in terms of ranging, positioning and timing. The Open Service performance ranks first among all GNSS service providers. The improvement of the service remains a priority, with a stronger commitment to liaise with users with the publication of Notice Advisories to Galileo Users (NAGUs), with updates of the ground infrastructure and the current constellation. A new version of the Galileo Open Service Definition Document (OS SDD) will be published soon through the GSC web portal with better Minimum Performance Levels (MPLs) for signal and position availability. Stay Connected to read the new version!

2. SAR/Galileo service and rescue mission

Galileo supports the international Search And Rescue (SAR) satellite services. It is transmitting distress signals from SAR beacons,  operating to COSPAS-SARSAT standards,  and relaying through the Galileo specific Return-Link Service (RLS) the responses to those beacons equipped with Galileo receivers. The Return-Link Service unique and pioneering feature of Galileo was declared operational in January 2020.  The Galileo RLS allows people in distress to receive an automatic acknowledgement that their signal has been picked up by the first responders. Galileo’s contribution to the Medium Earth Orbit Satellites Search and Rescue System (MEOSAR) managed by the International COSPAS-SARSAT Programme translates into 2000 lives saved per year. For example, in November 2020, this SAR/Galileo “lifesaver” service provided in less than 3 minutes key information leading to the successful rescue of a sailor in distress during the Vendee Globe Yacht race.

3. New Galileo service differentiator: High Accuracy Service (HAS)

The first-ever broadcast of High Accuracy Service test signal occurred on 19 May 2021 thanks to Galileo. This service will provide high accuracy data, enabling sub-meter level positioning accuracy. The initial performances are promising. Galileo is dressing the scene for the year to come. 

4. Galileo getting in our daily lives and professional applications

Galileo is not only satellites and services: since 2016, Galileo entered quickly in our daily lives, in our cars, smartphones, drones and is enhancing many professional domains, such as maritime navigation, agriculture and geomatics.  EUSPA’s market and user-driven approach has led to this success, developing innovative applications and receivers involving the growing GNSS downstream industry and SMEs, consulting with users, and launching innovation challenges for new space entrepreneurs.  

As of today, more than 2.4 billion Galileo-enabled smartphones are sold worldwide. It is a stunning number considering that the first Galileo-enabled smartphone only hit the market in 2016. Since April 2018, all new car models in the European Union are equipped with eCall technology that includes Galileo. In the event of a serious accident, eCall automatically dials 112 - Europe's single emergency number – providing the accurate position of the crashed vehicle to help the first responders reach the site faster.

What is next for Galileo?

The Galileo system robustness is being continuously improved to ensure seamless, safe and secured service delivery 24/7 to users worldwide.

The Public Regulated Service (PRS) of Galileo is expected to reach Initial Operational Capability by the end of 2023.

EUSPA is currently working on delivering next-generation services based on Galileo’s precise signals, timing capabilities, and robust performance. 

Visit the GNSS Service Centre website www.gsc-europa.eu for all details on Galileo service performance

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

As of today, more than 2.4 billion Galileo-enabled smartphones are sold worldwide.

5 Years of Galileo Services

15.12.2021 13:09  
As of today, more than 2.4 billion Galileo-enabled smartphones are sold worldwide.
Published: 
15 December 2021

On December 15th 2016 the Galileo Services were declared operational, marking a cornerstone in the field of satellite navigation for European citizens and worldwide. Since then, the EU Agency for the Space Programme has endeavored to increase the robustness of the system and services, enhance market adoption and offer new services to its users.

From the declaration of services, users worldwide from several domains have been reaping the benefits offered by European Union Galileo Programme. To celebrate its 5th anniversary, we want to share some Galileo milestones! 

1. Galileo Open Service performances rank 1 among all GNSS service providers worldwide

The Galileo state of the art Open Service (OS) is providing free of charge outstanding seamless performance to users worldwide, in terms of ranging, positioning and timing. The Open Service performance ranks first among all GNSS service providers. The improvement of the service remains a priority, with a stronger commitment to liaise with users with the publication of Notice Advisories to Galileo Users (NAGUs), with updates of the ground infrastructure and the current constellation. A new version of the Galileo Open Service Definition Document (OS SDD) will be published soon through the GSC web portal with better Minimum Performance Levels (MPLs) for signal and position availability. Stay Connected to read the new version!

2. SAR/Galileo service and rescue mission

Galileo supports the international Search And Rescue (SAR) satellite services. It is transmitting distress signals from SAR beacons,  operating to COSPAS-SARSAT standards,  and relaying through the Galileo specific Return-Link Service (RLS) the responses to those beacons equipped with Galileo receivers. The Return-Link Service unique and pioneering feature of Galileo was declared operational in January 2020.  The Galileo RLS allows people in distress to receive an automatic acknowledgement that their signal has been picked up by the first responders. Galileo’s contribution to the Medium Earth Orbit Satellites Search and Rescue System (MEOSAR) managed by the International COSPAS-SARSAT Programme translates into 2000 lives saved per year. For example, in November 2020, this SAR/Galileo “lifesaver” service provided in less than 3 minutes key information leading to the successful rescue of a sailor in distress during the Vendee Globe Yacht race.

3. New Galileo service differentiator: High Accuracy Service (HAS)

The first-ever broadcast of High Accuracy Service test signal occurred on 19 May 2021 thanks to Galileo. This service will provide high accuracy data, enabling sub-meter level positioning accuracy. The initial performances are promising. Galileo is dressing the scene for the year to come. 

4. Galileo getting in our daily lives and professional applications

Galileo is not only satellites and services: since 2016, Galileo entered quickly in our daily lives, in our cars, smartphones, drones and is enhancing many professional domains, such as maritime navigation, agriculture and geomatics.  EUSPA’s market and user-driven approach has led to this success, developing innovative applications and receivers involving the growing GNSS downstream industry and SMEs, consulting with users, and launching innovation challenges for new space entrepreneurs.  

As of today, more than 2.4 billion Galileo-enabled smartphones are sold worldwide. It is a stunning number considering that the first Galileo-enabled smartphone only hit the market in 2016. Since April 2018, all new car models in the European Union are equipped with eCall technology that includes Galileo. In the event of a serious accident, eCall automatically dials 112 - Europe's single emergency number – providing the accurate position of the crashed vehicle to help the first responders reach the site faster.

What is next for Galileo?

The Galileo system robustness is being continuously improved to ensure seamless, safe and secured service delivery 24/7 to users worldwide.

The Public Regulated Service (PRS) of Galileo is expected to reach Initial Operational Capability by the end of 2023.

EUSPA is currently working on delivering next-generation services based on Galileo’s precise signals, timing capabilities, and robust performance. 

Visit the GNSS Service Centre website www.gsc-europa.eu for all details on Galileo service performance

Undertaken by a European partnership, the European Commission manages Galileo, with EUSPA overseeing Galileo operations and service provision and ESA as the design authority overseeing its development, procuring satellites, and the ground segment.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

As of today, more than 2.4 billion Galileo-enabled smartphones are sold worldwide.

EU space initiative to open up new opportunities for General Aviation across the Union

14.12.2021 11:53  
Small EU aerodromes and airfields used for recreational aviation can rely on EGNOS to become safer and more accessible
Published: 
14 December 2021

EUSPA launched a new initiative called "EUSPA Network of pilot projects" to facilitate the implementation of EGNOS-based procedures to non-instrument runways for general aviation and validate the safety assessment guidelines, published earlier in November.

Since its certification for use in civil aviation in 2011, EGNOS has become an important aid in the European aviation sector, increasing both the safety and accessibility of airports. Thanks to the accurate guidance offered by the system, pilots can easily land under challenging weather conditions such as poor visibility and avoid aborted landings (go-arounds). 

From an airport perspective, EGNOS LPV approaches allow for instrument landings at lower costs as there is no need to install ground navigation aids. Satellite-based approaches by EGNOS are precise, stable, offer smoother glide paths and very high levels of availability.

As of today, more than 400 airports -mostly medium or large- in Europe rely on EGNOS-based approaches. General Aviation aerodromes usually rely on only VFR operations and have limited ground infrastructure. Even though the General Aviation (GA) community undertakes millions of flights on aircraft equipped with GNSS-receivers, it is not taking full advantage of the technology.

EUSPA worked together with the European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) and other general aviation stakeholders on the strategy and other materials to support the implementation of EGNOS for general aviation to increase instrument approaches with EGNOS at non-instrument aerodromes. In December 2019, the safety promotion material for the implementation of EGNOS based procedures to general aviation was published followed by the safety assessment guidance material focusing on safety assessment development. One of the biggest challenges of the implementation of EGNOS-based approaches to non-instrument runways for general aviation is the safety assessment.  EUSPA launched a new initiative called "EUSPA Network of pilot projects" to facilitate the implementation of EGNOS-based procedures to non-instrument runways for general aviation and validate the safety assessment guidelines.

 

Click here to read all you need to know about the "EUSPA Network of pilot projects"


Why invest in EGNOS?

Implementing EGNOS-based LPV procedures across European General Aviation airports brings numerous opportunities, from increasing flight traffic and boosting the economy of local communities to benefitting flight schools.  SBAS approaches can help smaller airports create more connections for General and Business Aviation flights, while GA and BA pilots can rely on their instruments to land even under poor weather conditions such as decreased visibility.

About EGNOS

The European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service, or EGNOS in short, is European Union regional satellite-based augmentation system (SBAS). SBASs are used to correct the performance of global navigation satellite systems, such as GPS. To do so, EGNOS uses a set of geostationary satellites and a network of ground stations to increase the accuracy of GPS. In the next 3 years, a new, more powerful system called "EGNOS V3" will become available and the user experience will be maximised through the strengthening of Galileo’s signal in addition to GPS’s.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Small EU aerodromes and airfields used for recreational aviation can rely on EGNOS to become safer and more accessible

EGNOS market share to accelerate across rail, maritime and aviation domains

13.12.2021 13:54  
Agriculture, rail, and maritime at the heart of EGNOS service provision
Published: 
13 December 2021

The 10th edition of the EGNOS Workshop brought together nearly 500 users of the European Satellite-Based augmentation service (SBAS), EGNOS, to appreciate how they are taking the best out of this component of the EU Space Programme.

The EGNOS Workshop is an opportunity to connect with Europe’s SBAS users, catch up on the GNSS latest developments, share success stories, and exchange views. Entrepreneurs, SMEs, space industry experts, and institutional stakeholders from a broad range of industries comprising aviation, maritime, rail, and agriculture joined us for this year’s online version.

The workshop gathered high-level speakers and users of EGNOS. EUSPA Head of Market Development, Fiammetta Diani, presented new market uptake strategies that will increase the EGNOS user base. Market segments with great EGNOS potential include autonomous vehicles, drones, and aviation with AFIS (Aerodrome Flight Information Service).

EGNOS to become a standard in aviation by 2024

2021 marked the 10th anniversary of the EGNOS Safety of Life service. The service was declared operational in March 2011, enabling approaches down to LPV (Localiser Performance with Vertical guidance) minima at airports across Europe. As of today, there are 798 EGNOS mapped procedures at 422 airports and aerodromes across the EU24 and in countries such as Switzerland, Norway, Iceland, Montenegro, and Serbia. According to EUSPA experts, in October, 62718 flights used EGNOS for landing, a number which is expected to grow even more in the years to come. A major step in enhancing the market uptake of EGNOS was the adoption of the PBN Implementing Rule by the European Commission in late 2018. By 2024, all European instrument runways should have implemented LPV approaches delivered by EGNOS. 

Various EGNOS use cases in aviation were presented. For instance, the first transcontinental flight using SBAS LPV approaches at both origin and destination airport. On September 12th, 2020, Finnair’s pilots set a flight plan from Helsinki Vantaa Airport to New York JFK to land on runway 4 with a LPV approach. The approach and landing were uneventful and carried out under optimal visual conditions. On September 13th, after a 24-hour layover at New York and using the same airbus A350, Finnair performed a cargo flight landing in Helsinki airport using EGNOS. 

Agriculture, rail, and maritime at the heart of EGNOS service provision

EGNOS has been a ‘’go-to source’’ for farmers who look to invest in precision farming, with almost 100% of new tractors in Europe incorporating its corrections. Coupled with imagery and in-situ data by Copernicus, EGNOS’s trusted precision allows for solutions such Variable-Rate Technology (VRT), a technique that automates the application of fertilizers, chemical sprays, and seeds to a given piece of land.

In the rail sector, chipset and receiver manufacturers are already developing devices and modules that combine signals from multiple constellations while integrating EGNOS corrections to ensure better signal availability. Mission studies are progressing to define a dedicated EGNSS service for rail safety-critical applications. Within non-safety critical applications, EUSPA has been instrumental in convincing stakeholders to adopt Galileo and EGNOS to achieve better performance in the area of asset tracking. A recent example of such successful EGNSS uptake in the rail sector was presented by DB Cargo representative, Sören Linse. At present, already more than 60.000 DB wagons rely on EGNSS to ensure effective asset monitoring, including geofencing alerts or improved billing processes for their transport service delivery to customers.

Watch this: #EUSpace for Rail

EGNOS's corrections Europe-wide is already making a difference in many inland waterways and ports. EUSPA is currently developing a new EGNOS service dedicated to the maritime community that will complement and serve as an alternative to the local DGNSS networks deployed along the European coasts. Additionally, in the maritime and inland waterways sector, EUSPA is supporting Members States with the upgrade of shore station equipment that enables the transmission of EGNOS corrections over IALA Radio beacons and AIS stations. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Agriculture, rail, and maritime at the heart of EGNOS service provision

EGNOS market share to accelerate across rail, maritime and aviation domains

13.12.2021 13:54  
Agriculture, rail, and maritime at the heart of EGNOS service provision
Published: 
13 December 2021

The 10th edition of the EGNOS Workshop brought together nearly 500 users of the European Satellite-Based augmentation service (SBAS), EGNOS, to appreciate how they are taking the best out of this component of the EU Space Programme.

The EGNOS Workshop is an opportunity to connect with Europe’s SBAS users, catch up on the GNSS latest developments, share success stories, and exchange views. Entrepreneurs, SMEs, space industry experts, and institutional stakeholders from a broad range of industries comprising aviation, maritime, rail, and agriculture joined us for this year’s online version.

The workshop gathered high-level speakers and users of EGNOS. EUSPA Head of Market Development, Fiammetta Diani, presented new market uptake strategies that will increase the EGNOS user base. Market segments with great EGNOS potential include autonomous vehicles, drones, and aviation with AFIS (Aerodrome Flight Information Service).

EGNOS to become a standard in aviation by 2024

2021 marked the 10th anniversary of the EGNOS Safety of Life service. The service was declared operational in March 2011, enabling approaches down to LPV (Localiser Performance with Vertical guidance) minima at airports across Europe. As of today, there are 798 EGNOS mapped procedures at 422 airports and aerodromes across the EU24 and in countries such as Switzerland, Norway, Iceland, Montenegro, and Serbia. According to EUSPA experts, in October, 62718 flights used EGNOS for landing, a number which is expected to grow even more in the years to come. A major step in enhancing the market uptake of EGNOS was the adoption of the PBN Implementing Rule by the European Commission in late 2018. By 2024, all European instrument runways should have implemented LPV approaches delivered by EGNOS. 

Various EGNOS use cases in aviation were presented. For instance, the first transcontinental flight using SBAS LPV approaches at both origin and destination airport. On September 12th, 2020, Finnair’s pilots set a flight plan from Helsinki Vantaa Airport to New York JFK to land on runway 4 with a LPV approach. The approach and landing were uneventful and carried out under optimal visual conditions. On September 13th, after a 24-hour layover at New York and using the same airbus A350, Finnair performed a cargo flight landing in Helsinki airport using EGNOS. 

Agriculture, rail, and maritime at the heart of EGNOS service provision

EGNOS has been a ‘’go-to source’’ for farmers who look to invest in precision farming, with almost 100% of new tractors in Europe incorporating its corrections. Coupled with imagery and in-situ data by Copernicus, EGNOS’s trusted precision allows for solutions such Variable-Rate Technology (VRT), a technique that automates the application of fertilizers, chemical sprays, and seeds to a given piece of land.

In the rail sector, chipset and receiver manufacturers are already developing devices and modules that combine signals from multiple constellations while integrating EGNOS corrections to ensure better signal availability. Mission studies are progressing to define a dedicated EGNSS service for rail safety-critical applications. Within non-safety critical applications, EUSPA has been instrumental in convincing stakeholders to adopt Galileo and EGNOS to achieve better performance in the area of asset tracking. A recent example of such successful EGNSS uptake in the rail sector was presented by DB Cargo representative, Sören Linse. At present, already more than 60.000 DB wagons rely on EGNSS to ensure effective asset monitoring, including geofencing alerts or improved billing processes for their transport service delivery to customers.

Watch this: #EUSpace for Rail

EGNOS's corrections Europe-wide are already making a difference in many inland waterways and ports. EUSPA is currently developing a new EGNOS service dedicated to the maritime community that will complement and serve as an alternative to the local DGNSS networks deployed along the European coasts. Additionally, in the maritime and inland waterways sector, EUSPA is supporting Members States with the upgrade of shore station equipment that enables the transmission of EGNOS corrections over IALA Radio beacons and AIS stations. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Agriculture, rail, and maritime at the heart of EGNOS service provision

EGNOS market share to accelerate across rail, maritime and aviation domains

13.12.2021 13:54  
Agriculture, rail, and maritime at the heart of EGNOS service provision
Published: 
13 December 2021

The 10th edition of the EGNOS Workshop brought together nearly 500 users of the European Satellite-Based augmentation service (SBAS), EGNOS, to appreciate how they are taking the best out of this component of the EU Space Programme.

The EGNOS Workshop is an opportunity to connect with Europe’s SBAS users, catch up on the GNSS latest developments, share success stories, and exchange views. Entrepreneurs, SMEs, space industry experts, and institutional stakeholders from a broad range of industries comprising aviation, maritime, rail, and agriculture joined us for this year’s online version.

The workshop gathered high-level speakers and users of EGNOS. EUSPA Head of Market Development, Fiammetta Diani, presented new market uptake strategies that will increase the EGNOS user base. Market segments with great EGNOS potential include autonomous vehicles, drones, and aviation with AFIS (Aerodrome Flight Information Service).

EGNOS to become a standard in aviation by 2024

2021 marked the 10th anniversary of the EGNOS Safety of Life service. The service was declared operational in March 2011, enabling approaches down to LPV (Localiser Performance with Vertical guidance) minima at airports across Europe. As of today, there are 798 EGNOS mapped procedures at 422 airports and aerodromes across the EU27 and in countries such as Switzerland, Norway, Iceland, Montenegro, and Serbia. According to EUSPA experts, in October, 62718 flights used EGNOS for landing, a number which is expected to grow even more in the years to come. A major step in enhancing the market uptake of EGNOS was the adoption of the PBN Implementing Rule by the European Commission in late 2018. By 2024, all European instrument runways should have implemented LPV approaches delivered by EGNOS. 

Various EGNOS use cases in aviation were presented. For instance, the first transcontinental flight using SBAS LPV approaches at both origin and destination airport. On September 12th, 2020, Finnair’s pilots set a flight plan from Helsinki Vantaa Airport to New York JFK to land on runway 4 with a LPV approach. The approach and landing were uneventful and carried out under optimal visual conditions. On September 13th, after a 24-hour layover at New York and using the same airbus A350, Finnair performed a cargo flight landing in Helsinki airport using EGNOS. 

Agriculture, rail, and maritime at the heart of EGNOS service provision

EGNOS has been a ‘’go-to source’’ for farmers who look to invest in precision farming, with almost 100% of new tractors in Europe incorporating its corrections. Coupled with imagery and in-situ data by Copernicus, EGNOS’s trusted precision allows for solutions such Variable-Rate Technology (VRT), a technique that automates the application of fertilizers, chemical sprays, and seeds to a given piece of land.

In the rail sector, chipset and receiver manufacturers are already developing devices and modules that combine signals from multiple constellations while integrating EGNOS corrections to ensure better signal availability. Mission studies are progressing to define a dedicated EGNSS service for rail safety-critical applications. Within non-safety critical applications, EUSPA has been instrumental in convincing stakeholders to adopt Galileo and EGNOS to achieve better performance in the area of asset tracking. A recent example of such successful EGNSS uptake in the rail sector was presented by DB Cargo representative, Sören Linse. At present, already more than 60.000 DB wagons rely on EGNSS to ensure effective asset monitoring, including geofencing alerts or improved billing processes for their transport service delivery to customers.

Watch this: #EUSpace for Rail

EGNOS's corrections Europe-wide are already making a difference in many inland waterways and ports. EUSPA is currently developing a new EGNOS service dedicated to the maritime community that will complement and serve as an alternative to the local DGNSS networks deployed along the European coasts. Additionally, in the maritime and inland waterways sector, EUSPA is supporting Members States with the upgrade of shore station equipment that enables the transmission of EGNOS corrections over IALA Radio beacons and AIS stations. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Agriculture, rail, and maritime at the heart of EGNOS service provision

GEARS project ready to enter the Critical Infrastructure market

9.12.2021 16:06  
Grid systems rely on GNSS clocks as a time reference source and atomic clocks as a backup in case of outages. GNSS receivers are comparably low-cost, reliable, high-precision timing sources that can be implemented in a large number in intelligent grids.
Published: 
09 December 2021

EUSPA-funded ‘’GEARS’’ set to conclude at the end of December developed a super accurate and highly robust Galileo-enabled receiver to provide time and frequency data for critical infrastructures. Join our webinar on 16th December 2021 for all the details!

GNSS Timing capability is at the core of Critical Infrastructures (CI). The GNSS CI market is driven by its strategic importance rather than its size. Currently, telecommunications represent 90% of the overall CI market and with the arrival of 5G, shipments of GNSS devices are expected to soar. Moreover, new regulations require financial institutions to trace operations within a consistent and accurate time scale, while smart grids are replacing traditional solutions in the field of energy.

In 2019, the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) awarded a grant to positioning, navigation, and timing (PNT) solution provider Orolia to develop a resilient time and frequency receiver to protect critical GNSS-reliant systems. The Galileo Authenticated Robust Timing System (GEARS) project developed an accurate and highly robust Galileo-enabled receiver for critical infrastructures. After two years of continuous work, Orolia is ready to market GEARS to boost operators' confidence in Galileo's Timing and Synchronisation services.

A webinar is scheduled for December 16th at 14:30 CET to present the concepts, activities, and results obtained by GEARS. Participants will be able to interact with the project contributors through a dedicated Q & A session.

You can register free here

About Fundamental Elements

Fundamental Elements is an EU R&D funding mechanism supporting the development of EGNSS-enabled chipsets, receivers, and antennas. The Fundamental Elements projects are part of the overall European GNSS strategy for market uptake, led by EUSPA. Read more.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Grid systems rely on GNSS clocks as a time reference source and atomic clocks as a backup in case of outages. GNSS receivers are comparably low-cost, reliable, high-precision timing sources that can be implemented in a large number in intelligent grids.

GEARS project ready to enter the Critical Infrastructure market

9.12.2021 16:06  
Grid systems rely on GNSS clocks as a time reference source and atomic clocks as a backup in case of outages. GNSS receivers are comparably low-cost, reliable, high-precision timing sources that can be implemented in a large number in intelligent grids.
Published: 
09 December 2021

EUSPA-funded ‘’GEARS’’ set to conclude at the end of December developed a super accurate and highly robust Galileo-enabled receiver to provide time and frequency data for critical infrastructures. Join our webinar on 16th December 2021 for all the details!

GNSS Timing capability is at the core of Critical Infrastructures (CI). The GNSS CI market is driven by its strategic importance rather than its size. Currently, telecommunications represent 90% of the overall CI market and with the arrival of 5G, shipments of GNSS devices are expected to soar. Moreover, new regulations require financial institutions to trace operations within a consistent and accurate time scale, while smart grids are replacing traditional solutions in the field of energy.

In 2019, the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) awarded a grant to positioning, navigation, and timing (PNT) solution provider Orolia to develop a resilient time and frequency receiver to protect critical GNSS-reliant systems. The Galileo Authenticated Robust Timing System (GEARS) project developed an accurate and highly robust Galileo-enabled receiver for critical infrastructures. After two years of continuous work, Orolia is ready to market GEARS to boost operators' confidence in Galileo's Timing and Synchronisation services.

A webinar is scheduled for December 16th at 14:30 CET to present the concepts, activities, and results obtained by GEARS. Participants will be able to interact with the project contributors through a dedicated Q & A session.

You can register free here

About Fundamental Elements

Fundamental Elements is an EU R&D funding mechanism supporting the development of EGNSS-enabled chipsets, receivers, and antennas. The Fundamental Elements projects are part of the overall European GNSS strategy for market uptake, led by EUSPA. Read more.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Grid systems rely on GNSS clocks as a time reference source and atomic clocks as a backup in case of outages. GNSS receivers are comparably low-cost, reliable, high-precision timing sources that can be implemented in a large number in intelligent grids.

EGNOS: an evolving satellite navigation system that anticipate user needs.

8.12.2021 14:20  
In the coming years, EGNOS V3 will be available and the user experience will be maximised through the strengthening of Galileo and GPS.

The EGNOS Workshop is the yearly opportunity to learn about the evolution of EGNOS services and connect with Europe’s Satellite Based Augmentation System (SBAS) users. 

Organised by the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) and the EGNOS Service Provider (ESSP), the EGNOS Annual Workshop provided nearly 500 participants first-hand information on the status and roadmap of EGNOS services, its development, and its implementation in fields such as aviation, maritime, rail and agriculture. 

The workshop kicked off with a welcome speech by EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa, who highlighted a major change for EGNOS, in line with the new EU Space Programme regulation. ‘’The transition into the EUSPA came with an enlarged scope of responsibilities reinforcing, in particular, our mission for EGNOS, one of the EU Space Programme founding components. We are the Exploitation Manager and now system prime of the EGNOS system in operation’’ said da Costa.

As EGNOS Exploitation Manager, and System Prime responsible for the changes to the system in operations, EUSPA was especially keen on demonstrating its vision of development of the system together with its partners, showcasing success stories and examples of the benefits that EGNOS keeps offering to European users. 

In her welcoming speech Charlotte Neyret, new ESSP CEO, remarked: “10 years have passed since EGNOS Safety of Life entered into service for the aviation sector, and as the PBN IR REGULATION (2018) states, by 2024 all-instrumental runway ends in Europe must have an RNP APCH procedure to LPV minima published, so I am confident that this figure of +700 EGNOS – enabled procedures for around 400 airports will continue to grow.”

EGNOS service provision to further expand 

With multi-constellation becoming the norm, the GNSS industry is now witnessing a shift towards the adoption of multi-frequency. In the coming years, EGNOS V3 will be available. This evolved system, will augment both GPS and Galileo in the L1 and L5 bands and will provide additional satellite-based augmentation system service capabilities through a new SBAS channel on L5. The increased EGNOS services availability will go beyond the EU, supporting a growing number of users.

In 2021, Iceland just joined the EGNOS Programme, as a new participating State. Furthermore, currently providing corrections and integrity information in a broad area centred over Europe, the EGNOS coverage area is set to expand. The European Commission has set aside some EUR 8 million from the European Neighbourhood Instrument for the Eastern Partnership countries (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova, Ukraine) in order to extend the EGNOS V3 System enabling future extensions to these territories of EGNOS high-quality services and cutting-edge technology.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

In the coming years, EGNOS V3 will be available and the user experience will be maximised through the strengthening of Galileo and GPS.

EGNOS: an evolving satellite navigation system that anticipates user needs

8.12.2021 14:20  
In the coming years, EGNOS V3 will be available and the user experience will be maximised through the strengthening of Galileo and GPS.
Published: 
08 December 2021

The EGNOS Workshop is the yearly opportunity to learn about the evolution of EGNOS services and connect with Europe’s Satellite Based Augmentation System (SBAS) users. 

Organised by the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) and the EGNOS Service Provider (ESSP), the EGNOS Annual Workshop provided nearly 500 participants first-hand information on the status and roadmap of EGNOS services, its development, and its implementation in fields such as aviation, maritime, rail and agriculture. 

The workshop kicked off with a welcome speech by EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa, who highlighted a major change for EGNOS, in line with the new EU Space Programme regulation. ‘’The transition into the EUSPA came with an enlarged scope of responsibilities reinforcing, in particular, our mission for EGNOS, one of the EU Space Programme founding components. We are the Exploitation Manager and now system prime of the EGNOS system in operation’’ said da Costa.

As EGNOS Exploitation Manager, and System Prime responsible for the changes to the system in operations, EUSPA was especially keen on demonstrating its vision of development of the system together with its partners, showcasing success stories and examples of the benefits that EGNOS keeps offering to European users. 

In her welcoming speech Charlotte Neyret, new ESSP CEO, remarked: “10 years have passed since EGNOS Safety of Life entered into service for the aviation sector, and as the PBN IR REGULATION (2018) states, by 2024 all-instrumental runway ends in Europe must have an RNP APCH procedure to LPV minima published, so I am confident that this figure of +700 EGNOS – enabled procedures for around 400 airports will continue to grow.”

EGNOS service provision to further expand 

With multi-constellation becoming the norm, the GNSS industry is now witnessing a shift towards the adoption of multi-frequency. In the coming years, EGNOS V3 will be available. This evolved system, will augment both GPS and Galileo in the L1 and L5 bands and will provide additional satellite-based augmentation system service capabilities through a new SBAS channel on L5. The increased EGNOS services availability will go beyond the EU, supporting a growing number of users.

In 2021, Iceland just joined the EGNOS Programme, as a new participating State. Furthermore, currently providing corrections and integrity information in a broad area centred over Europe, the EGNOS coverage area is set to expand. The European Commission has set aside some EUR 8 million from the European Neighbourhood Instrument for the Eastern Partnership countries (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova, Ukraine) in order to extend the EGNOS V3 System enabling future extensions to these territories of EGNOS high-quality services and cutting-edge technology.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

In the coming years, EGNOS V3 will be available and the user experience will be maximised through the strengthening of Galileo and GPS.

EGNOS: an evolving satellite navigation system that anticipates user needs

8.12.2021 14:20  
In the coming years, EGNOS V3 will be available and the user experience will be maximised through the strengthening of Galileo and GPS.
Published: 
08 December 2021

The EGNOS Workshop is the opportunity to learn about the evolution of EGNOS services and connect with Europe’s Satellite Based Augmentation System (SBAS) users. 

Organised by the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) and the EGNOS Service Provider (ESSP), the EGNOS Annual Workshop provided nearly 500 participants first-hand information on the status and roadmap of EGNOS services, its development, and its implementation in fields such as aviation, maritime, rail and agriculture. 

The workshop kicked off with a welcome speech by EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa, who highlighted a major change for EGNOS, in line with the new EU Space Programme regulation. ‘’The transition into the EUSPA came with an enlarged scope of responsibilities reinforcing, in particular, our mission for EGNOS, one of the EU Space Programme founding components. We are the Exploitation Manager and now system prime of the EGNOS system in operation’’ said da Costa.

As EGNOS Exploitation Manager, and System Prime responsible for the changes to the system in operations, EUSPA was especially keen on demonstrating its vision of development of the system together with its partners, showcasing success stories and examples of the benefits that EGNOS keeps offering to European users. 

In her welcoming speech Charlotte Neyret, new ESSP CEO, remarked: “10 years have passed since EGNOS Safety of Life entered into service for the aviation sector, and as the PBN IR REGULATION (2018) states, by 2024 all-instrumental runway ends in Europe must have an RNP APCH procedure to LPV minima published, so I am confident that this figure of +700 EGNOS – enabled procedures for around 400 airports will continue to grow.”

EGNOS service provision to further expand 

With multi-constellation becoming the norm, the GNSS industry is now witnessing a shift towards the adoption of multi-frequency. In the coming years, EGNOS V3 will be available. This evolved system, will augment both GPS and Galileo in the L1 and L5 bands and will provide additional satellite-based augmentation system service capabilities through a new SBAS channel on L5. The increased EGNOS services availability will go beyond the EU, supporting a growing number of users.

In 2021, Iceland just joined the EGNOS Programme, as a new participating State. Furthermore, currently providing corrections and integrity information in a broad area centred over Europe, the EGNOS coverage area is set to expand. The European Commission has set aside some EUR 8 million from the European Neighbourhood Instrument for the Eastern Partnership countries (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova, Ukraine) in order to extend the EGNOS V3 System enabling future extensions to these territories of EGNOS high-quality services and cutting-edge technology.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

In the coming years, EGNOS V3 will be available and the user experience will be maximised through the strengthening of Galileo and GPS.

Let’s shape the future of EU satnav together!

6.12.2021 12:10  
Published: 
06 December 2021

The EU Agency for the Space Programme has launched the 2021 Galileo and EGNOS User Satisfaction Surveys. Having your feedback is crucial to the evolution of the satnav components of the EU Space Programme.

The Galileo and EGNOS User Satisfaction Surveys are addressing all users and market segments including: Aviation, Maritime, Rail, Road, Location Based Services, Agriculture and Surveying and Mapping. When responding to the survey, select the market segment in which you operate; the market segment that corresponds to your main area of activity; or the market segment that is the most important for your company or organisation, if you are active in multiple market segments. The surveys only take a few minutes to complete and your feedback will make a real difference.  

Take part in the Galileo survey here.

In addition to the various market segments, the EGNOS survey also covers all the EGNOS services, including the Open Service, the Safety of Life Service and the EGNOS Data Access Service (EDAS). It also assesses the EGNOS service provider’s management of EGNOS User Support Services. 

Take part in the EGNOS survey here.

Based on the feedback, recommendations will be drawn up for improvements across all the EGNOS and Galileo services and support to users. For an overview of the results of the previous EGNOS and Galileo User Satisfaction Surveys and the recommendations they generated, click here for Galileo and here for EGNOS. 

The EU Space Programme was conceived with the core aim of multiplying the benefits of space and putting them into society. EUSPA wants to make sure that all end users in Europe and across the globe are satisfied with the service provision. Let’s keep our conversation going!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Let’s shape the future of EU satnav together!

6.12.2021 12:10  
Published: 
06 December 2021

The EU Agency for the Space Programme has launched the 2021 Galileo and EGNOS User Satisfaction Surveys. Having your feedback is crucial to the evolution of the satnav components of the EU Space Programme.

The Galileo and EGNOS User Satisfaction Surveys are addressing all users and market segments including: Aviation, Maritime, Rail, Road, Location Based Services, Agriculture and Surveying and Mapping. When responding to the survey, select the market segment in which you operate; the market segment that corresponds to your main area of activity; or the market segment that is the most important for your company or organisation, if you are active in multiple market segments. The surveys only take a few minutes to complete and your feedback will make a real difference.  

Take part in the Galileo survey here.

In addition to the various market segments, the EGNOS survey also covers all the EGNOS services, including the Open Service, the Safety of Life Service and the EGNOS Data Access Service (EDAS). It also assesses the EGNOS service provider’s management of EGNOS User Support Services. 

Take part in the EGNOS survey here.

Based on the feedback, recommendations will be drawn up for improvements across all the EGNOS and Galileo services and support to users. For an overview of the results of the previous EGNOS and Galileo User Satisfaction Surveys and the recommendations they generated, click here for Galileo and here for EGNOS. 

The EU Space Programme was conceived with the core aim of multiplying the benefits of space and putting them into society. EUSPA wants to make sure that all end users in Europe and across the globe are satisfied with the service provision. Let’s keep our conversation going!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Let’s shape the future of EU satnav together!

6.12.2021 12:10  
Published: 
06 December 2021

The EU Agency for the Space Programme, EUSPA, has launched the 2021 Galileo and EGNOS User Satisfaction Surveys. Having your feedback is crucial to the evolution of the satnav components of the EU Space Programme.

The Galileo and EGNOS User Satisfaction Surveys are addressing all users and market segments including: Aviation, Maritime, Rail, Road, Consumer Solutions, Agriculture, Geomatics and Critical Infrastructure. When responding to the survey, select the market segment in which you operate; the market segment that corresponds to your main area of activity; or the market segment that is the most important for your company or organisation, if you are active in multiple market segments you can select more than one. The surveys only take a few minutes to complete and your feedback will make a real difference.  

Take part in the Galileo survey here.

In addition, the EGNOS survey also covers all the EGNOS services, including the Open Service, the Safety of Life Service and the EGNOS Data Access Service (EDAS). It also assesses the EGNOS service provider’s management of EGNOS User Support Services. 

Take part in the EGNOS survey here.

Based on the feedback, recommendations will be drawn up for improvements across all the EGNOS and Galileo services and support to users. For an overview of the results of the previous EGNOS and Galileo User Satisfaction Surveys and the recommendations generated, click here for Galileo and here for EGNOS. 

The EU Space Programme was conceived with the core aim of multiplying the benefits of space for the society. EUSPA wants to make sure that all end users in Europe and across the globe are satisfied with the service provision. Let’s keep our conversation going!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Let’s shape the future of EU satnav together!

6.12.2021 12:10  
Published: 
06 December 2021

The EU Agency for the Space Programme, EUSPA, has launched the 2021 Galileo and EGNOS User Satisfaction Surveys. Having your feedback is crucial to the evolution of the satnav components of the EU Space Programme.

The Galileo and EGNOS User Satisfaction Surveys are addressing all users and market segments including: Aviation, Maritime, Rail, Road, Consumer Solutions, Agriculture, Geomatics and Critical Infrastructure. When responding to the survey, select the market segment in which you operate; the market segment that corresponds to your main area of activity; or the market segment that is the most important for your company or organisation, if you are active in multiple market segments you can select more than one. The surveys only take a few minutes to complete and your feedback will make a real difference.  

Take part in the Galileo survey here.

In addition, the EGNOS survey also covers all the EGNOS services, including the Open Service, the Safety of Life Service and the EGNOS Data Access Service (EDAS). It also assesses the EGNOS service provider’s management of EGNOS User Support Services. 

Take part in the EGNOS survey here.

Based on the feedback, recommendations will be drawn up for improvements across all the EGNOS and Galileo services and support to users. For an overview of the results of the previous EGNOS and Galileo User Satisfaction Surveys and the recommendations generated, click here for Galileo and here for EGNOS. 

The EU Space Programme was conceived with the core aim of multiplying the benefits of space for the society. EUSPA wants to make sure that all end users in Europe and across the globe are satisfied with the service provision. Let’s keep our conversation going!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Let’s shape the future of EU satnav together!

6.12.2021 12:10  
Published: 
06 December 2021

The EU Agency for the Space Programme, EUSPA, has launched the 2021 Galileo and EGNOS User Satisfaction Surveys. Having your feedback is crucial to the evolution of the satnav components of the EU Space Programme.

The Galileo and EGNOS User Satisfaction Surveys are addressing all users and market segments including: Aviation, Maritime, Rail, Road, Consumer Solutions, Agriculture, Geomatics and Critical Infrastructure. When responding to the survey, select the market segment in which you operate; the market segment that corresponds to your main area of activity; or the market segment that is the most important for your company or organisation, if you are active in multiple market segments you can select more than one. The surveys only take a few minutes to complete and your feedback will make a real difference.  

Take part in the Galileo survey here.

In addition, the EGNOS survey also covers all the EGNOS services, including the Open Service, the Safety of Life Service and the EGNOS Data Access Service (EDAS). It also assesses the EGNOS service provider’s management of EGNOS User Support Services. 

Take part in the EGNOS survey here.

Based on the feedback, recommendations will be drawn up for improvements across all the EGNOS and Galileo services and support to users. For an overview of the results of the previous EGNOS and Galileo User Satisfaction Surveys and the recommendations generated, click here for Galileo and here for EGNOS. 

The EU Space Programme was conceived with the core aim of multiplying the benefits of space for the society. EUSPA wants to make sure that all end users in Europe and across the globe are satisfied with the service provision. Let’s keep our conversation going!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Let’s shape the future of EU satnav together!

6.12.2021 12:10  
Published: 
06 December 2021

The EU Agency for the Space Programme, EUSPA, has launched the 2021 Galileo and EGNOS User Satisfaction Surveys. Having your feedback is crucial to the evolution of the satnav components of the EU Space Programme.

The Galileo and EGNOS User Satisfaction Surveys are addressing all users and market segments including: Aviation, Maritime, Rail, Road, Consumer Solutions, Agriculture, Geomatics and Critical Infrastructure. When responding to the survey, select the market segment in which you operate; the market segment that corresponds to your main area of activity; or the market segment that is the most important for your company or organisation, if you are active in multiple market segments you can select more than one. The surveys only take a few minutes to complete and your feedback will make a real difference.  

Take part in the Galileo survey here.

In addition, the EGNOS survey also covers all the EGNOS services, including the Open Service, the Safety of Life Service and the EGNOS Data Access Service (EDAS). It also assesses the EGNOS service provider’s management of EGNOS User Support Services. 

Take part in the EGNOS survey here.

Based on the feedback, recommendations will be drawn up for improvements across all the EGNOS and Galileo services and support to users. For an overview of the results of the previous EGNOS and Galileo User Satisfaction Surveys and the recommendations generated, click here for Galileo and here for EGNOS. 

The EU Space Programme was conceived with the core aim of multiplying the benefits of space for the society. EUSPA wants to make sure that all end users in Europe and across the globe are satisfied with the service provision. Let’s keep our conversation going!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

After the successful launch of 2 new Galileo satellites, the satellites operations are now ongoing.

3.12.2021 18:11  
Take-off of the Soyuz rocket bringing 2 additional Galileo satellites to the constellation
Published: 
05 December 2021

The Galileo satellites 27 and 28 were successfully launched on-board of a Soyuz carrier earlier on December 4 at 21:19, Kourou time – or on December 5 at 01:19 CET from Europe’s Spaceport in French Guyana. 

Earlier today, the 46m tall Soyuz launcher VS-26, successfully lifted off from Kourou, French Guyana, for a nearly four-hour voyage till the separation of the Galileo satellites 27-28 from the rocket. The Galileo Launch 11 is the first of a series of 6 launches (with two satellites per launch), which will allow Galileo to deliver greater accuracy to existing users and open up new market opportunities.

The Galileo satellites were ejected from the upper stage of the launcher at 05:09 CET. They are currently managed from the Galileo Control Centre in Oberpfaffenhofen in Germany by the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) and its Galileo Service Operator team led by SpaceOpal, in charge of the satellite operations after separation from the Launch vehicle. It is part of the Launch and Early Orbit Phase (LEOP)

Relive the launch here

The Launch and Early Orbit Phase is one of the most exciting and important phases of a space mission, as it handles the launch of the spacecraft its travel into the correct orbit, gradually switching on the spacecraft platform to test the core-satellite elements. Over the following days, the EUSPA and SpaceOpal team will be manoeuvring the satellites until the start of the drift phase which should last around 3 weeks till the Drift Stop and Fine Positioning Manoeuvres (DSFP), when the satellites will be placed into their home orbit at 23 220 km. 

Upon commissioning and rigorous in-Orbit tests, the spacecraft will enter into the Galileo service provision.

“Today we can proudly celebrate another milestone achieved by the European Union’s most ambitious and largest industrial project, Galileo’’ says EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa. “The successful addition of satellites 27-28 to the world’s most precise positioning system is a very important step for our more than 2 billion users around the world and is the result of a robust collaboration between us, the European Commission, the European Space Agency (ESA), and our industrial partners. I would like to express my deepest gratitude to all the parties involved, who are working relentlessly to ensure the success of the mission.”

Watch Rodrigo da Costa's message here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Take-off of the Soyuz rocket bringing 2 additional Galileo satellites to the constellation

After the successful launch of 2 new Galileo satellites, the satellites operations are now ongoing

3.12.2021 18:11  
Take-off of the Soyuz rocket bringing 2 additional Galileo satellites to the constellation
Published: 
05 December 2021

The Galileo satellites 27 and 28 were successfully launched on-board of a Soyuz carrier earlier on December 4 at 21:19, Kourou time – or on December 5 at 01:19 CET from Europe’s Spaceport in French Guyana. 

Earlier today, the 46m tall Soyuz launcher VS-26, successfully lifted off from Kourou, French Guyana, for a nearly four-hour voyage till the separation of the Galileo satellites 27-28 from the rocket. The Galileo Launch 11 is the first of a series of 6 launches (with two satellites per launch), which will allow Galileo to deliver greater accuracy to existing users and open up new market opportunities.

The Galileo satellites were ejected from the upper stage of the launcher at 05:09 CET. They are currently managed from the Galileo Control Centre in Oberpfaffenhofen in Germany by the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) and its Galileo Service Operator team led by SpaceOpal, in charge of the satellite operations after separation from the Launch vehicle. It is part of the Launch and Early Orbit Phase (LEOP)

Relive the launch here

The Launch and Early Orbit Phase is one of the most exciting and important phases of a space mission, as it handles the launch of the spacecraft its travel into the correct orbit, gradually switching on the spacecraft platform to test the core-satellite elements. Over the following days, the EUSPA and SpaceOpal team will be manoeuvring the satellites until the start of the drift phase which should last around 3 weeks till the Drift Stop and Fine Positioning Manoeuvres (DSFP), when the satellites will be placed into their home orbit at 23 220 km. 

Upon commissioning and rigorous in-Orbit tests, the spacecraft will enter into the Galileo service provision.

“Today we can proudly celebrate another milestone achieved by the European Union’s most ambitious and largest industrial project, Galileo’’ says EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa. “The successful addition of satellites 27-28 to the world’s most precise positioning system is a very important step for our more than 2 billion users around the world and is the result of a robust collaboration between us, the European Commission, the European Space Agency (ESA), and our industrial partners. I would like to express my deepest gratitude to all the parties involved, who are working relentlessly to ensure the success of the mission.”

Watch Rodrigo da Costa's message here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Take-off of the Soyuz rocket bringing 2 additional Galileo satellites to the constellation

After the successful launch of 2 new Galileo satellites, the satellites operations are now ongoing.

3.12.2021 18:11  
Take-off of the Soyuz rocket bringing 2 additional Galileo satellites to the constellation
Published: 
03 December 2021

The Galileo satellites 27 and 28 were successfully launched on-board of a Soyuz carrier earlier on December 4 at 21:19, Kourou time – or on December 5 at 01:19 CET from Europe’s Spaceport in French Guyana. 

Earlier today, the 46m tall Soyuz launcher VS-26, successfully lifted off from Kourou, French Guyana, for a nearly four-hour voyage till the separation of the Galileo satellites 27-28 from the rocket. The Galileo Launch 11 is the first of a series of 6 launches (with two satellites per launch), which will allow Galileo to deliver greater accuracy to existing users and open up new market opportunities.



The Galileo satellites were ejected from the upper stage of the launcher at 05:09 CET. They are currently managed from the Galileo Control Centre in Oberpfaffenhofen in Germany by the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) and its Galileo Service Operator team led by SpaceOpal, in charge of the satellite operations after separation from the Launch vehicle. It is part of the Launch and Early Orbit Phase (LEOP)

The Launch and Early Orbit Phase is one of the most exciting and important phases of a space mission, as it handles the launch of the spacecraft its travel into the correct orbit, gradually switching on the spacecraft platform to test the core-satellite elements. Over the following days, the EUSPA and SpaceOpal team will be manoeuvring the satellites until the start of the drift phase which should last around 3 weeks till the Drift Stop and Fine Positioning Manoeuvres (DSFP), when the satellites will be placed into their home orbit at 23 220 km. 

Upon commissioning and rigorous in-Orbit tests, the spacecraft will enter into the Galileo service provision.

“Today we can proudly celebrate another milestone achieved by the European Union’s most ambitious and largest industrial project, Galileo’’ says EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa. “The successful addition of satellites 27-28 to the world’s most precise positioning system is a very important step for our more than 2 billion users around the world and is the result of a robust collaboration between us, the European Commission, the European Space Agency (ESA), and our industrial partners. I would like to express my deepest gratitude to all the parties involved, who are working relentlessly to ensure the success of the mission.”

Watch Rodrigo da Costa message here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Take-off of the Soyuz rocket bringing 2 additional Galileo satellites to the constellation

After the successful launch of 2 new Galileo satellites, the satellites operations are now ongoing.

3.12.2021 18:11  
Take-off of the Soyuz rocket bringing 2 additional Galileo satellites to the constellation
Published: 
03 December 2021

The Galileo satellites 27 and 28 were successfully launched on-board of a Soyuz carrier earlier on December 4 at 21:19, Kourou time – or on December 5 at 01:19 CET from Europe’s Spaceport in French Guyana. 

Earlier today, the 46m tall Soyuz launcher VS-26, successfully lifted off from Kourou, French Guyana, for a nearly four-hour voyage till the separation of the Galileo satellites 27-28 from the rocket. The Galileo Launch 11 is the first of a series of 6 launches (with two satellites per launch), which will allow Galileo to deliver greater accuracy to existing users and open up new market opportunities.

The Galileo satellites were ejected from the upper stage of the launcher at 05:09 CET. They are currently managed from the Galileo Control Centre in Oberpfaffenhofen in Germany by the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) and its Galileo Service Operator team led by SpaceOpal, in charge of the satellite operations after separation from the Launch vehicle. It is part of the Launch and Early Orbit Phase (LEOP)

Relive the launch here

The Launch and Early Orbit Phase is one of the most exciting and important phases of a space mission, as it handles the launch of the spacecraft its travel into the correct orbit, gradually switching on the spacecraft platform to test the core-satellite elements. Over the following days, the EUSPA and SpaceOpal team will be manoeuvring the satellites until the start of the drift phase which should last around 3 weeks till the Drift Stop and Fine Positioning Manoeuvres (DSFP), when the satellites will be placed into their home orbit at 23 220 km. 

Upon commissioning and rigorous in-Orbit tests, the spacecraft will enter into the Galileo service provision.

“Today we can proudly celebrate another milestone achieved by the European Union’s most ambitious and largest industrial project, Galileo’’ says EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa. “The successful addition of satellites 27-28 to the world’s most precise positioning system is a very important step for our more than 2 billion users around the world and is the result of a robust collaboration between us, the European Commission, the European Space Agency (ESA), and our industrial partners. I would like to express my deepest gratitude to all the parties involved, who are working relentlessly to ensure the success of the mission.”

Watch Rodrigo da Costa's message here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Take-off of the Soyuz rocket bringing 2 additional Galileo satellites to the constellation

It’s the final countdown for #myEUspace! Ready to submit?

30.11.2021 11:57  
The prize contest targets innovators and entrepreneurs looking to develop and market innovative solutions, that leverage EU Space data, and for the first time, quantum technologies.
Published: 
30 November 2021

We have many countdowns to look forward to this week, the first being the Galileo Launch 11 taking place 24 hours just before the #myEUSpace deadline! To help you put a final touch on your projects/ideas, here are the nuts and bolts of the "Space my Life" and "Dive in Quantum" challenges.

The "Space my life" challenge looks to create consumer solutions such as mobile applications and services using space data for health, gaming, sports, leisure, tourism, and everyday life purposes. The ideas should be leveraging innovative features of EGNSS and Copernicus in the mobile apps and smart wearables domain, fusing non-space technologies like IoT, big data, artificial intelligence, drones, 5G, augmented/mixed reality, etc.

For example, Galileo’s capability to deliver precise, robust positioning and timing information, combined with IoT, can enhance our lives through interconnected devices. Another example of innovative applications in this area is the exploitation of Galileo’s differentiators – like the High Accuracy Service and the authentication features – of which mobile applications can benefits thanks to the availability of GNSS raw measurements in smartphones.

Previous solutions targeting mass markets were #MyGalileoSolution competition overall winner "Vision Anchor" and #ΜyGalileoSolution finalist "Bit Pet".  

Dive in Quantum, yes that’s a tough one!

Quantum technologies use the properties of quantum effects – the interactions of molecules, atoms, and even smaller particles, known as quantum objects – to create practical applications in many different fields, and space applications are one of them.

Participants are tasked with coupling Copernicus and Galileo with quantum technologies such as quantum computing, sensing, simulation, encryption to enhance space downstream applications. 

With high-speed connectivity, protected communications, and high computing power becoming essential, quantum technologies can address or help mitigate some of the biggest challenges of today’s digital challenges.

Applications addressing the "Dive in Quantum" innovation area shall be submitted only in Track 1. In Track 1, applicants will have to turn their theoretical idea into a prototype of their product, articulating their value proposition and exploring Problem-Solution Fit based on a validation test in a relevant environment. Projects are expected to reach at least TRL 4.

In Track 2 teams are asked to bring their prototype/beta version to a Minimum Viable Product (MVP), reach a functional stage and commercialization readiness and develop a value proposition to meet Product-Market Fit. Projects expected to reach at least TRL 9.

Time is running out but before submitting, remember to read again the Terms of References here. Good luck!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The prize contest targets innovators and entrepreneurs looking to develop and market innovative solutions, that leverage EU Space data, and for the first time, quantum technologies.

EUSPA makes first appearance at General Assembly of the Copernicus networks

29.11.2021 11:37  
Greek island of Naxos from #EUspace! Photo taken by Copernicus Sentinel-2
Published: 
29 November 2021

The 5th General Assembly of the Copernicus Academy and Relays Networks, organized by the European Commission, was the opportunity to reflect on the 2021 Earth Observation milestones and build the future of the Copernicus networks together. The EU Agency for the Space Programme was present for the first time to present its new mission and highlight Copernicus flavored funding opportunities. 

The two-day event, which took place on 23-24 November, gathered interesting European Commission policy experts, industry stakeholders, and Earth Observation enthusiasts. Distinguished panelists highlighted the importance of the new EU Space Programme policy framework and the potential synergies between the components can offer. Particular emphasis was placed on how Copernicus, in conjunction with Galileo and EGNOS, can contribute to current pressing challenges such as environmental compliance or ice retreat in polar regions.

For the first time after its extended mandate to support the promotion and commercialisation of the downstream Copernicus services, EUSPA participated in the General Assembly.  Justyna Redelkiewicz, head of LBS at EUSPA Market Development, participated in the Session ‘’CASSINI: Moving forward with a more competitive EU Space Industry’’ where she presented the revisited mission of the agency as well new funding opportunities that now also include Copernicus. Redelkiewicz highlighted that the Horizon Europe calls are designed to boost synergies between the EU Space Programme components and blend well with the EU Green Deal. She also sent a reminder to #myEUspace applicants about the December 2nd submission deadline before giving a hint about the upcoming EUSPA Market Report, as it will include Copernicus insights. 

New Space and Copernicus is the real deal!

Interest was sparked during the ''New Space & Copernicus: How can they best cooperate?'' session. European Commission experts pointed out, that relationship between the EU Earth Observation Programme and New Space companies is mutually beneficial. Copernicus offers a vast amount of geospatial data that help them step up their business operations. At the same time, Copernicus can benefit from quality input such as very high-resolution imagery from new space companies in Europe.

Guest speakers during this session included ICEYE, a Finnish global leader in small satellite synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) technology. The company recently became the first European New Space company to provide data to the Copernicus Contributing Missions. Copernicus services will now receive access to ICEYE’s SAR imagery and use it to enhance public safety, border control, security, and maritime domain awareness. Other New space companies included ScanWorld and Auroratech, both of which rely on Sentinel data for vegetation analysis and wildfire detection, respectively.

Read this: Unlocking Africa’s full EO potential with EU Space synergies

#EUSpace is truly global

The EU space economy is the second-largest - in the world- supported by flagship space assets Galileo, EGNOS, and Copernicus. It is estimated to have generated over 250,000 jobs, with over 50,000 in the downstream sector. The edition of the 2021 General Assemblies was the opportunity to tap on this and present the newly established initiative of DG DEFIS called ‘’EU GLOBAL ACTION on Space’’ aimed at deepening existing and forging new business opportunities with targeted third countries across the globe. Copernicus network members can patriciate in or benefit from webinars and events organized by Global action. 

‘’Propagating information about Copernicus's potential and preparing new generations of professionals to use space applications is fundamental for a successful European Space policy. In this respect, the Assembly of Copernicus Academy and Relays Networks has an important role and will also benefit from the extended mandate that EUSPA has gained in the New Space Programme” The Generally Assembly meeting is now renewed for 2022 and EUSPA looks forward to it,’’ says Mauro Facchini, Head of the Copernicus Unit at DG DEFIS.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Greek island of Naxos from #EUspace! Photo taken by Copernicus Sentinel-2

EUSPA makes first appearance at General Assembly of the Copernicus networks

29.11.2021 11:37  
Greek island of Naxos from #EUspace! Photo taken by Copernicus Sentinel-2
Published: 
29 November 2021

The 5th General Assembly of the Copernicus Academy and Relays Networks, organized by the European Commission, was the opportunity to reflect on the 2021 Earth Observation milestones and build the future of the Copernicus networks together. The EU Agency for the Space Programme was present for the first time to present its new mission and highlight Copernicus flavored funding opportunities. 

The two-day event, which took place on 23-24 November, gathered interesting European Commission policy experts, industry stakeholders, and Earth Observation enthusiasts. Distinguished panelists highlighted the importance of the new EU Space Programme policy framework and the potential synergies between the components can offer. Particular emphasis was placed on how Copernicus, in conjunction with Galileo and EGNOS, can contribute to current pressing challenges such as environmental compliance or ice retreat in polar regions.

For the first time after its extended mandate to support the promotion and commercialisation of the downstream Copernicus services, EUSPA participated in the General Assembly.  Justyna Redelkiewicz, head of LBS at EUSPA Market Development, participated in the Session ‘’CASSINI: Moving forward with a more competitive EU Space Industry’’ where she presented the revisited mission of the agency as well new funding opportunities that now also include Copernicus. Redelkiewicz highlighted that the Horizon Europe calls are designed to boost synergies between the EU Space Programme components and blend well with the EU Green Deal. She also sent a reminder to #myEUspace applicants about the December 3rd submission deadline before giving a hint about the upcoming EUSPA Market Report, as it will include Copernicus insights. 

New Space and Copernicus is the real deal!

Interest was sparked during the ''New Space & Copernicus: How can they best cooperate?'' session. European Commission experts pointed out, that relationship between the EU Earth Observation Programme and New Space companies is mutually beneficial. Copernicus offers a vast amount of geospatial data that help them step up their business operations. At the same time, Copernicus can benefit from quality input such as very high-resolution imagery from new space companies in Europe.

Guest speakers during this session included ICEYE, a Finnish global leader in small satellite synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) technology. The company recently became the first European New Space company to provide data to the Copernicus Contributing Missions. Copernicus services will now receive access to ICEYE’s SAR imagery and use it to enhance public safety, border control, security, and maritime domain awareness. Other New space companies included ScanWorld and Auroratech, both of which rely on Sentinel data for vegetation analysis and wildfire detection, respectively.

Read this: Unlocking Africa’s full EO potential with EU Space synergies

#EUSpace is truly global

The EU space economy is the second-largest - in the world- supported by flagship space assets Galileo, EGNOS, and Copernicus. It is estimated to have generated over 250,000 jobs, with over 50,000 in the downstream sector. The edition of the 2021 General Assemblies was the opportunity to tap on this and present the newly established initiative of DG DEFIS called ‘’EU GLOBAL ACTION on Space’’ aimed at deepening existing and forging new business opportunities with targeted third countries across the globe. Copernicus network members can patriciate in or benefit from webinars and events organized by Global action. 

‘’Propagating information about Copernicus's potential and preparing new generations of professionals to use space applications is fundamental for a successful European Space policy. In this respect, the Assembly of Copernicus Academy and Relays Networks has an important role and will also benefit from the extended mandate that EUSPA has gained in the New Space Programme” The Generally Assembly meeting is now renewed for 2022 and EUSPA looks forward to it,’’ says Mauro Facchini, Head of the Copernicus Unit at DG DEFIS.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Greek island of Naxos from #EUspace! Photo taken by Copernicus Sentinel-2

EUSPA makes first appearance at General Assembly of the Copernicus networks

29.11.2021 11:37  
Greek island of Naxos from #EUspace! Photo taken by Copernicus Sentinel-2
Published: 
29 November 2021

The 5th General Assembly of the Copernicus Academy and Relays Networks, organized by the European Commission, was the opportunity to reflect on the 2021 Earth Observation milestones and build the future of the Copernicus networks together. The EU Agency for the Space Programme was present for the first time to present its new mission and highlight Copernicus flavored funding opportunities. 

The two-day event, which took place on 23-24 November, gathered interesting European Commission policy experts, industry stakeholders, and Earth Observation enthusiasts. Distinguished panelists highlighted the importance of the new EU Space Programme policy framework and the potential synergies between the components can offer. Particular emphasis was placed on how Copernicus, in conjunction with Galileo and EGNOS, can contribute to current pressing challenges such as environmental compliance or ice retreat in polar regions.

For the first time after its extended mandate to support the promotion and commercialisation of the downstream Copernicus services, EUSPA participated in the General Assembly.  Justyna Redelkiewicz, head of LBS at EUSPA Market Development, participated in the Session ‘’CASSINI: Moving forward with a more competitive EU Space Industry’’ where she presented the revisited mission of the agency as well new funding opportunities that now also include Copernicus. Redelkiewicz highlighted that the Horizon Europe calls are designed to boost synergies between the EU Space Programme components and blend well with the EU Green Deal. She also sent a reminder to #myEUspace applicants about the December 3rd submission deadline before giving a hint about the upcoming EUSPA Market Report, as it will include Copernicus insights. 

New Space and Copernicus is the real deal!

Interest was sparked during the ''New Space & Copernicus: How can they best cooperate?'' session. European Commission experts pointed out, that relationship between the EU Earth Observation Programme and New Space companies is mutually beneficial. Copernicus offers a vast amount of geospatial data that help them step up their business operations. At the same time, Copernicus can benefit from quality input such as very high-resolution imagery from new space companies in Europe.

Guest speakers during this session included ICEYE, a Finnish global leader in small satellite synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) technology. The company recently became the first European New Space company to provide data to the Copernicus Contributing Missions. Copernicus services will now receive access to ICEYE’s SAR imagery and use it to enhance public safety, border control, security, and maritime domain awareness. Other New space companies included ScanWorld and Auroratech, both of which rely on Sentinel data for vegetation analysis and wildfire detection, respectively.

Read this: Unlocking Africa’s full EO potential with EU Space synergies

#EUSpace is truly global

The EU space economy is the second-largest - in the world- supported by flagship space assets Galileo, EGNOS, and Copernicus. It is estimated to have generated over 250,000 jobs, with over 50,000 in the downstream sector. The edition of the 2021 General Assemblies was the opportunity to tap on this and present the newly established initiative of DG DEFIS called ‘’EU GLOBAL ACTION on Space’’ aimed at deepening existing and forging new business opportunities with targeted third countries across the globe. Copernicus network members can patriciate in or benefit from webinars and events organized by Global action. 

‘’Propagating information about Copernicus's potential and preparing new generations of professionals to use space applications is fundamental for a successful European Space policy. In this respect, the Assembly of Copernicus Academy and Relays Networks has an important role and will also benefit from the extended mandate that EUSPA has gained in the New Space Programme,”  says Mauro Facchini, Head of the Copernicus Unit at DG DEFIS.

The Generally Assembly meeting is now renewed for 2022 and EUSPA looks forward to it!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Greek island of Naxos from #EUspace! Photo taken by Copernicus Sentinel-2

EUSPA launches Research and Innovation (R&I) consultation on downstream applications

23.11.2021 15:54  
Horizon Europe will establish the Union’s space leadership in markets that best exploit its programme’s differentiators.
Published: 
23 November 2021

The EU Agency for the Space Programme, EUSPA, is gathering input from industry and academia to define new funding priorities in view of Horizon Europe.

Building on the EGNSS R&I momentum gained through Horizon 2020, and to include Copernicus and GOVSATCOM, EUSPA launched today a survey to collect feedback from the industry and academia, in view of the upcoming Horizon Europe funding scheme.

The downstream space sector keeps creating new jobs thanks to the exploitation of satellite data. Today, the GNSS market has generated more than 50,000 jobs in the European downstream market. Interestingly, economic activities linked to the need for localisation through satellite navigation systems, including European GNSS (Galileo and EGNOS), contribute to over 10% of European GDP. 

R& I investment will substantially focus on the downstream domain, increasing the use of space signals and data, leveraging the differentiators of the EU Space Programme components to improve the worldwide market share of EU downstream industry and SMEs.

With the present Research and Innovation (R&I) consultation, EUSPA aims at receiving inputs on the needs and priorities for downstream R&I related to the EU Space programme components: EGNSS (Galileo, EGNOS), Copernicus, and GOVSATCOM and in particular information on major technological and application trends and challenges for the next 5-10 years. 

This consultation builds on the "European GNSS downstream Research & Innovation, priorities, and consultation results" gathering updates on GNSS and other EU Space Programme components downstream.

To help us shape the future of the EU Space Programme, please fill in this short survey by December 12, 2021.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Horizon Europe will establish the Union’s space leadership in markets that best exploit its programme’s differentiators.

EUSPA launches Research and Innovation (R&I) consultation on downstream applications

23.11.2021 15:54  
Horizon Europe will establish the Union’s space leadership in markets that best exploit its programme’s differentiators.
Published: 
23 November 2021

The EU Agency for the Space Programme, EUSPA, is gathering input from industry and academia to define new funding priorities in view of Horizon Europe.

Building on the EGNSS R&I momentum gained through Horizon 2020, and to include Copernicus and GOVSATCOM, EUSPA launched today a survey to collect feedback from the industry and academia, in view of the upcoming Horizon Europe funding scheme.

The downstream space sector keeps creating new jobs thanks to the exploitation of satellite data. Today, the GNSS market has generated more than 50,000 jobs in the European downstream market. Interestingly, economic activities linked to the need for localisation through satellite navigation systems, including European GNSS (Galileo and EGNOS), contribute to over 10% of European GDP. 

R& I investment will substantially focus on the downstream domain, increasing the use of space signals and data, leveraging the differentiators of the EU Space Programme components to improve the worldwide market share of EU downstream industry and SMEs.

With the present Research and Innovation (R&I) consultation, EUSPA aims at receiving inputs on the needs and priorities for downstream R&I related to the EU Space programme components: EGNSS (Galileo, EGNOS), Copernicus, and GOVSATCOM and in particular information on major technological and application trends and challenges for the next 5-10 years. 

This consultation builds on the "European GNSS downstream Research & Innovation, priorities, and consultation results" gathering updates on GNSS and other EU Space Programme components downstream.

To help us shape the future of the EU Space Programme, please fill in this short survey by December 13, 2021.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Horizon Europe will establish the Union’s space leadership in markets that best exploit its programme’s differentiators.

EUSPA and EASA join hands to bring instrument flying to general aviation with EGNOS

22.11.2021 16:52  
You can now download the Safety Assessment Guidelines for the implementation of EGNOS-based instrument approaches to non-instrument runways located at aerodromes serving General Aviation.
Published: 
22 November 2021

Small EU aerodromes and airfields used for recreational aviation can rely on EGNOS to become safer and more accessible. EUSPA, EASA, and the aviation industry joint effort yielded a second publication offering Safety Assessment Guidelines to General Aviation operators.

General Aviation encompasses a wide range of aerial activities from private and recreational aviation, including business and recreational flights, flight training, or flying clubs, among others. Approximately 350,000 aircraft and 700,000 pilots are involved in these activities worldwide, according to IAOPA Europe, which is the European branch of the International Council of Aircraft Owner and Pilot Associations (IAOPA). General Aviation flights are usually dispatched from small aerodrome with non-instrument runways where pilots can only land using Visual Flight Rules (VFR), weather permitting. In many cases, these aerodromes do not offer Air Traffic Services (ATS).

General Aviation aerodromes usually rely on only VFR operations and have limited ground infrastructure. EGNOS is a perfect technology to enable the implementation of Instrument Flight Procedures for the general aviation community that brings additional operational and safety benefits without the need to invest in ground navigation and additional infrastructure. Even though the General Aviation (GA) community undertakes millions of flights on aircraft equipped with GNSS-receivers, it is not taking full advantage of the technology. 

Following the publication of (GNSS-based) Instrument Flight Procedures implementation for General Aviation Uncontrolled Aerodromes and non-instrument runways, in 2019, the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) and European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) published today guidelines for developing a safety assessment for GNSS-based IFR operations at General Aviation. 

The present document is intended to be a supportive guidance material to ease the undertaking of the safety assessment-related activities in the local implementation process of EGNOS-based approaches in General Aviation operations. The target audience of this document is mainly the Airspace Change Initiator, but it also comprises airspace users, aerodrome operators, aerodrome owners, and National Competent Authorities (NCAs) willing to support the implementation of IFP procedures based on the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service (EGNOS) in a General Aviation environment. “I would like to salute the excellent cooperation between EASA and EUSPA teams in the development of these guidelines. The material an important element for achieving one of the key objectives of EASA General Aviation (GA) Roadmap - to allow safer, efficient and sustainable GA IFR operations in Europe,” said Dominique Roland, Champion for the GA roadmap project at EASA.

You can download it here: Safety Assessment Guidelines for the implementation of EGNOS-based instrument approaches to non-instrument runways located at aerodromes serving General Aviation. 

Why EGNOS is the future?

SBAS is becoming the favourite technology for both airlines and airports across the globe. In Europe only, more than 400 airports use EGNOS and the trend is on the rise. The provision of EGNOS services to airfields and aerodromes not equipped with conventional navigation aids increases aviation safety and airport accessibility, especially in remote regions. Accessible airports equal more opportunities for leisure and new flight routes at a regional level with minimum costs for ground infrastructure and its maintenance. 

Watch this: EGNOS for Aviation: High Precision, Low Investment

EGNOS guarantees safer approaches for the crew and the passengers while lowering the percentage of go-arounds due to poor visibility. As more and more SBASs switch to multi-constellation/multifrequency (notably benefiting from Galileo), the SBAS services offer greater availability to users while guaranteeing integrity to comply with aviation stringent regulations. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

You can now download the Safety Assessment Guidelines for the implementation of EGNOS-based instrument approaches to non-instrument runways located at aerodromes serving General Aviation.

EUSPA and EASA join hands to bring instrument flying to general aviation with EGNOS

22.11.2021 16:52  
You can now download the Safety Assessment Guidelines for the implementation of EGNOS-based instrument approaches to non-instrument runways located at aerodromes serving General Aviation.
Published: 
22 November 2021

Small EU aerodromes and airfields used for recreational aviation can rely on EGNOS to become safer and more accessible. EUSPA, EASA, and the aviation industry joint effort yielded a second publication offering Safety Assessment Guidelines to General Aviation operators.

General Aviation encompasses a wide range of aerial activities from private and recreational aviation, including business and recreational flights, flight training, or flying clubs, among others. Approximately 350,000 aircraft and 700,000 pilots are involved in these activities worldwide, according to IAOPA Europe, which is the European branch of the International Council of Aircraft Owner and Pilot Associations (IAOPA). General Aviation flights are usually dispatched from small aerodrome with non-instrument runways where pilots can only land using Visual Flight Rules (VFR), weather permitting. In many cases, these aerodromes do not offer Air Traffic Services (ATS).

General Aviation aerodromes usually rely on only VFR operations and have limited ground infrastructure. EGNOS is a perfect technology to enable the implementation of Instrument Flight Procedures for the general aviation community that brings additional operational and safety benefits without the need to invest in ground navigation and additional infrastructure. Even though the General Aviation (GA) community undertakes millions of flights on aircraft equipped with GNSS-receivers, it is not taking full advantage of the technology. 

Following the publication of (GNSS-based) Instrument Flight Procedures implementation for General Aviation Uncontrolled Aerodromes and non-instrument runways, in 2019, the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) and European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) published today guidelines for developing a safety assessment for GNSS-based IFR operations at General Aviation. 

The present document is intended to be a supportive guidance material to ease the undertaking of the safety assessment-related activities in the local implementation process of EGNOS-based

 approaches in General Aviation operations. The target audience of this document is mainly the Airspace Change Initiator, but it also comprises airspace users, aerodrome operators, aerodrome owners, and National Competent Authorities (NCAs) willing to support the implementation of IFP procedures based on the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service (EGNOS) in a General Aviation environment.

You can download it here: Safety Assessment Guidelines for the implementation of EGNOS-based instrument approaches to non-instrument runways located at aerodromes serving General Aviation. 

Why EGNOS is the future?

SBAS is becoming the favourite technology for both airlines and airports across the globe. In Europe only, more than 400 airports use EGNOS and the trend is on the rise. The provision of EGNOS services to airfields and aerodromes not equipped with conventional navigation aids increases aviation safety and airport accessibility, especially in remote regions. Accessible airports equal more opportunities for leisure and new flight routes at a regional level with minimum costs for ground infrastructure and its maintenance. 

Watch this: EGNOS for Aviation: High Precision, Low Investment

EGNOS guarantees safer approaches for the crew and the passengers while lowering the percentage of go-arounds due to poor visibility. As more and more SBASs switch to multi-constellation/multifrequency (notably benefiting from Galileo), the SBAS services offer greater availability to users while guaranteeing integrity to comply with aviation stringent regulations. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

You can now download the Safety Assessment Guidelines for the implementation of EGNOS-based instrument approaches to non-instrument runways located at aerodromes serving General Aviation.

EUSPA and EASA join hands to bring instrument flying to general aviation with EGNOS

22.11.2021 16:52  
You can now download the Safety Assessment Guidelines for the implementation of EGNOS-based instrument approaches to non-instrument runways located at aerodromes serving General Aviation.
Published: 
22 November 2021

Small EU aerodromes and airfields used for recreational aviation can rely on EGNOS to become safer and more accessible. EUSPA, EASA, and the aviation industry joint effort yielded a second publication offering Safety Assessment Guidelines to General Aviation operators.

General Aviation encompasses a wide range of aerial activities from private and recreational aviation to flight training, and flying clubs, among others. Approximately 350,000 aircraft and 700,000 pilots are involved in these activities worldwide, according to IAOPA Europe, which is the European branch of the International Council of Aircraft Owner and Pilot Associations (IAOPA). General Aviation flights are usually dispatched from small aerodromes with non-instrument runways where pilots can only land using Visual Flight Rules (VFR), weather permitting. In many cases, these aerodromes do not offer Air Traffic Services (ATS).

General Aviation aerodromes usually rely on only VFR operations and have limited ground infrastructure. EGNOS is a perfect technology to enable the implementation of Instrument Flight Procedures for the general aviation community that brings additional operational and safety benefits without the need to invest in ground navigation and additional infrastructure. Even though the General Aviation (GA) community undertakes millions of flights on aircraft equipped with GNSS-receivers, it is not taking full advantage of the technology. 

Following the publication of (GNSS-based) Instrument Flight Procedures implementation for General Aviation Uncontrolled Aerodromes and non-instrument runways, in 2019, the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) and European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) published today guidelines for developing a safety assessment for GNSS-based IFR operations at General Aviation. 

The present document is intended to be a supportive guidance material to ease the undertaking of the safety assessment-related activities in the local implementation process of EGNOS-based approaches in General Aviation operations. The target audience of this document is mainly the Airspace Change Initiator, but it also comprises airspace users, aerodrome operators, aerodrome owners, and National Competent Authorities (NCAs) willing to support the implementation of IFP procedures based on the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service (EGNOS) in a General Aviation environment. “I would like to salute the excellent cooperation between EASA and EUSPA teams in the development of these guidelines. The material an important element for achieving one of the key objectives of EASA General Aviation (GA) Roadmap - to allow safer, efficient and sustainable GA IFR operations in Europe,” said Dominique Roland, Champion for the GA roadmap project at EASA.

You can download it here: Safety Assessment Guidelines for the implementation of EGNOS-based instrument approaches to non-instrument runways located at aerodromes serving General Aviation. 

Why EGNOS is the future?

SBAS is becoming the favourite technology for both airlines and airports across the globe. In Europe only, more than 400 airports use EGNOS and the trend is on the rise. The provision of EGNOS services to airfields and aerodromes not equipped with conventional navigation aids increases aviation safety and airport accessibility, especially in remote regions. Accessible airports equal more opportunities for leisure and new flight routes at a regional level with minimum costs for ground infrastructure and its maintenance. 

Watch this: EGNOS for Aviation: High Precision, Low Investment

EGNOS guarantees safer approaches for the crew and the passengers while lowering the percentage of go-arounds due to poor visibility. As more and more SBASs switch to multi-constellation/multifrequency (notably benefiting from Galileo), the SBAS services offer greater availability to users while guaranteeing integrity to comply with aviation stringent regulations. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

You can now download the Safety Assessment Guidelines for the implementation of EGNOS-based instrument approaches to non-instrument runways located at aerodromes serving General Aviation.

EUSPA and EASA join hands to bring instrument flying to general aviation with EGNOS

22.11.2021 16:52  
You can now download the Safety Assessment Guidelines for the implementation of EGNOS-based instrument approaches to non-instrument runways located at aerodromes serving General Aviation.
Published: 
22 November 2021

Small EU aerodromes and airfields used for recreational aviation can rely on EGNOS to become safer and more accessible. EUSPA, EASA, and the aviation industry joint effort yielded a second publication offering Safety Assessment Guidelines to General Aviation operators.

General Aviation encompasses a wide range of aerial activities from private and recreational aviation, including business and recreational flights, flight training, or flying clubs, among others. Approximately 350,000 aircraft and 700,000 pilots are involved in these activities worldwide, according to IAOPA Europe, which is the European branch of the International Council of Aircraft Owner and Pilot Associations (IAOPA). General Aviation flights are usually dispatched from small aerodrome with non-instrument runways where pilots can only land using Visual Flight Rules (VFR), weather permitting. In many cases, these aerodromes do not offer Air Traffic Services (ATS).

General Aviation aerodromes usually rely on only VFR operations and have limited ground infrastructure. EGNOS is a perfect technology to enable the implementation of Instrument Flight Procedures for the general aviation community that brings additional operational and safety benefits without the need to invest in ground navigation and additional infrastructure. Even though the General Aviation (GA) community undertakes millions of flights on aircraft equipped with GNSS-receivers, it is not taking full advantage of the technology. 

Following the publication of (GNSS-based) Instrument Flight Procedures implementation for General Aviation Uncontrolled Aerodromes and non-instrument runways, in 2019, the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) and European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) published today guidelines for developing a safety assessment for GNSS-based IFR operations at General Aviation. 

The present document is intended to be a supportive guidance material to ease the undertaking of the safety assessment-related activities in the local implementation process of EGNOS-based approaches in General Aviation operations. The target audience of this document is mainly the Airspace Change Initiator, but it also comprises airspace users, aerodrome operators, aerodrome owners, and National Competent Authorities (NCAs) willing to support the implementation of IFP procedures based on the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service (EGNOS) in a General Aviation environment.

You can download it here: Safety Assessment Guidelines for the implementation of EGNOS-based instrument approaches to non-instrument runways located at aerodromes serving General Aviation. 

Why EGNOS is the future?

SBAS is becoming the favourite technology for both airlines and airports across the globe. In Europe only, more than 400 airports use EGNOS and the trend is on the rise. The provision of EGNOS services to airfields and aerodromes not equipped with conventional navigation aids increases aviation safety and airport accessibility, especially in remote regions. Accessible airports equal more opportunities for leisure and new flight routes at a regional level with minimum costs for ground infrastructure and its maintenance. 

Watch this: EGNOS for Aviation: High Precision, Low Investment

EGNOS guarantees safer approaches for the crew and the passengers while lowering the percentage of go-arounds due to poor visibility. As more and more SBASs switch to multi-constellation/multifrequency (notably benefiting from Galileo), the SBAS services offer greater availability to users while guaranteeing integrity to comply with aviation stringent regulations. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

You can now download the Safety Assessment Guidelines for the implementation of EGNOS-based instrument approaches to non-instrument runways located at aerodromes serving General Aviation.

EUSPA and EASA join hands to bring instrument flying to general aviation with EGNOS

22.11.2021 16:52  
You can now download the Safety Assessment Guidelines for the implementation of EGNOS-based instrument approaches to non-instrument runways located at aerodromes serving General Aviation.
Published: 
22 November 2021

Small EU aerodromes and airfields used for recreational aviation can rely on EGNOS to become safer and more accessible. EUSPA, EASA, and the aviation industry joint effort yielded a second publication offering Safety Assessment Guidelines to General Aviation operators.

General Aviation encompasses a wide range of aerial activities from private and recreational aviation to flight training, and flying clubs, among others. Approximately 350,000 aircraft and 700,000 pilots are involved in these activities worldwide, according to IAOPA Europe, which is the European branch of the International Council of Aircraft Owner and Pilot Associations (IAOPA). General Aviation flights are usually dispatched from small aerodromes with non-instrument runways where pilots can only land using Visual Flight Rules (VFR), weather permitting. In many cases, these aerodromes do not offer Air Traffic Services (ATS).

General Aviation aerodromes usually rely on only VFR operations and have limited ground infrastructure. EGNOS is a perfect technology to enable the implementation of Instrument Flight Procedures for the general aviation community that brings additional operational and safety benefits without the need to invest in ground navigation and additional infrastructure. Even though the General Aviation (GA) community undertakes millions of flights on aircraft equipped with GNSS-receivers, it is not taking full advantage of the technology. 

Following the publication of (GNSS-based) Instrument Flight Procedures implementation for General Aviation Uncontrolled Aerodromes and non-instrument runways, in 2019, the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) and European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) published today guidelines for developing a safety assessment for GNSS-based IFR operations at General Aviation. 

The present document is intended to be a supportive guidance material to ease the undertaking of the safety assessment-related activities in the local implementation process of EGNOS-based approaches in General Aviation operations. The target audience of this document is mainly the Airspace Change Initiator, but it also comprises airspace users, aerodrome operators, aerodrome owners, and National Competent Authorities (NCAs) willing to support the implementation of IFP procedures based on the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service (EGNOS) in a General Aviation environment. 

“I would like to salute the excellent cooperation between EASA and EUSPA teams in the development of these guidelines. The material an important element for achieving one of the key objectives of EASA General Aviation (GA) Roadmap - to allow safer, efficient and sustainable GA IFR operations in Europe,” said Dominique Roland, Champion for the GA roadmap project at EASA.

“This is another important step to facilitate EGNOS implementation in small general aviation aerodromes. EGNOS can enable landing with instrument guidance to non-instrumented aerodromes where now it is possible to land just visually. This material is an outcome of a great cooperation of EUSPA with EASA. The general aviation community and stakeholders supported us via their active participation in our working groups.” said Fiammetta Diani, Head of Market Development Department at EUSPA.

You can download it here: Safety Assessment Guidelines for the implementation of EGNOS-based instrument approaches to non-instrument runways located at aerodromes serving General Aviation. 

Why EGNOS is the future?

SBAS is becoming the favourite technology for both airlines and airports across the globe. In Europe only, more than 400 airports use EGNOS and the trend is on the rise. The provision of EGNOS services to airfields and aerodromes not equipped with conventional navigation aids increases aviation safety and airport accessibility, especially in remote regions. Accessible airports equal more opportunities for leisure and new flight routes at a regional level with minimum costs for ground infrastructure and its maintenance. 

Watch this: EGNOS for Aviation: High Precision, Low Investment

EGNOS guarantees safer approaches for the crew and the passengers while lowering the percentage of go-arounds due to poor visibility. As more and more SBASs switch to multi-constellation/multifrequency (notably benefiting from Galileo), the SBAS services offer greater availability to users while guaranteeing integrity to comply with aviation stringent regulations. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

You can now download the Safety Assessment Guidelines for the implementation of EGNOS-based instrument approaches to non-instrument runways located at aerodromes serving General Aviation.

EUSPA ready for LEOP ahead of Galileo Launch 11

19.11.2021 16:18  
Galileo satellites attached to their dispenser atop their Fregat upper stage separating from the Soyuz upper stage. The Fregat then flies them the rest of the way up to medium-Earth orbit. (Credits: ESA–Pierre Carril, 2014)
Published: 
19 November 2021

We are less than two weeks away from the latest Galileo launch from the European Spaceport in Kourou, French Guyana. The Galileo Launch 11 is the first of a series of 6 launches (with two satellites per launch), and the EUSPA’s tightly-knit LEOP team is ready for a cooperative EU space mission!

The Galileo satellites 27 and 28 will be launched on-board of a Soyuz carrier on December 1, 2021 at 21:31:27, Kourou time – or 01:31:27 CET from Europe’s Spaceport in French Guiana. The 46m tall rocket will bring the Galileo satellites to their new home located 23,222 km above us, in its medium-Earth orbit. 

Role of EUSPA in the launch 11

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) will be in charge Launch and Early Orbit Phase  (LEOP) operations which will be overseen by a tightly-knit team of specialists, ranging from spacecraft to ground engineers, from operations to design and manufacturing specialists, and from commanding through mission direction and project management.

LEOP is one of the most exciting and important phases of a space mission, as it handles the launch of the spacecraft, its travel it into the correct orbit, gradually switching on the spacecraft platform to test the core satellite elements. 

Let’s rewind to the beginning…

Soon after the spacecraft separates from the launcher, an initialisation sequence will be automatically triggered by the On-Board Data Handling software to bring the satellites to a ‘breathing point’. This is the point at which the satellite’s attitude is stable and pointing towards the sun, and its solar arrays are deployed to provide full charging power to its batteries. At this stage the satellite is thermally stable, ensuring adequate temperature ranges for all units, and a stable link to the ground.

Later on, the spacecraft internal reaction wheels will be tested to ensure that the spacecraft can hold its momentum, and can execute simple rotation manoeuvres without spending its limited fuel in thrusting activities. The teams will proceed to celebrate once the spacecraft uses these wheels to rotate towards the earth to achieve the most stable attitude for its future operations.  After that, and to finish the activities, the satellite couple will part ways and be put into the direction of their own orbital positions, by means of a set of Drift Start manoeuvres.

Altogether, the LEOP will take about 10 days, beginning with a system countdown a few hours before the launch, all the way up to the execution of the drift start manoeuvres (i.e. sending the spacecraft from the injection to its target position in orbit), later followed by complete commissioning and In Orbit Tests, that will eventually lead the spacecraft to entering into Galileo service provision. 

The LEOP operations will be conducted and commanded from the Galileo Control Centre in Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany. Working together with SpaceOpal and its GSOp consortium (DLR-GfR mbH, GSOC and Telespazio), in cooperation with CNES CSG and ESA, EUSPA is responsible for the different stages of the LEOP operations, which will eventually allow the new satellites to be inserted into the Galileo constellation.

Endorsed by the EUSPA Security Accreditation Board, responsible for the security approval of the satellite launches, Galileo LEOP operations will constitute one of the most cooperative activities between numerous European entities in the space sector.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Galileo satellites attached to their dispenser atop their Fregat upper stage separating from the Soyuz upper stage. The Fregat then flies them the rest of the way up to medium-Earth orbit. (Credits: ESA–Pierre Carril, 2014)

EUSPA ready for LEOP ahead of Galileo Launch 11

19.11.2021 16:18  
Galileo satellites attached to their dispenser atop their Fregat upper stage separating from the Soyuz upper stage. The Fregat then flies them the rest of the way up to medium-Earth orbit. (Credits: ESA–Pierre Carril, 2014)
Published: 
18 November 2021

We are less than two weeks away from the latest Galileo launch from the European Spaceport in Kourou, French Guyana. The Galileo Launch 11 is the first of a series of 6 launches (with two satellites per launch), and the EUSPA’s tightly-knit LEOP team is ready for a cooperative EU space mission!

The Galileo satellites 27 and 28 will be launched on-board of a Soyuz carrier on December 2, 2021 at 21:31:27, Kourou time – or 01:31:27 CET from Europe’s Spaceport in French Guiana. The 46m tall rocket will bring the Galileo satellites to their new home located 23,222 km above us, in its medium-Earth orbit. 

Role of EUSPA in the launch 11

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) will be in charge of the satellite operations from separation of the Launch vehicule. It will be overseen by a tightly-knit team of specialists, ranging from spacecraft to ground engineers, from operations to design and manufacturing specialists, and from commanding through mission direction and project management.

Launch and Early Orbit Phase is one of the most exciting and important phases of a space mission, as it handles the launch of the spacecraft, its travel into the correct orbit, gradually switching on the spacecraft platform to test the core satellite elements. 

Let’s rewind to the beginning…

Soon after the spacecraft separates from the launcher, an initialisation sequence will be automatically triggered by the On-Board Data Handling software to bring the satellites to a ‘breathing point’. This is the point at which the satellite’s attitude is stable and pointing towards the sun, and its solar arrays are deployed to provide full charging power to its batteries. At this stage the satellite is thermally stable, ensuring adequate temperature ranges for all units, and a stable link to the ground.

Later on, the spacecraft internal reaction wheels will be tested to ensure that the spacecraft can hold its momentum, and can execute simple rotation manoeuvres without spending its limited fuel in thrusting activities. The teams will proceed to celebrate once the spacecraft uses these wheels to rotate towards the earth to achieve the most stable attitude for its future operations.  After that, and to finish the activities, the satellite couple will part ways and be put into the direction of their own orbital positions, by means of a set of Drift Start manoeuvres.

Altogether, the LEOP will take about 10 days, beginning with a system countdown a few hours before the launch, all the way up to the execution of the drift start manoeuvres (i.e. sending the spacecraft from the injection to its target position in orbit), later followed by complete commissioning and In Orbit Tests, that will eventually lead the spacecraft to entering into Galileo service provision. 

The satellite operations will be conducted and commanded from the Galileo Control Centre in Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany. Working together with SpaceOpal and its GSOp consortium (DLR-GfR mbH, GSOC and Telespazio), in cooperation with CNES CSG and ESA, EUSPA is responsible for the different stages of the LEOP operations, which will eventually allow the new satellites to be inserted into the Galileo constellation.

Endorsed by the EUSPA Security Accreditation Board, responsible for the security approval of the satellite launches, Galileo LEOP operations will constitute one of the most cooperative activities between numerous European entities in the space sector.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Galileo satellites attached to their dispenser atop their Fregat upper stage separating from the Soyuz upper stage. The Fregat then flies them the rest of the way up to medium-Earth orbit. (Credits: ESA–Pierre Carril, 2014)

EUSPA ready for LEOP ahead of Galileo Launch 11

19.11.2021 16:18  
Galileo satellites attached to their dispenser atop their Fregat upper stage separating from the Soyuz upper stage. The Fregat then flies them the rest of the way up to medium-Earth orbit. (Credits: ESA–Pierre Carril, 2014)
Published: 
19 November 2021

We are less than two weeks away from the latest Galileo launch from the European Spaceport in Kourou, French Guyana. The Galileo Launch 11 is the first of a series of 6 launches (with two satellites per launch), and the EUSPA’s tightly-knit LEOP team is ready for a cooperative EU space mission!

The Galileo satellites 27 and 28 will be launched on-board of a Soyuz carrier on December 1, 2021 at 21:31:27, Kourou time – or 01:31:27 CET from Europe’s Spaceport in French Guiana. The 46m tall rocket will bring the Galileo satellites to their new home located 23,222 km above us, in its medium-Earth orbit. 

Role of EUSPA in the launch 11

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) will be in charge of Launch and Early Orbit Phase (LEOP) operations which will be overseen by a tightly-knit team of specialists, ranging from spacecraft to ground engineers, from operations to design and manufacturing specialists, and from commanding through mission direction and project management.

LEOP is one of the most exciting and important phases of a space mission, as it handles the launch of the spacecraft, its travel it into the correct orbit, gradually switching on the spacecraft platform to test the core satellite elements. 

Let’s rewind to the beginning…

Soon after the spacecraft separates from the launcher, an initialisation sequence will be automatically triggered by the On-Board Data Handling software to bring the satellites to a ‘breathing point’. This is the point at which the satellite’s attitude is stable and pointing towards the sun, and its solar arrays are deployed to provide full charging power to its batteries. At this stage the satellite is thermally stable, ensuring adequate temperature ranges for all units, and a stable link to the ground.

Later on, the spacecraft internal reaction wheels will be tested to ensure that the spacecraft can hold its momentum, and can execute simple rotation manoeuvres without spending its limited fuel in thrusting activities. The teams will proceed to celebrate once the spacecraft uses these wheels to rotate towards the earth to achieve the most stable attitude for its future operations.  After that, and to finish the activities, the satellite couple will part ways and be put into the direction of their own orbital positions, by means of a set of Drift Start manoeuvres.

Altogether, the LEOP will take about 10 days, beginning with a system countdown a few hours before the launch, all the way up to the execution of the drift start manoeuvres (i.e. sending the spacecraft from the injection to its target position in orbit), later followed by complete commissioning and In Orbit Tests, that will eventually lead the spacecraft to entering into Galileo service provision. 

The LEOP operations will be conducted and commanded from the Galileo Control Centre in Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany. Working together with SpaceOpal and its GSOp consortium (DLR-GfR mbH, GSOC and Telespazio), in cooperation with CNES CSG and ESA, EUSPA is responsible for the different stages of the LEOP operations, which will eventually allow the new satellites to be inserted into the Galileo constellation.

Endorsed by the EUSPA Security Accreditation Board, responsible for the security approval of the satellite launches, Galileo LEOP operations will constitute one of the most cooperative activities between numerous European entities in the space sector.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Galileo satellites attached to their dispenser atop their Fregat upper stage separating from the Soyuz upper stage. The Fregat then flies them the rest of the way up to medium-Earth orbit. (Credits: ESA–Pierre Carril, 2014)

EUSPA ready for satellite operations ahead of Galileo Launch 11

19.11.2021 16:18  
Galileo satellites attached to their dispenser atop their Fregat upper stage separating from the Soyuz upper stage. The Fregat then flies them the rest of the way up to medium-Earth orbit. (Credits: ESA–Pierre Carril, 2014)
Published: 
18 November 2021

We are less than two weeks away from the latest Galileo launch from the European Spaceport in Kourou, French Guyana. The Galileo Launch 11 is the first of a series of 6 launches (with two satellites per launch), and the EUSPA’s tightly-knit LEOP team is ready for a cooperative EU space mission!

The Galileo satellites 27 and 28 will be launched on-board of a Soyuz carrier on December 2, 2021 at 21:31:27, Kourou time – or 01:31:27 CET from Europe’s Spaceport in French Guiana. The 46m tall rocket will bring the Galileo satellites to their new home located 23,222 km above us, in its medium-Earth orbit. 

Role of EUSPA in the launch 11

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) will be in charge of the satellite operations from separation of the Launch vehicule. It will be overseen by a tightly-knit team of specialists, ranging from spacecraft to ground engineers, from operations to design and manufacturing specialists, and from commanding through mission direction and project management.

Launch and Early Orbit Phase is one of the most exciting and important phases of a space mission, as it handles the launch of the spacecraft, its travel into the correct orbit, gradually switching on the spacecraft platform to test the core satellite elements. 

Let’s rewind to the beginning…

Soon after the spacecraft separates from the launcher, an initialisation sequence will be automatically triggered by the On-Board Data Handling software to bring the satellites to a ‘breathing point’. This is the point at which the satellite’s attitude is stable and pointing towards the sun, and its solar arrays are deployed to provide full charging power to its batteries. At this stage the satellite is thermally stable, ensuring adequate temperature ranges for all units, and a stable link to the ground.

Later on, the spacecraft internal reaction wheels will be tested to ensure that the spacecraft can hold its momentum, and can execute simple rotation manoeuvres without spending its limited fuel in thrusting activities. The teams will proceed to celebrate once the spacecraft uses these wheels to rotate towards the earth to achieve the most stable attitude for its future operations.  After that, and to finish the activities, the satellite couple will part ways and be put into the direction of their own orbital positions, by means of a set of Drift Start manoeuvres.

Altogether, the LEOP will take about 10 days, beginning with a system countdown a few hours before the launch, all the way up to the execution of the drift start manoeuvres (i.e. sending the spacecraft from the injection to its target position in orbit), later followed by complete commissioning and In Orbit Tests, that will eventually lead the spacecraft to entering into Galileo service provision. 

The satellite operations will be conducted and commanded from the Galileo Control Centre in Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany. Working together with SpaceOpal and its GSOp consortium (DLR-GfR mbH, GSOC and Telespazio), in cooperation with CNES CSG and ESA, EUSPA is responsible for the different stages of the LEOP operations, which will eventually allow the new satellites to be inserted into the Galileo constellation.

Endorsed by the EUSPA Security Accreditation Board, responsible for the security approval of the satellite launches, Galileo LEOP operations will constitute one of the most cooperative activities between numerous European entities in the space sector.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Galileo satellites attached to their dispenser atop their Fregat upper stage separating from the Soyuz upper stage. The Fregat then flies them the rest of the way up to medium-Earth orbit. (Credits: ESA–Pierre Carril, 2014)

EUSPA ready for LEOP ahead of Galileo Launch 11

19.11.2021 16:18  
Galileo satellites attached to their dispenser atop their Fregat upper stage separating from the Soyuz upper stage. The Fregat then flies them the rest of the way up to medium-Earth orbit. (Credits: ESA–Pierre Carril, 2014)
Published: 
19 November 2021

We are less than two weeks away from the latest Galileo launch from the European Spaceport in Kourou, French Guyana. The Galileo Launch 11 is the first of a series of 6 launches (with two satellites per launch), and the EUSPA’s tightly-knit LEOP team is ready for a cooperative EU space mission!

The Galileo satellites 27 and 28 will be launched on-board of a Soyuz carrier on December 1, 2021 at 21:31:27, Kourou time – or 01:31:27 CET from Europe’s Spaceport in French Guiana. The 46m tall rocket will bring the Galileo satellites to their new home located 23,222 km above us, in its medium-Earth orbit. 

Role of EUSPA in the launch 11

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) will be in charge of Launch and Early Orbit Phase (LEOP) operations which will be overseen by a tightly-knit team of specialists, ranging from spacecraft to ground engineers, from operations to design and manufacturing specialists, and from commanding through mission direction and project management.

LEOP is one of the most exciting and important phases of a space mission, as it handles the launch of the spacecraft, its travel into the correct orbit, gradually switching on the spacecraft platform to test the core satellite elements. 

Let’s rewind to the beginning…

Soon after the spacecraft separates from the launcher, an initialisation sequence will be automatically triggered by the On-Board Data Handling software to bring the satellites to a ‘breathing point’. This is the point at which the satellite’s attitude is stable and pointing towards the sun, and its solar arrays are deployed to provide full charging power to its batteries. At this stage the satellite is thermally stable, ensuring adequate temperature ranges for all units, and a stable link to the ground.

Later on, the spacecraft internal reaction wheels will be tested to ensure that the spacecraft can hold its momentum, and can execute simple rotation manoeuvres without spending its limited fuel in thrusting activities. The teams will proceed to celebrate once the spacecraft uses these wheels to rotate towards the earth to achieve the most stable attitude for its future operations.  After that, and to finish the activities, the satellite couple will part ways and be put into the direction of their own orbital positions, by means of a set of Drift Start manoeuvres.

Altogether, the LEOP will take about 10 days, beginning with a system countdown a few hours before the launch, all the way up to the execution of the drift start manoeuvres (i.e. sending the spacecraft from the injection to its target position in orbit), later followed by complete commissioning and In Orbit Tests, that will eventually lead the spacecraft to entering into Galileo service provision. 

The LEOP operations will be conducted and commanded from the Galileo Control Centre in Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany. Working together with SpaceOpal and its GSOp consortium (DLR-GfR mbH, GSOC and Telespazio), in cooperation with CNES CSG and ESA, EUSPA is responsible for the different stages of the LEOP operations, which will eventually allow the new satellites to be inserted into the Galileo constellation.

Endorsed by the EUSPA Security Accreditation Board, responsible for the security approval of the satellite launches, Galileo LEOP operations will constitute one of the most cooperative activities between numerous European entities in the space sector.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Galileo satellites attached to their dispenser atop their Fregat upper stage separating from the Soyuz upper stage. The Fregat then flies them the rest of the way up to medium-Earth orbit. (Credits: ESA–Pierre Carril, 2014)

EUSPA ready for satellite operations ahead of Galileo Launch 11

19.11.2021 16:18  
Galileo satellites attached to their dispenser atop their Fregat upper stage separating from the Soyuz upper stage. The Fregat then flies them the rest of the way up to medium-Earth orbit. (Credits: ESA–Pierre Carril, 2014)
Published: 
18 November 2021

We are less than two weeks away from the latest Galileo launch from the European Spaceport in Kourou, French Guyana. The Galileo Launch 11 is the first of a series of 6 launches (with two satellites per launch), and the EUSPA’s tightly-knit LEOP team is ready for a cooperative EU space mission!

The Galileo satellites 27 and 28 will be launched on-board of a Soyuz carrier on December 2, 2021 at 21:31:27, Kourou time – or 01:31:27 CET from Europe’s Spaceport in French Guiana. The 46m tall rocket will bring the Galileo satellites to their new home located 23,222 km above us, in its medium-Earth orbit. 

Role of EUSPA in the launch 11

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) will be in charge of the satellite operations from separation of the Launch vehicle. It will be overseen by a tightly-knit team of specialists, ranging from spacecraft to ground engineers, from operations to design and manufacturing specialists, and from commanding through mission direction and project management.

Launch and Early Orbit Phase is one of the most exciting and important phases of a space mission, as it handles the launch of the spacecraft, its travel into the correct orbit, gradually switching on the spacecraft platform to test the core satellite elements. 

Let’s rewind to the beginning…

Soon after the spacecraft separates from the launcher, an initialisation sequence will be automatically triggered by the On-Board Data Handling software to bring the satellites to a ‘breathing point’. This is the point at which the satellite’s attitude is stable and pointing towards the sun, and its solar arrays are deployed to provide full charging power to its batteries. At this stage the satellite is thermally stable, ensuring adequate temperature ranges for all units, and a stable link to the ground.

Later on, the spacecraft internal reaction wheels will be tested to ensure that the spacecraft can hold its momentum, and can execute simple rotation manoeuvres without spending its limited fuel in thrusting activities. The teams will proceed to celebrate once the spacecraft uses these wheels to rotate towards the earth to achieve the most stable attitude for its future operations.  After that, and to finish the activities, the satellite couple will part ways and be put into the direction of their own orbital positions, by means of a set of Drift Start manoeuvres.

Altogether, the LEOP will take about 10 days, beginning with a system countdown a few hours before the launch, all the way up to the execution of the drift start manoeuvres (i.e. sending the spacecraft from the injection to its target position in orbit), later followed by complete commissioning and In Orbit Tests, that will eventually lead the spacecraft to entering into Galileo service provision. 

The satellite operations will be conducted and commanded from the Galileo Control Centre in Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany. Working together with SpaceOpal and its GSOp consortium (DLR-GfR mbH, GSOC and Telespazio), in cooperation with CNES CSG and ESA, EUSPA is responsible for the different stages of the LEOP operations, which will eventually allow the new satellites to be inserted into the Galileo constellation.

Endorsed by the EUSPA Security Accreditation Board, responsible for the security approval of the satellite launches, Galileo LEOP operations will constitute one of the most cooperative activities between numerous European entities in the space sector.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Galileo satellites attached to their dispenser atop their Fregat upper stage separating from the Soyuz upper stage. The Fregat then flies them the rest of the way up to medium-Earth orbit. (Credits: ESA–Pierre Carril, 2014)

EUSPA ready for satellite operations ahead of Galileo Launch 11

19.11.2021 16:18  
Galileo satellites attached to their dispenser atop their Fregat upper stage separating from the Soyuz upper stage. The Fregat then flies them the rest of the way up to medium-Earth orbit. (Credits: ESA–Pierre Carril, 2014)
Published: 
18 November 2021

We are less than two weeks away from the latest Galileo launch from the European Spaceport in Kourou, French Guyana. The Galileo Launch 11 is the first of a series of 6 launches (with two satellites per launch), and the EUSPA’s tightly-knit LEOP team is ready for a cooperative EU space mission!

The Galileo satellites 27 and 28 will be launched on-board of a Soyuz carrier on 2 December 2021 at 21:27:25, Kourou time – or 3 December at 01:27:25 CET from Europe’s Spaceport in French Guiana. The 46m tall rocket will bring the Galileo satellites to their new home located 23,222 km above us, in its medium-Earth orbit. 

Role of EUSPA in the launch 11

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) will be in charge of the satellite operations from separation of the Launch vehicle. It will be overseen by a tightly-knit team of specialists, ranging from spacecraft to ground engineers, from operations to design and manufacturing specialists, and from commanding through mission direction and project management.

Launch and Early Orbit Phase is one of the most exciting and important phases of a space mission, as it handles the launch of the spacecraft, its travel into the correct orbit, gradually switching on the spacecraft platform to test the core satellite elements. 

Let’s rewind to the beginning…

Soon after the spacecraft separates from the launcher, an initialisation sequence will be automatically triggered by the On-Board Data Handling software to bring the satellites to a ‘breathing point’. This is the point at which the satellite’s attitude is stable and pointing towards the sun, and its solar arrays are deployed to provide full charging power to its batteries. At this stage the satellite is thermally stable, ensuring adequate temperature ranges for all units, and a stable link to the ground.

Later on, the spacecraft internal reaction wheels will be tested to ensure that the spacecraft can hold its momentum, and can execute simple rotation manoeuvres without spending its limited fuel in thrusting activities. The teams will proceed to celebrate once the spacecraft uses these wheels to rotate towards the earth to achieve the most stable attitude for its future operations.  After that, and to finish the activities, the satellite couple will part ways and be put into the direction of their own orbital positions, by means of a set of Drift Start manoeuvres.

Altogether, the LEOP will take about 10 days, beginning with a system countdown a few hours before the launch, all the way up to the execution of the drift start manoeuvres (i.e. sending the spacecraft from the injection to its target position in orbit), later followed by complete commissioning and In Orbit Tests, that will eventually lead the spacecraft to entering into Galileo service provision. 

The satellite operations will be conducted and commanded from the Galileo Control Centre in Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany. Working together with SpaceOpal and its GSOp consortium (DLR-GfR mbH, GSOC and Telespazio), in cooperation with CNES CSG and ESA, EUSPA is responsible for the different stages of the LEOP operations, which will eventually allow the new satellites to be inserted into the Galileo constellation.

Endorsed by the EUSPA Security Accreditation Board, responsible for the security approval of the satellite launches, Galileo LEOP operations will constitute one of the most cooperative activities between numerous European entities in the space sector.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Galileo satellites attached to their dispenser atop their Fregat upper stage separating from the Soyuz upper stage. The Fregat then flies them the rest of the way up to medium-Earth orbit. (Credits: ESA–Pierre Carril, 2014)

EUSPA ready for satellite operations ahead of Galileo Launch 11

19.11.2021 16:18  
Galileo satellites attached to their dispenser atop their Fregat upper stage separating from the Soyuz upper stage. The Fregat then flies them the rest of the way up to medium-Earth orbit. (Credits: ESA–Pierre Carril, 2014)
Published: 
18 November 2021

We are less than two weeks away from the latest Galileo launch from the European Spaceport in Kourou, French Guyana. The Galileo Launch 11 is the first of a series of 6 launches (with two satellites per launch), and the EUSPA’s tightly-knit LEOP team is ready for a cooperative EU space mission!

The Galileo satellites 27 and 28 will be launched on-board of a Soyuz carrier on 1 December 2021 at 21:31:27, Kourou time – or 2 December at 01:31:27 CET from Europe’s Spaceport in French Guiana. The 46m tall rocket will bring the Galileo satellites to their new home located 23,222 km above us, in its medium-Earth orbit. 

Role of EUSPA in the launch 11

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) will be in charge of the satellite operations from separation of the Launch vehicle. It will be overseen by a tightly-knit team of specialists, ranging from spacecraft to ground engineers, from operations to design and manufacturing specialists, and from commanding through mission direction and project management.

Launch and Early Orbit Phase is one of the most exciting and important phases of a space mission, as it handles the launch of the spacecraft, its travel into the correct orbit, gradually switching on the spacecraft platform to test the core satellite elements. 

Let’s rewind to the beginning…

Soon after the spacecraft separates from the launcher, an initialisation sequence will be automatically triggered by the On-Board Data Handling software to bring the satellites to a ‘breathing point’. This is the point at which the satellite’s attitude is stable and pointing towards the sun, and its solar arrays are deployed to provide full charging power to its batteries. At this stage the satellite is thermally stable, ensuring adequate temperature ranges for all units, and a stable link to the ground.

Later on, the spacecraft internal reaction wheels will be tested to ensure that the spacecraft can hold its momentum, and can execute simple rotation manoeuvres without spending its limited fuel in thrusting activities. The teams will proceed to celebrate once the spacecraft uses these wheels to rotate towards the earth to achieve the most stable attitude for its future operations.  After that, and to finish the activities, the satellite couple will part ways and be put into the direction of their own orbital positions, by means of a set of Drift Start manoeuvres.

Altogether, the LEOP will take about 10 days, beginning with a system countdown a few hours before the launch, all the way up to the execution of the drift start manoeuvres (i.e. sending the spacecraft from the injection to its target position in orbit), later followed by complete commissioning and In Orbit Tests, that will eventually lead the spacecraft to entering into Galileo service provision. 

The satellite operations will be conducted and commanded from the Galileo Control Centre in Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany. Working together with SpaceOpal and its GSOp consortium (DLR-GfR mbH, GSOC and Telespazio), in cooperation with CNES CSG and ESA, EUSPA is responsible for the different stages of the LEOP operations, which will eventually allow the new satellites to be inserted into the Galileo constellation.

Endorsed by the EUSPA Security Accreditation Board, responsible for the security approval of the satellite launches, Galileo LEOP operations will constitute one of the most cooperative activities between numerous European entities in the space sector.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Galileo satellites attached to their dispenser atop their Fregat upper stage separating from the Soyuz upper stage. The Fregat then flies them the rest of the way up to medium-Earth orbit. (Credits: ESA–Pierre Carril, 2014)

EUSPA ready for satellite operations ahead of Galileo Launch 11

19.11.2021 16:18  
Galileo satellites attached to their dispenser atop their Fregat upper stage separating from the Soyuz upper stage. The Fregat then flies them the rest of the way up to medium-Earth orbit. (Credits: ESA–Pierre Carril, 2014)
Published: 
18 November 2021

We are less than two weeks away from the latest Galileo launch from the European Spaceport in Kourou, French Guyana. The Galileo Launch 11 is the first of a series of 6 launches (with two satellites per launch), and the EUSPA’s tightly-knit LEOP team is ready for a cooperative EU space mission!

The Galileo satellites 27 and 28 will be launched on-board of a Soyuz carrier on 4 December 2021 at 21:19, Kourou time – or 5 December at 01:19 CET from Europe’s Spaceport in French Guiana. The 46m tall rocket will bring the Galileo satellites to their new home located 23,222 km above us, in its medium-Earth orbit. 

Role of EUSPA in the launch 11

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) will be in charge of the satellite operations from separation of the Launch vehicle. It will be overseen by a tightly-knit team of specialists, ranging from spacecraft to ground engineers, from operations to design and manufacturing specialists, and from commanding through mission direction and project management.

Launch and Early Orbit Phase is one of the most exciting and important phases of a space mission, as it handles the launch of the spacecraft, its travel into the correct orbit, gradually switching on the spacecraft platform to test the core satellite elements. 

Let’s rewind to the beginning…

Soon after the spacecraft separates from the launcher, an initialisation sequence will be automatically triggered by the On-Board Data Handling software to bring the satellites to a ‘breathing point’. This is the point at which the satellite’s attitude is stable and pointing towards the sun, and its solar arrays are deployed to provide full charging power to its batteries. At this stage the satellite is thermally stable, ensuring adequate temperature ranges for all units, and a stable link to the ground.

Later on, the spacecraft internal reaction wheels will be tested to ensure that the spacecraft can hold its momentum, and can execute simple rotation manoeuvres without spending its limited fuel in thrusting activities. The teams will proceed to celebrate once the spacecraft uses these wheels to rotate towards the earth to achieve the most stable attitude for its future operations.  After that, and to finish the activities, the satellite couple will part ways and be put into the direction of their own orbital positions, by means of a set of Drift Start manoeuvres.

Altogether, the LEOP will take about 10 days, beginning with a system countdown a few hours before the launch, all the way up to the execution of the drift start manoeuvres (i.e. sending the spacecraft from the injection to its target position in orbit), later followed by complete commissioning and In Orbit Tests, that will eventually lead the spacecraft to entering into Galileo service provision. 

The satellite operations will be conducted and commanded from the Galileo Control Centre in Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany. Working together with SpaceOpal and its GSOp consortium (DLR-GfR mbH, GSOC and Telespazio), in cooperation with CNES CSG and ESA, EUSPA is responsible for the different stages of the LEOP operations, which will eventually allow the new satellites to be inserted into the Galileo constellation.

Endorsed by the EUSPA Security Accreditation Board, responsible for the security approval of the satellite launches, Galileo LEOP operations will constitute one of the most cooperative activities between numerous European entities in the space sector.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Galileo satellites attached to their dispenser atop their Fregat upper stage separating from the Soyuz upper stage. The Fregat then flies them the rest of the way up to medium-Earth orbit. (Credits: ESA–Pierre Carril, 2014)

EUSPA ready for LEOP ahead of Galileo Launch 11

19.11.2021 16:18  
Galileo satellites attached to their dispenser atop their Fregat upper stage separating from the Soyuz upper stage. The Fregat then flies them the rest of the way up to medium-Earth orbit. (Credits: ESA–Pierre Carril, 2014)
Published: 
19 November 2021

We are less than two weeks away from the latest Galileo launch from the European Spaceport in Kourou, French Guyana. The Galileo Launch 11 is the first of a series of 6 launches (with two satellites per launch), and the EUSPA’s tightly-knit LEOP team is ready for a cooperative EU space mission!

The Galileo satellites 27 and 28 will be launched on-board of a Soyuz carrier on December 2, 2021 at 21:31:27, Kourou time – or 01:31:27 CET from Europe’s Spaceport in French Guiana. The 46m tall rocket will bring the Galileo satellites to their new home located 23,222 km above us, in its medium-Earth orbit. 

Role of EUSPA in the launch 11

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) will be in charge of Launch and Early Orbit Phase (LEOP) operations which will be overseen by a tightly-knit team of specialists, ranging from spacecraft to ground engineers, from operations to design and manufacturing specialists, and from commanding through mission direction and project management.

LEOP is one of the most exciting and important phases of a space mission, as it handles the launch of the spacecraft, its travel into the correct orbit, gradually switching on the spacecraft platform to test the core satellite elements. 

Let’s rewind to the beginning…

Soon after the spacecraft separates from the launcher, an initialisation sequence will be automatically triggered by the On-Board Data Handling software to bring the satellites to a ‘breathing point’. This is the point at which the satellite’s attitude is stable and pointing towards the sun, and its solar arrays are deployed to provide full charging power to its batteries. At this stage the satellite is thermally stable, ensuring adequate temperature ranges for all units, and a stable link to the ground.

Later on, the spacecraft internal reaction wheels will be tested to ensure that the spacecraft can hold its momentum, and can execute simple rotation manoeuvres without spending its limited fuel in thrusting activities. The teams will proceed to celebrate once the spacecraft uses these wheels to rotate towards the earth to achieve the most stable attitude for its future operations.  After that, and to finish the activities, the satellite couple will part ways and be put into the direction of their own orbital positions, by means of a set of Drift Start manoeuvres.

Altogether, the LEOP will take about 10 days, beginning with a system countdown a few hours before the launch, all the way up to the execution of the drift start manoeuvres (i.e. sending the spacecraft from the injection to its target position in orbit), later followed by complete commissioning and In Orbit Tests, that will eventually lead the spacecraft to entering into Galileo service provision. 

The LEOP operations will be conducted and commanded from the Galileo Control Centre in Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany. Working together with SpaceOpal and its GSOp consortium (DLR-GfR mbH, GSOC and Telespazio), in cooperation with CNES CSG and ESA, EUSPA is responsible for the different stages of the LEOP operations, which will eventually allow the new satellites to be inserted into the Galileo constellation.

Endorsed by the EUSPA Security Accreditation Board, responsible for the security approval of the satellite launches, Galileo LEOP operations will constitute one of the most cooperative activities between numerous European entities in the space sector.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Galileo satellites attached to their dispenser atop their Fregat upper stage separating from the Soyuz upper stage. The Fregat then flies them the rest of the way up to medium-Earth orbit. (Credits: ESA–Pierre Carril, 2014)

Successful start-ups from EUSPA competitions ready to upscale!

15.11.2021 15:37  
Five selected space-tech companies will present their innovative ideas during the Forum: Alleryade, Krattworks, LESS Industries, Lympik, Traxit.
Published: 
15 November 2021

The European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) together with the European Business Angel Network (EBAN) are teaming up to boost space-tech start-ups! “Funding Space Forum” is a joint online panel session and fundraising event, where start-ups working with space data will pitch in front of Business Angels, receive feedback and raise interest for funding.

The EU Space Programme has created a dearth of opportunities for a broad range of businesses. Earth Observation data and new, more accurate, and secure GNSS services are emerging that enable start-ups to add value to their products and upscale their solutions or services. The EU is committed to helping businesses at their nascent stage to make the best use of space technology through private and public partnerships. 

EUSPA and EBAN teamed up to further assist small businesses to secure early investments. EUSPA also became a member of EBAN Space board to create synergies between space start-ups and business angels. 

Funding Space Forum will bring #MyGalileoSolution and #MyGalileoDrone participants Allerayde, Krattworks, LESS Industries, Lympik, Traxit together with the EU early-stage investor community. All the participating space-tech companies will have the opportunity to present their business plans in front of a panel of Business Angels, receive feedback and attract investments.

The event will also feature panel discussions on “Space Technology in Europe, what is next? Synergies between EU and angel investors hosted by Fiammetta Diani, Head of Market Development at EUSPA; Tomas S. Jonsson, Team Leader CASSINI initiative, European Commission, DG Defence Industry and Space; Uli Fricke, CEO Triangle Venture Capital Group, CEO FunderNation; Rob Desborough, Managing Partner Seraphim Space Fund, CEO Seraphim Space Camp moderated by Fabrice Testa, Co-chairman Luxembourg Space Tech Angels and EBAN Space Chairman. During this virtual panel session, seasoned space-tech investors and policymakers will discuss trends and challenges in the New Space ecosystem of Europe.

The forum will take place on November 22nd at 17:00 CET. Click here to register.  A matchmaking event with industry is also schedule for the first quarter of 2022.

About EBAN

EBAN is the pan-European representative for the early stage investor community gathering over 150-member organizations in more than 50 countries today. Established in 1999 by a group of pioneer angel networks in Europe with the collaboration of the European Commission and EURADA, EBAN represents a sector estimated to invest 11.4 billion Euros a year and playing a vital role in Europe’s future, notably in the funding of SMEs. EBAN fuels Europe’s growth through the creation of wealth and jobs.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Five selected space-tech companies will present their innovative ideas during the Forum: Alleryade, Krattworks, LESS Industries, Lympik, Traxit.

Successful start-ups from EUSPA competitions ready to upscale!

15.11.2021 15:37  
Five selected space-tech companies will present their innovative ideas during the Forum: Alleryade, Krattworks, LESS Industries, Lympik, Traxit.
Published: 
15 November 2021

The European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) together with the European Business Angel Network (EBAN) are teaming up to boost space-tech start-ups! “Funding Space Forum” is a joint online panel session and fundraising event, where start-ups working with space data will pitch in front of Business Angels, receive feedback and raise interest for funding.

The EU Space Programme has created a dearth of opportunities for a broad range of businesses. Earth Observation data and new, more accurate, and secure GNSS services are emerging that enable start-ups to add value to their products and upscale their solutions or services. The EU is committed to helping businesses at their nascent stage to make the best use of space technology through private and public partnerships. 

EUSPA and EBAN teamed up to further assist small businesses to secure early investments. EUSPA also became a member of EBAN Space board to create synergies between space start-ups and business angels. 

Funding Space Forum will bring #MyGalileoSolution and #MyGalileoDrone participants Alleryade, Krattworks, LESS Industries, Lympik, Traxit together with the EU early-stage investor community. All the participating space-tech companies will have the opportunity to present their business plans in front of a panel of Business Angels, receive feedback and attract investments.

The event will also feature panel discussions on “Space Technology in Europe, what is next? Synergies between EU and angel investors hosted by Fiammetta Diani, Head of Market Development at EUSPA; Tomas S. Jonsson, Team Leader CASSINI initiative, European Commission, DG Defence Industry and Space; Uli Fricke, CEO Triangle Venture Capital Group, CEO FunderNation; Rob Desborough, Managing Partner Seraphim Space Fund, CEO Seraphim Space Camp moderated by Fabrice Testa, Co-chairman Luxembourg Space Tech Angels and EBAN Space Chairman. During this virtual panel session, seasoned space-tech investors and policymakers will discuss trends and challenges in the New Space ecosystem of Europe.

The forum will take place on November 22nd at 17:00 CET. Click here to register.  A matchmaking event with industry is also schedule for the first quarter of 2022.

About EBAN

EBAN is the pan-European representative for the early stage investor community gathering over 150-member organizations in more than 50 countries today. Established in 1999 by a group of pioneer angel networks in Europe with the collaboration of the European Commission and EURADA, EBAN represents a sector estimated to invest 11.4 billion Euros a year and playing a vital role in Europe’s future, notably in the funding of SMEs. EBAN fuels Europe’s growth through the creation of wealth and jobs.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Five selected space-tech companies will present their innovative ideas during the Forum: Alleryade, Krattworks, LESS Industries, Lympik, Traxit.

GALILEO OPEN SERVICE NAVIGATION MESSAGE AUTHENTICATION (OSNMA) Info Note now available for download

12.11.2021 16:56  
Open Service Navigation Message Authentication (OSNMA) is a data authentication function for the Galileo Open Service worldwide users, freely accessible to all.
Published: 
12 November 2021

The new pioneering service of Galileo will pave the way towards robust Position, Velocity and Time information (PVT) for the Galileo Open Service users. An OSNMA Public Observation Test Phase will follow the publication of the Info Note. 

Robustness is part of the design of Galileo services. The evolution is bringing the need to provide the European Union secure and safe satellite navigation services one step further.

Spoofing is a sophisticated form of interfering and falsifying satellite navigation signals (GNSS). During a spoofing attack, a ‘’spoofer’’ uses a radio transmitter to generate fake GNSS signals and fool a receiver into showing its current location, for example, in the middle of the ocean while the smartphone user is climbing a mountain.

GNSS jamming incidents are reported in very large numbers, the vast majority of them caused by so-called “privacy protection devices” (illegal in most countries). GNSS spoofing (including meaconing) incidents are less frequently reported, but they are increasing in number. A possible explanation for the lower numbers is that successful spoofing attacks are not detected or not reported by their victims for security reasons.

GNSS signal falsification can have disastrous impacts on applications and market sectors that rely on precise navigation such as aviation, maritime, or drones. For instance, erroneous data of a vessel’s position, speed, and direction poses real threats to its operations but also surrounding ships, especially those carrying dangerous goods.

To contribute to the detection of GNSS attacks, EUSPA together with the European Commission is currently testing the Galileo Open Service – Navigation Message Authentication (OSNMA). This forthcoming service is an authentication mechanism that allows Open Service users to verify the authenticity of GNSS information, making sure that the data they receive is indeed from Galileo and has not been modified in any way. 

OSNMA is authenticating data for geolocation information from the Open Service through the Navigation Message (I/NAV) broadcast on the E1-B signal component. This is realised by transmitting authentication-specific data in previously reserved fields of the E1 I/NAV message. By using these previously reserved fields, OSNMA does not introduce any overlay to the system, thus the OS navigation performance remains untouched.

Authentication is set to further strengthen service robustness by increasing the capability of detecting spoofing events. However, it should be kept in mind that authentication does not prevent the occurrence of such an event, and does not protect against jamming. Nonetheless, this added layer of protection proposes to be one step ahead of evolving technological trends by amplifying the service’s overall robustness and resilience.

Analytical information can be found in the Info Note that was recently published.

You can download it here or visit the European GNSS Service Centre

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Open Service Navigation Message Authentication (OSNMA) is a data authentication function for the Galileo Open Service worldwide users, freely accessible to all.

#myEUspace competition deadline extended, take your chance!

12.11.2021 15:01  
#myEUspace competition deadline has been extended to 3 December 2021!
Published: 
12 November 2021

#myEUspace competition is on a mission to bring disruptive, space-based commercial solutions and applications to the European market. The contest invites the participants to innovate not only with Copernicus and Galileo but also with quantum technology. We have great news for all the late birds - the competition deadline has been extended to 3 December 2021, 23:59 GMT+2! 

With more than two weeks left until the deadline, let’s take a look at how you can make the most out of this additional time.

Choose from six challenges

#myEUspace is one of the biggest competitions ever organized by the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA). The winning prize pool is nearly €1million, 54 teams will receive awards ranging from €10.000 to €50.000.

The contest has two independent tracks and six different thematic areas:

  • Track 1 - From Idea to Prototype/customer validation – aims to turn a theoretical idea into a product prototype/beta version.
  • Track 2 - From Prototype to Product /Market entry – encourages to develop a prototype or beta idea into a Minimum Viable Product (MVP). 

Your space-tech based idea/product should address one of these six challenges: Move Me Smart, Space Up My Life, Our Green Planet, Map My World, Farming by Satellite, and Dive in Quantum. You can learn more about each challenge here

Use your time wisely

#myEUspace competition page is packed with valuable material that you can rely on to fine-tune your application. We have prepared a list of resources, including GNSS Raw Measurements White Paper and GNSS Market Report, for you to get a better overview of how to make the most out of EU Space technology. If you have any doubts regarding the eligibility criteria or the overall process of the contest, take a look at the competition’s Terms of Reference.

Have you already submitted your project? Do not forget that the competition platform allows you to edit your entry up until the deadline.  

Still got any questions? Applicants may send their questions via email to prizes@euspa.europa.eu. The answers and clarifications are published weekly on #myEUspace page.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

#myEUspace competition deadline has been extended to 3 December 2021!

EU-Japan GNSS Roundtable 25-26 November 2021

5.11.2021 15:18  
Scroll down for the registration link!
Published: 
05 November 2021

The European Union and Japan are key actors and partners in the domain of space with rapidly evolving ecosystems. The GNSS Roundtable 2021 offers companies from the EU and Japan the opportunity to explore potential business cooperation in the application of GNSS technologies.

Organised by the European Commission and the Cabinet Office, Government of Japan, the 5th edition of the EU-Japan GNSS Roundtable aspires to enhance public-private dialogue, promote business cooperation and bring together established as well as new industry actors. Join the European Commission, the Japan Cabinet Office, and representatives of the private sector in the EU and Japan to discuss how to make the most of our evolving GNSS assets to boost industrial cooperation and technological innovation, and to deliver jointly on the Sustainable Development Goals and the climate objectives. The Roundtable is supported by the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) and the Horizon2020-funded project, GNSS.asia.

You can expect to learn about the latest system developments and market trends as well as exciting keynotes and panel discussions on GNSS for automotive unmanned mobility, emergency response, and innovative services for ICT, Industry 4.0, and IoT amongst others. In addition, more than 10 companies from Europe and Japan will present how they create innovative solutions using GNSS. 

Moreover, you will have the opportunity to network through digital get-togethers and build new business collaboration partnerships. 

For an up-to-date agenda, as well as registration and additional information, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Scroll down for the registration link!

Green Deal, digital innovation and resilience, takes centre stage at EUSPA’s latest Horizon Europe call.

5.11.2021 12:59  
Staying true to its mission, EUSPA is linking space to user needs with Horizon Europe Call.
Published: 
05 November 2021

The first Horizon Europe call managed by the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is now open for submissions. With an overall budget of 32.6 million EUR, the call aims at developing innovative downstream applications that leverage data from the EU Space Programme, namely Galileo, EGNOS, and Copernicus. The deadline for applications is 16 February 2022.

Horizon Europe is the EU’s key funding mechanism that facilitates collaboration and strengthens the impact of research and innovation in developing, supporting, and implementing EU policies while tackling global challenges. Staying true to its mission, linking space to user needs, EUSPA will leverage this instrument to stimulate the EU Space Programme operational research and foster the creation of commercial value-adding solutions that contribute to the Union’s policies and priorities. The call focuses on the following three areas:

  1. EGNSS and Copernicus applications fostering the EU Green Deal, total budget: 14 million EUR
  2. EGNSS applications for safety and crisis management, total budget: 9.3 million EUR
  3. EGNSS applications for the digital age, total budget: 9.3 million EUR

The use of other space components such as Copernicus is highly encouraged in all topics. In addition, the solutions may integrate other non-space technologies like IoT, big data, artificial intelligence, drones, 5G, augmented/mixed reality, etc.

Analytical information about the calls can be found here and our press releases are available in all EU languages here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Staying true to its mission, EUSPA is linking space to user needs with Horizon Europe Call.

EUSPA landed in Madrid for World ATM Congress to highlight environmental benefits of EU Space technology to aviation

3.11.2021 14:08  
The contribution of space to green and safe flight operations was a key theme at WATM 2021.
Published: 
03 November 2021

World ATM Congress, the world’s largest international air traffic management (ATM) exhibition and conference, is always the place to be for EUSPA. Aviation experts and market development professionals were present to voice the importance of the EU Space Programme in aviation and its contribution to making the industry more sustainable. Drone demos by #MyGalileoDrone winners took place at Cuatro Vientos Airport.

Greener air travel and cost-efficient flight operations were a trending topic at World ATM Congress 2021. Aviation is one of the fastest-growing sources of greenhouse gas emissions. In particular, the aviation sector creates 13.9% of the emissions from transport, making it the second-biggest source of transport greenhouse gas emissions after road transport. In line with the EU Green Deal and to put a lid on aviation emissions, the European Union is placing a great emphasis on space technology. EUSPA aviation expert, Katerina Strelcova, explained how EU space technology contributes to safe and green aviation during a dedicated session. 

For greener aviation, #EUspace is essential

Satellite-based landing is becoming the preferred technology for airlines that wish to optimise their routes and fuel consumption. EGNOS allows planes to make flexible approaches towards European airports and therefore shorten the flight path. Thanks to this flexibility, airlines can save up fuel and reduce noise above densely populated areas. 

By enabling aircraft to land safely under challenging weather conditions such as fog, EGNOS helps reduce the frequency of aborted landings and emissions. An estimated 20.000 diversions will be avoided EU-wide thanks to EGNOS by 2025. 

Copernicus contributes significantly to monitoring the environmental footprint of aviation through the Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS). This service provides consistent and quality-controlled information about air pollution, greenhouse gases, and climate forcing.

Copernicus data is used to measure and monitor aircraft emissions that can enable to reduce climate impact, especially from contrail formation. 

Moreover, atmospheric data from Copernicus delivers accurate information about atmospheric conditions that affect aviation, for example, the presence of dust or other particles which may degrade engines. When the data are further combined with AI, it can contribute to analytics for increased efficiency in managing aviation fleets and enhanced data for maintenance purposes. This Copernicus data can bring real added value to the industry. 

Safety and accessibility are always a priority

In Europe, more than 400 airports use EGNOS, and the trend is on the rise. The provision of EGNOS approaches offers an alternative to airports not equipped with conventional navigation aids. It increases aviation safety and airport accessibility, especially in remote regions. Accessible airports equal more commercial opportunities for airlines and new flight routes at a regional and international level, with minimum costs for ground infrastructure and its maintenance. 

Volcano eruptions -like the recent Cumbre Vieja Spain- significantly disrupt flight traffic, forcing pilots to take longer routes. Volcanic ash ejected into the atmosphere by explosive eruptions has known damaging effects on the aircraft fuselage. The CAMS generate atmosphere analyses to help assess the number of dust & particles which can affect the engine performance. 

Read this: EGNOS Safety of Life: Serving aviation for 10 years

Drones and EGNSS go hand in hand

The drone market is booming and is set to outstrip any other GNSS user base in aviation. It is also opening up new business opportunities for application developers in many market segments. According to estimations, revenues from drone-based services are expected to exceed 150 million euros by 2023.

Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) have gained tremendous interest and have opened new possibilities in many areas ranging from mapping and surveying, to shipments delivery to even emergency response.

GNSS is not an option for drones anymore but a necessary asset. GNSS is essential for safe drone navigation, and GNSS receivers are now integrated on almost all new commercial drones as a standard feature. Given the additional accuracy Galileo offers, the EU GNSS is already present in more than 30% of the receivers used for drone applications, and many of them also implement EGNOS corrections to increase accuracy.

ATM was a great opportunity for #MyGalileoDrone participants to showcase the added-value Galileo brings to their operations through a dedicated demo session at the Expodronica of Cuatro Vientos airport. ABzero, the winner of the #MyGalilleoDrone competition, demonstrated a blood delivery while Connect Robotics delivered critical goods and medicine. KrattWorks presented their drone-based autonomous system that delivers rapid situational awareness for firefighters, rescue workers, and police. Most of these applications are already successfully available on the market while others will soon make their impact.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The contribution of space to green and safe flight operations was a key theme at WATM 2021.

EUSPA landed in Madrid for World ATM Congress to highlight environmental benefits of EU Space technology to aviation

3.11.2021 14:08  
The contribution of space to green and safe flight operations was a key theme at WATM 2021.
Published: 
03 November 2021

World ATM Congress, the world’s largest international air traffic management (ATM) exhibition and conference, is always the place to be for EUSPA. Aviation experts and market development professionals were present to voice the importance of the EU Space Programme in aviation and its contribution to making the industry more sustainable. Drone demos by #MyGalileoDrone winners took place at Cuatro Vientos Airport.

Greener air travel and cost-efficient flight operations were a trending topic at World ATM Congress 2021. Aviation is one of the fastest-growing sources of greenhouse gas emissions. In particular, the aviation sector creates 13.9% of the emissions from transport, making it the second-biggest source of transport greenhouse gas emissions after road transport. In line with the EU Green Deal and to put a lid on aviation emissions, the European Union is placing a great emphasis on space technology. EUSPA aviation expert, Katerina Strelcova, explained how EU space technology contributes to safe and green aviation during a dedicated session. 

For greener aviation, #EUspace is essential

Satellite-based landing is becoming the preferred technology for airlines that wish to optimise their routes and fuel consumption. EGNOS allows planes to make flexible approaches towards European airports and therefore shorten the flight path. Thanks to this flexibility, airlines can save up fuel and reduce noise above densely populated areas. 

By enabling aircraft to land safely under challenging weather conditions such as fog, EGNOS helps reduce the frequency of aborted landings and emissions. An estimated 20.000 diversions will be avoided EU-wide thanks to EGNOS by 2025. 

Copernicus contributes significantly to monitoring the environmental footprint of aviation through the Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS). This service provides consistent and quality-controlled information about air pollution, greenhouse gases, and climate forcing.

Copernicus data is used to measure and monitor aircraft emissions that can enable to reduce climate impact, especially from contrail formation. 

Moreover, atmospheric data from Copernicus delivers accurate information about atmospheric conditions that affect aviation, for example, the presence of dust or other particles which may degrade engines. When the data are further combined with AI, it can contribute to analytics for increased efficiency in managing aviation fleets and enhanced data for maintenance purposes. This Copernicus data can bring real added value to the industry. 

Safety and accessibility are always a priority

In Europe, more than 400 airports use EGNOS, and the trend is on the rise. The provision of EGNOS approaches offers an alternative to airports not equipped with conventional navigation aids. It increases aviation safety and airport accessibility, especially in remote regions. Accessible airports equal more commercial opportunities for airlines and new flight routes at a regional and international level, with minimum costs for ground infrastructure and its maintenance. 

Volcano eruptions -like the recent Cumbre Vieja Spain- significantly disrupt flight traffic, forcing pilots to take longer routes. Volcanic ash ejected into the atmosphere by explosive eruptions has known damaging effects on the aircraft fuselage. The CAMS generate atmosphere analyses to help assess the number of dust & particles which can affect the engine performance. 

Read this: EGNOS Safety of Life: Serving aviation for 10 years

Drones and EGNSS go hand in hand

The drone market is booming and is set to outstrip any other GNSS user base in aviation. It is also opening up new business opportunities for application developers in many market segments. According to estimations, revenues from drone-based services are expected to exceed 150 million euros by 2023.

Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) have gained tremendous interest and have opened new possibilities in many areas ranging from mapping and surveying, to shipments delivery to even emergency response.

GNSS is not an option for drones anymore but a necessary asset. GNSS is essential for safe drone navigation, and GNSS receivers are now integrated on almost all new commercial drones as a standard feature. Given the additional accuracy Galileo offers, the EU GNSS is already present in more than 30% of the receivers used for drone applications, and many of them also implement EGNOS corrections to increase accuracy.

ATM was a great opportunity for #MyGalileoDrone participants to showcase the added-value Galileo brings to their operations through a dedicated demo session at the Expodronica of Cuatro Vientos airport. ABzero, the winner of the #MyGalilleoDrone competition, demonstrated a blood delivery while Connect Robotics delivered critical goods and medicine. KrattWorks presented their drone-based autonomous system that delivers rapid situational awareness for firefighters, rescue workers, and police. Most of these applications are already successfully available on the market while others will soon make their impact.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The contribution of space to green and safe flight operations was a key theme at WATM 2021.
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